Zooming along

Anne here, and this morning I did an interview on Zoom for the French Romance Novel Festival — le Festival du Roman Féminin FrenchMarryInScandal


It will surprise nobody that this year the festival is going virtual, rather than in person, as most festivals and conferences of this sort have had to since CoVid hit. We're all fairly used to Zoom meetings and on-line interviews now, and yet I'd be willing to bet most of us had never used Zoom before 2020.

And though these on-line meetings started as a second-best necessity, I think it's really opened us up to the benefits and innovations are happening that I think will stay when the Covid danger has passed and we're more or less back to normal.

For instance the lovely people who organize le Festival du Roman Féminin have several times invited me to come to their conference, and I would love to go, but traveling from Australia to France is a big time and money commitment — and a very long flight — between 21 and 24 hours sitting on a plane. Thus for various reasons I haven't been able to attend. Yet.

GracieFrenchBooksSo when they asked me to do a Zoom interview with US Historical romance writers Darlene Marshall and Minerva Spencer (who also writes historical mysteries as S.M. Goodwin) I jumped at it. It was scheduled for 10.30 a.m. my time, and the US writers had their times and the valiant French interviewer was staying up until 1 am to do the interview.

However for me, this morning ended up more of a scramble than a zoom. <g> I'd just stepped out of my shower when an anxious email came through, saying Anne, we've started the interview. It was 8.30 am! Two hours earlier than planned. Yikes!

We had forgotten about the effect of daylight saving — a double effect, in fact, because just as Australia had "fallen back" an hour, people in some parts of the Northern Hemisphere had "sprung forward" and there was now a two hour difference.

I flung on a dress, didn't even brush my hair (which was still damp), had no time to gather up my French translation editions for 'show and tell' and, in dire need of a large mug of industrial strength coffee, I jumped belatedly into the interview. 

FrenchZoomMeeting

Here we are; Darlene (top left);  me (top right); Minerva (bottom right), and Agnès, our interviewer. (My dog Milly did attempt to photo-bomb us, but she didn't make it into this pic.)

Despite my scrambled start it was a lovely session. I hadn't met the other two writers, but as they described their books and spoke a little bit about their latest books that had been published in France, I realized we had a lot in common, and I've ordered books from both. Agnès, our French interviewer did an excellent job — and she'll be translating everything we said for the French speakers in the festival audience — no small feat!

Minerva SpencerAs well as talking about our own books, we talked a little about how we thought the romance market had weathered the 2020 CoVid year, and Darlene made the point that she thought historical romance had done relatively well, that it seemed as though a lot of people were turning to historical romance rather than contemporary romances, perhaps as an escape from current day stresses. 

Then we talked about how some of that "conversion" to historical romance was a result of the huge popularity of the Netflix Bridgerton series, and the flow-on effect that happened after readers had devoured all of Julia Quinn's books and were looking for more historical romances to enjoy.

Bridgerton-simon-and-daphne-story-over-

And naturally that led to a brief discussion of the shock announcement that the handsome male lead of Bridgerton, Regé-Jean Page, would not be appearing in season 2.

DarleneMarshall

 

We then talked a little about how it's a feature of most romance series that each book deals with a different couple, but that's not necessarily how TV works. The Virgin River series — books and TV series— was another example we discussed.

The appearance of previous characters in a series appearing in "future" books threw up some interesting discussion — some readers love it when characters from a previous book appear in the current book, but apparently a lot of readers hate it. I suppose it depends on how it's handled. I'd love to know what people here think.

So that was my morning. I've only touched a little on what we discussed — there was much more, and if you can attend the virtual French festival, I'm sure you'd enjoy it. I know Wench Nicola Cornick has been a guest there in the past. I'm not sure about the other wenches. But I do know we'd all love to go in person one day. (Maybe combine it with a Wench writing retreat and follow it up with a UK reader meet-up — wouldn't that be fun?)

So what about you — Do you like it or loathe it when characters from previous books appear in a 'current' book?  And what about TV adaptations of romance novels — do you have any favorites? Or do you prefer the books? And lastly, has on-line technology given you an escape during Lockdown and enhanced your ability to experience events you might not otherwise have attended? 

185 thoughts on “Zooming along”

  1. This sounds like such fun! I can’t wait to watch it. It sounds as if you covered a lot of subjects!!
    I love seeing characters from previous books in the later ones. I’m a big fan of small town romance and women’s fiction, so it’s not surprising.

    Reply
  2. This sounds like such fun! I can’t wait to watch it. It sounds as if you covered a lot of subjects!!
    I love seeing characters from previous books in the later ones. I’m a big fan of small town romance and women’s fiction, so it’s not surprising.

    Reply
  3. This sounds like such fun! I can’t wait to watch it. It sounds as if you covered a lot of subjects!!
    I love seeing characters from previous books in the later ones. I’m a big fan of small town romance and women’s fiction, so it’s not surprising.

    Reply
  4. This sounds like such fun! I can’t wait to watch it. It sounds as if you covered a lot of subjects!!
    I love seeing characters from previous books in the later ones. I’m a big fan of small town romance and women’s fiction, so it’s not surprising.

    Reply
  5. This sounds like such fun! I can’t wait to watch it. It sounds as if you covered a lot of subjects!!
    I love seeing characters from previous books in the later ones. I’m a big fan of small town romance and women’s fiction, so it’s not surprising.

    Reply
  6. I would love to go to the Festival du Roman Feminin – only 3 hours by train from London! And I love it when characters from previous books make an appearance, it’s great to catch up with them. (As long as they’re still happy).

    Reply
  7. I would love to go to the Festival du Roman Feminin – only 3 hours by train from London! And I love it when characters from previous books make an appearance, it’s great to catch up with them. (As long as they’re still happy).

    Reply
  8. I would love to go to the Festival du Roman Feminin – only 3 hours by train from London! And I love it when characters from previous books make an appearance, it’s great to catch up with them. (As long as they’re still happy).

    Reply
  9. I would love to go to the Festival du Roman Feminin – only 3 hours by train from London! And I love it when characters from previous books make an appearance, it’s great to catch up with them. (As long as they’re still happy).

    Reply
  10. I would love to go to the Festival du Roman Feminin – only 3 hours by train from London! And I love it when characters from previous books make an appearance, it’s great to catch up with them. (As long as they’re still happy).

    Reply
  11. I do like it when characters from previous books show up, but it can be confusing if you are not familiar with the series. The first Mary Balogh book that I read was SIMPLY LOVE which was a book in the middle of a series (Simply) which also had side characters from a previous series (Slightly). I loved the book from the get-go because – well because – it was Mary Balogh. But I had to keep going back and re-read sections to remember who all of the extra characters were.
    As for TV and movie adaptations of books – I’ve seen some good ones and not so good ones. So, as long as they do their best to stay true to the book I guess I’m ok with it.
    Finally, as for zoom technology and the like, so far I have been pretty resistant to it. My relatives are trying to educate me but I have a real mental block about it. My bad.

    Reply
  12. I do like it when characters from previous books show up, but it can be confusing if you are not familiar with the series. The first Mary Balogh book that I read was SIMPLY LOVE which was a book in the middle of a series (Simply) which also had side characters from a previous series (Slightly). I loved the book from the get-go because – well because – it was Mary Balogh. But I had to keep going back and re-read sections to remember who all of the extra characters were.
    As for TV and movie adaptations of books – I’ve seen some good ones and not so good ones. So, as long as they do their best to stay true to the book I guess I’m ok with it.
    Finally, as for zoom technology and the like, so far I have been pretty resistant to it. My relatives are trying to educate me but I have a real mental block about it. My bad.

    Reply
  13. I do like it when characters from previous books show up, but it can be confusing if you are not familiar with the series. The first Mary Balogh book that I read was SIMPLY LOVE which was a book in the middle of a series (Simply) which also had side characters from a previous series (Slightly). I loved the book from the get-go because – well because – it was Mary Balogh. But I had to keep going back and re-read sections to remember who all of the extra characters were.
    As for TV and movie adaptations of books – I’ve seen some good ones and not so good ones. So, as long as they do their best to stay true to the book I guess I’m ok with it.
    Finally, as for zoom technology and the like, so far I have been pretty resistant to it. My relatives are trying to educate me but I have a real mental block about it. My bad.

    Reply
  14. I do like it when characters from previous books show up, but it can be confusing if you are not familiar with the series. The first Mary Balogh book that I read was SIMPLY LOVE which was a book in the middle of a series (Simply) which also had side characters from a previous series (Slightly). I loved the book from the get-go because – well because – it was Mary Balogh. But I had to keep going back and re-read sections to remember who all of the extra characters were.
    As for TV and movie adaptations of books – I’ve seen some good ones and not so good ones. So, as long as they do their best to stay true to the book I guess I’m ok with it.
    Finally, as for zoom technology and the like, so far I have been pretty resistant to it. My relatives are trying to educate me but I have a real mental block about it. My bad.

    Reply
  15. I do like it when characters from previous books show up, but it can be confusing if you are not familiar with the series. The first Mary Balogh book that I read was SIMPLY LOVE which was a book in the middle of a series (Simply) which also had side characters from a previous series (Slightly). I loved the book from the get-go because – well because – it was Mary Balogh. But I had to keep going back and re-read sections to remember who all of the extra characters were.
    As for TV and movie adaptations of books – I’ve seen some good ones and not so good ones. So, as long as they do their best to stay true to the book I guess I’m ok with it.
    Finally, as for zoom technology and the like, so far I have been pretty resistant to it. My relatives are trying to educate me but I have a real mental block about it. My bad.

    Reply
  16. I don’t really care for previous characters to appear in the next story, even though it seems to be the norm. I don’t mind so much when the previous characters actually have a part in the story, but I loathe when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are. LOL that is what the epilogue in their own book was for. 😉

    Reply
  17. I don’t really care for previous characters to appear in the next story, even though it seems to be the norm. I don’t mind so much when the previous characters actually have a part in the story, but I loathe when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are. LOL that is what the epilogue in their own book was for. 😉

    Reply
  18. I don’t really care for previous characters to appear in the next story, even though it seems to be the norm. I don’t mind so much when the previous characters actually have a part in the story, but I loathe when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are. LOL that is what the epilogue in their own book was for. 😉

    Reply
  19. I don’t really care for previous characters to appear in the next story, even though it seems to be the norm. I don’t mind so much when the previous characters actually have a part in the story, but I loathe when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are. LOL that is what the epilogue in their own book was for. 😉

    Reply
  20. I don’t really care for previous characters to appear in the next story, even though it seems to be the norm. I don’t mind so much when the previous characters actually have a part in the story, but I loathe when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are. LOL that is what the epilogue in their own book was for. 😉

    Reply
  21. My husband moved from Skype to Zoom for online tutoring and to chat with our daughter (in South Korea) back in about 2017 or so, so we actually did know Zoom prior to last year!
    Oops on the time change, Anne; I’m glad that the session went well and hope that you enjoyed some post-meeting coffee.
    I do enjoy seeing characters from previous books in a series… when they contribute something to a current book. I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!

    Reply
  22. My husband moved from Skype to Zoom for online tutoring and to chat with our daughter (in South Korea) back in about 2017 or so, so we actually did know Zoom prior to last year!
    Oops on the time change, Anne; I’m glad that the session went well and hope that you enjoyed some post-meeting coffee.
    I do enjoy seeing characters from previous books in a series… when they contribute something to a current book. I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!

    Reply
  23. My husband moved from Skype to Zoom for online tutoring and to chat with our daughter (in South Korea) back in about 2017 or so, so we actually did know Zoom prior to last year!
    Oops on the time change, Anne; I’m glad that the session went well and hope that you enjoyed some post-meeting coffee.
    I do enjoy seeing characters from previous books in a series… when they contribute something to a current book. I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!

    Reply
  24. My husband moved from Skype to Zoom for online tutoring and to chat with our daughter (in South Korea) back in about 2017 or so, so we actually did know Zoom prior to last year!
    Oops on the time change, Anne; I’m glad that the session went well and hope that you enjoyed some post-meeting coffee.
    I do enjoy seeing characters from previous books in a series… when they contribute something to a current book. I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!

    Reply
  25. My husband moved from Skype to Zoom for online tutoring and to chat with our daughter (in South Korea) back in about 2017 or so, so we actually did know Zoom prior to last year!
    Oops on the time change, Anne; I’m glad that the session went well and hope that you enjoyed some post-meeting coffee.
    I do enjoy seeing characters from previous books in a series… when they contribute something to a current book. I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!

    Reply
  26. My first zoom meeting was a bit like a seance as people tried to connect …. captured beautifully in a cartoon:
    https://www.joeydevilla.com/2021/01/25/virtual-meetings-are-basically-modern-seances/
    I’m used to the technology now though and have enjoyed many online webinars with zoom.
    I have also been enjoying live football matches on my laptop but the absence of crowd noise in large stadiums is strange to say the least … and one can hear players being rude to the ref after a bad decision! Still we are through the worst now I think, and the crowds will soon be back to create that essential atmosphere.
    As for books, my pronunciation dictionary for text-to-speech has expanded enormously during lockdown and I am getting very good results for home-made audio books (converting digital ebooks) so will now start exploring more books which are not available to me in audio … thumbing nose at publishers!
    Conferences on zoom sound good for listening to individuals and taking the floor with comments but you miss the social interaction, exchanging ideas over lunch and a few drinks. So still plenty of room for the technology to expand!
    I’ve tried most things but for me nothing beats a good audio book.

    Reply
  27. My first zoom meeting was a bit like a seance as people tried to connect …. captured beautifully in a cartoon:
    https://www.joeydevilla.com/2021/01/25/virtual-meetings-are-basically-modern-seances/
    I’m used to the technology now though and have enjoyed many online webinars with zoom.
    I have also been enjoying live football matches on my laptop but the absence of crowd noise in large stadiums is strange to say the least … and one can hear players being rude to the ref after a bad decision! Still we are through the worst now I think, and the crowds will soon be back to create that essential atmosphere.
    As for books, my pronunciation dictionary for text-to-speech has expanded enormously during lockdown and I am getting very good results for home-made audio books (converting digital ebooks) so will now start exploring more books which are not available to me in audio … thumbing nose at publishers!
    Conferences on zoom sound good for listening to individuals and taking the floor with comments but you miss the social interaction, exchanging ideas over lunch and a few drinks. So still plenty of room for the technology to expand!
    I’ve tried most things but for me nothing beats a good audio book.

    Reply
  28. My first zoom meeting was a bit like a seance as people tried to connect …. captured beautifully in a cartoon:
    https://www.joeydevilla.com/2021/01/25/virtual-meetings-are-basically-modern-seances/
    I’m used to the technology now though and have enjoyed many online webinars with zoom.
    I have also been enjoying live football matches on my laptop but the absence of crowd noise in large stadiums is strange to say the least … and one can hear players being rude to the ref after a bad decision! Still we are through the worst now I think, and the crowds will soon be back to create that essential atmosphere.
    As for books, my pronunciation dictionary for text-to-speech has expanded enormously during lockdown and I am getting very good results for home-made audio books (converting digital ebooks) so will now start exploring more books which are not available to me in audio … thumbing nose at publishers!
    Conferences on zoom sound good for listening to individuals and taking the floor with comments but you miss the social interaction, exchanging ideas over lunch and a few drinks. So still plenty of room for the technology to expand!
    I’ve tried most things but for me nothing beats a good audio book.

    Reply
  29. My first zoom meeting was a bit like a seance as people tried to connect …. captured beautifully in a cartoon:
    https://www.joeydevilla.com/2021/01/25/virtual-meetings-are-basically-modern-seances/
    I’m used to the technology now though and have enjoyed many online webinars with zoom.
    I have also been enjoying live football matches on my laptop but the absence of crowd noise in large stadiums is strange to say the least … and one can hear players being rude to the ref after a bad decision! Still we are through the worst now I think, and the crowds will soon be back to create that essential atmosphere.
    As for books, my pronunciation dictionary for text-to-speech has expanded enormously during lockdown and I am getting very good results for home-made audio books (converting digital ebooks) so will now start exploring more books which are not available to me in audio … thumbing nose at publishers!
    Conferences on zoom sound good for listening to individuals and taking the floor with comments but you miss the social interaction, exchanging ideas over lunch and a few drinks. So still plenty of room for the technology to expand!
    I’ve tried most things but for me nothing beats a good audio book.

    Reply
  30. My first zoom meeting was a bit like a seance as people tried to connect …. captured beautifully in a cartoon:
    https://www.joeydevilla.com/2021/01/25/virtual-meetings-are-basically-modern-seances/
    I’m used to the technology now though and have enjoyed many online webinars with zoom.
    I have also been enjoying live football matches on my laptop but the absence of crowd noise in large stadiums is strange to say the least … and one can hear players being rude to the ref after a bad decision! Still we are through the worst now I think, and the crowds will soon be back to create that essential atmosphere.
    As for books, my pronunciation dictionary for text-to-speech has expanded enormously during lockdown and I am getting very good results for home-made audio books (converting digital ebooks) so will now start exploring more books which are not available to me in audio … thumbing nose at publishers!
    Conferences on zoom sound good for listening to individuals and taking the floor with comments but you miss the social interaction, exchanging ideas over lunch and a few drinks. So still plenty of room for the technology to expand!
    I’ve tried most things but for me nothing beats a good audio book.

    Reply
  31. Thanks, Bridget. I think we could have gone on talking for quite a while, which was lovely, as we hadn’t met before. And thanks for your comment about characters from previous books — as a reader I often like it too, and was surprised to hear than a lot of readers don’t.

    Reply
  32. Thanks, Bridget. I think we could have gone on talking for quite a while, which was lovely, as we hadn’t met before. And thanks for your comment about characters from previous books — as a reader I often like it too, and was surprised to hear than a lot of readers don’t.

    Reply
  33. Thanks, Bridget. I think we could have gone on talking for quite a while, which was lovely, as we hadn’t met before. And thanks for your comment about characters from previous books — as a reader I often like it too, and was surprised to hear than a lot of readers don’t.

    Reply
  34. Thanks, Bridget. I think we could have gone on talking for quite a while, which was lovely, as we hadn’t met before. And thanks for your comment about characters from previous books — as a reader I often like it too, and was surprised to hear than a lot of readers don’t.

    Reply
  35. Thanks, Bridget. I think we could have gone on talking for quite a while, which was lovely, as we hadn’t met before. And thanks for your comment about characters from previous books — as a reader I often like it too, and was surprised to hear than a lot of readers don’t.

    Reply
  36. Oh Christina, I have such envy of people who can just nip over to Paris, or other parts of Europe for the weekend or whatever. It’s a huge trip for us and it always takes me a day or two to recover from that long flight.
    That’s a good point about the characters being happy in the “future” books. It would be so disappointing if they weren’t.

    Reply
  37. Oh Christina, I have such envy of people who can just nip over to Paris, or other parts of Europe for the weekend or whatever. It’s a huge trip for us and it always takes me a day or two to recover from that long flight.
    That’s a good point about the characters being happy in the “future” books. It would be so disappointing if they weren’t.

    Reply
  38. Oh Christina, I have such envy of people who can just nip over to Paris, or other parts of Europe for the weekend or whatever. It’s a huge trip for us and it always takes me a day or two to recover from that long flight.
    That’s a good point about the characters being happy in the “future” books. It would be so disappointing if they weren’t.

    Reply
  39. Oh Christina, I have such envy of people who can just nip over to Paris, or other parts of Europe for the weekend or whatever. It’s a huge trip for us and it always takes me a day or two to recover from that long flight.
    That’s a good point about the characters being happy in the “future” books. It would be so disappointing if they weren’t.

    Reply
  40. Oh Christina, I have such envy of people who can just nip over to Paris, or other parts of Europe for the weekend or whatever. It’s a huge trip for us and it always takes me a day or two to recover from that long flight.
    That’s a good point about the characters being happy in the “future” books. It would be so disappointing if they weren’t.

    Reply
  41. Yes, I do agree that the cast of characters from previous books can be confusing. In fact, much as I love Mary Balogh, and have read all her books, I’ve also found some of her scenes with a lot of previous characters a little hard to sort out in my head because I don’t always remember who they are and from which book. But as you say, it’s Mary Balogh, so you know it’s going to be wonderful.
    I think it’s hard for a film or TV adaptation to stay true to a book. In a book, especially a romance, so much of the writing is about the characters’ thoughts, which can’t be shown visually. And often the filmmakers are appealing to a different audience. My friend Barbara Hannay’s book MOLLY COOPER’S DREAM DATE was a book that was made into a film. The story in the film was roughly the same, except the scenes that took place on a tropical Australian island were transferred to a farmhouse in Connecticut and they added in a lot of other aspects to the story, so that if they hadn’t kept the title I might not have recognized it.
    I’ve had to go onto Zoom for business reasons — author appearances, and so on, but it’s pretty easy once you’ve muddled through the first time. I now have a fortnightly meeting with my writing retreat group, and the Wenches have met on Zoom a couple of times — the first time all of us have been together at the same time. We haven’t been able to manage that in person— yet!

    Reply
  42. Yes, I do agree that the cast of characters from previous books can be confusing. In fact, much as I love Mary Balogh, and have read all her books, I’ve also found some of her scenes with a lot of previous characters a little hard to sort out in my head because I don’t always remember who they are and from which book. But as you say, it’s Mary Balogh, so you know it’s going to be wonderful.
    I think it’s hard for a film or TV adaptation to stay true to a book. In a book, especially a romance, so much of the writing is about the characters’ thoughts, which can’t be shown visually. And often the filmmakers are appealing to a different audience. My friend Barbara Hannay’s book MOLLY COOPER’S DREAM DATE was a book that was made into a film. The story in the film was roughly the same, except the scenes that took place on a tropical Australian island were transferred to a farmhouse in Connecticut and they added in a lot of other aspects to the story, so that if they hadn’t kept the title I might not have recognized it.
    I’ve had to go onto Zoom for business reasons — author appearances, and so on, but it’s pretty easy once you’ve muddled through the first time. I now have a fortnightly meeting with my writing retreat group, and the Wenches have met on Zoom a couple of times — the first time all of us have been together at the same time. We haven’t been able to manage that in person— yet!

    Reply
  43. Yes, I do agree that the cast of characters from previous books can be confusing. In fact, much as I love Mary Balogh, and have read all her books, I’ve also found some of her scenes with a lot of previous characters a little hard to sort out in my head because I don’t always remember who they are and from which book. But as you say, it’s Mary Balogh, so you know it’s going to be wonderful.
    I think it’s hard for a film or TV adaptation to stay true to a book. In a book, especially a romance, so much of the writing is about the characters’ thoughts, which can’t be shown visually. And often the filmmakers are appealing to a different audience. My friend Barbara Hannay’s book MOLLY COOPER’S DREAM DATE was a book that was made into a film. The story in the film was roughly the same, except the scenes that took place on a tropical Australian island were transferred to a farmhouse in Connecticut and they added in a lot of other aspects to the story, so that if they hadn’t kept the title I might not have recognized it.
    I’ve had to go onto Zoom for business reasons — author appearances, and so on, but it’s pretty easy once you’ve muddled through the first time. I now have a fortnightly meeting with my writing retreat group, and the Wenches have met on Zoom a couple of times — the first time all of us have been together at the same time. We haven’t been able to manage that in person— yet!

    Reply
  44. Yes, I do agree that the cast of characters from previous books can be confusing. In fact, much as I love Mary Balogh, and have read all her books, I’ve also found some of her scenes with a lot of previous characters a little hard to sort out in my head because I don’t always remember who they are and from which book. But as you say, it’s Mary Balogh, so you know it’s going to be wonderful.
    I think it’s hard for a film or TV adaptation to stay true to a book. In a book, especially a romance, so much of the writing is about the characters’ thoughts, which can’t be shown visually. And often the filmmakers are appealing to a different audience. My friend Barbara Hannay’s book MOLLY COOPER’S DREAM DATE was a book that was made into a film. The story in the film was roughly the same, except the scenes that took place on a tropical Australian island were transferred to a farmhouse in Connecticut and they added in a lot of other aspects to the story, so that if they hadn’t kept the title I might not have recognized it.
    I’ve had to go onto Zoom for business reasons — author appearances, and so on, but it’s pretty easy once you’ve muddled through the first time. I now have a fortnightly meeting with my writing retreat group, and the Wenches have met on Zoom a couple of times — the first time all of us have been together at the same time. We haven’t been able to manage that in person— yet!

    Reply
  45. Yes, I do agree that the cast of characters from previous books can be confusing. In fact, much as I love Mary Balogh, and have read all her books, I’ve also found some of her scenes with a lot of previous characters a little hard to sort out in my head because I don’t always remember who they are and from which book. But as you say, it’s Mary Balogh, so you know it’s going to be wonderful.
    I think it’s hard for a film or TV adaptation to stay true to a book. In a book, especially a romance, so much of the writing is about the characters’ thoughts, which can’t be shown visually. And often the filmmakers are appealing to a different audience. My friend Barbara Hannay’s book MOLLY COOPER’S DREAM DATE was a book that was made into a film. The story in the film was roughly the same, except the scenes that took place on a tropical Australian island were transferred to a farmhouse in Connecticut and they added in a lot of other aspects to the story, so that if they hadn’t kept the title I might not have recognized it.
    I’ve had to go onto Zoom for business reasons — author appearances, and so on, but it’s pretty easy once you’ve muddled through the first time. I now have a fortnightly meeting with my writing retreat group, and the Wenches have met on Zoom a couple of times — the first time all of us have been together at the same time. We haven’t been able to manage that in person— yet!

    Reply
  46. Yes, Misti, I think that’s the key — whether they have a real part in the story. (I love this: “when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are.” )
    I know when I was writing my little self-published Christmas novella, I wanted the characters from my Chance sisters series to be there, because the story was about the last man standing in that series — my last “unused hero” — but I didn’t want it to be confusing or annoying for new readers as well. It’s a fine line.

    Reply
  47. Yes, Misti, I think that’s the key — whether they have a real part in the story. (I love this: “when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are.” )
    I know when I was writing my little self-published Christmas novella, I wanted the characters from my Chance sisters series to be there, because the story was about the last man standing in that series — my last “unused hero” — but I didn’t want it to be confusing or annoying for new readers as well. It’s a fine line.

    Reply
  48. Yes, Misti, I think that’s the key — whether they have a real part in the story. (I love this: “when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are.” )
    I know when I was writing my little self-published Christmas novella, I wanted the characters from my Chance sisters series to be there, because the story was about the last man standing in that series — my last “unused hero” — but I didn’t want it to be confusing or annoying for new readers as well. It’s a fine line.

    Reply
  49. Yes, Misti, I think that’s the key — whether they have a real part in the story. (I love this: “when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are.” )
    I know when I was writing my little self-published Christmas novella, I wanted the characters from my Chance sisters series to be there, because the story was about the last man standing in that series — my last “unused hero” — but I didn’t want it to be confusing or annoying for new readers as well. It’s a fine line.

    Reply
  50. Yes, Misti, I think that’s the key — whether they have a real part in the story. (I love this: “when they hijack it just to prove how happy they still are.” )
    I know when I was writing my little self-published Christmas novella, I wanted the characters from my Chance sisters series to be there, because the story was about the last man standing in that series — my last “unused hero” — but I didn’t want it to be confusing or annoying for new readers as well. It’s a fine line.

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Kareni. Zoom has, I think, brought a lot of people comfort and support in these tough times, and I love that your husband has been using it for years. I really felt for all the teachers who had to grapple with new technology and teach whole classes on line — such a different set of skills to in-person teaching — a lot more one-way. It’s quite hard to have a discussion with a lot of people, for instance. I conducted a few writing workshops on line last year, and found there were things that I would normally do that just wouldn’t work as well. I think that’s a whole new area to explore.
    “I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!”
    Yes, that’s a bit of a token (and unnecessary) catch up, isn’t it? That’s the kind of thing I mean when I said it depended on how it was handled.

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Kareni. Zoom has, I think, brought a lot of people comfort and support in these tough times, and I love that your husband has been using it for years. I really felt for all the teachers who had to grapple with new technology and teach whole classes on line — such a different set of skills to in-person teaching — a lot more one-way. It’s quite hard to have a discussion with a lot of people, for instance. I conducted a few writing workshops on line last year, and found there were things that I would normally do that just wouldn’t work as well. I think that’s a whole new area to explore.
    “I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!”
    Yes, that’s a bit of a token (and unnecessary) catch up, isn’t it? That’s the kind of thing I mean when I said it depended on how it was handled.

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Kareni. Zoom has, I think, brought a lot of people comfort and support in these tough times, and I love that your husband has been using it for years. I really felt for all the teachers who had to grapple with new technology and teach whole classes on line — such a different set of skills to in-person teaching — a lot more one-way. It’s quite hard to have a discussion with a lot of people, for instance. I conducted a few writing workshops on line last year, and found there were things that I would normally do that just wouldn’t work as well. I think that’s a whole new area to explore.
    “I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!”
    Yes, that’s a bit of a token (and unnecessary) catch up, isn’t it? That’s the kind of thing I mean when I said it depended on how it was handled.

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Kareni. Zoom has, I think, brought a lot of people comfort and support in these tough times, and I love that your husband has been using it for years. I really felt for all the teachers who had to grapple with new technology and teach whole classes on line — such a different set of skills to in-person teaching — a lot more one-way. It’s quite hard to have a discussion with a lot of people, for instance. I conducted a few writing workshops on line last year, and found there were things that I would normally do that just wouldn’t work as well. I think that’s a whole new area to explore.
    “I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!”
    Yes, that’s a bit of a token (and unnecessary) catch up, isn’t it? That’s the kind of thing I mean when I said it depended on how it was handled.

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Kareni. Zoom has, I think, brought a lot of people comfort and support in these tough times, and I love that your husband has been using it for years. I really felt for all the teachers who had to grapple with new technology and teach whole classes on line — such a different set of skills to in-person teaching — a lot more one-way. It’s quite hard to have a discussion with a lot of people, for instance. I conducted a few writing workshops on line last year, and found there were things that I would normally do that just wouldn’t work as well. I think that’s a whole new area to explore.
    “I’ve read more than a few books where there is a gathering and we see the couples from books A, B, and C along with their children D, E, F, G, and H…I don’t need that!”
    Yes, that’s a bit of a token (and unnecessary) catch up, isn’t it? That’s the kind of thing I mean when I said it depended on how it was handled.

    Reply
  56. Quantum, thanks for that link — I loved the cartoon! And I want a zoom meeting with the voice of a dead eight-year-old child. LOL.
    I can imagine watching “live” footy with no roars from the crowd would be strange. It would be the same for rock concerts and maybe even comedy gigs — there is something about being in a crowd that loosens people up –in a good, and sometimes a bad way. I know that a comedy is funnier in the group than watching by yourself — laughter is infectious.
    I’m so glad you’re able to convert e-books to audio with acceptable results. I confess, the quality of the narrator can make a big difference and I’m not sure I could listen to a whole book with an automatic voice. I wish publishers would be more alert to readers and audio listeners outside their immediate circle. But I also know that often the lack of availability of a book is often an oversight, so keep writing to the authors and they will alert their publishers (I hope).
    And yes, nothing will take the place of a group of people chatting over a meal and or a few drinks. Last week I had the first lunch with a group of old friends in over a year, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  57. Quantum, thanks for that link — I loved the cartoon! And I want a zoom meeting with the voice of a dead eight-year-old child. LOL.
    I can imagine watching “live” footy with no roars from the crowd would be strange. It would be the same for rock concerts and maybe even comedy gigs — there is something about being in a crowd that loosens people up –in a good, and sometimes a bad way. I know that a comedy is funnier in the group than watching by yourself — laughter is infectious.
    I’m so glad you’re able to convert e-books to audio with acceptable results. I confess, the quality of the narrator can make a big difference and I’m not sure I could listen to a whole book with an automatic voice. I wish publishers would be more alert to readers and audio listeners outside their immediate circle. But I also know that often the lack of availability of a book is often an oversight, so keep writing to the authors and they will alert their publishers (I hope).
    And yes, nothing will take the place of a group of people chatting over a meal and or a few drinks. Last week I had the first lunch with a group of old friends in over a year, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  58. Quantum, thanks for that link — I loved the cartoon! And I want a zoom meeting with the voice of a dead eight-year-old child. LOL.
    I can imagine watching “live” footy with no roars from the crowd would be strange. It would be the same for rock concerts and maybe even comedy gigs — there is something about being in a crowd that loosens people up –in a good, and sometimes a bad way. I know that a comedy is funnier in the group than watching by yourself — laughter is infectious.
    I’m so glad you’re able to convert e-books to audio with acceptable results. I confess, the quality of the narrator can make a big difference and I’m not sure I could listen to a whole book with an automatic voice. I wish publishers would be more alert to readers and audio listeners outside their immediate circle. But I also know that often the lack of availability of a book is often an oversight, so keep writing to the authors and they will alert their publishers (I hope).
    And yes, nothing will take the place of a group of people chatting over a meal and or a few drinks. Last week I had the first lunch with a group of old friends in over a year, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  59. Quantum, thanks for that link — I loved the cartoon! And I want a zoom meeting with the voice of a dead eight-year-old child. LOL.
    I can imagine watching “live” footy with no roars from the crowd would be strange. It would be the same for rock concerts and maybe even comedy gigs — there is something about being in a crowd that loosens people up –in a good, and sometimes a bad way. I know that a comedy is funnier in the group than watching by yourself — laughter is infectious.
    I’m so glad you’re able to convert e-books to audio with acceptable results. I confess, the quality of the narrator can make a big difference and I’m not sure I could listen to a whole book with an automatic voice. I wish publishers would be more alert to readers and audio listeners outside their immediate circle. But I also know that often the lack of availability of a book is often an oversight, so keep writing to the authors and they will alert their publishers (I hope).
    And yes, nothing will take the place of a group of people chatting over a meal and or a few drinks. Last week I had the first lunch with a group of old friends in over a year, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  60. Quantum, thanks for that link — I loved the cartoon! And I want a zoom meeting with the voice of a dead eight-year-old child. LOL.
    I can imagine watching “live” footy with no roars from the crowd would be strange. It would be the same for rock concerts and maybe even comedy gigs — there is something about being in a crowd that loosens people up –in a good, and sometimes a bad way. I know that a comedy is funnier in the group than watching by yourself — laughter is infectious.
    I’m so glad you’re able to convert e-books to audio with acceptable results. I confess, the quality of the narrator can make a big difference and I’m not sure I could listen to a whole book with an automatic voice. I wish publishers would be more alert to readers and audio listeners outside their immediate circle. But I also know that often the lack of availability of a book is often an oversight, so keep writing to the authors and they will alert their publishers (I hope).
    And yes, nothing will take the place of a group of people chatting over a meal and or a few drinks. Last week I had the first lunch with a group of old friends in over a year, and it was wonderful.

    Reply
  61. I love the appearance of previous characters so long as they are part of the story. That is the way most of those appearnces work in the series that I follow.
    I also allow cameo reappearances when a scene requires outsiders to make some point. I believe that familiar charcters make the point better than walk-ons would.

    Reply
  62. I love the appearance of previous characters so long as they are part of the story. That is the way most of those appearnces work in the series that I follow.
    I also allow cameo reappearances when a scene requires outsiders to make some point. I believe that familiar charcters make the point better than walk-ons would.

    Reply
  63. I love the appearance of previous characters so long as they are part of the story. That is the way most of those appearnces work in the series that I follow.
    I also allow cameo reappearances when a scene requires outsiders to make some point. I believe that familiar charcters make the point better than walk-ons would.

    Reply
  64. I love the appearance of previous characters so long as they are part of the story. That is the way most of those appearnces work in the series that I follow.
    I also allow cameo reappearances when a scene requires outsiders to make some point. I believe that familiar charcters make the point better than walk-ons would.

    Reply
  65. I love the appearance of previous characters so long as they are part of the story. That is the way most of those appearnces work in the series that I follow.
    I also allow cameo reappearances when a scene requires outsiders to make some point. I believe that familiar charcters make the point better than walk-ons would.

    Reply
  66. Thanks, Sue. I like your observation that cameo appearances by familiar characters can sometimes make a point better than walk-on characters would. I think that’s true.
    And yes, I think it’s absolutely necessary for previous characters to be part of the story, though it’s sometimes a fine line they walk.

    Reply
  67. Thanks, Sue. I like your observation that cameo appearances by familiar characters can sometimes make a point better than walk-on characters would. I think that’s true.
    And yes, I think it’s absolutely necessary for previous characters to be part of the story, though it’s sometimes a fine line they walk.

    Reply
  68. Thanks, Sue. I like your observation that cameo appearances by familiar characters can sometimes make a point better than walk-on characters would. I think that’s true.
    And yes, I think it’s absolutely necessary for previous characters to be part of the story, though it’s sometimes a fine line they walk.

    Reply
  69. Thanks, Sue. I like your observation that cameo appearances by familiar characters can sometimes make a point better than walk-on characters would. I think that’s true.
    And yes, I think it’s absolutely necessary for previous characters to be part of the story, though it’s sometimes a fine line they walk.

    Reply
  70. Thanks, Sue. I like your observation that cameo appearances by familiar characters can sometimes make a point better than walk-on characters would. I think that’s true.
    And yes, I think it’s absolutely necessary for previous characters to be part of the story, though it’s sometimes a fine line they walk.

    Reply
  71. Ditto Kareni and ditto Sue McCormick. I do like previous characters IF they fit. Not if they are cluttering the scene.
    As for the Virgin River series…from what I heard from my sister’s that watched it they deviated from the books tremendously. So different that the only thing that stayed the same were the names of the characters. One sister had to quit watching it because it was so different. I can’t remember whether the other sister continued watching. Anyone then deciding to read the books was in for a big shock!
    Personally, if I’ve read the book, I can’t watch the movie or series. Or vice versa because they aren’t the same. That is just my little hangup.
    I’d never done Zoom before March 2020 so it took a bit to get used to. I also know that doing it on my tablet it doesn’t work quite as well because I can’t get all the participants on the screen at once. Probably because the tablet screen is so small. But it is very useful and I think I’ll end up doing it still in the future.
    My sister has loved Zoom because she has been able to attend several week long genealogy conferences that she would never have been able to do because of the price and logistics of attending.
    I think there are lots of interesting possibilities out there now that people have been forced to reinvent events and think outside the box. Plus telemedicine has taken a tremendous jump into viability. Which it needed to do especially in underserved areas of the US & the world as a whole.

    Reply
  72. Ditto Kareni and ditto Sue McCormick. I do like previous characters IF they fit. Not if they are cluttering the scene.
    As for the Virgin River series…from what I heard from my sister’s that watched it they deviated from the books tremendously. So different that the only thing that stayed the same were the names of the characters. One sister had to quit watching it because it was so different. I can’t remember whether the other sister continued watching. Anyone then deciding to read the books was in for a big shock!
    Personally, if I’ve read the book, I can’t watch the movie or series. Or vice versa because they aren’t the same. That is just my little hangup.
    I’d never done Zoom before March 2020 so it took a bit to get used to. I also know that doing it on my tablet it doesn’t work quite as well because I can’t get all the participants on the screen at once. Probably because the tablet screen is so small. But it is very useful and I think I’ll end up doing it still in the future.
    My sister has loved Zoom because she has been able to attend several week long genealogy conferences that she would never have been able to do because of the price and logistics of attending.
    I think there are lots of interesting possibilities out there now that people have been forced to reinvent events and think outside the box. Plus telemedicine has taken a tremendous jump into viability. Which it needed to do especially in underserved areas of the US & the world as a whole.

    Reply
  73. Ditto Kareni and ditto Sue McCormick. I do like previous characters IF they fit. Not if they are cluttering the scene.
    As for the Virgin River series…from what I heard from my sister’s that watched it they deviated from the books tremendously. So different that the only thing that stayed the same were the names of the characters. One sister had to quit watching it because it was so different. I can’t remember whether the other sister continued watching. Anyone then deciding to read the books was in for a big shock!
    Personally, if I’ve read the book, I can’t watch the movie or series. Or vice versa because they aren’t the same. That is just my little hangup.
    I’d never done Zoom before March 2020 so it took a bit to get used to. I also know that doing it on my tablet it doesn’t work quite as well because I can’t get all the participants on the screen at once. Probably because the tablet screen is so small. But it is very useful and I think I’ll end up doing it still in the future.
    My sister has loved Zoom because she has been able to attend several week long genealogy conferences that she would never have been able to do because of the price and logistics of attending.
    I think there are lots of interesting possibilities out there now that people have been forced to reinvent events and think outside the box. Plus telemedicine has taken a tremendous jump into viability. Which it needed to do especially in underserved areas of the US & the world as a whole.

    Reply
  74. Ditto Kareni and ditto Sue McCormick. I do like previous characters IF they fit. Not if they are cluttering the scene.
    As for the Virgin River series…from what I heard from my sister’s that watched it they deviated from the books tremendously. So different that the only thing that stayed the same were the names of the characters. One sister had to quit watching it because it was so different. I can’t remember whether the other sister continued watching. Anyone then deciding to read the books was in for a big shock!
    Personally, if I’ve read the book, I can’t watch the movie or series. Or vice versa because they aren’t the same. That is just my little hangup.
    I’d never done Zoom before March 2020 so it took a bit to get used to. I also know that doing it on my tablet it doesn’t work quite as well because I can’t get all the participants on the screen at once. Probably because the tablet screen is so small. But it is very useful and I think I’ll end up doing it still in the future.
    My sister has loved Zoom because she has been able to attend several week long genealogy conferences that she would never have been able to do because of the price and logistics of attending.
    I think there are lots of interesting possibilities out there now that people have been forced to reinvent events and think outside the box. Plus telemedicine has taken a tremendous jump into viability. Which it needed to do especially in underserved areas of the US & the world as a whole.

    Reply
  75. Ditto Kareni and ditto Sue McCormick. I do like previous characters IF they fit. Not if they are cluttering the scene.
    As for the Virgin River series…from what I heard from my sister’s that watched it they deviated from the books tremendously. So different that the only thing that stayed the same were the names of the characters. One sister had to quit watching it because it was so different. I can’t remember whether the other sister continued watching. Anyone then deciding to read the books was in for a big shock!
    Personally, if I’ve read the book, I can’t watch the movie or series. Or vice versa because they aren’t the same. That is just my little hangup.
    I’d never done Zoom before March 2020 so it took a bit to get used to. I also know that doing it on my tablet it doesn’t work quite as well because I can’t get all the participants on the screen at once. Probably because the tablet screen is so small. But it is very useful and I think I’ll end up doing it still in the future.
    My sister has loved Zoom because she has been able to attend several week long genealogy conferences that she would never have been able to do because of the price and logistics of attending.
    I think there are lots of interesting possibilities out there now that people have been forced to reinvent events and think outside the box. Plus telemedicine has taken a tremendous jump into viability. Which it needed to do especially in underserved areas of the US & the world as a whole.

    Reply
  76. Anne-how lovely that you and your fellow historical romance writers were able to be interviewed for this French romance novelist conference. And what gorgeous covers on those French editions! As for me-I love when characters in an author’s previous books appear in later works. When characters are well-written, I enjoy “meeting”them again. Many of the Wenches’ characters are certainly welcome to revisit. And I just realized that as a reader, I might tense when reading a new series, wondering whether this new set of characters will captivate me as their predecessors have, and will I welcome them back. Among non-Wench authors who have created memorable series with recurring characters would be Robyn Carr (Virgin River, Thunder Point, Sullivan’s Crossing), Lisa Kleypas (Hathaways, Ravenels, Travis Family) and if course, Grace Burrowes. In short, recurring characters are welcome on my shelves.

    Reply
  77. Anne-how lovely that you and your fellow historical romance writers were able to be interviewed for this French romance novelist conference. And what gorgeous covers on those French editions! As for me-I love when characters in an author’s previous books appear in later works. When characters are well-written, I enjoy “meeting”them again. Many of the Wenches’ characters are certainly welcome to revisit. And I just realized that as a reader, I might tense when reading a new series, wondering whether this new set of characters will captivate me as their predecessors have, and will I welcome them back. Among non-Wench authors who have created memorable series with recurring characters would be Robyn Carr (Virgin River, Thunder Point, Sullivan’s Crossing), Lisa Kleypas (Hathaways, Ravenels, Travis Family) and if course, Grace Burrowes. In short, recurring characters are welcome on my shelves.

    Reply
  78. Anne-how lovely that you and your fellow historical romance writers were able to be interviewed for this French romance novelist conference. And what gorgeous covers on those French editions! As for me-I love when characters in an author’s previous books appear in later works. When characters are well-written, I enjoy “meeting”them again. Many of the Wenches’ characters are certainly welcome to revisit. And I just realized that as a reader, I might tense when reading a new series, wondering whether this new set of characters will captivate me as their predecessors have, and will I welcome them back. Among non-Wench authors who have created memorable series with recurring characters would be Robyn Carr (Virgin River, Thunder Point, Sullivan’s Crossing), Lisa Kleypas (Hathaways, Ravenels, Travis Family) and if course, Grace Burrowes. In short, recurring characters are welcome on my shelves.

    Reply
  79. Anne-how lovely that you and your fellow historical romance writers were able to be interviewed for this French romance novelist conference. And what gorgeous covers on those French editions! As for me-I love when characters in an author’s previous books appear in later works. When characters are well-written, I enjoy “meeting”them again. Many of the Wenches’ characters are certainly welcome to revisit. And I just realized that as a reader, I might tense when reading a new series, wondering whether this new set of characters will captivate me as their predecessors have, and will I welcome them back. Among non-Wench authors who have created memorable series with recurring characters would be Robyn Carr (Virgin River, Thunder Point, Sullivan’s Crossing), Lisa Kleypas (Hathaways, Ravenels, Travis Family) and if course, Grace Burrowes. In short, recurring characters are welcome on my shelves.

    Reply
  80. Anne-how lovely that you and your fellow historical romance writers were able to be interviewed for this French romance novelist conference. And what gorgeous covers on those French editions! As for me-I love when characters in an author’s previous books appear in later works. When characters are well-written, I enjoy “meeting”them again. Many of the Wenches’ characters are certainly welcome to revisit. And I just realized that as a reader, I might tense when reading a new series, wondering whether this new set of characters will captivate me as their predecessors have, and will I welcome them back. Among non-Wench authors who have created memorable series with recurring characters would be Robyn Carr (Virgin River, Thunder Point, Sullivan’s Crossing), Lisa Kleypas (Hathaways, Ravenels, Travis Family) and if course, Grace Burrowes. In short, recurring characters are welcome on my shelves.

    Reply
  81. I don’t mind seeing past characters reappear in a new book. But it seems like a good solution is those holiday novellas where the author gets to reunite all the happy couples from a series. Jennifer Ashley has done a couple of those with her Mackenzie family series.
    I’ve read the Virgin River books, and Bridgerton and saw the Netflix series. I didn’t mind the plot changes in either. But I would have preferred if Virgin River followed one main couple to their HEA, instead of having so many storylines going on simultaneously. That made it too soap opera-ish for me, although I did watch till the end!
    Like everyone else, I am sad Regé-Jean Page won’t be back, but I suppose he might have stolen the attention from the main couple. I am definitely looking forward to the next season.

    Reply
  82. I don’t mind seeing past characters reappear in a new book. But it seems like a good solution is those holiday novellas where the author gets to reunite all the happy couples from a series. Jennifer Ashley has done a couple of those with her Mackenzie family series.
    I’ve read the Virgin River books, and Bridgerton and saw the Netflix series. I didn’t mind the plot changes in either. But I would have preferred if Virgin River followed one main couple to their HEA, instead of having so many storylines going on simultaneously. That made it too soap opera-ish for me, although I did watch till the end!
    Like everyone else, I am sad Regé-Jean Page won’t be back, but I suppose he might have stolen the attention from the main couple. I am definitely looking forward to the next season.

    Reply
  83. I don’t mind seeing past characters reappear in a new book. But it seems like a good solution is those holiday novellas where the author gets to reunite all the happy couples from a series. Jennifer Ashley has done a couple of those with her Mackenzie family series.
    I’ve read the Virgin River books, and Bridgerton and saw the Netflix series. I didn’t mind the plot changes in either. But I would have preferred if Virgin River followed one main couple to their HEA, instead of having so many storylines going on simultaneously. That made it too soap opera-ish for me, although I did watch till the end!
    Like everyone else, I am sad Regé-Jean Page won’t be back, but I suppose he might have stolen the attention from the main couple. I am definitely looking forward to the next season.

    Reply
  84. I don’t mind seeing past characters reappear in a new book. But it seems like a good solution is those holiday novellas where the author gets to reunite all the happy couples from a series. Jennifer Ashley has done a couple of those with her Mackenzie family series.
    I’ve read the Virgin River books, and Bridgerton and saw the Netflix series. I didn’t mind the plot changes in either. But I would have preferred if Virgin River followed one main couple to their HEA, instead of having so many storylines going on simultaneously. That made it too soap opera-ish for me, although I did watch till the end!
    Like everyone else, I am sad Regé-Jean Page won’t be back, but I suppose he might have stolen the attention from the main couple. I am definitely looking forward to the next season.

    Reply
  85. I don’t mind seeing past characters reappear in a new book. But it seems like a good solution is those holiday novellas where the author gets to reunite all the happy couples from a series. Jennifer Ashley has done a couple of those with her Mackenzie family series.
    I’ve read the Virgin River books, and Bridgerton and saw the Netflix series. I didn’t mind the plot changes in either. But I would have preferred if Virgin River followed one main couple to their HEA, instead of having so many storylines going on simultaneously. That made it too soap opera-ish for me, although I did watch till the end!
    Like everyone else, I am sad Regé-Jean Page won’t be back, but I suppose he might have stolen the attention from the main couple. I am definitely looking forward to the next season.

    Reply
  86. Seeing familiar faces in a story are nice reminders of past book that I have enjoyed.
    I have not watched the Bridgerton Tv film
    I thank you so much for this post. You have introduced me to some new authors as well as the fact that there are so many authors and books and so little time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well. And though zoom meetings are not ideal….they do keep people well.

    Reply
  87. Seeing familiar faces in a story are nice reminders of past book that I have enjoyed.
    I have not watched the Bridgerton Tv film
    I thank you so much for this post. You have introduced me to some new authors as well as the fact that there are so many authors and books and so little time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well. And though zoom meetings are not ideal….they do keep people well.

    Reply
  88. Seeing familiar faces in a story are nice reminders of past book that I have enjoyed.
    I have not watched the Bridgerton Tv film
    I thank you so much for this post. You have introduced me to some new authors as well as the fact that there are so many authors and books and so little time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well. And though zoom meetings are not ideal….they do keep people well.

    Reply
  89. Seeing familiar faces in a story are nice reminders of past book that I have enjoyed.
    I have not watched the Bridgerton Tv film
    I thank you so much for this post. You have introduced me to some new authors as well as the fact that there are so many authors and books and so little time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well. And though zoom meetings are not ideal….they do keep people well.

    Reply
  90. Seeing familiar faces in a story are nice reminders of past book that I have enjoyed.
    I have not watched the Bridgerton Tv film
    I thank you so much for this post. You have introduced me to some new authors as well as the fact that there are so many authors and books and so little time.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well. And though zoom meetings are not ideal….they do keep people well.

    Reply
  91. Interesting that they time change affected you by 2 hours – I had not thought of that. Glad you got on and it is nice to see all of you on the screen shot.
    As for returning characters – If their stories intertwine then I would prefer to know it is a series and which to read first. Otherwise they can pop in and out – at parties, family gatherings etc. just don’t give away too much that would tell what happens in “their book”. I loved the Survivor series of Balogh as they met in each book and further told each story.
    I liked Virgin River on TV but had not read the books, only found out after viewing the whole thing. Bridgerton I did read all of their books years before and it was fun to see how they produced the show. Made a fun story, but I think I liked the books better.

    Reply
  92. Interesting that they time change affected you by 2 hours – I had not thought of that. Glad you got on and it is nice to see all of you on the screen shot.
    As for returning characters – If their stories intertwine then I would prefer to know it is a series and which to read first. Otherwise they can pop in and out – at parties, family gatherings etc. just don’t give away too much that would tell what happens in “their book”. I loved the Survivor series of Balogh as they met in each book and further told each story.
    I liked Virgin River on TV but had not read the books, only found out after viewing the whole thing. Bridgerton I did read all of their books years before and it was fun to see how they produced the show. Made a fun story, but I think I liked the books better.

    Reply
  93. Interesting that they time change affected you by 2 hours – I had not thought of that. Glad you got on and it is nice to see all of you on the screen shot.
    As for returning characters – If their stories intertwine then I would prefer to know it is a series and which to read first. Otherwise they can pop in and out – at parties, family gatherings etc. just don’t give away too much that would tell what happens in “their book”. I loved the Survivor series of Balogh as they met in each book and further told each story.
    I liked Virgin River on TV but had not read the books, only found out after viewing the whole thing. Bridgerton I did read all of their books years before and it was fun to see how they produced the show. Made a fun story, but I think I liked the books better.

    Reply
  94. Interesting that they time change affected you by 2 hours – I had not thought of that. Glad you got on and it is nice to see all of you on the screen shot.
    As for returning characters – If their stories intertwine then I would prefer to know it is a series and which to read first. Otherwise they can pop in and out – at parties, family gatherings etc. just don’t give away too much that would tell what happens in “their book”. I loved the Survivor series of Balogh as they met in each book and further told each story.
    I liked Virgin River on TV but had not read the books, only found out after viewing the whole thing. Bridgerton I did read all of their books years before and it was fun to see how they produced the show. Made a fun story, but I think I liked the books better.

    Reply
  95. Interesting that they time change affected you by 2 hours – I had not thought of that. Glad you got on and it is nice to see all of you on the screen shot.
    As for returning characters – If their stories intertwine then I would prefer to know it is a series and which to read first. Otherwise they can pop in and out – at parties, family gatherings etc. just don’t give away too much that would tell what happens in “their book”. I loved the Survivor series of Balogh as they met in each book and further told each story.
    I liked Virgin River on TV but had not read the books, only found out after viewing the whole thing. Bridgerton I did read all of their books years before and it was fun to see how they produced the show. Made a fun story, but I think I liked the books better.

    Reply
  96. Vicki, I thought the same as your sisters — I watched some of the Virgin River series, and thought the scenery was stunning, but it wasn’t about the books I’d read and enjoyed.
    These days I expect a book and the TV or movie version to be different, and romance, I think, is likely to be very different because much of a romance novel is about internal thoughts and feelings, which are impossible to show on a screen.
    And I agree with you about how the limitations CoVid have caused has resulted in a lot of good technological innovation. Let’s hope it continues.

    Reply
  97. Vicki, I thought the same as your sisters — I watched some of the Virgin River series, and thought the scenery was stunning, but it wasn’t about the books I’d read and enjoyed.
    These days I expect a book and the TV or movie version to be different, and romance, I think, is likely to be very different because much of a romance novel is about internal thoughts and feelings, which are impossible to show on a screen.
    And I agree with you about how the limitations CoVid have caused has resulted in a lot of good technological innovation. Let’s hope it continues.

    Reply
  98. Vicki, I thought the same as your sisters — I watched some of the Virgin River series, and thought the scenery was stunning, but it wasn’t about the books I’d read and enjoyed.
    These days I expect a book and the TV or movie version to be different, and romance, I think, is likely to be very different because much of a romance novel is about internal thoughts and feelings, which are impossible to show on a screen.
    And I agree with you about how the limitations CoVid have caused has resulted in a lot of good technological innovation. Let’s hope it continues.

    Reply
  99. Vicki, I thought the same as your sisters — I watched some of the Virgin River series, and thought the scenery was stunning, but it wasn’t about the books I’d read and enjoyed.
    These days I expect a book and the TV or movie version to be different, and romance, I think, is likely to be very different because much of a romance novel is about internal thoughts and feelings, which are impossible to show on a screen.
    And I agree with you about how the limitations CoVid have caused has resulted in a lot of good technological innovation. Let’s hope it continues.

    Reply
  100. Vicki, I thought the same as your sisters — I watched some of the Virgin River series, and thought the scenery was stunning, but it wasn’t about the books I’d read and enjoyed.
    These days I expect a book and the TV or movie version to be different, and romance, I think, is likely to be very different because much of a romance novel is about internal thoughts and feelings, which are impossible to show on a screen.
    And I agree with you about how the limitations CoVid have caused has resulted in a lot of good technological innovation. Let’s hope it continues.

    Reply
  101. Thanks, Binnie, I also think my French romance covers are lovely. It’s interesting to compare the various translations and see the different cultural approaches taken. The comparison between the English titles and the French ones, which are rarely straight translations, is also very interesting. I recall my first book, Gallant Waif, was translated as Un Bonheur Si Fragile, which is something like ‘Such Fragile Happiness’ which I thought was a beautiful title.
    I smiled at your tension on beginning a new series. I suspect we authors have much the same tension, hoping readers will like this new set of characters as much as previous ones.

    Reply
  102. Thanks, Binnie, I also think my French romance covers are lovely. It’s interesting to compare the various translations and see the different cultural approaches taken. The comparison between the English titles and the French ones, which are rarely straight translations, is also very interesting. I recall my first book, Gallant Waif, was translated as Un Bonheur Si Fragile, which is something like ‘Such Fragile Happiness’ which I thought was a beautiful title.
    I smiled at your tension on beginning a new series. I suspect we authors have much the same tension, hoping readers will like this new set of characters as much as previous ones.

    Reply
  103. Thanks, Binnie, I also think my French romance covers are lovely. It’s interesting to compare the various translations and see the different cultural approaches taken. The comparison between the English titles and the French ones, which are rarely straight translations, is also very interesting. I recall my first book, Gallant Waif, was translated as Un Bonheur Si Fragile, which is something like ‘Such Fragile Happiness’ which I thought was a beautiful title.
    I smiled at your tension on beginning a new series. I suspect we authors have much the same tension, hoping readers will like this new set of characters as much as previous ones.

    Reply
  104. Thanks, Binnie, I also think my French romance covers are lovely. It’s interesting to compare the various translations and see the different cultural approaches taken. The comparison between the English titles and the French ones, which are rarely straight translations, is also very interesting. I recall my first book, Gallant Waif, was translated as Un Bonheur Si Fragile, which is something like ‘Such Fragile Happiness’ which I thought was a beautiful title.
    I smiled at your tension on beginning a new series. I suspect we authors have much the same tension, hoping readers will like this new set of characters as much as previous ones.

    Reply
  105. Thanks, Binnie, I also think my French romance covers are lovely. It’s interesting to compare the various translations and see the different cultural approaches taken. The comparison between the English titles and the French ones, which are rarely straight translations, is also very interesting. I recall my first book, Gallant Waif, was translated as Un Bonheur Si Fragile, which is something like ‘Such Fragile Happiness’ which I thought was a beautiful title.
    I smiled at your tension on beginning a new series. I suspect we authors have much the same tension, hoping readers will like this new set of characters as much as previous ones.

    Reply
  106. Karin, yes, I’ve read those Jennifer Ashley Christmas stories, and I wrote and self-published one of my own last Christmas, with characters from the Chance sisters’, and the response was so gratifying I’m thinking of writing another one. If I can find the time.
    The whole issue of book series turned into TV series is a fruitful one for discussion. I’m just glad they’re being made. The effect, I think (I hope?) is to open more people to reading romance.

    Reply
  107. Karin, yes, I’ve read those Jennifer Ashley Christmas stories, and I wrote and self-published one of my own last Christmas, with characters from the Chance sisters’, and the response was so gratifying I’m thinking of writing another one. If I can find the time.
    The whole issue of book series turned into TV series is a fruitful one for discussion. I’m just glad they’re being made. The effect, I think (I hope?) is to open more people to reading romance.

    Reply
  108. Karin, yes, I’ve read those Jennifer Ashley Christmas stories, and I wrote and self-published one of my own last Christmas, with characters from the Chance sisters’, and the response was so gratifying I’m thinking of writing another one. If I can find the time.
    The whole issue of book series turned into TV series is a fruitful one for discussion. I’m just glad they’re being made. The effect, I think (I hope?) is to open more people to reading romance.

    Reply
  109. Karin, yes, I’ve read those Jennifer Ashley Christmas stories, and I wrote and self-published one of my own last Christmas, with characters from the Chance sisters’, and the response was so gratifying I’m thinking of writing another one. If I can find the time.
    The whole issue of book series turned into TV series is a fruitful one for discussion. I’m just glad they’re being made. The effect, I think (I hope?) is to open more people to reading romance.

    Reply
  110. Karin, yes, I’ve read those Jennifer Ashley Christmas stories, and I wrote and self-published one of my own last Christmas, with characters from the Chance sisters’, and the response was so gratifying I’m thinking of writing another one. If I can find the time.
    The whole issue of book series turned into TV series is a fruitful one for discussion. I’m just glad they’re being made. The effect, I think (I hope?) is to open more people to reading romance.

    Reply
  111. Margot, the change took me by surprise as well! LOL
    The writer of a good series needs to handle those ‘other characters’ appearances carefully, I agree. I also loved Mary Balogh’s Survivor series, and yes, I think the Bridgerton watchers fell into two distinct camps — book or TV lovers. What I particularly love about the TV series is that it has opened up a lot of non-romance readers to the pleasures and possibilities of reading romance. As Darlene Marshall said in our Zoom interview, “All boats float in a rising tide.”

    Reply
  112. Margot, the change took me by surprise as well! LOL
    The writer of a good series needs to handle those ‘other characters’ appearances carefully, I agree. I also loved Mary Balogh’s Survivor series, and yes, I think the Bridgerton watchers fell into two distinct camps — book or TV lovers. What I particularly love about the TV series is that it has opened up a lot of non-romance readers to the pleasures and possibilities of reading romance. As Darlene Marshall said in our Zoom interview, “All boats float in a rising tide.”

    Reply
  113. Margot, the change took me by surprise as well! LOL
    The writer of a good series needs to handle those ‘other characters’ appearances carefully, I agree. I also loved Mary Balogh’s Survivor series, and yes, I think the Bridgerton watchers fell into two distinct camps — book or TV lovers. What I particularly love about the TV series is that it has opened up a lot of non-romance readers to the pleasures and possibilities of reading romance. As Darlene Marshall said in our Zoom interview, “All boats float in a rising tide.”

    Reply
  114. Margot, the change took me by surprise as well! LOL
    The writer of a good series needs to handle those ‘other characters’ appearances carefully, I agree. I also loved Mary Balogh’s Survivor series, and yes, I think the Bridgerton watchers fell into two distinct camps — book or TV lovers. What I particularly love about the TV series is that it has opened up a lot of non-romance readers to the pleasures and possibilities of reading romance. As Darlene Marshall said in our Zoom interview, “All boats float in a rising tide.”

    Reply
  115. Margot, the change took me by surprise as well! LOL
    The writer of a good series needs to handle those ‘other characters’ appearances carefully, I agree. I also loved Mary Balogh’s Survivor series, and yes, I think the Bridgerton watchers fell into two distinct camps — book or TV lovers. What I particularly love about the TV series is that it has opened up a lot of non-romance readers to the pleasures and possibilities of reading romance. As Darlene Marshall said in our Zoom interview, “All boats float in a rising tide.”

    Reply
  116. I like to see characters through multiple books when that’s part of an overarching theme or cohesive plotline (someone please tell Joanna Bourne that she’s a master at this!). I don’t like appearances that are overly clever or contrived.

    Reply
  117. I like to see characters through multiple books when that’s part of an overarching theme or cohesive plotline (someone please tell Joanna Bourne that she’s a master at this!). I don’t like appearances that are overly clever or contrived.

    Reply
  118. I like to see characters through multiple books when that’s part of an overarching theme or cohesive plotline (someone please tell Joanna Bourne that she’s a master at this!). I don’t like appearances that are overly clever or contrived.

    Reply
  119. I like to see characters through multiple books when that’s part of an overarching theme or cohesive plotline (someone please tell Joanna Bourne that she’s a master at this!). I don’t like appearances that are overly clever or contrived.

    Reply
  120. I like to see characters through multiple books when that’s part of an overarching theme or cohesive plotline (someone please tell Joanna Bourne that she’s a master at this!). I don’t like appearances that are overly clever or contrived.

    Reply
  121. I love seeing characters from previous book show up, and getting a glimpse into what has been happening in their lives. In some ways, I think this makes the fictional world more like the real world, with friends (or enemies!) encountering each other naturally.

    Reply
  122. I love seeing characters from previous book show up, and getting a glimpse into what has been happening in their lives. In some ways, I think this makes the fictional world more like the real world, with friends (or enemies!) encountering each other naturally.

    Reply
  123. I love seeing characters from previous book show up, and getting a glimpse into what has been happening in their lives. In some ways, I think this makes the fictional world more like the real world, with friends (or enemies!) encountering each other naturally.

    Reply
  124. I love seeing characters from previous book show up, and getting a glimpse into what has been happening in their lives. In some ways, I think this makes the fictional world more like the real world, with friends (or enemies!) encountering each other naturally.

    Reply
  125. I love seeing characters from previous book show up, and getting a glimpse into what has been happening in their lives. In some ways, I think this makes the fictional world more like the real world, with friends (or enemies!) encountering each other naturally.

    Reply
  126. Thanks, Anita. You’re right about Joanna’s books all connecting so well. As for overly clever or contrived — I suppose it’s all in the eye of the beholder. *g*

    Reply
  127. Thanks, Anita. You’re right about Joanna’s books all connecting so well. As for overly clever or contrived — I suppose it’s all in the eye of the beholder. *g*

    Reply
  128. Thanks, Anita. You’re right about Joanna’s books all connecting so well. As for overly clever or contrived — I suppose it’s all in the eye of the beholder. *g*

    Reply
  129. Thanks, Anita. You’re right about Joanna’s books all connecting so well. As for overly clever or contrived — I suppose it’s all in the eye of the beholder. *g*

    Reply
  130. Thanks, Anita. You’re right about Joanna’s books all connecting so well. As for overly clever or contrived — I suppose it’s all in the eye of the beholder. *g*

    Reply
  131. Thanks, Jane. Yes, I think authors do create worlds and so it’s hard to prevent characters meeting up again. I know most of my heroines these days visit a certain dressmaker called Daisy. And, as Sue said (above) sometimes it’s better to have a cameo appearance of a previous character than to have any-old-character walk on and perform the required plot task.
    It would be fun to have them meet up with previous enemies. Now that’s tempting . . . 😉

    Reply
  132. Thanks, Jane. Yes, I think authors do create worlds and so it’s hard to prevent characters meeting up again. I know most of my heroines these days visit a certain dressmaker called Daisy. And, as Sue said (above) sometimes it’s better to have a cameo appearance of a previous character than to have any-old-character walk on and perform the required plot task.
    It would be fun to have them meet up with previous enemies. Now that’s tempting . . . 😉

    Reply
  133. Thanks, Jane. Yes, I think authors do create worlds and so it’s hard to prevent characters meeting up again. I know most of my heroines these days visit a certain dressmaker called Daisy. And, as Sue said (above) sometimes it’s better to have a cameo appearance of a previous character than to have any-old-character walk on and perform the required plot task.
    It would be fun to have them meet up with previous enemies. Now that’s tempting . . . 😉

    Reply
  134. Thanks, Jane. Yes, I think authors do create worlds and so it’s hard to prevent characters meeting up again. I know most of my heroines these days visit a certain dressmaker called Daisy. And, as Sue said (above) sometimes it’s better to have a cameo appearance of a previous character than to have any-old-character walk on and perform the required plot task.
    It would be fun to have them meet up with previous enemies. Now that’s tempting . . . 😉

    Reply
  135. Thanks, Jane. Yes, I think authors do create worlds and so it’s hard to prevent characters meeting up again. I know most of my heroines these days visit a certain dressmaker called Daisy. And, as Sue said (above) sometimes it’s better to have a cameo appearance of a previous character than to have any-old-character walk on and perform the required plot task.
    It would be fun to have them meet up with previous enemies. Now that’s tempting . . . 😉

    Reply
  136. It was great to meet all three of you! I’ve been avoiding “zooming” during the pandemic because I live at 8000 ft elevation out in the boonies and our internet connection is weak and uncertain.
    Anyhow, this was my first Zoom panel and I thought it was great fun.
    Hopefully we can all make it to France one of these years and meet in person. Thanks for taking the time to document this experience.
    I love your books!

    Reply
  137. It was great to meet all three of you! I’ve been avoiding “zooming” during the pandemic because I live at 8000 ft elevation out in the boonies and our internet connection is weak and uncertain.
    Anyhow, this was my first Zoom panel and I thought it was great fun.
    Hopefully we can all make it to France one of these years and meet in person. Thanks for taking the time to document this experience.
    I love your books!

    Reply
  138. It was great to meet all three of you! I’ve been avoiding “zooming” during the pandemic because I live at 8000 ft elevation out in the boonies and our internet connection is weak and uncertain.
    Anyhow, this was my first Zoom panel and I thought it was great fun.
    Hopefully we can all make it to France one of these years and meet in person. Thanks for taking the time to document this experience.
    I love your books!

    Reply
  139. It was great to meet all three of you! I’ve been avoiding “zooming” during the pandemic because I live at 8000 ft elevation out in the boonies and our internet connection is weak and uncertain.
    Anyhow, this was my first Zoom panel and I thought it was great fun.
    Hopefully we can all make it to France one of these years and meet in person. Thanks for taking the time to document this experience.
    I love your books!

    Reply
  140. It was great to meet all three of you! I’ve been avoiding “zooming” during the pandemic because I live at 8000 ft elevation out in the boonies and our internet connection is weak and uncertain.
    Anyhow, this was my first Zoom panel and I thought it was great fun.
    Hopefully we can all make it to France one of these years and meet in person. Thanks for taking the time to document this experience.
    I love your books!

    Reply
  141. To your questions:
    I really like it when charcters of previous books reapear. But they have to stay the same characters I loved in their own books! I don’t like it when a nice character is converted into an arrogant one.
    Balogh sometimes writes about meeetings of many characters and sometimes I just skim these parts. Otherwise I love her books.
    Over the time I’ve seen many screen adaptations of books. I would say 10% make it right, the others… not so much.
    I tend to avoid these adaptations but I noticed that others who didn’t know the book like them. In reading a story your own mind creates “pictures” and these often don’t match the new ones. As for the storylines they often are altered so much you can’t recognise the book. Have you ever seen someone dying on screen who stayed alive in the book – or the other way round? That’s more than annoying!
    It’s years that I read the Bridgertons and so I’ve forgotten most of the stories. I’ve no netflix and I surely will not subscribe because of this series. All I’ve so far read and seen about it… no, no and no.
    Others may love it and I’m surely pleased when it brings business to good romance authors!
    As for Zoom, my sons use it frequently for private and business. It’s very usefull in pandemic times. If covid doesn’t disappear very soon maybe I’ll try it myself.

    Reply
  142. To your questions:
    I really like it when charcters of previous books reapear. But they have to stay the same characters I loved in their own books! I don’t like it when a nice character is converted into an arrogant one.
    Balogh sometimes writes about meeetings of many characters and sometimes I just skim these parts. Otherwise I love her books.
    Over the time I’ve seen many screen adaptations of books. I would say 10% make it right, the others… not so much.
    I tend to avoid these adaptations but I noticed that others who didn’t know the book like them. In reading a story your own mind creates “pictures” and these often don’t match the new ones. As for the storylines they often are altered so much you can’t recognise the book. Have you ever seen someone dying on screen who stayed alive in the book – or the other way round? That’s more than annoying!
    It’s years that I read the Bridgertons and so I’ve forgotten most of the stories. I’ve no netflix and I surely will not subscribe because of this series. All I’ve so far read and seen about it… no, no and no.
    Others may love it and I’m surely pleased when it brings business to good romance authors!
    As for Zoom, my sons use it frequently for private and business. It’s very usefull in pandemic times. If covid doesn’t disappear very soon maybe I’ll try it myself.

    Reply
  143. To your questions:
    I really like it when charcters of previous books reapear. But they have to stay the same characters I loved in their own books! I don’t like it when a nice character is converted into an arrogant one.
    Balogh sometimes writes about meeetings of many characters and sometimes I just skim these parts. Otherwise I love her books.
    Over the time I’ve seen many screen adaptations of books. I would say 10% make it right, the others… not so much.
    I tend to avoid these adaptations but I noticed that others who didn’t know the book like them. In reading a story your own mind creates “pictures” and these often don’t match the new ones. As for the storylines they often are altered so much you can’t recognise the book. Have you ever seen someone dying on screen who stayed alive in the book – or the other way round? That’s more than annoying!
    It’s years that I read the Bridgertons and so I’ve forgotten most of the stories. I’ve no netflix and I surely will not subscribe because of this series. All I’ve so far read and seen about it… no, no and no.
    Others may love it and I’m surely pleased when it brings business to good romance authors!
    As for Zoom, my sons use it frequently for private and business. It’s very usefull in pandemic times. If covid doesn’t disappear very soon maybe I’ll try it myself.

    Reply
  144. To your questions:
    I really like it when charcters of previous books reapear. But they have to stay the same characters I loved in their own books! I don’t like it when a nice character is converted into an arrogant one.
    Balogh sometimes writes about meeetings of many characters and sometimes I just skim these parts. Otherwise I love her books.
    Over the time I’ve seen many screen adaptations of books. I would say 10% make it right, the others… not so much.
    I tend to avoid these adaptations but I noticed that others who didn’t know the book like them. In reading a story your own mind creates “pictures” and these often don’t match the new ones. As for the storylines they often are altered so much you can’t recognise the book. Have you ever seen someone dying on screen who stayed alive in the book – or the other way round? That’s more than annoying!
    It’s years that I read the Bridgertons and so I’ve forgotten most of the stories. I’ve no netflix and I surely will not subscribe because of this series. All I’ve so far read and seen about it… no, no and no.
    Others may love it and I’m surely pleased when it brings business to good romance authors!
    As for Zoom, my sons use it frequently for private and business. It’s very usefull in pandemic times. If covid doesn’t disappear very soon maybe I’ll try it myself.

    Reply
  145. To your questions:
    I really like it when charcters of previous books reapear. But they have to stay the same characters I loved in their own books! I don’t like it when a nice character is converted into an arrogant one.
    Balogh sometimes writes about meeetings of many characters and sometimes I just skim these parts. Otherwise I love her books.
    Over the time I’ve seen many screen adaptations of books. I would say 10% make it right, the others… not so much.
    I tend to avoid these adaptations but I noticed that others who didn’t know the book like them. In reading a story your own mind creates “pictures” and these often don’t match the new ones. As for the storylines they often are altered so much you can’t recognise the book. Have you ever seen someone dying on screen who stayed alive in the book – or the other way round? That’s more than annoying!
    It’s years that I read the Bridgertons and so I’ve forgotten most of the stories. I’ve no netflix and I surely will not subscribe because of this series. All I’ve so far read and seen about it… no, no and no.
    Others may love it and I’m surely pleased when it brings business to good romance authors!
    As for Zoom, my sons use it frequently for private and business. It’s very usefull in pandemic times. If covid doesn’t disappear very soon maybe I’ll try it myself.

    Reply

Leave a Comment