You can quote me

Sept_barbie_nqal From Loretta:

I have a book due soon, and my brain, which is thinking as hard as it can about that one thing, begs to be excused from thinking about anything else.  That is why today I’m letting others do my thinking for me, in the form of quotations.  You’re invited to join the quote fest.

Woman_writing “Tim had made shift to live many years by writing novels, at the rate of five pounds a volume; but that branch of business is now engrossed by female authors, who publish merely for the propagation of virtue, with so much ease and spirit, and delicacy, and knowledge of the human heart, and all in the serene tranquillity of high life, that the reader is not only inchanted by their genius, but reformed by their morality.”

Tobias_smollett_c1770wjpg A guy wrote that.  The guy is Tobias Smollett and the quotation comes from THE EXPEDITION OF HUMPHRY CLINKER, which, some of you may recall (though I can’t imagine why) was one of the books I never got around to reading (the blog is One of these days).  I finally did get around to it, and it’s a delightful book.  Though I am more in sympathy with Samuel Johnson regarding remuneration–“Sir, no man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money”–and I’ve a constitutional aversion to using books to reform anybody, I think Smollett was certainly right about women’s “knowledge of the human heart.”  He had many apt things to say about this, that, and the other thing.  For instance, “A man may be very entertaining and instructive on paper…and exceedingly dull in common discourse.”  That’s my thinking.  If I could talk entertainingly, I wouldn’t need to write.  Not that this is what I wish for.  What I wish for is to be a quotable writer.  In the meantime…

Womanbook How about this little Smollett gem: “truly, she has got a languishing eye, and reads romances.

If this tempts you to try the book, I strongly urge you to spring for the Norton Critical Edition, which is very nicely annotated.  Otherwise, you’ll feel as though you are reading a language you learned in junior high school and haven’t used since.  And that, BTW, is something I stole–er, I mean, am quoting from somebody or other (a Wench, could it be?).

Robt_benchleyw Which brings me to this from Robert Benchley:  “Great literature must spring from an upheaval in the author’s soul.  If that upheaval is not present, then it must come from the works of any other author which happen to be handy and easily adapted.”

My current WIP, YOUR SCANDALOUS WAYS, has many quotations. 

Mocenigo_palBecause Byron was in Venice about the time of my story, and because he has such delicious things to say about men and women and their relationships, I’ve used quotations from his poetry at the start of each chapter.  Too, now and again my characters will quote somebody.  This is a way, among other things, to indicate that H/H have similar tastes in books or music or to show a deeper understanding of an issue.  Some quotations I’ve used because they’re so apt that nothing else will do.  And some because, well, I love them so much that I just want to share them

Lovers Here’s a chapter quotation, from BEPPO:
      For glances beget ogles, ogles sighs,
      Sighs wishes, wishes words, and words a letter,
      Which flies on wings of light-heel’d Mercuries
      And then, God knows what mischief may arise
      When love links two young people in one fetter,
      Vile assignations, and adulterous beds,
      Elopements, broken vows and hearts and heads.

I quote from DON JUAN as well, which is very accommodating in that way, being so looooooong and loaded with great stuff.  You’ll find quotations from that poem in Lord_of_scoundrels_07sm LORD OF SCOUNDRELS (reissue coming in December) as well.

I have lots of quotations to share, not all sublime.  Many are ridiculous, but they are favorites, some decades old.  There was the Salada Tea Bag:  “If it weren’t for Venetian blinds, it’d be curtains for all of us.”  There are other authors.  Dickens, of course.  Oscar Wilde.  I could go on and on but that would get pretty boring, since it’s all one person’s taste.

So I ask you to take a turn and share quotations from your collection.  Sublime?  Ridiculous?  In between?  It can come from a Great Work, a fortune cookie, your Uncle Albert.

Maybe I’ll steal it and use it somewhere.

190 thoughts on “You can quote me”

  1. I have two favorites lately.
    Voltaire, to Rousseau:
    “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”
    And for some cultural-historical perspective…
    Chou En Lai, second-in-command in Mao’s People’s Republic of China, was asked his thoughts on the French Revolution. His response:
    “Too soon to tell.”

    Reply
  2. I have two favorites lately.
    Voltaire, to Rousseau:
    “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”
    And for some cultural-historical perspective…
    Chou En Lai, second-in-command in Mao’s People’s Republic of China, was asked his thoughts on the French Revolution. His response:
    “Too soon to tell.”

    Reply
  3. I have two favorites lately.
    Voltaire, to Rousseau:
    “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”
    And for some cultural-historical perspective…
    Chou En Lai, second-in-command in Mao’s People’s Republic of China, was asked his thoughts on the French Revolution. His response:
    “Too soon to tell.”

    Reply
  4. I have two favorites lately.
    Voltaire, to Rousseau:
    “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”
    And for some cultural-historical perspective…
    Chou En Lai, second-in-command in Mao’s People’s Republic of China, was asked his thoughts on the French Revolution. His response:
    “Too soon to tell.”

    Reply
  5. I have two favorites lately.
    Voltaire, to Rousseau:
    “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”
    And for some cultural-historical perspective…
    Chou En Lai, second-in-command in Mao’s People’s Republic of China, was asked his thoughts on the French Revolution. His response:
    “Too soon to tell.”

    Reply
  6. I love LBJ’s “It’s probably better to have him inside the tent pissing out, than outside the tent pissing in.” (said about J Edgar Hoover).
    Also, it’s completely not in the same league, but the only one I’ve ever come up with myself is:
    “You can pay now, or you can pay later, but you always pay.”
    (Developed in response to this eternal dilemma: should we let the baby take a nap and then stay up until 10 pm, or should we keep her awake in the afternoon and then have her fall asleep in her dinner at 6 pm?)

    Reply
  7. I love LBJ’s “It’s probably better to have him inside the tent pissing out, than outside the tent pissing in.” (said about J Edgar Hoover).
    Also, it’s completely not in the same league, but the only one I’ve ever come up with myself is:
    “You can pay now, or you can pay later, but you always pay.”
    (Developed in response to this eternal dilemma: should we let the baby take a nap and then stay up until 10 pm, or should we keep her awake in the afternoon and then have her fall asleep in her dinner at 6 pm?)

    Reply
  8. I love LBJ’s “It’s probably better to have him inside the tent pissing out, than outside the tent pissing in.” (said about J Edgar Hoover).
    Also, it’s completely not in the same league, but the only one I’ve ever come up with myself is:
    “You can pay now, or you can pay later, but you always pay.”
    (Developed in response to this eternal dilemma: should we let the baby take a nap and then stay up until 10 pm, or should we keep her awake in the afternoon and then have her fall asleep in her dinner at 6 pm?)

    Reply
  9. I love LBJ’s “It’s probably better to have him inside the tent pissing out, than outside the tent pissing in.” (said about J Edgar Hoover).
    Also, it’s completely not in the same league, but the only one I’ve ever come up with myself is:
    “You can pay now, or you can pay later, but you always pay.”
    (Developed in response to this eternal dilemma: should we let the baby take a nap and then stay up until 10 pm, or should we keep her awake in the afternoon and then have her fall asleep in her dinner at 6 pm?)

    Reply
  10. I love LBJ’s “It’s probably better to have him inside the tent pissing out, than outside the tent pissing in.” (said about J Edgar Hoover).
    Also, it’s completely not in the same league, but the only one I’ve ever come up with myself is:
    “You can pay now, or you can pay later, but you always pay.”
    (Developed in response to this eternal dilemma: should we let the baby take a nap and then stay up until 10 pm, or should we keep her awake in the afternoon and then have her fall asleep in her dinner at 6 pm?)

    Reply
  11. Oh, thank God you have finally gotten rid of that unbearable cover. I’m going to have to buy a new copy just for the pleasure of never having to see the old one again. Please tell me it doesn’t have something yucky on the spine, please!

    Reply
  12. Oh, thank God you have finally gotten rid of that unbearable cover. I’m going to have to buy a new copy just for the pleasure of never having to see the old one again. Please tell me it doesn’t have something yucky on the spine, please!

    Reply
  13. Oh, thank God you have finally gotten rid of that unbearable cover. I’m going to have to buy a new copy just for the pleasure of never having to see the old one again. Please tell me it doesn’t have something yucky on the spine, please!

    Reply
  14. Oh, thank God you have finally gotten rid of that unbearable cover. I’m going to have to buy a new copy just for the pleasure of never having to see the old one again. Please tell me it doesn’t have something yucky on the spine, please!

    Reply
  15. Oh, thank God you have finally gotten rid of that unbearable cover. I’m going to have to buy a new copy just for the pleasure of never having to see the old one again. Please tell me it doesn’t have something yucky on the spine, please!

    Reply
  16. I love most anything by Oscar Wilde, but am especially fond of “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”
    Loretta, I loved this post. You weren’t cheating by quoting! I feel all inspired now.

    Reply
  17. I love most anything by Oscar Wilde, but am especially fond of “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”
    Loretta, I loved this post. You weren’t cheating by quoting! I feel all inspired now.

    Reply
  18. I love most anything by Oscar Wilde, but am especially fond of “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”
    Loretta, I loved this post. You weren’t cheating by quoting! I feel all inspired now.

    Reply
  19. I love most anything by Oscar Wilde, but am especially fond of “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”
    Loretta, I loved this post. You weren’t cheating by quoting! I feel all inspired now.

    Reply
  20. I love most anything by Oscar Wilde, but am especially fond of “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”
    Loretta, I loved this post. You weren’t cheating by quoting! I feel all inspired now.

    Reply
  21. I love the Benchley quote. And I offer this short verse from Dorothy Parker:
    “In youth it was a way I had to do my best to please.
    I’d change with every passing lad to suit his theories.
    But now I know the things know, and do the things I do,
    And if you do not like me so, to Hell, my love, with you.”
    (I came across that when I was in college, and have treasured it ever since.) I also love this, from James Thurber:
    “Ill fares the land, to galloping ills a prey
    Where gobbledygook accumulates and words decay.”

    Reply
  22. I love the Benchley quote. And I offer this short verse from Dorothy Parker:
    “In youth it was a way I had to do my best to please.
    I’d change with every passing lad to suit his theories.
    But now I know the things know, and do the things I do,
    And if you do not like me so, to Hell, my love, with you.”
    (I came across that when I was in college, and have treasured it ever since.) I also love this, from James Thurber:
    “Ill fares the land, to galloping ills a prey
    Where gobbledygook accumulates and words decay.”

    Reply
  23. I love the Benchley quote. And I offer this short verse from Dorothy Parker:
    “In youth it was a way I had to do my best to please.
    I’d change with every passing lad to suit his theories.
    But now I know the things know, and do the things I do,
    And if you do not like me so, to Hell, my love, with you.”
    (I came across that when I was in college, and have treasured it ever since.) I also love this, from James Thurber:
    “Ill fares the land, to galloping ills a prey
    Where gobbledygook accumulates and words decay.”

    Reply
  24. I love the Benchley quote. And I offer this short verse from Dorothy Parker:
    “In youth it was a way I had to do my best to please.
    I’d change with every passing lad to suit his theories.
    But now I know the things know, and do the things I do,
    And if you do not like me so, to Hell, my love, with you.”
    (I came across that when I was in college, and have treasured it ever since.) I also love this, from James Thurber:
    “Ill fares the land, to galloping ills a prey
    Where gobbledygook accumulates and words decay.”

    Reply
  25. I love the Benchley quote. And I offer this short verse from Dorothy Parker:
    “In youth it was a way I had to do my best to please.
    I’d change with every passing lad to suit his theories.
    But now I know the things know, and do the things I do,
    And if you do not like me so, to Hell, my love, with you.”
    (I came across that when I was in college, and have treasured it ever since.) I also love this, from James Thurber:
    “Ill fares the land, to galloping ills a prey
    Where gobbledygook accumulates and words decay.”

    Reply
  26. Great post, Loretta. I love quotes.
    Here are a few of my favorites
    “I’ve never travel without my diary. One should have something sensational to read on the train” Oscar Wilde.
    “If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.” Ben Franklin
    “I am because you are. They are because I was. You have changed the world.”
    And in line with RevMelinda’s quote (Hi Mel!)…”Don’t let sleeping dogs lie unless you can afford to feed them when they wake up.”
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  27. Great post, Loretta. I love quotes.
    Here are a few of my favorites
    “I’ve never travel without my diary. One should have something sensational to read on the train” Oscar Wilde.
    “If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.” Ben Franklin
    “I am because you are. They are because I was. You have changed the world.”
    And in line with RevMelinda’s quote (Hi Mel!)…”Don’t let sleeping dogs lie unless you can afford to feed them when they wake up.”
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  28. Great post, Loretta. I love quotes.
    Here are a few of my favorites
    “I’ve never travel without my diary. One should have something sensational to read on the train” Oscar Wilde.
    “If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.” Ben Franklin
    “I am because you are. They are because I was. You have changed the world.”
    And in line with RevMelinda’s quote (Hi Mel!)…”Don’t let sleeping dogs lie unless you can afford to feed them when they wake up.”
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  29. Great post, Loretta. I love quotes.
    Here are a few of my favorites
    “I’ve never travel without my diary. One should have something sensational to read on the train” Oscar Wilde.
    “If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.” Ben Franklin
    “I am because you are. They are because I was. You have changed the world.”
    And in line with RevMelinda’s quote (Hi Mel!)…”Don’t let sleeping dogs lie unless you can afford to feed them when they wake up.”
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  30. Great post, Loretta. I love quotes.
    Here are a few of my favorites
    “I’ve never travel without my diary. One should have something sensational to read on the train” Oscar Wilde.
    “If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing.” Ben Franklin
    “I am because you are. They are because I was. You have changed the world.”
    And in line with RevMelinda’s quote (Hi Mel!)…”Don’t let sleeping dogs lie unless you can afford to feed them when they wake up.”
    🙂
    Nina

    Reply
  31. Personally, I LOVED the old cover, apart from the guy not having a big enough nose to really be Dain.
    Alas that I am reading this at work, without my armamentarium handy. I will have to rely on my so-called memory.
    There was a college student writer whom I encountered briefly some years ago, who, upon learning that I was a writer too, said gleefully “Don’t you just hate writing?” I kind of know what he meant.
    I’ve always loved the line in The Importance of Being Earnest: “To lose one parent may be considered a misfortune; to loose two begins to look like carelessness.” And there’s good old La Rochefoucauld, that amusing cynic, who remarked that there is always something pleasing to us in the misfortunes of our friends. He also said “Those who know their minds do not necessarily know their hearts,” which seems a fitting maxim for a romance writer.
    Lastly, I’ve always liked Chaucer’s comment on the Wife of Bath’s romantic past: five husbands plus “other company in youth.” How very discreetly indiscreete of him!

    Reply
  32. Personally, I LOVED the old cover, apart from the guy not having a big enough nose to really be Dain.
    Alas that I am reading this at work, without my armamentarium handy. I will have to rely on my so-called memory.
    There was a college student writer whom I encountered briefly some years ago, who, upon learning that I was a writer too, said gleefully “Don’t you just hate writing?” I kind of know what he meant.
    I’ve always loved the line in The Importance of Being Earnest: “To lose one parent may be considered a misfortune; to loose two begins to look like carelessness.” And there’s good old La Rochefoucauld, that amusing cynic, who remarked that there is always something pleasing to us in the misfortunes of our friends. He also said “Those who know their minds do not necessarily know their hearts,” which seems a fitting maxim for a romance writer.
    Lastly, I’ve always liked Chaucer’s comment on the Wife of Bath’s romantic past: five husbands plus “other company in youth.” How very discreetly indiscreete of him!

    Reply
  33. Personally, I LOVED the old cover, apart from the guy not having a big enough nose to really be Dain.
    Alas that I am reading this at work, without my armamentarium handy. I will have to rely on my so-called memory.
    There was a college student writer whom I encountered briefly some years ago, who, upon learning that I was a writer too, said gleefully “Don’t you just hate writing?” I kind of know what he meant.
    I’ve always loved the line in The Importance of Being Earnest: “To lose one parent may be considered a misfortune; to loose two begins to look like carelessness.” And there’s good old La Rochefoucauld, that amusing cynic, who remarked that there is always something pleasing to us in the misfortunes of our friends. He also said “Those who know their minds do not necessarily know their hearts,” which seems a fitting maxim for a romance writer.
    Lastly, I’ve always liked Chaucer’s comment on the Wife of Bath’s romantic past: five husbands plus “other company in youth.” How very discreetly indiscreete of him!

    Reply
  34. Personally, I LOVED the old cover, apart from the guy not having a big enough nose to really be Dain.
    Alas that I am reading this at work, without my armamentarium handy. I will have to rely on my so-called memory.
    There was a college student writer whom I encountered briefly some years ago, who, upon learning that I was a writer too, said gleefully “Don’t you just hate writing?” I kind of know what he meant.
    I’ve always loved the line in The Importance of Being Earnest: “To lose one parent may be considered a misfortune; to loose two begins to look like carelessness.” And there’s good old La Rochefoucauld, that amusing cynic, who remarked that there is always something pleasing to us in the misfortunes of our friends. He also said “Those who know their minds do not necessarily know their hearts,” which seems a fitting maxim for a romance writer.
    Lastly, I’ve always liked Chaucer’s comment on the Wife of Bath’s romantic past: five husbands plus “other company in youth.” How very discreetly indiscreete of him!

    Reply
  35. Personally, I LOVED the old cover, apart from the guy not having a big enough nose to really be Dain.
    Alas that I am reading this at work, without my armamentarium handy. I will have to rely on my so-called memory.
    There was a college student writer whom I encountered briefly some years ago, who, upon learning that I was a writer too, said gleefully “Don’t you just hate writing?” I kind of know what he meant.
    I’ve always loved the line in The Importance of Being Earnest: “To lose one parent may be considered a misfortune; to loose two begins to look like carelessness.” And there’s good old La Rochefoucauld, that amusing cynic, who remarked that there is always something pleasing to us in the misfortunes of our friends. He also said “Those who know their minds do not necessarily know their hearts,” which seems a fitting maxim for a romance writer.
    Lastly, I’ve always liked Chaucer’s comment on the Wife of Bath’s romantic past: five husbands plus “other company in youth.” How very discreetly indiscreete of him!

    Reply
  36. Great new cover! The old one was, well not quite a stinker, but the hair colour remained annoying long after I accustomed myself to the wrongly handsome man without his Italian nose.
    I only quote The Simpsons. Practically any bit of dialogue will do.

    Reply
  37. Great new cover! The old one was, well not quite a stinker, but the hair colour remained annoying long after I accustomed myself to the wrongly handsome man without his Italian nose.
    I only quote The Simpsons. Practically any bit of dialogue will do.

    Reply
  38. Great new cover! The old one was, well not quite a stinker, but the hair colour remained annoying long after I accustomed myself to the wrongly handsome man without his Italian nose.
    I only quote The Simpsons. Practically any bit of dialogue will do.

    Reply
  39. Great new cover! The old one was, well not quite a stinker, but the hair colour remained annoying long after I accustomed myself to the wrongly handsome man without his Italian nose.
    I only quote The Simpsons. Practically any bit of dialogue will do.

    Reply
  40. Great new cover! The old one was, well not quite a stinker, but the hair colour remained annoying long after I accustomed myself to the wrongly handsome man without his Italian nose.
    I only quote The Simpsons. Practically any bit of dialogue will do.

    Reply
  41. Some favorite quotes:
    From Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf speaking to Frodo: “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”
    Two favorites from the eminently quotable Shawshank Redemption:
    “Get busy living, or get busy dying.”
    “I find I’m so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it’s the excitement only a free man can feel, a free man at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope I can make it across the border. I hope to see my friend, and shake his hand. I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams. I hope.”
    And two from the highly quotable Bull Durham (not my favorites, but ones that work well out of context):
    “Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains.”
    “The world is not made for people cursed with self-awareness.”
    That covers my three favorite movies. This is fun–I may have more later…

    Reply
  42. Some favorite quotes:
    From Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf speaking to Frodo: “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”
    Two favorites from the eminently quotable Shawshank Redemption:
    “Get busy living, or get busy dying.”
    “I find I’m so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it’s the excitement only a free man can feel, a free man at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope I can make it across the border. I hope to see my friend, and shake his hand. I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams. I hope.”
    And two from the highly quotable Bull Durham (not my favorites, but ones that work well out of context):
    “Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains.”
    “The world is not made for people cursed with self-awareness.”
    That covers my three favorite movies. This is fun–I may have more later…

    Reply
  43. Some favorite quotes:
    From Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf speaking to Frodo: “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”
    Two favorites from the eminently quotable Shawshank Redemption:
    “Get busy living, or get busy dying.”
    “I find I’m so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it’s the excitement only a free man can feel, a free man at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope I can make it across the border. I hope to see my friend, and shake his hand. I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams. I hope.”
    And two from the highly quotable Bull Durham (not my favorites, but ones that work well out of context):
    “Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains.”
    “The world is not made for people cursed with self-awareness.”
    That covers my three favorite movies. This is fun–I may have more later…

    Reply
  44. Some favorite quotes:
    From Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf speaking to Frodo: “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”
    Two favorites from the eminently quotable Shawshank Redemption:
    “Get busy living, or get busy dying.”
    “I find I’m so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it’s the excitement only a free man can feel, a free man at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope I can make it across the border. I hope to see my friend, and shake his hand. I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams. I hope.”
    And two from the highly quotable Bull Durham (not my favorites, but ones that work well out of context):
    “Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains.”
    “The world is not made for people cursed with self-awareness.”
    That covers my three favorite movies. This is fun–I may have more later…

    Reply
  45. Some favorite quotes:
    From Fellowship of the Ring, Gandalf speaking to Frodo: “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”
    Two favorites from the eminently quotable Shawshank Redemption:
    “Get busy living, or get busy dying.”
    “I find I’m so excited, I can barely sit still or hold a thought in my head. I think it’s the excitement only a free man can feel, a free man at the start of a long journey whose conclusion is uncertain. I hope I can make it across the border. I hope to see my friend, and shake his hand. I hope the Pacific is as blue as it has been in my dreams. I hope.”
    And two from the highly quotable Bull Durham (not my favorites, but ones that work well out of context):
    “Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains.”
    “The world is not made for people cursed with self-awareness.”
    That covers my three favorite movies. This is fun–I may have more later…

    Reply
  46. Gosh, you all are way too cerebral for me this afternoon. I have a migraine. sigh
    This is my current one from my sig and it works for me since my years are old buy my heart/spirit are young:
    I think age is a very high price to pay for maturity. – Tom Stoppard

    Reply
  47. Gosh, you all are way too cerebral for me this afternoon. I have a migraine. sigh
    This is my current one from my sig and it works for me since my years are old buy my heart/spirit are young:
    I think age is a very high price to pay for maturity. – Tom Stoppard

    Reply
  48. Gosh, you all are way too cerebral for me this afternoon. I have a migraine. sigh
    This is my current one from my sig and it works for me since my years are old buy my heart/spirit are young:
    I think age is a very high price to pay for maturity. – Tom Stoppard

    Reply
  49. Gosh, you all are way too cerebral for me this afternoon. I have a migraine. sigh
    This is my current one from my sig and it works for me since my years are old buy my heart/spirit are young:
    I think age is a very high price to pay for maturity. – Tom Stoppard

    Reply
  50. Gosh, you all are way too cerebral for me this afternoon. I have a migraine. sigh
    This is my current one from my sig and it works for me since my years are old buy my heart/spirit are young:
    I think age is a very high price to pay for maturity. – Tom Stoppard

    Reply
  51. I’m a compulsive quote collector. Don’t ask me where these came from – I lifted them myself.
    “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.” -Lewis Carroll
    “What is reading, but silent conversation.” -Walter Savage Landor
    “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.” -J.D. Salinger (Wench book anyone?)

    Reply
  52. I’m a compulsive quote collector. Don’t ask me where these came from – I lifted them myself.
    “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.” -Lewis Carroll
    “What is reading, but silent conversation.” -Walter Savage Landor
    “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.” -J.D. Salinger (Wench book anyone?)

    Reply
  53. I’m a compulsive quote collector. Don’t ask me where these came from – I lifted them myself.
    “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.” -Lewis Carroll
    “What is reading, but silent conversation.” -Walter Savage Landor
    “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.” -J.D. Salinger (Wench book anyone?)

    Reply
  54. I’m a compulsive quote collector. Don’t ask me where these came from – I lifted them myself.
    “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.” -Lewis Carroll
    “What is reading, but silent conversation.” -Walter Savage Landor
    “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.” -J.D. Salinger (Wench book anyone?)

    Reply
  55. I’m a compulsive quote collector. Don’t ask me where these came from – I lifted them myself.
    “When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in a rather scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less.” -Lewis Carroll
    “What is reading, but silent conversation.” -Walter Savage Landor
    “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.” -J.D. Salinger (Wench book anyone?)

    Reply
  56. I knew I’d get great stuff from this group. RfP and RevMelinda, I’m particularly fond of Chou En Lai’s comment on French revolution, and the LBJ (who did have a way with words)–but I do see myself stealing the “always pay” quotation.
    Wendy, the spine is not a clinch this time but a piece of the cover: her profile.
    Elaine, the stepback uses the old clinch from LOS, but it’s been Photoshopped with very nice results–although his nose still isn’t big enough.
    Francois, a great deal about the old cover annoyed me. At least the new clinch gets the hair color right and makes my big guy look a little bigger. And they are no longer having smoochies on a rhododendron, which is a pretty tricky thing to do, I think.

    Reply
  57. I knew I’d get great stuff from this group. RfP and RevMelinda, I’m particularly fond of Chou En Lai’s comment on French revolution, and the LBJ (who did have a way with words)–but I do see myself stealing the “always pay” quotation.
    Wendy, the spine is not a clinch this time but a piece of the cover: her profile.
    Elaine, the stepback uses the old clinch from LOS, but it’s been Photoshopped with very nice results–although his nose still isn’t big enough.
    Francois, a great deal about the old cover annoyed me. At least the new clinch gets the hair color right and makes my big guy look a little bigger. And they are no longer having smoochies on a rhododendron, which is a pretty tricky thing to do, I think.

    Reply
  58. I knew I’d get great stuff from this group. RfP and RevMelinda, I’m particularly fond of Chou En Lai’s comment on French revolution, and the LBJ (who did have a way with words)–but I do see myself stealing the “always pay” quotation.
    Wendy, the spine is not a clinch this time but a piece of the cover: her profile.
    Elaine, the stepback uses the old clinch from LOS, but it’s been Photoshopped with very nice results–although his nose still isn’t big enough.
    Francois, a great deal about the old cover annoyed me. At least the new clinch gets the hair color right and makes my big guy look a little bigger. And they are no longer having smoochies on a rhododendron, which is a pretty tricky thing to do, I think.

    Reply
  59. I knew I’d get great stuff from this group. RfP and RevMelinda, I’m particularly fond of Chou En Lai’s comment on French revolution, and the LBJ (who did have a way with words)–but I do see myself stealing the “always pay” quotation.
    Wendy, the spine is not a clinch this time but a piece of the cover: her profile.
    Elaine, the stepback uses the old clinch from LOS, but it’s been Photoshopped with very nice results–although his nose still isn’t big enough.
    Francois, a great deal about the old cover annoyed me. At least the new clinch gets the hair color right and makes my big guy look a little bigger. And they are no longer having smoochies on a rhododendron, which is a pretty tricky thing to do, I think.

    Reply
  60. I knew I’d get great stuff from this group. RfP and RevMelinda, I’m particularly fond of Chou En Lai’s comment on French revolution, and the LBJ (who did have a way with words)–but I do see myself stealing the “always pay” quotation.
    Wendy, the spine is not a clinch this time but a piece of the cover: her profile.
    Elaine, the stepback uses the old clinch from LOS, but it’s been Photoshopped with very nice results–although his nose still isn’t big enough.
    Francois, a great deal about the old cover annoyed me. At least the new clinch gets the hair color right and makes my big guy look a little bigger. And they are no longer having smoochies on a rhododendron, which is a pretty tricky thing to do, I think.

    Reply
  61. Maggie, I too love most anything by Wilde but that quotation is one of the best. I loved that the Pretenders used it in a song.
    Jane O, Dorothy Parker is endlessly quotable. I do love “Why is it no one ever sent me yet/ One perfect limousine, do you suppose?/Ah no, it’s always just my luck to get/One perfect rose.” Thurber, too–the lot of them. Susan/Miranda and I recently talked about that generation, its wit and insouciance.
    Nina and Elaine, I totally agree: Practically every line of THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST is quotable. The lady in the red dress? I know not her name. I stole her off Wikipedia.
    Susan W, Shawshank Redemption and Bull Durham are among my favorite movies, too. And I do hope you give us more later. This is even more fun than I thought it would be!

    Reply
  62. Maggie, I too love most anything by Wilde but that quotation is one of the best. I loved that the Pretenders used it in a song.
    Jane O, Dorothy Parker is endlessly quotable. I do love “Why is it no one ever sent me yet/ One perfect limousine, do you suppose?/Ah no, it’s always just my luck to get/One perfect rose.” Thurber, too–the lot of them. Susan/Miranda and I recently talked about that generation, its wit and insouciance.
    Nina and Elaine, I totally agree: Practically every line of THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST is quotable. The lady in the red dress? I know not her name. I stole her off Wikipedia.
    Susan W, Shawshank Redemption and Bull Durham are among my favorite movies, too. And I do hope you give us more later. This is even more fun than I thought it would be!

    Reply
  63. Maggie, I too love most anything by Wilde but that quotation is one of the best. I loved that the Pretenders used it in a song.
    Jane O, Dorothy Parker is endlessly quotable. I do love “Why is it no one ever sent me yet/ One perfect limousine, do you suppose?/Ah no, it’s always just my luck to get/One perfect rose.” Thurber, too–the lot of them. Susan/Miranda and I recently talked about that generation, its wit and insouciance.
    Nina and Elaine, I totally agree: Practically every line of THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST is quotable. The lady in the red dress? I know not her name. I stole her off Wikipedia.
    Susan W, Shawshank Redemption and Bull Durham are among my favorite movies, too. And I do hope you give us more later. This is even more fun than I thought it would be!

    Reply
  64. Maggie, I too love most anything by Wilde but that quotation is one of the best. I loved that the Pretenders used it in a song.
    Jane O, Dorothy Parker is endlessly quotable. I do love “Why is it no one ever sent me yet/ One perfect limousine, do you suppose?/Ah no, it’s always just my luck to get/One perfect rose.” Thurber, too–the lot of them. Susan/Miranda and I recently talked about that generation, its wit and insouciance.
    Nina and Elaine, I totally agree: Practically every line of THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST is quotable. The lady in the red dress? I know not her name. I stole her off Wikipedia.
    Susan W, Shawshank Redemption and Bull Durham are among my favorite movies, too. And I do hope you give us more later. This is even more fun than I thought it would be!

    Reply
  65. Maggie, I too love most anything by Wilde but that quotation is one of the best. I loved that the Pretenders used it in a song.
    Jane O, Dorothy Parker is endlessly quotable. I do love “Why is it no one ever sent me yet/ One perfect limousine, do you suppose?/Ah no, it’s always just my luck to get/One perfect rose.” Thurber, too–the lot of them. Susan/Miranda and I recently talked about that generation, its wit and insouciance.
    Nina and Elaine, I totally agree: Practically every line of THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST is quotable. The lady in the red dress? I know not her name. I stole her off Wikipedia.
    Susan W, Shawshank Redemption and Bull Durham are among my favorite movies, too. And I do hope you give us more later. This is even more fun than I thought it would be!

    Reply
  66. Quotes are so much fun – I’ll throw in some well-known, but still good ones:
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ”
    Oscar Wilde
    “A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “If you are going through hell, keep going.” Sir Winston Churchill
    And two from one of my favourite non-Wench authors:
    “A good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.” Terry Pratchett
    “Words are the litmus paper of the minds. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word “commence” in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say “Enter”, don’t stop to pack.” Terry Pratchett
    I could spend all day on these ^_^

    Reply
  67. Quotes are so much fun – I’ll throw in some well-known, but still good ones:
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ”
    Oscar Wilde
    “A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “If you are going through hell, keep going.” Sir Winston Churchill
    And two from one of my favourite non-Wench authors:
    “A good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.” Terry Pratchett
    “Words are the litmus paper of the minds. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word “commence” in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say “Enter”, don’t stop to pack.” Terry Pratchett
    I could spend all day on these ^_^

    Reply
  68. Quotes are so much fun – I’ll throw in some well-known, but still good ones:
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ”
    Oscar Wilde
    “A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “If you are going through hell, keep going.” Sir Winston Churchill
    And two from one of my favourite non-Wench authors:
    “A good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.” Terry Pratchett
    “Words are the litmus paper of the minds. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word “commence” in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say “Enter”, don’t stop to pack.” Terry Pratchett
    I could spend all day on these ^_^

    Reply
  69. Quotes are so much fun – I’ll throw in some well-known, but still good ones:
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ”
    Oscar Wilde
    “A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “If you are going through hell, keep going.” Sir Winston Churchill
    And two from one of my favourite non-Wench authors:
    “A good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.” Terry Pratchett
    “Words are the litmus paper of the minds. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word “commence” in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say “Enter”, don’t stop to pack.” Terry Pratchett
    I could spend all day on these ^_^

    Reply
  70. Quotes are so much fun – I’ll throw in some well-known, but still good ones:
    “Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. ”
    Oscar Wilde
    “A fanatic is one who can’t change his mind and won’t change the subject.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, Courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.” Sir Winston Churchill
    “If you are going through hell, keep going.” Sir Winston Churchill
    And two from one of my favourite non-Wench authors:
    “A good bookshop is just a genteel Black Hole that knows how to read.” Terry Pratchett
    “Words are the litmus paper of the minds. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word “commence” in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say “Enter”, don’t stop to pack.” Terry Pratchett
    I could spend all day on these ^_^

    Reply
  71. Alas, I’m incapable of memorizing anything, even the t-shirt quotes I used in Impossible Dreams. But I have my daughter’s old chalkboard still sitting here with some wonderful quotes on it, and at least one of them is printable “G”:
    Abraham Lincoln–Education is not given for the purpose of earning a living; it’s learning what to do with a living after you’ve earned it.

    Reply
  72. Alas, I’m incapable of memorizing anything, even the t-shirt quotes I used in Impossible Dreams. But I have my daughter’s old chalkboard still sitting here with some wonderful quotes on it, and at least one of them is printable “G”:
    Abraham Lincoln–Education is not given for the purpose of earning a living; it’s learning what to do with a living after you’ve earned it.

    Reply
  73. Alas, I’m incapable of memorizing anything, even the t-shirt quotes I used in Impossible Dreams. But I have my daughter’s old chalkboard still sitting here with some wonderful quotes on it, and at least one of them is printable “G”:
    Abraham Lincoln–Education is not given for the purpose of earning a living; it’s learning what to do with a living after you’ve earned it.

    Reply
  74. Alas, I’m incapable of memorizing anything, even the t-shirt quotes I used in Impossible Dreams. But I have my daughter’s old chalkboard still sitting here with some wonderful quotes on it, and at least one of them is printable “G”:
    Abraham Lincoln–Education is not given for the purpose of earning a living; it’s learning what to do with a living after you’ve earned it.

    Reply
  75. Alas, I’m incapable of memorizing anything, even the t-shirt quotes I used in Impossible Dreams. But I have my daughter’s old chalkboard still sitting here with some wonderful quotes on it, and at least one of them is printable “G”:
    Abraham Lincoln–Education is not given for the purpose of earning a living; it’s learning what to do with a living after you’ve earned it.

    Reply
  76. love quotes, my favorite is the last one:
    “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”
    Groucho Marx
    “I looked back and saw my father, and his father, and all our fathers, and in front to see my son, and his son, and the sons upon sons beyond. And their eyes were my eyes.” –
    Richard Llewellyn
    “Memory is a selection of images, some illusive, some printed indelibly on the brain. Each image is like a thread, each thread woven together to make a tapestry of intricate textures. And each tapestry tells a story and the story is our past.” –
    Kasi Lemmons from Eve’s Bayou

    Reply
  77. love quotes, my favorite is the last one:
    “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”
    Groucho Marx
    “I looked back and saw my father, and his father, and all our fathers, and in front to see my son, and his son, and the sons upon sons beyond. And their eyes were my eyes.” –
    Richard Llewellyn
    “Memory is a selection of images, some illusive, some printed indelibly on the brain. Each image is like a thread, each thread woven together to make a tapestry of intricate textures. And each tapestry tells a story and the story is our past.” –
    Kasi Lemmons from Eve’s Bayou

    Reply
  78. love quotes, my favorite is the last one:
    “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”
    Groucho Marx
    “I looked back and saw my father, and his father, and all our fathers, and in front to see my son, and his son, and the sons upon sons beyond. And their eyes were my eyes.” –
    Richard Llewellyn
    “Memory is a selection of images, some illusive, some printed indelibly on the brain. Each image is like a thread, each thread woven together to make a tapestry of intricate textures. And each tapestry tells a story and the story is our past.” –
    Kasi Lemmons from Eve’s Bayou

    Reply
  79. love quotes, my favorite is the last one:
    “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”
    Groucho Marx
    “I looked back and saw my father, and his father, and all our fathers, and in front to see my son, and his son, and the sons upon sons beyond. And their eyes were my eyes.” –
    Richard Llewellyn
    “Memory is a selection of images, some illusive, some printed indelibly on the brain. Each image is like a thread, each thread woven together to make a tapestry of intricate textures. And each tapestry tells a story and the story is our past.” –
    Kasi Lemmons from Eve’s Bayou

    Reply
  80. love quotes, my favorite is the last one:
    “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.”
    Groucho Marx
    “I looked back and saw my father, and his father, and all our fathers, and in front to see my son, and his son, and the sons upon sons beyond. And their eyes were my eyes.” –
    Richard Llewellyn
    “Memory is a selection of images, some illusive, some printed indelibly on the brain. Each image is like a thread, each thread woven together to make a tapestry of intricate textures. And each tapestry tells a story and the story is our past.” –
    Kasi Lemmons from Eve’s Bayou

    Reply
  81. Oh, Liz, Archy & Mehitabel is in the Great Works category for me. But the Camus is new to me, and wonderful. Margaret, my heart (and head) ache for you. I too endure migraines. But you came through with Stoppard, and a terrific quote. Which I am stealing. Mary K, Lewis Carroll is also in the Great Works category. Oh, and you reminded me of James Barrie, whose PETER PAN I am rereading for the umpteenth time after seeing a beautiful recent movie version. BTW, rhododendrons on page 275 *g*

    Reply
  82. Oh, Liz, Archy & Mehitabel is in the Great Works category for me. But the Camus is new to me, and wonderful. Margaret, my heart (and head) ache for you. I too endure migraines. But you came through with Stoppard, and a terrific quote. Which I am stealing. Mary K, Lewis Carroll is also in the Great Works category. Oh, and you reminded me of James Barrie, whose PETER PAN I am rereading for the umpteenth time after seeing a beautiful recent movie version. BTW, rhododendrons on page 275 *g*

    Reply
  83. Oh, Liz, Archy & Mehitabel is in the Great Works category for me. But the Camus is new to me, and wonderful. Margaret, my heart (and head) ache for you. I too endure migraines. But you came through with Stoppard, and a terrific quote. Which I am stealing. Mary K, Lewis Carroll is also in the Great Works category. Oh, and you reminded me of James Barrie, whose PETER PAN I am rereading for the umpteenth time after seeing a beautiful recent movie version. BTW, rhododendrons on page 275 *g*

    Reply
  84. Oh, Liz, Archy & Mehitabel is in the Great Works category for me. But the Camus is new to me, and wonderful. Margaret, my heart (and head) ache for you. I too endure migraines. But you came through with Stoppard, and a terrific quote. Which I am stealing. Mary K, Lewis Carroll is also in the Great Works category. Oh, and you reminded me of James Barrie, whose PETER PAN I am rereading for the umpteenth time after seeing a beautiful recent movie version. BTW, rhododendrons on page 275 *g*

    Reply
  85. Oh, Liz, Archy & Mehitabel is in the Great Works category for me. But the Camus is new to me, and wonderful. Margaret, my heart (and head) ache for you. I too endure migraines. But you came through with Stoppard, and a terrific quote. Which I am stealing. Mary K, Lewis Carroll is also in the Great Works category. Oh, and you reminded me of James Barrie, whose PETER PAN I am rereading for the umpteenth time after seeing a beautiful recent movie version. BTW, rhododendrons on page 275 *g*

    Reply
  86. Jill, the Churchill quotations tell me that I really need to read him. I particularly like the “Courage” one. And isn’t Terry Pratchett another that one can quote endlessly? Pat, that Lincoln one needs to be posted in schools everywhere. It’s pretty much what we used to say to parents debating whether to send their kids to Clark U or not. But I didn’t know then I could have quoted Lincoln! Kay, the Groucho Marx quotation is truly a classic. The others are beautiful. Don’t know about everyone else, but I’m having a blast with this.

    Reply
  87. Jill, the Churchill quotations tell me that I really need to read him. I particularly like the “Courage” one. And isn’t Terry Pratchett another that one can quote endlessly? Pat, that Lincoln one needs to be posted in schools everywhere. It’s pretty much what we used to say to parents debating whether to send their kids to Clark U or not. But I didn’t know then I could have quoted Lincoln! Kay, the Groucho Marx quotation is truly a classic. The others are beautiful. Don’t know about everyone else, but I’m having a blast with this.

    Reply
  88. Jill, the Churchill quotations tell me that I really need to read him. I particularly like the “Courage” one. And isn’t Terry Pratchett another that one can quote endlessly? Pat, that Lincoln one needs to be posted in schools everywhere. It’s pretty much what we used to say to parents debating whether to send their kids to Clark U or not. But I didn’t know then I could have quoted Lincoln! Kay, the Groucho Marx quotation is truly a classic. The others are beautiful. Don’t know about everyone else, but I’m having a blast with this.

    Reply
  89. Jill, the Churchill quotations tell me that I really need to read him. I particularly like the “Courage” one. And isn’t Terry Pratchett another that one can quote endlessly? Pat, that Lincoln one needs to be posted in schools everywhere. It’s pretty much what we used to say to parents debating whether to send their kids to Clark U or not. But I didn’t know then I could have quoted Lincoln! Kay, the Groucho Marx quotation is truly a classic. The others are beautiful. Don’t know about everyone else, but I’m having a blast with this.

    Reply
  90. Jill, the Churchill quotations tell me that I really need to read him. I particularly like the “Courage” one. And isn’t Terry Pratchett another that one can quote endlessly? Pat, that Lincoln one needs to be posted in schools everywhere. It’s pretty much what we used to say to parents debating whether to send their kids to Clark U or not. But I didn’t know then I could have quoted Lincoln! Kay, the Groucho Marx quotation is truly a classic. The others are beautiful. Don’t know about everyone else, but I’m having a blast with this.

    Reply
  91. Back in the days before I retired and grew mellow, I had a sign in my office that said, “Yes, I am an agent of Satan, but my duties are largely ceremonial.”
    I always wanted to put up the one that said “I’ll try being nicer if you’ll try being smarter.”
    Both came on a list of useful work phrases that my daughter-in-law – bless her – sent me.

    Reply
  92. Back in the days before I retired and grew mellow, I had a sign in my office that said, “Yes, I am an agent of Satan, but my duties are largely ceremonial.”
    I always wanted to put up the one that said “I’ll try being nicer if you’ll try being smarter.”
    Both came on a list of useful work phrases that my daughter-in-law – bless her – sent me.

    Reply
  93. Back in the days before I retired and grew mellow, I had a sign in my office that said, “Yes, I am an agent of Satan, but my duties are largely ceremonial.”
    I always wanted to put up the one that said “I’ll try being nicer if you’ll try being smarter.”
    Both came on a list of useful work phrases that my daughter-in-law – bless her – sent me.

    Reply
  94. Back in the days before I retired and grew mellow, I had a sign in my office that said, “Yes, I am an agent of Satan, but my duties are largely ceremonial.”
    I always wanted to put up the one that said “I’ll try being nicer if you’ll try being smarter.”
    Both came on a list of useful work phrases that my daughter-in-law – bless her – sent me.

    Reply
  95. Back in the days before I retired and grew mellow, I had a sign in my office that said, “Yes, I am an agent of Satan, but my duties are largely ceremonial.”
    I always wanted to put up the one that said “I’ll try being nicer if you’ll try being smarter.”
    Both came on a list of useful work phrases that my daughter-in-law – bless her – sent me.

    Reply
  96. I am also an OCD quote collector! Some of the above are my old friends and some were new to me. Here are a few of my faves:
    “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” H.G. Wells
    “Snobs talk as if they had begotten their own ancestors.” Herbert Agar
    “I don’t think much of a dance step where the girl looks like she was being carried out of a burning building.” Frank McKinney Hubbard
    “I’m happy when I’m writing, but I’m more happy when I’m not.” Fannie Hurst
    “Friends: people who borrow my books and set wet glasses on them.” Edwin Arlington Robinson
    “When I walk with you, I feel as if I had a flower in my buttonhole.” Wm. Makepeace Thackeray
    And here are some wicked quotations by my all-time favorite quotable man, Mark Twain:
    “Twenty-four years ago I was strangely handsome; in San Francisco in the rainy season I was often mistaken for fair weather.”
    “Repartee is something we think of twenty-four hours too late.”
    “Never run after your own hat–others will be delighted to do it; why spoil their fun.”
    “Noise proves nothing; often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as if she had laid an asteroid.”
    “I don’t give a damn for a man that can spell a word only one way.”
    I have to stop, because I could go on forever. Told you I was OCD about quotations. Oh, oh, one final quote I just remembered. It’s from the mother of my high school sweetheart:
    “Well, I guess I had better go to bed so I can get up on the morning.”

    Reply
  97. I am also an OCD quote collector! Some of the above are my old friends and some were new to me. Here are a few of my faves:
    “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” H.G. Wells
    “Snobs talk as if they had begotten their own ancestors.” Herbert Agar
    “I don’t think much of a dance step where the girl looks like she was being carried out of a burning building.” Frank McKinney Hubbard
    “I’m happy when I’m writing, but I’m more happy when I’m not.” Fannie Hurst
    “Friends: people who borrow my books and set wet glasses on them.” Edwin Arlington Robinson
    “When I walk with you, I feel as if I had a flower in my buttonhole.” Wm. Makepeace Thackeray
    And here are some wicked quotations by my all-time favorite quotable man, Mark Twain:
    “Twenty-four years ago I was strangely handsome; in San Francisco in the rainy season I was often mistaken for fair weather.”
    “Repartee is something we think of twenty-four hours too late.”
    “Never run after your own hat–others will be delighted to do it; why spoil their fun.”
    “Noise proves nothing; often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as if she had laid an asteroid.”
    “I don’t give a damn for a man that can spell a word only one way.”
    I have to stop, because I could go on forever. Told you I was OCD about quotations. Oh, oh, one final quote I just remembered. It’s from the mother of my high school sweetheart:
    “Well, I guess I had better go to bed so I can get up on the morning.”

    Reply
  98. I am also an OCD quote collector! Some of the above are my old friends and some were new to me. Here are a few of my faves:
    “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” H.G. Wells
    “Snobs talk as if they had begotten their own ancestors.” Herbert Agar
    “I don’t think much of a dance step where the girl looks like she was being carried out of a burning building.” Frank McKinney Hubbard
    “I’m happy when I’m writing, but I’m more happy when I’m not.” Fannie Hurst
    “Friends: people who borrow my books and set wet glasses on them.” Edwin Arlington Robinson
    “When I walk with you, I feel as if I had a flower in my buttonhole.” Wm. Makepeace Thackeray
    And here are some wicked quotations by my all-time favorite quotable man, Mark Twain:
    “Twenty-four years ago I was strangely handsome; in San Francisco in the rainy season I was often mistaken for fair weather.”
    “Repartee is something we think of twenty-four hours too late.”
    “Never run after your own hat–others will be delighted to do it; why spoil their fun.”
    “Noise proves nothing; often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as if she had laid an asteroid.”
    “I don’t give a damn for a man that can spell a word only one way.”
    I have to stop, because I could go on forever. Told you I was OCD about quotations. Oh, oh, one final quote I just remembered. It’s from the mother of my high school sweetheart:
    “Well, I guess I had better go to bed so I can get up on the morning.”

    Reply
  99. I am also an OCD quote collector! Some of the above are my old friends and some were new to me. Here are a few of my faves:
    “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” H.G. Wells
    “Snobs talk as if they had begotten their own ancestors.” Herbert Agar
    “I don’t think much of a dance step where the girl looks like she was being carried out of a burning building.” Frank McKinney Hubbard
    “I’m happy when I’m writing, but I’m more happy when I’m not.” Fannie Hurst
    “Friends: people who borrow my books and set wet glasses on them.” Edwin Arlington Robinson
    “When I walk with you, I feel as if I had a flower in my buttonhole.” Wm. Makepeace Thackeray
    And here are some wicked quotations by my all-time favorite quotable man, Mark Twain:
    “Twenty-four years ago I was strangely handsome; in San Francisco in the rainy season I was often mistaken for fair weather.”
    “Repartee is something we think of twenty-four hours too late.”
    “Never run after your own hat–others will be delighted to do it; why spoil their fun.”
    “Noise proves nothing; often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as if she had laid an asteroid.”
    “I don’t give a damn for a man that can spell a word only one way.”
    I have to stop, because I could go on forever. Told you I was OCD about quotations. Oh, oh, one final quote I just remembered. It’s from the mother of my high school sweetheart:
    “Well, I guess I had better go to bed so I can get up on the morning.”

    Reply
  100. I am also an OCD quote collector! Some of the above are my old friends and some were new to me. Here are a few of my faves:
    “No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.” H.G. Wells
    “Snobs talk as if they had begotten their own ancestors.” Herbert Agar
    “I don’t think much of a dance step where the girl looks like she was being carried out of a burning building.” Frank McKinney Hubbard
    “I’m happy when I’m writing, but I’m more happy when I’m not.” Fannie Hurst
    “Friends: people who borrow my books and set wet glasses on them.” Edwin Arlington Robinson
    “When I walk with you, I feel as if I had a flower in my buttonhole.” Wm. Makepeace Thackeray
    And here are some wicked quotations by my all-time favorite quotable man, Mark Twain:
    “Twenty-four years ago I was strangely handsome; in San Francisco in the rainy season I was often mistaken for fair weather.”
    “Repartee is something we think of twenty-four hours too late.”
    “Never run after your own hat–others will be delighted to do it; why spoil their fun.”
    “Noise proves nothing; often a hen who has merely laid an egg cackles as if she had laid an asteroid.”
    “I don’t give a damn for a man that can spell a word only one way.”
    I have to stop, because I could go on forever. Told you I was OCD about quotations. Oh, oh, one final quote I just remembered. It’s from the mother of my high school sweetheart:
    “Well, I guess I had better go to bed so I can get up on the morning.”

    Reply
  101. I like this quote from Ghandi:
    The seven blunders that human society commits and cause all the violence: wealth without work, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, worship without sacrifice, and politics without principles.
    (From a written list given to his departing grandson Arun in October 1947 [5][6], as told by Arun Gandhi [7])

    Reply
  102. I like this quote from Ghandi:
    The seven blunders that human society commits and cause all the violence: wealth without work, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, worship without sacrifice, and politics without principles.
    (From a written list given to his departing grandson Arun in October 1947 [5][6], as told by Arun Gandhi [7])

    Reply
  103. I like this quote from Ghandi:
    The seven blunders that human society commits and cause all the violence: wealth without work, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, worship without sacrifice, and politics without principles.
    (From a written list given to his departing grandson Arun in October 1947 [5][6], as told by Arun Gandhi [7])

    Reply
  104. I like this quote from Ghandi:
    The seven blunders that human society commits and cause all the violence: wealth without work, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, worship without sacrifice, and politics without principles.
    (From a written list given to his departing grandson Arun in October 1947 [5][6], as told by Arun Gandhi [7])

    Reply
  105. I like this quote from Ghandi:
    The seven blunders that human society commits and cause all the violence: wealth without work, pleasure without conscience, knowledge without character, commerce without morality, science without humanity, worship without sacrifice, and politics without principles.
    (From a written list given to his departing grandson Arun in October 1947 [5][6], as told by Arun Gandhi [7])

    Reply
  106. In memory of Madeleine L’Engle, I quote her quoting of the Rune of St. Patrick:
    “At Tara in this fateful hour,
    I place all Heaven with its power,
    And the sun with its brightness,
    And the snow with its whiteness,
    And the fire with all the strength it hath,
    And the lightning with its rapid wrath,
    And the winds with their swiftness along their path,
    And the sea with its deepness,
    And the rocks with their steepness,
    And the earth with its starkness:
    All these I place,
    By God’s almighty help and grace
    Between myself and the powers of darkness!”

    Reply
  107. In memory of Madeleine L’Engle, I quote her quoting of the Rune of St. Patrick:
    “At Tara in this fateful hour,
    I place all Heaven with its power,
    And the sun with its brightness,
    And the snow with its whiteness,
    And the fire with all the strength it hath,
    And the lightning with its rapid wrath,
    And the winds with their swiftness along their path,
    And the sea with its deepness,
    And the rocks with their steepness,
    And the earth with its starkness:
    All these I place,
    By God’s almighty help and grace
    Between myself and the powers of darkness!”

    Reply
  108. In memory of Madeleine L’Engle, I quote her quoting of the Rune of St. Patrick:
    “At Tara in this fateful hour,
    I place all Heaven with its power,
    And the sun with its brightness,
    And the snow with its whiteness,
    And the fire with all the strength it hath,
    And the lightning with its rapid wrath,
    And the winds with their swiftness along their path,
    And the sea with its deepness,
    And the rocks with their steepness,
    And the earth with its starkness:
    All these I place,
    By God’s almighty help and grace
    Between myself and the powers of darkness!”

    Reply
  109. In memory of Madeleine L’Engle, I quote her quoting of the Rune of St. Patrick:
    “At Tara in this fateful hour,
    I place all Heaven with its power,
    And the sun with its brightness,
    And the snow with its whiteness,
    And the fire with all the strength it hath,
    And the lightning with its rapid wrath,
    And the winds with their swiftness along their path,
    And the sea with its deepness,
    And the rocks with their steepness,
    And the earth with its starkness:
    All these I place,
    By God’s almighty help and grace
    Between myself and the powers of darkness!”

    Reply
  110. In memory of Madeleine L’Engle, I quote her quoting of the Rune of St. Patrick:
    “At Tara in this fateful hour,
    I place all Heaven with its power,
    And the sun with its brightness,
    And the snow with its whiteness,
    And the fire with all the strength it hath,
    And the lightning with its rapid wrath,
    And the winds with their swiftness along their path,
    And the sea with its deepness,
    And the rocks with their steepness,
    And the earth with its starkness:
    All these I place,
    By God’s almighty help and grace
    Between myself and the powers of darkness!”

    Reply
  111. I always liked, “Never attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity.” I try to remember it.
    PS Hey, Loretta, PLEASE, PLEASE give us an idea about the contents of the new book and when it will be out! Please? We all live in hope!

    Reply
  112. I always liked, “Never attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity.” I try to remember it.
    PS Hey, Loretta, PLEASE, PLEASE give us an idea about the contents of the new book and when it will be out! Please? We all live in hope!

    Reply
  113. I always liked, “Never attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity.” I try to remember it.
    PS Hey, Loretta, PLEASE, PLEASE give us an idea about the contents of the new book and when it will be out! Please? We all live in hope!

    Reply
  114. I always liked, “Never attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity.” I try to remember it.
    PS Hey, Loretta, PLEASE, PLEASE give us an idea about the contents of the new book and when it will be out! Please? We all live in hope!

    Reply
  115. I always liked, “Never attribute to malice what can be explained by stupidity.” I try to remember it.
    PS Hey, Loretta, PLEASE, PLEASE give us an idea about the contents of the new book and when it will be out! Please? We all live in hope!

    Reply
  116. A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
    A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread – and Thou
    Beside me singing in the Wilderness –
    Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!
    Omar Khayyam translated by Edward Fitzgerald

    Reply
  117. A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
    A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread – and Thou
    Beside me singing in the Wilderness –
    Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!
    Omar Khayyam translated by Edward Fitzgerald

    Reply
  118. A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
    A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread – and Thou
    Beside me singing in the Wilderness –
    Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!
    Omar Khayyam translated by Edward Fitzgerald

    Reply
  119. A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
    A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread – and Thou
    Beside me singing in the Wilderness –
    Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!
    Omar Khayyam translated by Edward Fitzgerald

    Reply
  120. A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
    A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread – and Thou
    Beside me singing in the Wilderness –
    Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!
    Omar Khayyam translated by Edward Fitzgerald

    Reply
  121. i adore apt quotations, but have realized from this thread that my collection is too modern – i need to acquire more classics.
    i’ll offer two from woody allen:
    ‘life doesn’t imitate art. it imitates bad television.’
    ‘i don’t believe in an afterlife, but i’m taking a change of underwear.’
    p.s. loretta – received the copy of ‘captives of the night’ you sent out some time ago, thanks again. i was fascinated by the two leads, both unique and compelling characters. maybe they’ll show up somewhere again?

    Reply
  122. i adore apt quotations, but have realized from this thread that my collection is too modern – i need to acquire more classics.
    i’ll offer two from woody allen:
    ‘life doesn’t imitate art. it imitates bad television.’
    ‘i don’t believe in an afterlife, but i’m taking a change of underwear.’
    p.s. loretta – received the copy of ‘captives of the night’ you sent out some time ago, thanks again. i was fascinated by the two leads, both unique and compelling characters. maybe they’ll show up somewhere again?

    Reply
  123. i adore apt quotations, but have realized from this thread that my collection is too modern – i need to acquire more classics.
    i’ll offer two from woody allen:
    ‘life doesn’t imitate art. it imitates bad television.’
    ‘i don’t believe in an afterlife, but i’m taking a change of underwear.’
    p.s. loretta – received the copy of ‘captives of the night’ you sent out some time ago, thanks again. i was fascinated by the two leads, both unique and compelling characters. maybe they’ll show up somewhere again?

    Reply
  124. i adore apt quotations, but have realized from this thread that my collection is too modern – i need to acquire more classics.
    i’ll offer two from woody allen:
    ‘life doesn’t imitate art. it imitates bad television.’
    ‘i don’t believe in an afterlife, but i’m taking a change of underwear.’
    p.s. loretta – received the copy of ‘captives of the night’ you sent out some time ago, thanks again. i was fascinated by the two leads, both unique and compelling characters. maybe they’ll show up somewhere again?

    Reply
  125. i adore apt quotations, but have realized from this thread that my collection is too modern – i need to acquire more classics.
    i’ll offer two from woody allen:
    ‘life doesn’t imitate art. it imitates bad television.’
    ‘i don’t believe in an afterlife, but i’m taking a change of underwear.’
    p.s. loretta – received the copy of ‘captives of the night’ you sent out some time ago, thanks again. i was fascinated by the two leads, both unique and compelling characters. maybe they’ll show up somewhere again?

    Reply
  126. Sherrie, you must have a stunning collection. I don’t have any of these. Barbara, that’s a pretty devastating list–no wonder Ghandi was Ghandi. Susan Wilbanks: a beautiful work–thank you! Blue Angel, that one’s going on my bulletin board. Re the new book: Your Scandalous Ways will be out in June 2008. Since Pat Rice & I traded blog days, I’ll be blogging again next Friday. How about I talk about YSW then?

    Reply
  127. Sherrie, you must have a stunning collection. I don’t have any of these. Barbara, that’s a pretty devastating list–no wonder Ghandi was Ghandi. Susan Wilbanks: a beautiful work–thank you! Blue Angel, that one’s going on my bulletin board. Re the new book: Your Scandalous Ways will be out in June 2008. Since Pat Rice & I traded blog days, I’ll be blogging again next Friday. How about I talk about YSW then?

    Reply
  128. Sherrie, you must have a stunning collection. I don’t have any of these. Barbara, that’s a pretty devastating list–no wonder Ghandi was Ghandi. Susan Wilbanks: a beautiful work–thank you! Blue Angel, that one’s going on my bulletin board. Re the new book: Your Scandalous Ways will be out in June 2008. Since Pat Rice & I traded blog days, I’ll be blogging again next Friday. How about I talk about YSW then?

    Reply
  129. Sherrie, you must have a stunning collection. I don’t have any of these. Barbara, that’s a pretty devastating list–no wonder Ghandi was Ghandi. Susan Wilbanks: a beautiful work–thank you! Blue Angel, that one’s going on my bulletin board. Re the new book: Your Scandalous Ways will be out in June 2008. Since Pat Rice & I traded blog days, I’ll be blogging again next Friday. How about I talk about YSW then?

    Reply
  130. Sherrie, you must have a stunning collection. I don’t have any of these. Barbara, that’s a pretty devastating list–no wonder Ghandi was Ghandi. Susan Wilbanks: a beautiful work–thank you! Blue Angel, that one’s going on my bulletin board. Re the new book: Your Scandalous Ways will be out in June 2008. Since Pat Rice & I traded blog days, I’ll be blogging again next Friday. How about I talk about YSW then?

    Reply
  131. Moi, again. Helen, you’ve offered us another classic. That one is engraved on my memory banks. Imagine writing a handful of words that stick with people for a lifetime.
    Maya: Modern is fine. I mean, I quoted a Salada Tea Bag up there. And I didn’t even get into my rock and roll collection.

    Reply
  132. Moi, again. Helen, you’ve offered us another classic. That one is engraved on my memory banks. Imagine writing a handful of words that stick with people for a lifetime.
    Maya: Modern is fine. I mean, I quoted a Salada Tea Bag up there. And I didn’t even get into my rock and roll collection.

    Reply
  133. Moi, again. Helen, you’ve offered us another classic. That one is engraved on my memory banks. Imagine writing a handful of words that stick with people for a lifetime.
    Maya: Modern is fine. I mean, I quoted a Salada Tea Bag up there. And I didn’t even get into my rock and roll collection.

    Reply
  134. Moi, again. Helen, you’ve offered us another classic. That one is engraved on my memory banks. Imagine writing a handful of words that stick with people for a lifetime.
    Maya: Modern is fine. I mean, I quoted a Salada Tea Bag up there. And I didn’t even get into my rock and roll collection.

    Reply
  135. Moi, again. Helen, you’ve offered us another classic. That one is engraved on my memory banks. Imagine writing a handful of words that stick with people for a lifetime.
    Maya: Modern is fine. I mean, I quoted a Salada Tea Bag up there. And I didn’t even get into my rock and roll collection.

    Reply
  136. Loretta – have you read much Marquis outside the archy books? When I really got into him I couldn’t believe the extent of what he’d done. Truly one of our finest writers and for me, up there with Twain.

    Reply
  137. Loretta – have you read much Marquis outside the archy books? When I really got into him I couldn’t believe the extent of what he’d done. Truly one of our finest writers and for me, up there with Twain.

    Reply
  138. Loretta – have you read much Marquis outside the archy books? When I really got into him I couldn’t believe the extent of what he’d done. Truly one of our finest writers and for me, up there with Twain.

    Reply
  139. Loretta – have you read much Marquis outside the archy books? When I really got into him I couldn’t believe the extent of what he’d done. Truly one of our finest writers and for me, up there with Twain.

    Reply
  140. Loretta – have you read much Marquis outside the archy books? When I really got into him I couldn’t believe the extent of what he’d done. Truly one of our finest writers and for me, up there with Twain.

    Reply
  141. It’s dangerous to ask me for quotations. I don’t know when to stop. Here are ten favorites:
    Second-hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. Besides, in this random miscellaneous company we may rub against some complete stranger who will, with luck, turn into the best friend we have in the world.
    –Virginia Woolf , “Street Haunting”
    The universe is made of stories,
    not of atoms.
    –Muriel Rukeyser, “The Speed of Darkness”
    “Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity.” –G. K. Chesterton, Defendant
    We must all, in order to make reality more tolerable, keep alive in us a few little follies. —-Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past
    Lust is easy. Love is hard. Like is most important. –Carl Reiner
    “I don’t see much sense in that,” said Rabbit.
    “No,” said Pooh humbly, “there isn’t. But there was going to be when I began it. It’s just that something happened to it along the way.”
    “Poetry and Hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is go where they can find you.”
    –Winnie the Pooh
    “Why isn’t my life like a situation comedy? Why don’t I have a bunch of friends with nothing better to do but drop by and instigate wacky adventures? Why aren’t my conversations peppered with spontaneous witticisms? Why don’t my friends demonstrate heartfelt concern for my well being when I have problems? …I gotta get my life some writers.” –Calvin
    Calvin: You can’t just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood.
    Hobbes: What mood is that?
    Calvin: Last-minute panic.
    And to join Susan in tribute to a writer whose books I love:
    “Nothing important is completely explicable.”
    Madeleine L’Engle, A Circle of Quiet
    The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been. Madeleine L’Engle, quoted in NY Times

    Reply
  142. It’s dangerous to ask me for quotations. I don’t know when to stop. Here are ten favorites:
    Second-hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. Besides, in this random miscellaneous company we may rub against some complete stranger who will, with luck, turn into the best friend we have in the world.
    –Virginia Woolf , “Street Haunting”
    The universe is made of stories,
    not of atoms.
    –Muriel Rukeyser, “The Speed of Darkness”
    “Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity.” –G. K. Chesterton, Defendant
    We must all, in order to make reality more tolerable, keep alive in us a few little follies. —-Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past
    Lust is easy. Love is hard. Like is most important. –Carl Reiner
    “I don’t see much sense in that,” said Rabbit.
    “No,” said Pooh humbly, “there isn’t. But there was going to be when I began it. It’s just that something happened to it along the way.”
    “Poetry and Hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is go where they can find you.”
    –Winnie the Pooh
    “Why isn’t my life like a situation comedy? Why don’t I have a bunch of friends with nothing better to do but drop by and instigate wacky adventures? Why aren’t my conversations peppered with spontaneous witticisms? Why don’t my friends demonstrate heartfelt concern for my well being when I have problems? …I gotta get my life some writers.” –Calvin
    Calvin: You can’t just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood.
    Hobbes: What mood is that?
    Calvin: Last-minute panic.
    And to join Susan in tribute to a writer whose books I love:
    “Nothing important is completely explicable.”
    Madeleine L’Engle, A Circle of Quiet
    The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been. Madeleine L’Engle, quoted in NY Times

    Reply
  143. It’s dangerous to ask me for quotations. I don’t know when to stop. Here are ten favorites:
    Second-hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. Besides, in this random miscellaneous company we may rub against some complete stranger who will, with luck, turn into the best friend we have in the world.
    –Virginia Woolf , “Street Haunting”
    The universe is made of stories,
    not of atoms.
    –Muriel Rukeyser, “The Speed of Darkness”
    “Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity.” –G. K. Chesterton, Defendant
    We must all, in order to make reality more tolerable, keep alive in us a few little follies. —-Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past
    Lust is easy. Love is hard. Like is most important. –Carl Reiner
    “I don’t see much sense in that,” said Rabbit.
    “No,” said Pooh humbly, “there isn’t. But there was going to be when I began it. It’s just that something happened to it along the way.”
    “Poetry and Hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is go where they can find you.”
    –Winnie the Pooh
    “Why isn’t my life like a situation comedy? Why don’t I have a bunch of friends with nothing better to do but drop by and instigate wacky adventures? Why aren’t my conversations peppered with spontaneous witticisms? Why don’t my friends demonstrate heartfelt concern for my well being when I have problems? …I gotta get my life some writers.” –Calvin
    Calvin: You can’t just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood.
    Hobbes: What mood is that?
    Calvin: Last-minute panic.
    And to join Susan in tribute to a writer whose books I love:
    “Nothing important is completely explicable.”
    Madeleine L’Engle, A Circle of Quiet
    The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been. Madeleine L’Engle, quoted in NY Times

    Reply
  144. It’s dangerous to ask me for quotations. I don’t know when to stop. Here are ten favorites:
    Second-hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. Besides, in this random miscellaneous company we may rub against some complete stranger who will, with luck, turn into the best friend we have in the world.
    –Virginia Woolf , “Street Haunting”
    The universe is made of stories,
    not of atoms.
    –Muriel Rukeyser, “The Speed of Darkness”
    “Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity.” –G. K. Chesterton, Defendant
    We must all, in order to make reality more tolerable, keep alive in us a few little follies. —-Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past
    Lust is easy. Love is hard. Like is most important. –Carl Reiner
    “I don’t see much sense in that,” said Rabbit.
    “No,” said Pooh humbly, “there isn’t. But there was going to be when I began it. It’s just that something happened to it along the way.”
    “Poetry and Hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is go where they can find you.”
    –Winnie the Pooh
    “Why isn’t my life like a situation comedy? Why don’t I have a bunch of friends with nothing better to do but drop by and instigate wacky adventures? Why aren’t my conversations peppered with spontaneous witticisms? Why don’t my friends demonstrate heartfelt concern for my well being when I have problems? …I gotta get my life some writers.” –Calvin
    Calvin: You can’t just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood.
    Hobbes: What mood is that?
    Calvin: Last-minute panic.
    And to join Susan in tribute to a writer whose books I love:
    “Nothing important is completely explicable.”
    Madeleine L’Engle, A Circle of Quiet
    The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been. Madeleine L’Engle, quoted in NY Times

    Reply
  145. It’s dangerous to ask me for quotations. I don’t know when to stop. Here are ten favorites:
    Second-hand books are wild books, homeless books; they have come together in vast flocks of variegated feather, and have a charm which the domesticated volumes of the library lack. Besides, in this random miscellaneous company we may rub against some complete stranger who will, with luck, turn into the best friend we have in the world.
    –Virginia Woolf , “Street Haunting”
    The universe is made of stories,
    not of atoms.
    –Muriel Rukeyser, “The Speed of Darkness”
    “Literature is a luxury; fiction is a necessity.” –G. K. Chesterton, Defendant
    We must all, in order to make reality more tolerable, keep alive in us a few little follies. —-Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past
    Lust is easy. Love is hard. Like is most important. –Carl Reiner
    “I don’t see much sense in that,” said Rabbit.
    “No,” said Pooh humbly, “there isn’t. But there was going to be when I began it. It’s just that something happened to it along the way.”
    “Poetry and Hums aren’t things which you get, they’re things which get you. And all you can do is go where they can find you.”
    –Winnie the Pooh
    “Why isn’t my life like a situation comedy? Why don’t I have a bunch of friends with nothing better to do but drop by and instigate wacky adventures? Why aren’t my conversations peppered with spontaneous witticisms? Why don’t my friends demonstrate heartfelt concern for my well being when I have problems? …I gotta get my life some writers.” –Calvin
    Calvin: You can’t just turn on creativity like a faucet. You have to be in the right mood.
    Hobbes: What mood is that?
    Calvin: Last-minute panic.
    And to join Susan in tribute to a writer whose books I love:
    “Nothing important is completely explicable.”
    Madeleine L’Engle, A Circle of Quiet
    The great thing about getting older is that you don’t lose all the other ages you’ve been. Madeleine L’Engle, quoted in NY Times

    Reply
  146. Just about every social situation can be served by a quote from The Big Lebowski.
    “That rug really tied the room together.”
    “I’m sitting here finishing my coffee.”
    “I can get you a toe by 3 O’clock.”
    “Where’s the money, Lebowski?”
    “Dude, you’re being very un-Dude.”
    “There are lots of ins and outs, Maude. Lot’s of ins and outs.”
    “Condolences, Lebowski, the bums lost!”
    I could go on and on…
    And from Nietzsche:
    “To become wise, one must wish to have certain experiences and run, as it were, into their gaping jaws.”
    To which the Dude would respond, “He’s a Nihilist? That must be exhausting.”
    See what I mean? 🙂

    Reply
  147. Just about every social situation can be served by a quote from The Big Lebowski.
    “That rug really tied the room together.”
    “I’m sitting here finishing my coffee.”
    “I can get you a toe by 3 O’clock.”
    “Where’s the money, Lebowski?”
    “Dude, you’re being very un-Dude.”
    “There are lots of ins and outs, Maude. Lot’s of ins and outs.”
    “Condolences, Lebowski, the bums lost!”
    I could go on and on…
    And from Nietzsche:
    “To become wise, one must wish to have certain experiences and run, as it were, into their gaping jaws.”
    To which the Dude would respond, “He’s a Nihilist? That must be exhausting.”
    See what I mean? 🙂

    Reply
  148. Just about every social situation can be served by a quote from The Big Lebowski.
    “That rug really tied the room together.”
    “I’m sitting here finishing my coffee.”
    “I can get you a toe by 3 O’clock.”
    “Where’s the money, Lebowski?”
    “Dude, you’re being very un-Dude.”
    “There are lots of ins and outs, Maude. Lot’s of ins and outs.”
    “Condolences, Lebowski, the bums lost!”
    I could go on and on…
    And from Nietzsche:
    “To become wise, one must wish to have certain experiences and run, as it were, into their gaping jaws.”
    To which the Dude would respond, “He’s a Nihilist? That must be exhausting.”
    See what I mean? 🙂

    Reply
  149. Just about every social situation can be served by a quote from The Big Lebowski.
    “That rug really tied the room together.”
    “I’m sitting here finishing my coffee.”
    “I can get you a toe by 3 O’clock.”
    “Where’s the money, Lebowski?”
    “Dude, you’re being very un-Dude.”
    “There are lots of ins and outs, Maude. Lot’s of ins and outs.”
    “Condolences, Lebowski, the bums lost!”
    I could go on and on…
    And from Nietzsche:
    “To become wise, one must wish to have certain experiences and run, as it were, into their gaping jaws.”
    To which the Dude would respond, “He’s a Nihilist? That must be exhausting.”
    See what I mean? 🙂

    Reply
  150. Just about every social situation can be served by a quote from The Big Lebowski.
    “That rug really tied the room together.”
    “I’m sitting here finishing my coffee.”
    “I can get you a toe by 3 O’clock.”
    “Where’s the money, Lebowski?”
    “Dude, you’re being very un-Dude.”
    “There are lots of ins and outs, Maude. Lot’s of ins and outs.”
    “Condolences, Lebowski, the bums lost!”
    I could go on and on…
    And from Nietzsche:
    “To become wise, one must wish to have certain experiences and run, as it were, into their gaping jaws.”
    To which the Dude would respond, “He’s a Nihilist? That must be exhausting.”
    See what I mean? 🙂

    Reply
  151. A member of a mystery loop I belong to uses this quote on her signature line:
    “Ignorance killed the cat. Curiosity was framed.” — C.J. Cherryh

    Reply
  152. A member of a mystery loop I belong to uses this quote on her signature line:
    “Ignorance killed the cat. Curiosity was framed.” — C.J. Cherryh

    Reply
  153. A member of a mystery loop I belong to uses this quote on her signature line:
    “Ignorance killed the cat. Curiosity was framed.” — C.J. Cherryh

    Reply
  154. A member of a mystery loop I belong to uses this quote on her signature line:
    “Ignorance killed the cat. Curiosity was framed.” — C.J. Cherryh

    Reply
  155. A member of a mystery loop I belong to uses this quote on her signature line:
    “Ignorance killed the cat. Curiosity was framed.” — C.J. Cherryh

    Reply
  156. Not deeply poetic or philosphical, but worth remembering. What my daddy said about the best cons:
    “If you think you’re getting something for nothing, then they’ve got you.”
    Which is why I don’t buy lottery tickets or run to the phone when I see those “…and that’s not all!” offers on TV.

    Reply
  157. Not deeply poetic or philosphical, but worth remembering. What my daddy said about the best cons:
    “If you think you’re getting something for nothing, then they’ve got you.”
    Which is why I don’t buy lottery tickets or run to the phone when I see those “…and that’s not all!” offers on TV.

    Reply
  158. Not deeply poetic or philosphical, but worth remembering. What my daddy said about the best cons:
    “If you think you’re getting something for nothing, then they’ve got you.”
    Which is why I don’t buy lottery tickets or run to the phone when I see those “…and that’s not all!” offers on TV.

    Reply
  159. Not deeply poetic or philosphical, but worth remembering. What my daddy said about the best cons:
    “If you think you’re getting something for nothing, then they’ve got you.”
    Which is why I don’t buy lottery tickets or run to the phone when I see those “…and that’s not all!” offers on TV.

    Reply
  160. Not deeply poetic or philosphical, but worth remembering. What my daddy said about the best cons:
    “If you think you’re getting something for nothing, then they’ve got you.”
    Which is why I don’t buy lottery tickets or run to the phone when I see those “…and that’s not all!” offers on TV.

    Reply
  161. I was just going through some old boxes and came across this one which I had posted on my desk at college, lo some 30 years ago:
    Browning, on a poem of his earlier years:
    “When I wrote that, only God and Robert Browning knew what it meant. Now only God knows.”

    Reply
  162. I was just going through some old boxes and came across this one which I had posted on my desk at college, lo some 30 years ago:
    Browning, on a poem of his earlier years:
    “When I wrote that, only God and Robert Browning knew what it meant. Now only God knows.”

    Reply
  163. I was just going through some old boxes and came across this one which I had posted on my desk at college, lo some 30 years ago:
    Browning, on a poem of his earlier years:
    “When I wrote that, only God and Robert Browning knew what it meant. Now only God knows.”

    Reply
  164. I was just going through some old boxes and came across this one which I had posted on my desk at college, lo some 30 years ago:
    Browning, on a poem of his earlier years:
    “When I wrote that, only God and Robert Browning knew what it meant. Now only God knows.”

    Reply
  165. I was just going through some old boxes and came across this one which I had posted on my desk at college, lo some 30 years ago:
    Browning, on a poem of his earlier years:
    “When I wrote that, only God and Robert Browning knew what it meant. Now only God knows.”

    Reply

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