WWR—What We’ve Read in November

Anne here, and this month we have a bumper crop of recommended reads for you, from YA to timeslip, to Christmas treats, romance, literary fiction, crime and more.

The Christmas Escape

We'll start with Christina: This month I’ve read and enjoyed a couple of books recommended by fellow Wenches. First and foremost, The Christmas Escape by Sarah Morgan which was exactly as wonderful as I had hoped. The fact that it is set in snowy Lapland in the north of Sweden was just the icing on the cake! I now long to go there to take sleigh rides through the forests and see the aurora borealis in all its glory.

Then there was Boyfriend by Sarina Bowen, which I thoroughly enjoyed. I was very happy to find that it was the first in a series penned by different authors, all connected through the fictional US college Moo U in Vermont. The second book in the series, Blindsided by Victoria Denault, was just brilliant! As well as keeping up with hockey practice and his studies, hockey star Tate Adler is trying to save his family’s farm by doing an illicit side job. Their neighbours the Todds have their own problems. They are sworn enemies so when fellow student Maggie Todd finds out what Tate is doing, she doesn’t hesitate to blackmail him. But whenever they meet, sparks fly and their chemistry is off the charts. Can they risk a relationship or will the feud remain forever? This love story was just explosive and I loved every minute of it. I’m now reading my way through the rest of the series.

Pretty Reckless

A friend also recommended a brilliant YA series by L.J. Shen, starting with Pretty Reckless. It’s raw and angsty with a lot of misunderstandings, but I’m thoroughly enjoying these stories too. Penn Scully is from the wrong end of town with a drug addict mother and a deadbeat step-father, while Daria Followhill is a rich and spoiled princess. He believes she took away the only thing he ever loved and is out for revenge. When Penn’s mother dies, Daria’s parents decide to take him in as a foster son and he can set his plans in motion. As for Daria, she’s tired of always coming second in her mother’s eyes and wants to lash out at everyone and everything. But things don’t go to plan for either of them …

Next comes Pat, who says: If you’re in a literary mood, Anne Tyler is always a good bet.

Redheadbysideofroad

In REDHEAD BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD, Micah Mortimer, is a 40-something computer tech. He’s the youngest of a large, messy family, and in consequence, he’s a tad obsessive about keeping his personal life contained, so contained that he has a bad habit of shutting doors on the world. The story follows Micah through a series of events that opens his eyes to what he’s been missing all his life. There’s no violence, no sex, just a lovely journey of discovery told by a fabulously talented writer. It’s wonderful to settle in for the evening in safe hands—I didn’t skim a single page!  

Overduelife

 

For a change of pace, THE OVERDUE LIFE OF AMY BYLER by Kelly Harms is just pure unadulterated fun, whether or not you agree with the premise. Amy Byler is a single mom of two adolescent children, struggling to make ends meet on a librarian’s salary after her husband decided he’d rather live in Asia. Said husband unexpectedly returns, wealthy, and ready to get to know his kids over the summer. He’s perfectly competent. Amy’s friends are there to keep an eye on them while Amy goes to a librarian’s conference in NYC. Events transpire and voila, Amy is suddenly living the high life in the city with a bottomless credit card and no kids to transport and argue with. The wit is fabulous and the story line tumbles along at breakneck speed while Amy learns to be herself again. Highly recommended!

Nicola said:  This month I’ve read a variety of books, some on the recommendation of other Wenches. I’m currently reading and loving One More Christmas at the Castle by Trisha Ashley which Anne reviewed last month. I totally agree with her that it’s utterly charming and engrossing, a poignant but uplifting family story that is definitely putting me in the mood for Christmas. (And when I’ve finished that I have Mistletoe at the Manor by Teresa F Morgan waiting on my Kindle to pick up the festive theme!)

Like Pat I’ve also read Redhead by the Side of the Road by Anne Tyler which I highly recommend. Her sharp observations on life and family had me nodding in recognition and appreciation. I enjoyed it so much I’ve now got Anne Tyler’s Ladder of Years waiting in my TBR pile.

ManWhoDiedTwice

On the crime front I borrowed my husband’s birthday book, The Man Who Died Twice by Richard Osman. Book 2 of the Thursday Murder Club series it sees the octogenarian sleuths of Coopers Chase Retirement Village tackle a mystery involving murder and a cache of missing diamonds. I enjoyed the first Thursday Murder Club book but this is so much better, a really cleverly-plotted, page turning book but the heart of it comes from the wonderfully eccentric members of the club themselves and the love and kindness they show each other in so many different ways. I loved this one. 

Tepted by the runesFinally a shout out for our own Christina Courtenay’s latest Runes book, Tempted by the Runes which is out on 9th December.  I was lucky enough to read an ARC of this; each time I read the latest book in the series I think it’s the best so far and I adored Maddie and Geir’s story. When Maddie is left to her own devices on a family trip to Dublin, she takes the opportunity to have her own adventure into the past. Maddie knows about the runes and about time travel – she only intends to be away for a short while but finds herself on a ship bound for Iceland with a hunky Viking! There are so many things I love about this book – as always Christina creates the most fascinating Viking world for her characters to inhabit, and the Icelandic setting is beautifully drawn. What I like the most, though, is that Maddie is quite young and needs time to grow as a person and within her relationship with Geir. He, believing they are fated to be together, is very patient waiting for her, which makes the romance all the more enjoyable when they get together. Both of them are brilliant characters and the whole book is rich and romantic and wonderful. Thank you, Christina! 

A Rising Man

And now, here's Andrea: It’s always very exciting to discover a new author and series. I just finished A Rising Man, by Abir Mukherjee, the first book in his historical mystery series set in 1920s Calcutta, and I am totally hooked! It features a former Scotland Yard detective, Sam Wyndham, who has been disillusioned and mentally scarred by the horrors of WWI. On top of seeing his comrades slaughtered, his new bride has died in the influenza epidemic before he got home from the front. Feeling there is nothing left for him in England, he accepts his wartime commander’s invitation to join the Imperial Police force in India. On arrival, he’s immediately plunged into the murder of British government official . . .

The descriptions of Calcutta are wonderfully wrought, as are the complicated relationships of class, race and prejudice. Wyndham is teamed with an Indian sergeant—called Surrender-Not because no Brit can pronounce his real name—who was educated at Harrow and Cambridge. Again, a fascinating and nuanced relationship develops as they feel each other out. Wyndham  struggles with his conscience and sense of honor and justice—and with a growing opium addiction—as they try to unravel the truth behind the crime. The murder has been set up to appear it’s the work of violent Indian nationalists, but it quickly becomes clear that it’s not nearly that simple. The mystery is really well done, and writing is marvelous—it’s told in first person by Wyndham, who has a very pithy and self deprecating sense of humor. Add to the mix a beguiling half-English-half Indian woman secretary, who is just as sardonic and world-weary as Wyndham, which creates an interesting romantic tension. I found it a really engaging read. I’ve already started the second book and intend to glom the whole series.

The Last Daughter of YorkI was also lucky enough to read a ARC of Nicola’s latest book, The Last Daughter of York, which released in the U. S. on November 16th. I love Nicola’s dual-timeline novels as she always weaves together her two stories so brilliantly, creating characters in both eras facing challenges that test their mettle in every way—I always stay WAY too late at night, unable to stop reading because I’m on the edge of my seat about what’s going to happen next! I’m not really a Ricardian, but the Tudor-era plot, which revolves around the surviving young Prince of York, is riveting. The heroine and her husband are tasked by King Richard III with protecting the boy, and when Henry VII’s agents are closing in after Richard’s death, she needs to resort to extreme measures in to keep him safe . . 

The present day plot focuses on Serena Warren, who has been haunted for years by the disappearance of her twin sister, Caitlin when they were teenagers. When Caitlin’s bones are unearthed in a church crypt that hasn’t been opened in centuries, the mystery has everyone baffled. But as Serena slowly pieices together local folklore and hazy recollections of a family heirloom—helped by a childhood friend who still makes her heart flutter—the story takes some very unexpected twists! (I have to say, Nicola creates the most divine hunky heros for her modern-day heroines!) It’s a wonderful read and I highly recommend it!

Shadows of the Past

Mary Jo here.  I've always been a fan of Sharon Shinn's fantasy novels such as her Archangels, Twelve Houses, and Elemental Blessings series.  Though I'm not usually a big fan of short stories, I not surprisingly found that her recent story collection, Shadows of the Past, was imaginative and pure enjoyment.  And because this is Sharon Shinn, there is often a dash of romance.  My favorite story was "Can You Hear Me Now?"  Two months after her father's death, Stacey starts receiving cell phone calls from people who have recently died… It's a sweet, romantic story and all of the stories are suffused with warmth and humanity.  

Another favorite writer is the British Trisha Ashley. (She's a general Word Wench favorite.)  I loved her most recent Christmas novel, One More Christmas at the Castle, that Anne recommended last month and Nicola is recommending today.

ALeapOfFaith
This time I'm recommending one of her early books, A Leap of Faith(It was originally published under the title The Urge to Jump.)  As the blurb indicates, fantasy writer Sappho Jones is closing in on 40–UNTHINKABLE!–and has "pretty much been there, done that, and got the T-shirt."  One thing she hasn't tried is motherhood. Does she really want to go down that path, or should she move back to Wales and become an eccentric spinster with a cat?

Fast paced and zany, the story zips along as Sappho sorts out the lives of her two closest childhood friends, writes past and possibly future boyfriends as sexy lead characters in her fantasy series, and in fact winds up with an unusual and unexpected cat.  The story is great, over the top fun!

Anne again:

PartyCrasher

I am a fan of Sophie Kinsella's books, and this latest, The Party Crasher, is no exception. It's about the aftermath of parental divorce, particularly from the point of view of the youngest child, Effie, who is in her 20's. It's a year on and Effie's still having trouble accepting it, and particularly not her father's new girlfriend. Now their beloved family home is for sale, and a 'house-cooling' party arranged by the girlfriend, only Effie's not invited. But her beloved Russian dolls, which she'd hidden, are still there and she wants them back. Her plan is to creep into the party, grab the dolls and leave. No one will know she was ever there.

What follows is a funny — and sometimes painful— series of events, where she searches for the dolls, hides from her family and other guests at the party, accidentally reconnects with the ex who broke her heart, and discovers unexpected truths about her family — and about herself. I know — this description sounds a bit grim and not a lot of fun, but it's a wonderful read, wise, and in the end, heartwarming. I couldn't put it down. 

Next is SJ Bennett A Three Dog Problem — which is also known as All the Queen's Men, I think they changed the title (and the cover) for the US. But it's the same story.

Last month Nicola recommended The Windsor Knot, a whodunnit starring the Queen. I admit I was a bit skeptical, but also curious. I'm no royalist and couldn't imagine the Queen as some kind of amateur detective. So I bought it.

ThreeDogProblemAnd it works — it really does. The Queen is portrayed as an intelligent, canny, intuitive observer who notices things that concern her — after all she's been doing this job for 60 years. Since all her staff in the Palace try not to worry her with unpleasant details, she turns to her young assistant, Rozie, to privately investigate, occasionally calling on former palace employees she knows and trusts. The whole thing was surprisingly plausible and I thoroughly enjoyed it. (The Windsor Knot is currently on special so if you're interested, grab it now.)

All the Queen's Men

So I bought the next book in the series, A Three Dog Problem (also called All The Queen's Men). I'm not going to describe the plot, but it's just as clever and engaging. Just a word about the timing of the series — it's set a few years ago, so the Queen is in her early 90's, Prince Phillip is still alive (his brief appearances are entertaining) and Harry hasn't married yet. It's set around the Brexit vote and the lead-up to Trump's election, but it's mostly about art, missing paintings, and poison pen letters, as well as murder.

As well, I've been doing a lot of rereading. CS Lewis once said “I can’t imagine a man really enjoying a book and reading it only once.” I concur. I've reread several Jules Wake books, Covent Garden in the Snow and Notting Hill in the Snow. Plus several Trish Ashley books, which are always a pleasure to revisit.

So, what about you? What books have you read and enjoyed in the last month? 

 

 

 

 

160 thoughts on “WWR—What We’ve Read in November”

  1. A great selection of recommendations as always and I look forward to working my way through them, particularly the ones by the Word Wenches. The best book for me this month was the fourth instalment of Kate Morrell’s series The Gentlemen of Christophers, A Charity Case. Interestingly they run concurrently, rather than sequentially so I find I need to re-read the others – which is no problem at all! Another series that I am reading is the Marwood and Lovett one by Andrew Taylor, set in Charles II era. I am on no. 5 – The Royal Secret and it started with The Ashes of London. I also discovered Ariana Franklin this month. She wrote a great murder/mystery series set in the Medieval period – the first one being The Mistress of the Art of Death

    Reply
  2. A great selection of recommendations as always and I look forward to working my way through them, particularly the ones by the Word Wenches. The best book for me this month was the fourth instalment of Kate Morrell’s series The Gentlemen of Christophers, A Charity Case. Interestingly they run concurrently, rather than sequentially so I find I need to re-read the others – which is no problem at all! Another series that I am reading is the Marwood and Lovett one by Andrew Taylor, set in Charles II era. I am on no. 5 – The Royal Secret and it started with The Ashes of London. I also discovered Ariana Franklin this month. She wrote a great murder/mystery series set in the Medieval period – the first one being The Mistress of the Art of Death

    Reply
  3. A great selection of recommendations as always and I look forward to working my way through them, particularly the ones by the Word Wenches. The best book for me this month was the fourth instalment of Kate Morrell’s series The Gentlemen of Christophers, A Charity Case. Interestingly they run concurrently, rather than sequentially so I find I need to re-read the others – which is no problem at all! Another series that I am reading is the Marwood and Lovett one by Andrew Taylor, set in Charles II era. I am on no. 5 – The Royal Secret and it started with The Ashes of London. I also discovered Ariana Franklin this month. She wrote a great murder/mystery series set in the Medieval period – the first one being The Mistress of the Art of Death

    Reply
  4. A great selection of recommendations as always and I look forward to working my way through them, particularly the ones by the Word Wenches. The best book for me this month was the fourth instalment of Kate Morrell’s series The Gentlemen of Christophers, A Charity Case. Interestingly they run concurrently, rather than sequentially so I find I need to re-read the others – which is no problem at all! Another series that I am reading is the Marwood and Lovett one by Andrew Taylor, set in Charles II era. I am on no. 5 – The Royal Secret and it started with The Ashes of London. I also discovered Ariana Franklin this month. She wrote a great murder/mystery series set in the Medieval period – the first one being The Mistress of the Art of Death

    Reply
  5. A great selection of recommendations as always and I look forward to working my way through them, particularly the ones by the Word Wenches. The best book for me this month was the fourth instalment of Kate Morrell’s series The Gentlemen of Christophers, A Charity Case. Interestingly they run concurrently, rather than sequentially so I find I need to re-read the others – which is no problem at all! Another series that I am reading is the Marwood and Lovett one by Andrew Taylor, set in Charles II era. I am on no. 5 – The Royal Secret and it started with The Ashes of London. I also discovered Ariana Franklin this month. She wrote a great murder/mystery series set in the Medieval period – the first one being The Mistress of the Art of Death

    Reply
  6. I have been enjoying the free audios of Sally Rigby’s Cavendish and Walker crime series. DCI Walker combines forces with forensic psychologist Georgina Cavendish. The series is easy to listen to and has humour, suspense and a dab of romance as the two women solve some tricky crime mysteries. I’m up to book 6 now …. can’t think of a better recommendation!
    I also started Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series with ‘The Lady Chosen’. This book has the longest seduction scene that I can recall with the heroine doing the seducing. The characteristic steamy stuff is supported by a strong adventurous mystery plot …. overall very enjoyable. I have the next audio lined up already!
    I was interested in the L J Shen recommendation. Audible has a number of the adult books free at the moment so I might try one or two to see if I like the author’s style.

    Reply
  7. I have been enjoying the free audios of Sally Rigby’s Cavendish and Walker crime series. DCI Walker combines forces with forensic psychologist Georgina Cavendish. The series is easy to listen to and has humour, suspense and a dab of romance as the two women solve some tricky crime mysteries. I’m up to book 6 now …. can’t think of a better recommendation!
    I also started Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series with ‘The Lady Chosen’. This book has the longest seduction scene that I can recall with the heroine doing the seducing. The characteristic steamy stuff is supported by a strong adventurous mystery plot …. overall very enjoyable. I have the next audio lined up already!
    I was interested in the L J Shen recommendation. Audible has a number of the adult books free at the moment so I might try one or two to see if I like the author’s style.

    Reply
  8. I have been enjoying the free audios of Sally Rigby’s Cavendish and Walker crime series. DCI Walker combines forces with forensic psychologist Georgina Cavendish. The series is easy to listen to and has humour, suspense and a dab of romance as the two women solve some tricky crime mysteries. I’m up to book 6 now …. can’t think of a better recommendation!
    I also started Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series with ‘The Lady Chosen’. This book has the longest seduction scene that I can recall with the heroine doing the seducing. The characteristic steamy stuff is supported by a strong adventurous mystery plot …. overall very enjoyable. I have the next audio lined up already!
    I was interested in the L J Shen recommendation. Audible has a number of the adult books free at the moment so I might try one or two to see if I like the author’s style.

    Reply
  9. I have been enjoying the free audios of Sally Rigby’s Cavendish and Walker crime series. DCI Walker combines forces with forensic psychologist Georgina Cavendish. The series is easy to listen to and has humour, suspense and a dab of romance as the two women solve some tricky crime mysteries. I’m up to book 6 now …. can’t think of a better recommendation!
    I also started Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series with ‘The Lady Chosen’. This book has the longest seduction scene that I can recall with the heroine doing the seducing. The characteristic steamy stuff is supported by a strong adventurous mystery plot …. overall very enjoyable. I have the next audio lined up already!
    I was interested in the L J Shen recommendation. Audible has a number of the adult books free at the moment so I might try one or two to see if I like the author’s style.

    Reply
  10. I have been enjoying the free audios of Sally Rigby’s Cavendish and Walker crime series. DCI Walker combines forces with forensic psychologist Georgina Cavendish. The series is easy to listen to and has humour, suspense and a dab of romance as the two women solve some tricky crime mysteries. I’m up to book 6 now …. can’t think of a better recommendation!
    I also started Stephanie Laurens Bastion Club series with ‘The Lady Chosen’. This book has the longest seduction scene that I can recall with the heroine doing the seducing. The characteristic steamy stuff is supported by a strong adventurous mystery plot …. overall very enjoyable. I have the next audio lined up already!
    I was interested in the L J Shen recommendation. Audible has a number of the adult books free at the moment so I might try one or two to see if I like the author’s style.

    Reply
  11. I did read one really outstanding book this month, and that was Piranesi by Susanna Clarke. I’d been waiting for the paperback so I am behind some of you. It’s genius. It really did make me feel as if I had transited to another world. Its evocative, stylish, immersive and distinctive prose swept me along as surely as the Tides in the Great Halls. It’s a mystery, a thought piece, a thoroughly original world creation. Susanna Clarke really knows how to cast a spell. Coast to Coast AM’s guest last night spoke on metaphysical idealism, the idea that reality is essentially mental. I sense a confluence of thought 🙂
    On the other end of the spectrum, I read Btter Off Dead, the latest Jack Reacher novel by Lee & Andrew Child. This is a case where the continuing author (Child’s son) has picked up all the tropes of the original, but without the intensity or originality of the creator. I can’t recommend it.
    I am still trying to finish The Jane Austen Society, which is a book that everybody seemed to love, but which has failed to hold my interest so far.
    Other than that, I’m continuing my read through of ancient Fawcett and Signet regencies in my collection. I think they’re better written than most new stuff out there these days. The prose is a little more complex and adult, I think.

    Reply
  12. I did read one really outstanding book this month, and that was Piranesi by Susanna Clarke. I’d been waiting for the paperback so I am behind some of you. It’s genius. It really did make me feel as if I had transited to another world. Its evocative, stylish, immersive and distinctive prose swept me along as surely as the Tides in the Great Halls. It’s a mystery, a thought piece, a thoroughly original world creation. Susanna Clarke really knows how to cast a spell. Coast to Coast AM’s guest last night spoke on metaphysical idealism, the idea that reality is essentially mental. I sense a confluence of thought 🙂
    On the other end of the spectrum, I read Btter Off Dead, the latest Jack Reacher novel by Lee & Andrew Child. This is a case where the continuing author (Child’s son) has picked up all the tropes of the original, but without the intensity or originality of the creator. I can’t recommend it.
    I am still trying to finish The Jane Austen Society, which is a book that everybody seemed to love, but which has failed to hold my interest so far.
    Other than that, I’m continuing my read through of ancient Fawcett and Signet regencies in my collection. I think they’re better written than most new stuff out there these days. The prose is a little more complex and adult, I think.

    Reply
  13. I did read one really outstanding book this month, and that was Piranesi by Susanna Clarke. I’d been waiting for the paperback so I am behind some of you. It’s genius. It really did make me feel as if I had transited to another world. Its evocative, stylish, immersive and distinctive prose swept me along as surely as the Tides in the Great Halls. It’s a mystery, a thought piece, a thoroughly original world creation. Susanna Clarke really knows how to cast a spell. Coast to Coast AM’s guest last night spoke on metaphysical idealism, the idea that reality is essentially mental. I sense a confluence of thought 🙂
    On the other end of the spectrum, I read Btter Off Dead, the latest Jack Reacher novel by Lee & Andrew Child. This is a case where the continuing author (Child’s son) has picked up all the tropes of the original, but without the intensity or originality of the creator. I can’t recommend it.
    I am still trying to finish The Jane Austen Society, which is a book that everybody seemed to love, but which has failed to hold my interest so far.
    Other than that, I’m continuing my read through of ancient Fawcett and Signet regencies in my collection. I think they’re better written than most new stuff out there these days. The prose is a little more complex and adult, I think.

    Reply
  14. I did read one really outstanding book this month, and that was Piranesi by Susanna Clarke. I’d been waiting for the paperback so I am behind some of you. It’s genius. It really did make me feel as if I had transited to another world. Its evocative, stylish, immersive and distinctive prose swept me along as surely as the Tides in the Great Halls. It’s a mystery, a thought piece, a thoroughly original world creation. Susanna Clarke really knows how to cast a spell. Coast to Coast AM’s guest last night spoke on metaphysical idealism, the idea that reality is essentially mental. I sense a confluence of thought 🙂
    On the other end of the spectrum, I read Btter Off Dead, the latest Jack Reacher novel by Lee & Andrew Child. This is a case where the continuing author (Child’s son) has picked up all the tropes of the original, but without the intensity or originality of the creator. I can’t recommend it.
    I am still trying to finish The Jane Austen Society, which is a book that everybody seemed to love, but which has failed to hold my interest so far.
    Other than that, I’m continuing my read through of ancient Fawcett and Signet regencies in my collection. I think they’re better written than most new stuff out there these days. The prose is a little more complex and adult, I think.

    Reply
  15. I did read one really outstanding book this month, and that was Piranesi by Susanna Clarke. I’d been waiting for the paperback so I am behind some of you. It’s genius. It really did make me feel as if I had transited to another world. Its evocative, stylish, immersive and distinctive prose swept me along as surely as the Tides in the Great Halls. It’s a mystery, a thought piece, a thoroughly original world creation. Susanna Clarke really knows how to cast a spell. Coast to Coast AM’s guest last night spoke on metaphysical idealism, the idea that reality is essentially mental. I sense a confluence of thought 🙂
    On the other end of the spectrum, I read Btter Off Dead, the latest Jack Reacher novel by Lee & Andrew Child. This is a case where the continuing author (Child’s son) has picked up all the tropes of the original, but without the intensity or originality of the creator. I can’t recommend it.
    I am still trying to finish The Jane Austen Society, which is a book that everybody seemed to love, but which has failed to hold my interest so far.
    Other than that, I’m continuing my read through of ancient Fawcett and Signet regencies in my collection. I think they’re better written than most new stuff out there these days. The prose is a little more complex and adult, I think.

    Reply
  16. – Another animal & travel book: This time it’s The Penguin Lessons: What I Learned from a Remarkable Bird by Tom Michell. Instead of a kitty rescue in eastern Europe, it’s an oily penguin rescue in Uruguay. After cleaning the bird off, the author realizes he’s been adopted, just like Nala the cat in Nala’s world. Fortunately, he’s a teacher in a boarding college in Argentina and everyone—staff and students alike—loves Juan Salvador (John Savior) aka Juan Salvado (John the Saved). Happy little Juan has lessons to teach his new friends, even the school’s rugby captain, but mostly author Tom Michell. A warm-hearted and satisfying read.
    – Think you understand what’s going on in the world? I didn’t think so. Me neither. Find out why things are so often not what we want or expect. Why do polsters and pundits get it so wrong so often? Most of them are asking too limited questions and not getting the underlying connections, lying often being the key word: people lie to pollsters. Also their parents, kids, and juries. Everybody Lies by ______ shows how research using Big Data is finding answers to questions that were unanswerable just a few years ago (thanks, Interwebs,). Big Data comprises comprehensive databases such as Google search data, IRS tax returns, Facebook users’ profiles, a central crime data bank, weather history—any data collection big enough to drill down to nuance. When cross-refernced, the world turns upside down. All kinds of answers are unintuitive but proven. Examples: What predicts a person’s sports team allegiance? Turns out it depends a lot on where the person lives at the age of eight, and whether the local team is doing well or in the tank. Similarly, in politics, who is president when a person is eighteen and whether it’s a popular presidency or not. Or, where should a person be born for the best chance to be famous or likeliest to end up upper middle class? Not where you’d expect and not the same for both. There’s a lot on personal experiences, such as: Does violence go up when a violent movie is doing blockbuster business? (The opposite is true.) What do men vs women ask Google about sex? Why does a race horse’s upper left ventricle predict its chances for a Triple Crown victory? You’ll have to read the book to find out—but the answers are surprising. Not a dry book, it’s well-written and very interesting to read.
    – Finally, I’ve worked my way through (glommed!) the Knitting in the City series by Penny Reid and enjoyed it all. It’s chick-lit for TV the intelligent reader, with a fantastic cast of characters. My favorite is still the first book, Neanderthal Seeks Human, maybe because I relate to the quirky Janie, but they’re all good and masterfully tied together by the author. Can be read alone, but better in order as plot elements knit (!) together as they go. I wish I could Big Data the author’s mind to discover how she put together such a treasure trove of yarns.

    Reply
  17. – Another animal & travel book: This time it’s The Penguin Lessons: What I Learned from a Remarkable Bird by Tom Michell. Instead of a kitty rescue in eastern Europe, it’s an oily penguin rescue in Uruguay. After cleaning the bird off, the author realizes he’s been adopted, just like Nala the cat in Nala’s world. Fortunately, he’s a teacher in a boarding college in Argentina and everyone—staff and students alike—loves Juan Salvador (John Savior) aka Juan Salvado (John the Saved). Happy little Juan has lessons to teach his new friends, even the school’s rugby captain, but mostly author Tom Michell. A warm-hearted and satisfying read.
    – Think you understand what’s going on in the world? I didn’t think so. Me neither. Find out why things are so often not what we want or expect. Why do polsters and pundits get it so wrong so often? Most of them are asking too limited questions and not getting the underlying connections, lying often being the key word: people lie to pollsters. Also their parents, kids, and juries. Everybody Lies by ______ shows how research using Big Data is finding answers to questions that were unanswerable just a few years ago (thanks, Interwebs,). Big Data comprises comprehensive databases such as Google search data, IRS tax returns, Facebook users’ profiles, a central crime data bank, weather history—any data collection big enough to drill down to nuance. When cross-refernced, the world turns upside down. All kinds of answers are unintuitive but proven. Examples: What predicts a person’s sports team allegiance? Turns out it depends a lot on where the person lives at the age of eight, and whether the local team is doing well or in the tank. Similarly, in politics, who is president when a person is eighteen and whether it’s a popular presidency or not. Or, where should a person be born for the best chance to be famous or likeliest to end up upper middle class? Not where you’d expect and not the same for both. There’s a lot on personal experiences, such as: Does violence go up when a violent movie is doing blockbuster business? (The opposite is true.) What do men vs women ask Google about sex? Why does a race horse’s upper left ventricle predict its chances for a Triple Crown victory? You’ll have to read the book to find out—but the answers are surprising. Not a dry book, it’s well-written and very interesting to read.
    – Finally, I’ve worked my way through (glommed!) the Knitting in the City series by Penny Reid and enjoyed it all. It’s chick-lit for TV the intelligent reader, with a fantastic cast of characters. My favorite is still the first book, Neanderthal Seeks Human, maybe because I relate to the quirky Janie, but they’re all good and masterfully tied together by the author. Can be read alone, but better in order as plot elements knit (!) together as they go. I wish I could Big Data the author’s mind to discover how she put together such a treasure trove of yarns.

    Reply
  18. – Another animal & travel book: This time it’s The Penguin Lessons: What I Learned from a Remarkable Bird by Tom Michell. Instead of a kitty rescue in eastern Europe, it’s an oily penguin rescue in Uruguay. After cleaning the bird off, the author realizes he’s been adopted, just like Nala the cat in Nala’s world. Fortunately, he’s a teacher in a boarding college in Argentina and everyone—staff and students alike—loves Juan Salvador (John Savior) aka Juan Salvado (John the Saved). Happy little Juan has lessons to teach his new friends, even the school’s rugby captain, but mostly author Tom Michell. A warm-hearted and satisfying read.
    – Think you understand what’s going on in the world? I didn’t think so. Me neither. Find out why things are so often not what we want or expect. Why do polsters and pundits get it so wrong so often? Most of them are asking too limited questions and not getting the underlying connections, lying often being the key word: people lie to pollsters. Also their parents, kids, and juries. Everybody Lies by ______ shows how research using Big Data is finding answers to questions that were unanswerable just a few years ago (thanks, Interwebs,). Big Data comprises comprehensive databases such as Google search data, IRS tax returns, Facebook users’ profiles, a central crime data bank, weather history—any data collection big enough to drill down to nuance. When cross-refernced, the world turns upside down. All kinds of answers are unintuitive but proven. Examples: What predicts a person’s sports team allegiance? Turns out it depends a lot on where the person lives at the age of eight, and whether the local team is doing well or in the tank. Similarly, in politics, who is president when a person is eighteen and whether it’s a popular presidency or not. Or, where should a person be born for the best chance to be famous or likeliest to end up upper middle class? Not where you’d expect and not the same for both. There’s a lot on personal experiences, such as: Does violence go up when a violent movie is doing blockbuster business? (The opposite is true.) What do men vs women ask Google about sex? Why does a race horse’s upper left ventricle predict its chances for a Triple Crown victory? You’ll have to read the book to find out—but the answers are surprising. Not a dry book, it’s well-written and very interesting to read.
    – Finally, I’ve worked my way through (glommed!) the Knitting in the City series by Penny Reid and enjoyed it all. It’s chick-lit for TV the intelligent reader, with a fantastic cast of characters. My favorite is still the first book, Neanderthal Seeks Human, maybe because I relate to the quirky Janie, but they’re all good and masterfully tied together by the author. Can be read alone, but better in order as plot elements knit (!) together as they go. I wish I could Big Data the author’s mind to discover how she put together such a treasure trove of yarns.

    Reply
  19. – Another animal & travel book: This time it’s The Penguin Lessons: What I Learned from a Remarkable Bird by Tom Michell. Instead of a kitty rescue in eastern Europe, it’s an oily penguin rescue in Uruguay. After cleaning the bird off, the author realizes he’s been adopted, just like Nala the cat in Nala’s world. Fortunately, he’s a teacher in a boarding college in Argentina and everyone—staff and students alike—loves Juan Salvador (John Savior) aka Juan Salvado (John the Saved). Happy little Juan has lessons to teach his new friends, even the school’s rugby captain, but mostly author Tom Michell. A warm-hearted and satisfying read.
    – Think you understand what’s going on in the world? I didn’t think so. Me neither. Find out why things are so often not what we want or expect. Why do polsters and pundits get it so wrong so often? Most of them are asking too limited questions and not getting the underlying connections, lying often being the key word: people lie to pollsters. Also their parents, kids, and juries. Everybody Lies by ______ shows how research using Big Data is finding answers to questions that were unanswerable just a few years ago (thanks, Interwebs,). Big Data comprises comprehensive databases such as Google search data, IRS tax returns, Facebook users’ profiles, a central crime data bank, weather history—any data collection big enough to drill down to nuance. When cross-refernced, the world turns upside down. All kinds of answers are unintuitive but proven. Examples: What predicts a person’s sports team allegiance? Turns out it depends a lot on where the person lives at the age of eight, and whether the local team is doing well or in the tank. Similarly, in politics, who is president when a person is eighteen and whether it’s a popular presidency or not. Or, where should a person be born for the best chance to be famous or likeliest to end up upper middle class? Not where you’d expect and not the same for both. There’s a lot on personal experiences, such as: Does violence go up when a violent movie is doing blockbuster business? (The opposite is true.) What do men vs women ask Google about sex? Why does a race horse’s upper left ventricle predict its chances for a Triple Crown victory? You’ll have to read the book to find out—but the answers are surprising. Not a dry book, it’s well-written and very interesting to read.
    – Finally, I’ve worked my way through (glommed!) the Knitting in the City series by Penny Reid and enjoyed it all. It’s chick-lit for TV the intelligent reader, with a fantastic cast of characters. My favorite is still the first book, Neanderthal Seeks Human, maybe because I relate to the quirky Janie, but they’re all good and masterfully tied together by the author. Can be read alone, but better in order as plot elements knit (!) together as they go. I wish I could Big Data the author’s mind to discover how she put together such a treasure trove of yarns.

    Reply
  20. – Another animal & travel book: This time it’s The Penguin Lessons: What I Learned from a Remarkable Bird by Tom Michell. Instead of a kitty rescue in eastern Europe, it’s an oily penguin rescue in Uruguay. After cleaning the bird off, the author realizes he’s been adopted, just like Nala the cat in Nala’s world. Fortunately, he’s a teacher in a boarding college in Argentina and everyone—staff and students alike—loves Juan Salvador (John Savior) aka Juan Salvado (John the Saved). Happy little Juan has lessons to teach his new friends, even the school’s rugby captain, but mostly author Tom Michell. A warm-hearted and satisfying read.
    – Think you understand what’s going on in the world? I didn’t think so. Me neither. Find out why things are so often not what we want or expect. Why do polsters and pundits get it so wrong so often? Most of them are asking too limited questions and not getting the underlying connections, lying often being the key word: people lie to pollsters. Also their parents, kids, and juries. Everybody Lies by ______ shows how research using Big Data is finding answers to questions that were unanswerable just a few years ago (thanks, Interwebs,). Big Data comprises comprehensive databases such as Google search data, IRS tax returns, Facebook users’ profiles, a central crime data bank, weather history—any data collection big enough to drill down to nuance. When cross-refernced, the world turns upside down. All kinds of answers are unintuitive but proven. Examples: What predicts a person’s sports team allegiance? Turns out it depends a lot on where the person lives at the age of eight, and whether the local team is doing well or in the tank. Similarly, in politics, who is president when a person is eighteen and whether it’s a popular presidency or not. Or, where should a person be born for the best chance to be famous or likeliest to end up upper middle class? Not where you’d expect and not the same for both. There’s a lot on personal experiences, such as: Does violence go up when a violent movie is doing blockbuster business? (The opposite is true.) What do men vs women ask Google about sex? Why does a race horse’s upper left ventricle predict its chances for a Triple Crown victory? You’ll have to read the book to find out—but the answers are surprising. Not a dry book, it’s well-written and very interesting to read.
    – Finally, I’ve worked my way through (glommed!) the Knitting in the City series by Penny Reid and enjoyed it all. It’s chick-lit for TV the intelligent reader, with a fantastic cast of characters. My favorite is still the first book, Neanderthal Seeks Human, maybe because I relate to the quirky Janie, but they’re all good and masterfully tied together by the author. Can be read alone, but better in order as plot elements knit (!) together as they go. I wish I could Big Data the author’s mind to discover how she put together such a treasure trove of yarns.

    Reply
  21. Since last time, week by week ~
    — The Last Watch (The Divide Series Book 1) by J. S. Dewes; this science fiction novel kept my interest. I haven’t decided yet whether or not I’ll read the sequel.
    — Into the Labyrinth: Mage Errant Book 1 by John Bierce; this fantasy was a quick and fun read. It’s a coming of age story set in an academy for mages.
    — and the next in the series, Jewel of the Endless Erg: Mage Errant Book 2 by John Bierce which I enjoyed. I’d describe this as a young adult fantasy.
    — reread Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. This is a short modern classic (about 200 pages), but it’s sentence after (frequently long) sentence with no chapters or breaks between paragraphs. Several of the other group members mentioned finding it challenging/a slog. I can’t really disagree!
    — continued with the young adult series and read A Traitor in Skyhold: Mage Errant Book 3 by John Bierce; I enjoyed it but may take a break to read other things.
    — Someone to Cherish (The Westcott Series Book 8) by Mary Balogh. I came very close to abandoning the book in chapter one; however, I’m glad that I continued on as I did enjoy it. Why did I almost give it up? This is book eight in a series and each book features a different couple in the greater Westcott family; I’ve read several of the earlier books. Chapter one featured a huge crowd from those earlier books plotting the hero’s future; all were named (there must have been two dozen or more) and it was tiresome. My suggestion if you read this book is to begin with chapter two.
    — reread Carla Kelly’s Christmas Collection which I enjoyed once again.
    — for my local book group ~ Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch. It is not what I would call an uplifting read, but it was very well researched and readable.
    — Someone to Wed (The Westcott Series Book 3) by Mary Balogh: I enjoyed this historical romance.
    — the contemporary romance Sweetheart (The Busy Bean) by Sarah Mayberry which I quite enjoyed.
    — The Lost Letter: A Victorian Romance by Mimi Matthews. I enjoyed the book, but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll be rereading.
    — a reread of The Protector (Guardsmen) by Cooper West which I enjoyed once again. This is a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — continued re-reading the Guardsmen series and finished Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is a FREE short prequel), Parker’s Sanctuary, Second Chances (an epilogue available from the author), and the novella Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella all by Cooper West. My favorite of these are the Parker’s Sanctuary pieces.
    — the contemporary male/male romance Role Model (Game Changers Book 5) by Rachel Reid which I enjoyed.
    — reread Silent Blade (The World of Kinsmen Book 1) by Ilona Andrews; this was an inadvertent reread as I only recognized the story after I began reading. It’s a fairly short work, and it was a pleasant read albeit with violence.

    Reply
  22. Since last time, week by week ~
    — The Last Watch (The Divide Series Book 1) by J. S. Dewes; this science fiction novel kept my interest. I haven’t decided yet whether or not I’ll read the sequel.
    — Into the Labyrinth: Mage Errant Book 1 by John Bierce; this fantasy was a quick and fun read. It’s a coming of age story set in an academy for mages.
    — and the next in the series, Jewel of the Endless Erg: Mage Errant Book 2 by John Bierce which I enjoyed. I’d describe this as a young adult fantasy.
    — reread Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. This is a short modern classic (about 200 pages), but it’s sentence after (frequently long) sentence with no chapters or breaks between paragraphs. Several of the other group members mentioned finding it challenging/a slog. I can’t really disagree!
    — continued with the young adult series and read A Traitor in Skyhold: Mage Errant Book 3 by John Bierce; I enjoyed it but may take a break to read other things.
    — Someone to Cherish (The Westcott Series Book 8) by Mary Balogh. I came very close to abandoning the book in chapter one; however, I’m glad that I continued on as I did enjoy it. Why did I almost give it up? This is book eight in a series and each book features a different couple in the greater Westcott family; I’ve read several of the earlier books. Chapter one featured a huge crowd from those earlier books plotting the hero’s future; all were named (there must have been two dozen or more) and it was tiresome. My suggestion if you read this book is to begin with chapter two.
    — reread Carla Kelly’s Christmas Collection which I enjoyed once again.
    — for my local book group ~ Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch. It is not what I would call an uplifting read, but it was very well researched and readable.
    — Someone to Wed (The Westcott Series Book 3) by Mary Balogh: I enjoyed this historical romance.
    — the contemporary romance Sweetheart (The Busy Bean) by Sarah Mayberry which I quite enjoyed.
    — The Lost Letter: A Victorian Romance by Mimi Matthews. I enjoyed the book, but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll be rereading.
    — a reread of The Protector (Guardsmen) by Cooper West which I enjoyed once again. This is a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — continued re-reading the Guardsmen series and finished Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is a FREE short prequel), Parker’s Sanctuary, Second Chances (an epilogue available from the author), and the novella Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella all by Cooper West. My favorite of these are the Parker’s Sanctuary pieces.
    — the contemporary male/male romance Role Model (Game Changers Book 5) by Rachel Reid which I enjoyed.
    — reread Silent Blade (The World of Kinsmen Book 1) by Ilona Andrews; this was an inadvertent reread as I only recognized the story after I began reading. It’s a fairly short work, and it was a pleasant read albeit with violence.

    Reply
  23. Since last time, week by week ~
    — The Last Watch (The Divide Series Book 1) by J. S. Dewes; this science fiction novel kept my interest. I haven’t decided yet whether or not I’ll read the sequel.
    — Into the Labyrinth: Mage Errant Book 1 by John Bierce; this fantasy was a quick and fun read. It’s a coming of age story set in an academy for mages.
    — and the next in the series, Jewel of the Endless Erg: Mage Errant Book 2 by John Bierce which I enjoyed. I’d describe this as a young adult fantasy.
    — reread Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. This is a short modern classic (about 200 pages), but it’s sentence after (frequently long) sentence with no chapters or breaks between paragraphs. Several of the other group members mentioned finding it challenging/a slog. I can’t really disagree!
    — continued with the young adult series and read A Traitor in Skyhold: Mage Errant Book 3 by John Bierce; I enjoyed it but may take a break to read other things.
    — Someone to Cherish (The Westcott Series Book 8) by Mary Balogh. I came very close to abandoning the book in chapter one; however, I’m glad that I continued on as I did enjoy it. Why did I almost give it up? This is book eight in a series and each book features a different couple in the greater Westcott family; I’ve read several of the earlier books. Chapter one featured a huge crowd from those earlier books plotting the hero’s future; all were named (there must have been two dozen or more) and it was tiresome. My suggestion if you read this book is to begin with chapter two.
    — reread Carla Kelly’s Christmas Collection which I enjoyed once again.
    — for my local book group ~ Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch. It is not what I would call an uplifting read, but it was very well researched and readable.
    — Someone to Wed (The Westcott Series Book 3) by Mary Balogh: I enjoyed this historical romance.
    — the contemporary romance Sweetheart (The Busy Bean) by Sarah Mayberry which I quite enjoyed.
    — The Lost Letter: A Victorian Romance by Mimi Matthews. I enjoyed the book, but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll be rereading.
    — a reread of The Protector (Guardsmen) by Cooper West which I enjoyed once again. This is a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — continued re-reading the Guardsmen series and finished Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is a FREE short prequel), Parker’s Sanctuary, Second Chances (an epilogue available from the author), and the novella Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella all by Cooper West. My favorite of these are the Parker’s Sanctuary pieces.
    — the contemporary male/male romance Role Model (Game Changers Book 5) by Rachel Reid which I enjoyed.
    — reread Silent Blade (The World of Kinsmen Book 1) by Ilona Andrews; this was an inadvertent reread as I only recognized the story after I began reading. It’s a fairly short work, and it was a pleasant read albeit with violence.

    Reply
  24. Since last time, week by week ~
    — The Last Watch (The Divide Series Book 1) by J. S. Dewes; this science fiction novel kept my interest. I haven’t decided yet whether or not I’ll read the sequel.
    — Into the Labyrinth: Mage Errant Book 1 by John Bierce; this fantasy was a quick and fun read. It’s a coming of age story set in an academy for mages.
    — and the next in the series, Jewel of the Endless Erg: Mage Errant Book 2 by John Bierce which I enjoyed. I’d describe this as a young adult fantasy.
    — reread Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. This is a short modern classic (about 200 pages), but it’s sentence after (frequently long) sentence with no chapters or breaks between paragraphs. Several of the other group members mentioned finding it challenging/a slog. I can’t really disagree!
    — continued with the young adult series and read A Traitor in Skyhold: Mage Errant Book 3 by John Bierce; I enjoyed it but may take a break to read other things.
    — Someone to Cherish (The Westcott Series Book 8) by Mary Balogh. I came very close to abandoning the book in chapter one; however, I’m glad that I continued on as I did enjoy it. Why did I almost give it up? This is book eight in a series and each book features a different couple in the greater Westcott family; I’ve read several of the earlier books. Chapter one featured a huge crowd from those earlier books plotting the hero’s future; all were named (there must have been two dozen or more) and it was tiresome. My suggestion if you read this book is to begin with chapter two.
    — reread Carla Kelly’s Christmas Collection which I enjoyed once again.
    — for my local book group ~ Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch. It is not what I would call an uplifting read, but it was very well researched and readable.
    — Someone to Wed (The Westcott Series Book 3) by Mary Balogh: I enjoyed this historical romance.
    — the contemporary romance Sweetheart (The Busy Bean) by Sarah Mayberry which I quite enjoyed.
    — The Lost Letter: A Victorian Romance by Mimi Matthews. I enjoyed the book, but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll be rereading.
    — a reread of The Protector (Guardsmen) by Cooper West which I enjoyed once again. This is a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — continued re-reading the Guardsmen series and finished Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is a FREE short prequel), Parker’s Sanctuary, Second Chances (an epilogue available from the author), and the novella Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella all by Cooper West. My favorite of these are the Parker’s Sanctuary pieces.
    — the contemporary male/male romance Role Model (Game Changers Book 5) by Rachel Reid which I enjoyed.
    — reread Silent Blade (The World of Kinsmen Book 1) by Ilona Andrews; this was an inadvertent reread as I only recognized the story after I began reading. It’s a fairly short work, and it was a pleasant read albeit with violence.

    Reply
  25. Since last time, week by week ~
    — The Last Watch (The Divide Series Book 1) by J. S. Dewes; this science fiction novel kept my interest. I haven’t decided yet whether or not I’ll read the sequel.
    — Into the Labyrinth: Mage Errant Book 1 by John Bierce; this fantasy was a quick and fun read. It’s a coming of age story set in an academy for mages.
    — and the next in the series, Jewel of the Endless Erg: Mage Errant Book 2 by John Bierce which I enjoyed. I’d describe this as a young adult fantasy.
    — reread Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. This is a short modern classic (about 200 pages), but it’s sentence after (frequently long) sentence with no chapters or breaks between paragraphs. Several of the other group members mentioned finding it challenging/a slog. I can’t really disagree!
    — continued with the young adult series and read A Traitor in Skyhold: Mage Errant Book 3 by John Bierce; I enjoyed it but may take a break to read other things.
    — Someone to Cherish (The Westcott Series Book 8) by Mary Balogh. I came very close to abandoning the book in chapter one; however, I’m glad that I continued on as I did enjoy it. Why did I almost give it up? This is book eight in a series and each book features a different couple in the greater Westcott family; I’ve read several of the earlier books. Chapter one featured a huge crowd from those earlier books plotting the hero’s future; all were named (there must have been two dozen or more) and it was tiresome. My suggestion if you read this book is to begin with chapter two.
    — reread Carla Kelly’s Christmas Collection which I enjoyed once again.
    — for my local book group ~ Yellow Bird: Oil, Murder, and a Woman’s Search for Justice in Indian Country by Sierra Crane Murdoch. It is not what I would call an uplifting read, but it was very well researched and readable.
    — Someone to Wed (The Westcott Series Book 3) by Mary Balogh: I enjoyed this historical romance.
    — the contemporary romance Sweetheart (The Busy Bean) by Sarah Mayberry which I quite enjoyed.
    — The Lost Letter: A Victorian Romance by Mimi Matthews. I enjoyed the book, but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll be rereading.
    — a reread of The Protector (Guardsmen) by Cooper West which I enjoyed once again. This is a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — continued re-reading the Guardsmen series and finished Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is a FREE short prequel), Parker’s Sanctuary, Second Chances (an epilogue available from the author), and the novella Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella all by Cooper West. My favorite of these are the Parker’s Sanctuary pieces.
    — the contemporary male/male romance Role Model (Game Changers Book 5) by Rachel Reid which I enjoyed.
    — reread Silent Blade (The World of Kinsmen Book 1) by Ilona Andrews; this was an inadvertent reread as I only recognized the story after I began reading. It’s a fairly short work, and it was a pleasant read albeit with violence.

    Reply
  26. @Pat, my book group will be reading REDHEAD BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD in the near future, so I’m happy to see your positive review. Yours also, @Nicola!
    What a lot of great books above. Thank you all.

    Reply
  27. @Pat, my book group will be reading REDHEAD BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD in the near future, so I’m happy to see your positive review. Yours also, @Nicola!
    What a lot of great books above. Thank you all.

    Reply
  28. @Pat, my book group will be reading REDHEAD BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD in the near future, so I’m happy to see your positive review. Yours also, @Nicola!
    What a lot of great books above. Thank you all.

    Reply
  29. @Pat, my book group will be reading REDHEAD BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD in the near future, so I’m happy to see your positive review. Yours also, @Nicola!
    What a lot of great books above. Thank you all.

    Reply
  30. @Pat, my book group will be reading REDHEAD BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD in the near future, so I’m happy to see your positive review. Yours also, @Nicola!
    What a lot of great books above. Thank you all.

    Reply
  31. I’m still recovering from my hospital stay, so all of my reading has been rereads. I will need to add the Trisha Ashley book to my book list.

    Reply
  32. I’m still recovering from my hospital stay, so all of my reading has been rereads. I will need to add the Trisha Ashley book to my book list.

    Reply
  33. I’m still recovering from my hospital stay, so all of my reading has been rereads. I will need to add the Trisha Ashley book to my book list.

    Reply
  34. I’m still recovering from my hospital stay, so all of my reading has been rereads. I will need to add the Trisha Ashley book to my book list.

    Reply
  35. I’m still recovering from my hospital stay, so all of my reading has been rereads. I will need to add the Trisha Ashley book to my book list.

    Reply
  36. I’m in the most awful reading slump and have been for a few weeks. I was waiting for the new Danielle Steel book, Flying Angels but find it’s no where near as good as her books that I read in the eighties and nineties.
    Also trying to finish The Key in the Lock for a NetGalley read. Don’t know if it’s me or the book but it’s not going great.
    Have Christina’s book on my TBR. I must get to that as I’m enjoyed the others so far. Might crack the slump:)

    Reply
  37. I’m in the most awful reading slump and have been for a few weeks. I was waiting for the new Danielle Steel book, Flying Angels but find it’s no where near as good as her books that I read in the eighties and nineties.
    Also trying to finish The Key in the Lock for a NetGalley read. Don’t know if it’s me or the book but it’s not going great.
    Have Christina’s book on my TBR. I must get to that as I’m enjoyed the others so far. Might crack the slump:)

    Reply
  38. I’m in the most awful reading slump and have been for a few weeks. I was waiting for the new Danielle Steel book, Flying Angels but find it’s no where near as good as her books that I read in the eighties and nineties.
    Also trying to finish The Key in the Lock for a NetGalley read. Don’t know if it’s me or the book but it’s not going great.
    Have Christina’s book on my TBR. I must get to that as I’m enjoyed the others so far. Might crack the slump:)

    Reply
  39. I’m in the most awful reading slump and have been for a few weeks. I was waiting for the new Danielle Steel book, Flying Angels but find it’s no where near as good as her books that I read in the eighties and nineties.
    Also trying to finish The Key in the Lock for a NetGalley read. Don’t know if it’s me or the book but it’s not going great.
    Have Christina’s book on my TBR. I must get to that as I’m enjoyed the others so far. Might crack the slump:)

    Reply
  40. I’m in the most awful reading slump and have been for a few weeks. I was waiting for the new Danielle Steel book, Flying Angels but find it’s no where near as good as her books that I read in the eighties and nineties.
    Also trying to finish The Key in the Lock for a NetGalley read. Don’t know if it’s me or the book but it’s not going great.
    Have Christina’s book on my TBR. I must get to that as I’m enjoyed the others so far. Might crack the slump:)

    Reply
  41. Thanks for those recommendations, Quantum. I might try the Sally Rigby books. I chuckled at your comment on the length of the Stephanie Laurens seduction scene — she’s famous for them. I remember counting the pages when her first Avon books came out.
    It’s also very good to get audiobook recommendations, as I know a lot of people are turning to them. Thank you.

    Reply
  42. Thanks for those recommendations, Quantum. I might try the Sally Rigby books. I chuckled at your comment on the length of the Stephanie Laurens seduction scene — she’s famous for them. I remember counting the pages when her first Avon books came out.
    It’s also very good to get audiobook recommendations, as I know a lot of people are turning to them. Thank you.

    Reply
  43. Thanks for those recommendations, Quantum. I might try the Sally Rigby books. I chuckled at your comment on the length of the Stephanie Laurens seduction scene — she’s famous for them. I remember counting the pages when her first Avon books came out.
    It’s also very good to get audiobook recommendations, as I know a lot of people are turning to them. Thank you.

    Reply
  44. Thanks for those recommendations, Quantum. I might try the Sally Rigby books. I chuckled at your comment on the length of the Stephanie Laurens seduction scene — she’s famous for them. I remember counting the pages when her first Avon books came out.
    It’s also very good to get audiobook recommendations, as I know a lot of people are turning to them. Thank you.

    Reply
  45. Thanks for those recommendations, Quantum. I might try the Sally Rigby books. I chuckled at your comment on the length of the Stephanie Laurens seduction scene — she’s famous for them. I remember counting the pages when her first Avon books came out.
    It’s also very good to get audiobook recommendations, as I know a lot of people are turning to them. Thank you.

    Reply
  46. Thanks for that, Janice. I plan to try Piranesi. It sounds fascinating.
    Interesting about the latest Jack Reacher book by Lee Child’s son — I thought the same thing about the Dick Francis books by his son — the author’s voice can’t be duplicated.
    I haven’t tried The Jane Austen Society. Probably won’t given the reactions here to it. As for your rereading the old Signet and Fawcett regencies — perhaps you could pop up the website where they
    are listed. I’m sure a lot of wenchly readers would love to revisit some old favorites. On second thoughts, maybe I could do it. *g*
    http://hibiscus-sinensis.com/regency/

    Reply
  47. Thanks for that, Janice. I plan to try Piranesi. It sounds fascinating.
    Interesting about the latest Jack Reacher book by Lee Child’s son — I thought the same thing about the Dick Francis books by his son — the author’s voice can’t be duplicated.
    I haven’t tried The Jane Austen Society. Probably won’t given the reactions here to it. As for your rereading the old Signet and Fawcett regencies — perhaps you could pop up the website where they
    are listed. I’m sure a lot of wenchly readers would love to revisit some old favorites. On second thoughts, maybe I could do it. *g*
    http://hibiscus-sinensis.com/regency/

    Reply
  48. Thanks for that, Janice. I plan to try Piranesi. It sounds fascinating.
    Interesting about the latest Jack Reacher book by Lee Child’s son — I thought the same thing about the Dick Francis books by his son — the author’s voice can’t be duplicated.
    I haven’t tried The Jane Austen Society. Probably won’t given the reactions here to it. As for your rereading the old Signet and Fawcett regencies — perhaps you could pop up the website where they
    are listed. I’m sure a lot of wenchly readers would love to revisit some old favorites. On second thoughts, maybe I could do it. *g*
    http://hibiscus-sinensis.com/regency/

    Reply
  49. Thanks for that, Janice. I plan to try Piranesi. It sounds fascinating.
    Interesting about the latest Jack Reacher book by Lee Child’s son — I thought the same thing about the Dick Francis books by his son — the author’s voice can’t be duplicated.
    I haven’t tried The Jane Austen Society. Probably won’t given the reactions here to it. As for your rereading the old Signet and Fawcett regencies — perhaps you could pop up the website where they
    are listed. I’m sure a lot of wenchly readers would love to revisit some old favorites. On second thoughts, maybe I could do it. *g*
    http://hibiscus-sinensis.com/regency/

    Reply
  50. Thanks for that, Janice. I plan to try Piranesi. It sounds fascinating.
    Interesting about the latest Jack Reacher book by Lee Child’s son — I thought the same thing about the Dick Francis books by his son — the author’s voice can’t be duplicated.
    I haven’t tried The Jane Austen Society. Probably won’t given the reactions here to it. As for your rereading the old Signet and Fawcett regencies — perhaps you could pop up the website where they
    are listed. I’m sure a lot of wenchly readers would love to revisit some old favorites. On second thoughts, maybe I could do it. *g*
    http://hibiscus-sinensis.com/regency/

    Reply
  51. Mary what a varied and interesting set of recommendations. The Penguin Lessons sounds charming — I’m a bit of a sucker for animal/bird stories. It started when I was a child and it’s never stopped.
    I find that Big Data stuff fascinating, but unsettling — so much of what we think is private is out there, ready to be harvested and used by who-knows?
    The knitting books sound like fun too. I’m not a knitter, so I’ve never tried them, though I know a lot of authors weave in — knit in? — their pastime with their fiction, and they have huge followings.

    Reply
  52. Mary what a varied and interesting set of recommendations. The Penguin Lessons sounds charming — I’m a bit of a sucker for animal/bird stories. It started when I was a child and it’s never stopped.
    I find that Big Data stuff fascinating, but unsettling — so much of what we think is private is out there, ready to be harvested and used by who-knows?
    The knitting books sound like fun too. I’m not a knitter, so I’ve never tried them, though I know a lot of authors weave in — knit in? — their pastime with their fiction, and they have huge followings.

    Reply
  53. Mary what a varied and interesting set of recommendations. The Penguin Lessons sounds charming — I’m a bit of a sucker for animal/bird stories. It started when I was a child and it’s never stopped.
    I find that Big Data stuff fascinating, but unsettling — so much of what we think is private is out there, ready to be harvested and used by who-knows?
    The knitting books sound like fun too. I’m not a knitter, so I’ve never tried them, though I know a lot of authors weave in — knit in? — their pastime with their fiction, and they have huge followings.

    Reply
  54. Mary what a varied and interesting set of recommendations. The Penguin Lessons sounds charming — I’m a bit of a sucker for animal/bird stories. It started when I was a child and it’s never stopped.
    I find that Big Data stuff fascinating, but unsettling — so much of what we think is private is out there, ready to be harvested and used by who-knows?
    The knitting books sound like fun too. I’m not a knitter, so I’ve never tried them, though I know a lot of authors weave in — knit in? — their pastime with their fiction, and they have huge followings.

    Reply
  55. Mary what a varied and interesting set of recommendations. The Penguin Lessons sounds charming — I’m a bit of a sucker for animal/bird stories. It started when I was a child and it’s never stopped.
    I find that Big Data stuff fascinating, but unsettling — so much of what we think is private is out there, ready to be harvested and used by who-knows?
    The knitting books sound like fun too. I’m not a knitter, so I’ve never tried them, though I know a lot of authors weave in — knit in? — their pastime with their fiction, and they have huge followings.

    Reply
  56. Once again you’ve given us an impressive and varied list, Kareni — thank you. Virginia Woolf seems to be having a bit of a renaissance, as I’ve seen a lot of references to her books recently. I must admit I haven’t read Mrs. Dalloway since university — I glommed all her writing as a student, but my favorite VW book isn’t by her, it’s about her — the biography of Virginia Woolf by Quentin Bell.
    I’ve just started Someone Perfect, Mary Balogh’s latest — well the latest one out in Kindle. I’d preordered it and forgotten all about it until it arrived on my kindle. I love that process.
    And Carla Kelly is always a good reliable read.

    Reply
  57. Once again you’ve given us an impressive and varied list, Kareni — thank you. Virginia Woolf seems to be having a bit of a renaissance, as I’ve seen a lot of references to her books recently. I must admit I haven’t read Mrs. Dalloway since university — I glommed all her writing as a student, but my favorite VW book isn’t by her, it’s about her — the biography of Virginia Woolf by Quentin Bell.
    I’ve just started Someone Perfect, Mary Balogh’s latest — well the latest one out in Kindle. I’d preordered it and forgotten all about it until it arrived on my kindle. I love that process.
    And Carla Kelly is always a good reliable read.

    Reply
  58. Once again you’ve given us an impressive and varied list, Kareni — thank you. Virginia Woolf seems to be having a bit of a renaissance, as I’ve seen a lot of references to her books recently. I must admit I haven’t read Mrs. Dalloway since university — I glommed all her writing as a student, but my favorite VW book isn’t by her, it’s about her — the biography of Virginia Woolf by Quentin Bell.
    I’ve just started Someone Perfect, Mary Balogh’s latest — well the latest one out in Kindle. I’d preordered it and forgotten all about it until it arrived on my kindle. I love that process.
    And Carla Kelly is always a good reliable read.

    Reply
  59. Once again you’ve given us an impressive and varied list, Kareni — thank you. Virginia Woolf seems to be having a bit of a renaissance, as I’ve seen a lot of references to her books recently. I must admit I haven’t read Mrs. Dalloway since university — I glommed all her writing as a student, but my favorite VW book isn’t by her, it’s about her — the biography of Virginia Woolf by Quentin Bell.
    I’ve just started Someone Perfect, Mary Balogh’s latest — well the latest one out in Kindle. I’d preordered it and forgotten all about it until it arrived on my kindle. I love that process.
    And Carla Kelly is always a good reliable read.

    Reply
  60. Once again you’ve given us an impressive and varied list, Kareni — thank you. Virginia Woolf seems to be having a bit of a renaissance, as I’ve seen a lot of references to her books recently. I must admit I haven’t read Mrs. Dalloway since university — I glommed all her writing as a student, but my favorite VW book isn’t by her, it’s about her — the biography of Virginia Woolf by Quentin Bell.
    I’ve just started Someone Perfect, Mary Balogh’s latest — well the latest one out in Kindle. I’d preordered it and forgotten all about it until it arrived on my kindle. I love that process.
    And Carla Kelly is always a good reliable read.

    Reply
  61. Sue, rereads are such a lovely comforting thing to have, aren’t they? No need to concentrate on working out what’s happening, just sink into a familiar favorite story — perfect for when you’re not feeling “very how” (to quote Eeyore.)
    Wishing you a speedy return to good health.

    Reply
  62. Sue, rereads are such a lovely comforting thing to have, aren’t they? No need to concentrate on working out what’s happening, just sink into a familiar favorite story — perfect for when you’re not feeling “very how” (to quote Eeyore.)
    Wishing you a speedy return to good health.

    Reply
  63. Sue, rereads are such a lovely comforting thing to have, aren’t they? No need to concentrate on working out what’s happening, just sink into a familiar favorite story — perfect for when you’re not feeling “very how” (to quote Eeyore.)
    Wishing you a speedy return to good health.

    Reply
  64. Sue, rereads are such a lovely comforting thing to have, aren’t they? No need to concentrate on working out what’s happening, just sink into a familiar favorite story — perfect for when you’re not feeling “very how” (to quote Eeyore.)
    Wishing you a speedy return to good health.

    Reply
  65. Sue, rereads are such a lovely comforting thing to have, aren’t they? No need to concentrate on working out what’s happening, just sink into a familiar favorite story — perfect for when you’re not feeling “very how” (to quote Eeyore.)
    Wishing you a speedy return to good health.

    Reply
  66. Oh, Teresa, isn’t it awful when you’re in a reading slump? I was in one a while back and it was so depressing, as reading is my “escape.” I hope you find something that lifts you out of it soon.

    Reply
  67. Oh, Teresa, isn’t it awful when you’re in a reading slump? I was in one a while back and it was so depressing, as reading is my “escape.” I hope you find something that lifts you out of it soon.

    Reply
  68. Oh, Teresa, isn’t it awful when you’re in a reading slump? I was in one a while back and it was so depressing, as reading is my “escape.” I hope you find something that lifts you out of it soon.

    Reply
  69. Oh, Teresa, isn’t it awful when you’re in a reading slump? I was in one a while back and it was so depressing, as reading is my “escape.” I hope you find something that lifts you out of it soon.

    Reply
  70. Oh, Teresa, isn’t it awful when you’re in a reading slump? I was in one a while back and it was so depressing, as reading is my “escape.” I hope you find something that lifts you out of it soon.

    Reply
  71. The Regency Retro Reads website is an outgrowth of the comments we used to do on the old regency yahoo group. Yvonne thought it was a shame that the informaton wasn’t preserved, and that there should be such a site that concentrates on the older authors who were then falling out of knowledge. We are happy to see that their books are findng a new life on ebook. We get nothing from it; it’s a hobby. It is not meant to be encyclopedic; it’s just two fans talking. Thanks for the plug 🙂

    Reply
  72. The Regency Retro Reads website is an outgrowth of the comments we used to do on the old regency yahoo group. Yvonne thought it was a shame that the informaton wasn’t preserved, and that there should be such a site that concentrates on the older authors who were then falling out of knowledge. We are happy to see that their books are findng a new life on ebook. We get nothing from it; it’s a hobby. It is not meant to be encyclopedic; it’s just two fans talking. Thanks for the plug 🙂

    Reply
  73. The Regency Retro Reads website is an outgrowth of the comments we used to do on the old regency yahoo group. Yvonne thought it was a shame that the informaton wasn’t preserved, and that there should be such a site that concentrates on the older authors who were then falling out of knowledge. We are happy to see that their books are findng a new life on ebook. We get nothing from it; it’s a hobby. It is not meant to be encyclopedic; it’s just two fans talking. Thanks for the plug 🙂

    Reply
  74. The Regency Retro Reads website is an outgrowth of the comments we used to do on the old regency yahoo group. Yvonne thought it was a shame that the informaton wasn’t preserved, and that there should be such a site that concentrates on the older authors who were then falling out of knowledge. We are happy to see that their books are findng a new life on ebook. We get nothing from it; it’s a hobby. It is not meant to be encyclopedic; it’s just two fans talking. Thanks for the plug 🙂

    Reply
  75. The Regency Retro Reads website is an outgrowth of the comments we used to do on the old regency yahoo group. Yvonne thought it was a shame that the informaton wasn’t preserved, and that there should be such a site that concentrates on the older authors who were then falling out of knowledge. We are happy to see that their books are findng a new life on ebook. We get nothing from it; it’s a hobby. It is not meant to be encyclopedic; it’s just two fans talking. Thanks for the plug 🙂

    Reply
  76. Sue…I’m glad you are home from the hospital and able to enjoy being surrounded by your husband and favorite books. Rereads are so lovely. Take care and feel better soon.

    Reply
  77. Sue…I’m glad you are home from the hospital and able to enjoy being surrounded by your husband and favorite books. Rereads are so lovely. Take care and feel better soon.

    Reply
  78. Sue…I’m glad you are home from the hospital and able to enjoy being surrounded by your husband and favorite books. Rereads are so lovely. Take care and feel better soon.

    Reply
  79. Sue…I’m glad you are home from the hospital and able to enjoy being surrounded by your husband and favorite books. Rereads are so lovely. Take care and feel better soon.

    Reply
  80. Sue…I’m glad you are home from the hospital and able to enjoy being surrounded by your husband and favorite books. Rereads are so lovely. Take care and feel better soon.

    Reply
  81. I’ve read some new to me books but either they didn’t live up to the hype or I wasn’t hyped. Whichever it was, there was a lot of meh, glad I got it from the library and didn’t pay for it books.
    Hot Money by Dick Francis – read by Simon Prebble. One of my favorites to listen to. At heart it is a book about family and the complexities of managing all the ex-wives and children by the ex’s. There are of course horses and a mystery.
    I’ve also begun my annual listen to Winter Solstice by Rosamund Pilcher as read by Lisa Burgett. It isn’t Christmas unless I welcome the season in by listening to it. Also at heart a book about family. This time a family that is both biological and stitched together. Set in Scotland during December. Love love it.
    I’ve continued my reading of Anna Jacobs books. I read book 2 (A Time for Renewal) & 3 (A Time to Rejoice) of the Rivenshaw saga. Set in England in the months after WWII ends. I knew about the severe rationing during the war but was not aware that rations were cut again after the war so food could be sent to Europe.
    I was also intellectually aware of how many houses were bombed and how many families were doubled up but wasn’t aware of the sheer number of houses that needed to be built to replace the bombed houses plus all the new families that were created. That the planning commissions were also limiting the sizes of new houses so that more could be built.
    These were enjoyable reads because there was hope, renewal, planning for a better life with lots of romances taking place.
    Next month I’ll have more time to read and I know there are some good books sitting on my TBR… There is always hope if I have books sitting on my TBR shelves…

    Reply
  82. I’ve read some new to me books but either they didn’t live up to the hype or I wasn’t hyped. Whichever it was, there was a lot of meh, glad I got it from the library and didn’t pay for it books.
    Hot Money by Dick Francis – read by Simon Prebble. One of my favorites to listen to. At heart it is a book about family and the complexities of managing all the ex-wives and children by the ex’s. There are of course horses and a mystery.
    I’ve also begun my annual listen to Winter Solstice by Rosamund Pilcher as read by Lisa Burgett. It isn’t Christmas unless I welcome the season in by listening to it. Also at heart a book about family. This time a family that is both biological and stitched together. Set in Scotland during December. Love love it.
    I’ve continued my reading of Anna Jacobs books. I read book 2 (A Time for Renewal) & 3 (A Time to Rejoice) of the Rivenshaw saga. Set in England in the months after WWII ends. I knew about the severe rationing during the war but was not aware that rations were cut again after the war so food could be sent to Europe.
    I was also intellectually aware of how many houses were bombed and how many families were doubled up but wasn’t aware of the sheer number of houses that needed to be built to replace the bombed houses plus all the new families that were created. That the planning commissions were also limiting the sizes of new houses so that more could be built.
    These were enjoyable reads because there was hope, renewal, planning for a better life with lots of romances taking place.
    Next month I’ll have more time to read and I know there are some good books sitting on my TBR… There is always hope if I have books sitting on my TBR shelves…

    Reply
  83. I’ve read some new to me books but either they didn’t live up to the hype or I wasn’t hyped. Whichever it was, there was a lot of meh, glad I got it from the library and didn’t pay for it books.
    Hot Money by Dick Francis – read by Simon Prebble. One of my favorites to listen to. At heart it is a book about family and the complexities of managing all the ex-wives and children by the ex’s. There are of course horses and a mystery.
    I’ve also begun my annual listen to Winter Solstice by Rosamund Pilcher as read by Lisa Burgett. It isn’t Christmas unless I welcome the season in by listening to it. Also at heart a book about family. This time a family that is both biological and stitched together. Set in Scotland during December. Love love it.
    I’ve continued my reading of Anna Jacobs books. I read book 2 (A Time for Renewal) & 3 (A Time to Rejoice) of the Rivenshaw saga. Set in England in the months after WWII ends. I knew about the severe rationing during the war but was not aware that rations were cut again after the war so food could be sent to Europe.
    I was also intellectually aware of how many houses were bombed and how many families were doubled up but wasn’t aware of the sheer number of houses that needed to be built to replace the bombed houses plus all the new families that were created. That the planning commissions were also limiting the sizes of new houses so that more could be built.
    These were enjoyable reads because there was hope, renewal, planning for a better life with lots of romances taking place.
    Next month I’ll have more time to read and I know there are some good books sitting on my TBR… There is always hope if I have books sitting on my TBR shelves…

    Reply
  84. I’ve read some new to me books but either they didn’t live up to the hype or I wasn’t hyped. Whichever it was, there was a lot of meh, glad I got it from the library and didn’t pay for it books.
    Hot Money by Dick Francis – read by Simon Prebble. One of my favorites to listen to. At heart it is a book about family and the complexities of managing all the ex-wives and children by the ex’s. There are of course horses and a mystery.
    I’ve also begun my annual listen to Winter Solstice by Rosamund Pilcher as read by Lisa Burgett. It isn’t Christmas unless I welcome the season in by listening to it. Also at heart a book about family. This time a family that is both biological and stitched together. Set in Scotland during December. Love love it.
    I’ve continued my reading of Anna Jacobs books. I read book 2 (A Time for Renewal) & 3 (A Time to Rejoice) of the Rivenshaw saga. Set in England in the months after WWII ends. I knew about the severe rationing during the war but was not aware that rations were cut again after the war so food could be sent to Europe.
    I was also intellectually aware of how many houses were bombed and how many families were doubled up but wasn’t aware of the sheer number of houses that needed to be built to replace the bombed houses plus all the new families that were created. That the planning commissions were also limiting the sizes of new houses so that more could be built.
    These were enjoyable reads because there was hope, renewal, planning for a better life with lots of romances taking place.
    Next month I’ll have more time to read and I know there are some good books sitting on my TBR… There is always hope if I have books sitting on my TBR shelves…

    Reply
  85. I’ve read some new to me books but either they didn’t live up to the hype or I wasn’t hyped. Whichever it was, there was a lot of meh, glad I got it from the library and didn’t pay for it books.
    Hot Money by Dick Francis – read by Simon Prebble. One of my favorites to listen to. At heart it is a book about family and the complexities of managing all the ex-wives and children by the ex’s. There are of course horses and a mystery.
    I’ve also begun my annual listen to Winter Solstice by Rosamund Pilcher as read by Lisa Burgett. It isn’t Christmas unless I welcome the season in by listening to it. Also at heart a book about family. This time a family that is both biological and stitched together. Set in Scotland during December. Love love it.
    I’ve continued my reading of Anna Jacobs books. I read book 2 (A Time for Renewal) & 3 (A Time to Rejoice) of the Rivenshaw saga. Set in England in the months after WWII ends. I knew about the severe rationing during the war but was not aware that rations were cut again after the war so food could be sent to Europe.
    I was also intellectually aware of how many houses were bombed and how many families were doubled up but wasn’t aware of the sheer number of houses that needed to be built to replace the bombed houses plus all the new families that were created. That the planning commissions were also limiting the sizes of new houses so that more could be built.
    These were enjoyable reads because there was hope, renewal, planning for a better life with lots of romances taking place.
    Next month I’ll have more time to read and I know there are some good books sitting on my TBR… There is always hope if I have books sitting on my TBR shelves…

    Reply
  86. I don’t remember if I commented here last month, so I hope I’m not repeating myself.
    I read “The Scoundrel’s Daughter”, and loved it. I especially enjoyed that the story included two couples, and the fact that I enjoyed the older couple more is probably a reflection of my own age!
    I read a lot more over the past month or so, including:
    Deadly Engagement-the first of a Georgian murder mystery series by Lucinda Brant. Over the top violence, depravity, and oh the clothes, back when men could dress like peacocks! Brant likes to torture her characters, so it was more angsty than I like, but the great atmosphere and really compelling hero made it for me.
    Rogues & Gentlemen Christmas by Emma Leech, 3 sweet and sexy novellas set around the holidays.
    The Earl’s Iron Warrant by Kate Archer-after starting it, I realized it was Book 5 of a series, but that didn’t stop my enjoyment. Going back to books 1-4 now.
    Louise Allen’s Dangerous Deceptions mystery trilogy. My favorite was the 2nd book, The Swordmaster’s Mistress, but I enjoyed all 3.
    Murder Most Fair by Anna Lee Huber-her post World War I series, which I now prefer to her Victorian series.
    Books 3 and 4 of Michelle’s Diener’s Class 5 sci-fi series. If you’ve read one, you know the plot of all of them, because they are very formulaic. Nonetheless, fun and action-packed reads.
    I’m saving the best for last. The highlight of my reading month was The Brightest Star in Paris by Diane Biller. The hero is the brother of the hero of her first book, The Widow of Rose House. That was a great book, and incredibly, this one was even better. A joy to read even though she also makes her characters suffer before they get their HEA. It’s set during an era of French history that we rarely see in novels, in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870’s. There are lots of flashbacks to the Siege of Paris, the Paris Commune, and Bloody Week, which I knew nothing about, so I learned some history too. By the way, both of Biller’s books have a paranormal element in the form of ghosts. But in this book the ghosts become developed characters. It’s hard to describe, but even if you are not a reader of paranormals(and I am not) I can’t imagine anyone not enjoying this book.

    Reply
  87. I don’t remember if I commented here last month, so I hope I’m not repeating myself.
    I read “The Scoundrel’s Daughter”, and loved it. I especially enjoyed that the story included two couples, and the fact that I enjoyed the older couple more is probably a reflection of my own age!
    I read a lot more over the past month or so, including:
    Deadly Engagement-the first of a Georgian murder mystery series by Lucinda Brant. Over the top violence, depravity, and oh the clothes, back when men could dress like peacocks! Brant likes to torture her characters, so it was more angsty than I like, but the great atmosphere and really compelling hero made it for me.
    Rogues & Gentlemen Christmas by Emma Leech, 3 sweet and sexy novellas set around the holidays.
    The Earl’s Iron Warrant by Kate Archer-after starting it, I realized it was Book 5 of a series, but that didn’t stop my enjoyment. Going back to books 1-4 now.
    Louise Allen’s Dangerous Deceptions mystery trilogy. My favorite was the 2nd book, The Swordmaster’s Mistress, but I enjoyed all 3.
    Murder Most Fair by Anna Lee Huber-her post World War I series, which I now prefer to her Victorian series.
    Books 3 and 4 of Michelle’s Diener’s Class 5 sci-fi series. If you’ve read one, you know the plot of all of them, because they are very formulaic. Nonetheless, fun and action-packed reads.
    I’m saving the best for last. The highlight of my reading month was The Brightest Star in Paris by Diane Biller. The hero is the brother of the hero of her first book, The Widow of Rose House. That was a great book, and incredibly, this one was even better. A joy to read even though she also makes her characters suffer before they get their HEA. It’s set during an era of French history that we rarely see in novels, in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870’s. There are lots of flashbacks to the Siege of Paris, the Paris Commune, and Bloody Week, which I knew nothing about, so I learned some history too. By the way, both of Biller’s books have a paranormal element in the form of ghosts. But in this book the ghosts become developed characters. It’s hard to describe, but even if you are not a reader of paranormals(and I am not) I can’t imagine anyone not enjoying this book.

    Reply
  88. I don’t remember if I commented here last month, so I hope I’m not repeating myself.
    I read “The Scoundrel’s Daughter”, and loved it. I especially enjoyed that the story included two couples, and the fact that I enjoyed the older couple more is probably a reflection of my own age!
    I read a lot more over the past month or so, including:
    Deadly Engagement-the first of a Georgian murder mystery series by Lucinda Brant. Over the top violence, depravity, and oh the clothes, back when men could dress like peacocks! Brant likes to torture her characters, so it was more angsty than I like, but the great atmosphere and really compelling hero made it for me.
    Rogues & Gentlemen Christmas by Emma Leech, 3 sweet and sexy novellas set around the holidays.
    The Earl’s Iron Warrant by Kate Archer-after starting it, I realized it was Book 5 of a series, but that didn’t stop my enjoyment. Going back to books 1-4 now.
    Louise Allen’s Dangerous Deceptions mystery trilogy. My favorite was the 2nd book, The Swordmaster’s Mistress, but I enjoyed all 3.
    Murder Most Fair by Anna Lee Huber-her post World War I series, which I now prefer to her Victorian series.
    Books 3 and 4 of Michelle’s Diener’s Class 5 sci-fi series. If you’ve read one, you know the plot of all of them, because they are very formulaic. Nonetheless, fun and action-packed reads.
    I’m saving the best for last. The highlight of my reading month was The Brightest Star in Paris by Diane Biller. The hero is the brother of the hero of her first book, The Widow of Rose House. That was a great book, and incredibly, this one was even better. A joy to read even though she also makes her characters suffer before they get their HEA. It’s set during an era of French history that we rarely see in novels, in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870’s. There are lots of flashbacks to the Siege of Paris, the Paris Commune, and Bloody Week, which I knew nothing about, so I learned some history too. By the way, both of Biller’s books have a paranormal element in the form of ghosts. But in this book the ghosts become developed characters. It’s hard to describe, but even if you are not a reader of paranormals(and I am not) I can’t imagine anyone not enjoying this book.

    Reply
  89. I don’t remember if I commented here last month, so I hope I’m not repeating myself.
    I read “The Scoundrel’s Daughter”, and loved it. I especially enjoyed that the story included two couples, and the fact that I enjoyed the older couple more is probably a reflection of my own age!
    I read a lot more over the past month or so, including:
    Deadly Engagement-the first of a Georgian murder mystery series by Lucinda Brant. Over the top violence, depravity, and oh the clothes, back when men could dress like peacocks! Brant likes to torture her characters, so it was more angsty than I like, but the great atmosphere and really compelling hero made it for me.
    Rogues & Gentlemen Christmas by Emma Leech, 3 sweet and sexy novellas set around the holidays.
    The Earl’s Iron Warrant by Kate Archer-after starting it, I realized it was Book 5 of a series, but that didn’t stop my enjoyment. Going back to books 1-4 now.
    Louise Allen’s Dangerous Deceptions mystery trilogy. My favorite was the 2nd book, The Swordmaster’s Mistress, but I enjoyed all 3.
    Murder Most Fair by Anna Lee Huber-her post World War I series, which I now prefer to her Victorian series.
    Books 3 and 4 of Michelle’s Diener’s Class 5 sci-fi series. If you’ve read one, you know the plot of all of them, because they are very formulaic. Nonetheless, fun and action-packed reads.
    I’m saving the best for last. The highlight of my reading month was The Brightest Star in Paris by Diane Biller. The hero is the brother of the hero of her first book, The Widow of Rose House. That was a great book, and incredibly, this one was even better. A joy to read even though she also makes her characters suffer before they get their HEA. It’s set during an era of French history that we rarely see in novels, in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870’s. There are lots of flashbacks to the Siege of Paris, the Paris Commune, and Bloody Week, which I knew nothing about, so I learned some history too. By the way, both of Biller’s books have a paranormal element in the form of ghosts. But in this book the ghosts become developed characters. It’s hard to describe, but even if you are not a reader of paranormals(and I am not) I can’t imagine anyone not enjoying this book.

    Reply
  90. I don’t remember if I commented here last month, so I hope I’m not repeating myself.
    I read “The Scoundrel’s Daughter”, and loved it. I especially enjoyed that the story included two couples, and the fact that I enjoyed the older couple more is probably a reflection of my own age!
    I read a lot more over the past month or so, including:
    Deadly Engagement-the first of a Georgian murder mystery series by Lucinda Brant. Over the top violence, depravity, and oh the clothes, back when men could dress like peacocks! Brant likes to torture her characters, so it was more angsty than I like, but the great atmosphere and really compelling hero made it for me.
    Rogues & Gentlemen Christmas by Emma Leech, 3 sweet and sexy novellas set around the holidays.
    The Earl’s Iron Warrant by Kate Archer-after starting it, I realized it was Book 5 of a series, but that didn’t stop my enjoyment. Going back to books 1-4 now.
    Louise Allen’s Dangerous Deceptions mystery trilogy. My favorite was the 2nd book, The Swordmaster’s Mistress, but I enjoyed all 3.
    Murder Most Fair by Anna Lee Huber-her post World War I series, which I now prefer to her Victorian series.
    Books 3 and 4 of Michelle’s Diener’s Class 5 sci-fi series. If you’ve read one, you know the plot of all of them, because they are very formulaic. Nonetheless, fun and action-packed reads.
    I’m saving the best for last. The highlight of my reading month was The Brightest Star in Paris by Diane Biller. The hero is the brother of the hero of her first book, The Widow of Rose House. That was a great book, and incredibly, this one was even better. A joy to read even though she also makes her characters suffer before they get their HEA. It’s set during an era of French history that we rarely see in novels, in the aftermath of the Franco-Prussian war in the 1870’s. There are lots of flashbacks to the Siege of Paris, the Paris Commune, and Bloody Week, which I knew nothing about, so I learned some history too. By the way, both of Biller’s books have a paranormal element in the form of ghosts. But in this book the ghosts become developed characters. It’s hard to describe, but even if you are not a reader of paranormals(and I am not) I can’t imagine anyone not enjoying this book.

    Reply
  91. Thank you Janice, I have referred to Regency Retro Reads quite often. With the older books, you often can’t find even one review at Amazon. You’re performing a great service!
    Another site I often reference is the hilarious Uncrushable Jersey Dress(https://everyneelsthing.blogspot.com/) which has in depth reviews of every book Betty Neels every wrote.

    Reply
  92. Thank you Janice, I have referred to Regency Retro Reads quite often. With the older books, you often can’t find even one review at Amazon. You’re performing a great service!
    Another site I often reference is the hilarious Uncrushable Jersey Dress(https://everyneelsthing.blogspot.com/) which has in depth reviews of every book Betty Neels every wrote.

    Reply
  93. Thank you Janice, I have referred to Regency Retro Reads quite often. With the older books, you often can’t find even one review at Amazon. You’re performing a great service!
    Another site I often reference is the hilarious Uncrushable Jersey Dress(https://everyneelsthing.blogspot.com/) which has in depth reviews of every book Betty Neels every wrote.

    Reply
  94. Thank you Janice, I have referred to Regency Retro Reads quite often. With the older books, you often can’t find even one review at Amazon. You’re performing a great service!
    Another site I often reference is the hilarious Uncrushable Jersey Dress(https://everyneelsthing.blogspot.com/) which has in depth reviews of every book Betty Neels every wrote.

    Reply
  95. Thank you Janice, I have referred to Regency Retro Reads quite often. With the older books, you often can’t find even one review at Amazon. You’re performing a great service!
    Another site I often reference is the hilarious Uncrushable Jersey Dress(https://everyneelsthing.blogspot.com/) which has in depth reviews of every book Betty Neels every wrote.

    Reply
  96. Thanks, Vicki — Dick Francis is an old favorite of mine. Might be time for a reread. And a writer friend got me onto Rosamund Pilcher. I prefer her on kindle these days as those books are so thick.
    And yes, nice thought — that the TBR is a small beacon of hope.

    Reply
  97. Thanks, Vicki — Dick Francis is an old favorite of mine. Might be time for a reread. And a writer friend got me onto Rosamund Pilcher. I prefer her on kindle these days as those books are so thick.
    And yes, nice thought — that the TBR is a small beacon of hope.

    Reply
  98. Thanks, Vicki — Dick Francis is an old favorite of mine. Might be time for a reread. And a writer friend got me onto Rosamund Pilcher. I prefer her on kindle these days as those books are so thick.
    And yes, nice thought — that the TBR is a small beacon of hope.

    Reply
  99. Thanks, Vicki — Dick Francis is an old favorite of mine. Might be time for a reread. And a writer friend got me onto Rosamund Pilcher. I prefer her on kindle these days as those books are so thick.
    And yes, nice thought — that the TBR is a small beacon of hope.

    Reply
  100. Thanks, Vicki — Dick Francis is an old favorite of mine. Might be time for a reread. And a writer friend got me onto Rosamund Pilcher. I prefer her on kindle these days as those books are so thick.
    And yes, nice thought — that the TBR is a small beacon of hope.

    Reply
  101. Thanks, Karin — I’m so pleased you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. As for Lucinda Brant, she’s an old friend of mine. We met in an on-line Georgette Heyer group, and were first published at the same time. We used to catch up in person, but then she moved interstate and sine then it’s been occasional on-line connections. Hers was the first ever e-book I ever saw in the flesh (so to speak) — it was a small floppy disk! Haven’t things com a long way since then?
    The Michelle Diener books are faves of mine., too Thanks for the recommendation of the Diane Biller book. I plan to try it.

    Reply
  102. Thanks, Karin — I’m so pleased you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. As for Lucinda Brant, she’s an old friend of mine. We met in an on-line Georgette Heyer group, and were first published at the same time. We used to catch up in person, but then she moved interstate and sine then it’s been occasional on-line connections. Hers was the first ever e-book I ever saw in the flesh (so to speak) — it was a small floppy disk! Haven’t things com a long way since then?
    The Michelle Diener books are faves of mine., too Thanks for the recommendation of the Diane Biller book. I plan to try it.

    Reply
  103. Thanks, Karin — I’m so pleased you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. As for Lucinda Brant, she’s an old friend of mine. We met in an on-line Georgette Heyer group, and were first published at the same time. We used to catch up in person, but then she moved interstate and sine then it’s been occasional on-line connections. Hers was the first ever e-book I ever saw in the flesh (so to speak) — it was a small floppy disk! Haven’t things com a long way since then?
    The Michelle Diener books are faves of mine., too Thanks for the recommendation of the Diane Biller book. I plan to try it.

    Reply
  104. Thanks, Karin — I’m so pleased you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. As for Lucinda Brant, she’s an old friend of mine. We met in an on-line Georgette Heyer group, and were first published at the same time. We used to catch up in person, but then she moved interstate and sine then it’s been occasional on-line connections. Hers was the first ever e-book I ever saw in the flesh (so to speak) — it was a small floppy disk! Haven’t things com a long way since then?
    The Michelle Diener books are faves of mine., too Thanks for the recommendation of the Diane Biller book. I plan to try it.

    Reply
  105. Thanks, Karin — I’m so pleased you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. As for Lucinda Brant, she’s an old friend of mine. We met in an on-line Georgette Heyer group, and were first published at the same time. We used to catch up in person, but then she moved interstate and sine then it’s been occasional on-line connections. Hers was the first ever e-book I ever saw in the flesh (so to speak) — it was a small floppy disk! Haven’t things com a long way since then?
    The Michelle Diener books are faves of mine., too Thanks for the recommendation of the Diane Biller book. I plan to try it.

    Reply
  106. Love all these recommendations – can’t wait to try them. My favourite book of my recent reads was a translation of a Swedish author named Katarina Bivald and the book is called The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend. I got a huge pile of books given to me and had never heard anything about this one but I really, really enjoyed it! I thought I would just read the first chapter as my night time relaxer to see if I liked it (my usual test!) and next time I looked up it was almost midnight! The story is funny and quirky – almost like LM Montgomery with a bit of sex added to it! Thanks for this great post.

    Reply
  107. Love all these recommendations – can’t wait to try them. My favourite book of my recent reads was a translation of a Swedish author named Katarina Bivald and the book is called The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend. I got a huge pile of books given to me and had never heard anything about this one but I really, really enjoyed it! I thought I would just read the first chapter as my night time relaxer to see if I liked it (my usual test!) and next time I looked up it was almost midnight! The story is funny and quirky – almost like LM Montgomery with a bit of sex added to it! Thanks for this great post.

    Reply
  108. Love all these recommendations – can’t wait to try them. My favourite book of my recent reads was a translation of a Swedish author named Katarina Bivald and the book is called The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend. I got a huge pile of books given to me and had never heard anything about this one but I really, really enjoyed it! I thought I would just read the first chapter as my night time relaxer to see if I liked it (my usual test!) and next time I looked up it was almost midnight! The story is funny and quirky – almost like LM Montgomery with a bit of sex added to it! Thanks for this great post.

    Reply
  109. Love all these recommendations – can’t wait to try them. My favourite book of my recent reads was a translation of a Swedish author named Katarina Bivald and the book is called The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend. I got a huge pile of books given to me and had never heard anything about this one but I really, really enjoyed it! I thought I would just read the first chapter as my night time relaxer to see if I liked it (my usual test!) and next time I looked up it was almost midnight! The story is funny and quirky – almost like LM Montgomery with a bit of sex added to it! Thanks for this great post.

    Reply
  110. Love all these recommendations – can’t wait to try them. My favourite book of my recent reads was a translation of a Swedish author named Katarina Bivald and the book is called The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend. I got a huge pile of books given to me and had never heard anything about this one but I really, really enjoyed it! I thought I would just read the first chapter as my night time relaxer to see if I liked it (my usual test!) and next time I looked up it was almost midnight! The story is funny and quirky – almost like LM Montgomery with a bit of sex added to it! Thanks for this great post.

    Reply
  111. Someone else recommended L J Shen to me and I liked them, although they might not be for everyone. Do please let me know what you think Quantum!

    Reply
  112. Someone else recommended L J Shen to me and I liked them, although they might not be for everyone. Do please let me know what you think Quantum!

    Reply
  113. Someone else recommended L J Shen to me and I liked them, although they might not be for everyone. Do please let me know what you think Quantum!

    Reply
  114. Someone else recommended L J Shen to me and I liked them, although they might not be for everyone. Do please let me know what you think Quantum!

    Reply
  115. Someone else recommended L J Shen to me and I liked them, although they might not be for everyone. Do please let me know what you think Quantum!

    Reply
  116. I read Katarina’s book when it first came out and loved it too! I enjoyed her second book as well but unfortunately it doesn’t seem to have been translated into English yet. (Didn’t like the third though).

    Reply
  117. I read Katarina’s book when it first came out and loved it too! I enjoyed her second book as well but unfortunately it doesn’t seem to have been translated into English yet. (Didn’t like the third though).

    Reply
  118. I read Katarina’s book when it first came out and loved it too! I enjoyed her second book as well but unfortunately it doesn’t seem to have been translated into English yet. (Didn’t like the third though).

    Reply
  119. I read Katarina’s book when it first came out and loved it too! I enjoyed her second book as well but unfortunately it doesn’t seem to have been translated into English yet. (Didn’t like the third though).

    Reply
  120. I read Katarina’s book when it first came out and loved it too! I enjoyed her second book as well but unfortunately it doesn’t seem to have been translated into English yet. (Didn’t like the third though).

    Reply

Leave a Comment