WWR—What we’ve read in June

Anne here, hosting the June edition of What We've Read this month.

Pat's up first: Unlike other authors who say they can’t read what they’re writing, I tend to read a lot of what I’m writing because it puts my mind in the right groove. If I’m in a romance groove while reading a mystery, it can get messy. Heroes may die. So I’ve been in a mystery frame of mind lately. FatalTwist

I can’t remember if I mentioned Patrice Greenwood’s A FATAL TWIST OF LEMON that I finished a few weeks back. This is a very pleasant, laidback cozy set in an old house turned into a tea room in Santa Fe. There’s a small romance and bits of history and it’s just a lovely book for kicking back on a lazy day.

I just finished Donna Andrews’ A MURDER HATCHED, which is more of a riotous circus compared to Greenwood’s proper tea party manners. The heroine is maid of honor in three different weddings in a small town, so we have a three ring circus even before people start getting snuffed. Luckily, her love interest is running the local bridal shop for his mother. Unluckily, she thinks he’s gay, despite all evidence to the contrary. No real dark moments and lots of laughter, so another good summer read.

And I’m ashamed to admit that I’ve apparently missed some of the Dorothy Sayers’ Peter Wimsey stories. So I’m currently digging into THE UNPLEASANTNESS AT THE BELLONA CLUB.  The story is driving me crazy, because I’m absolutely certain I know who did it, right up until the moment the story spins around and goes another direction. And Peter knows all without telling the reader, which makes him a fascinating character— and this is a mystery without any clues

SenseNicola says:  This month has mostly been about trying to write through all the home renovations we are doing so most of my reading matter has been Homebuilding and Renovating Magazine with especial focus on how to instal a new bathroom. I have managed to keep going with my glom on Deborah Crombie's Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James crime series; this month's book was Water Like a Stone and was another fabulous crime mystery wrapped in a thought-provoking story about family relationships. I'm now moving on to Joanna Trollope's reworking of Sense and Sensibility.  

Susan says: Seems like I'm always reading something new and something old, and this month I confess to digging way back into the TBRS (TBR Someday) pile returning to a book that I read halfway long ago and loved, but for various reasons not at all related to the book, I set aside with intentions to return.

I started at the beginning and I'm happily plowing through Laurie R. King's THE BEEKEEPER'S APPRENTICE, and I'm loving it and sorry I waited so long. What an intelligent, clever, well-paced read with a delightful premise, as Mary Russell takes on (and innocently enchants) the great sleuth Sherlock, brilliantly portrayed by King. What an achievement! I'm nearly done with TBA and ready to move on to the next one – and I will do that quickly this time!   Cover-beekeeper

From the new section of the TBR pile, I'm reading THE MAGICIANS by Lev Grossman – this on the very strong recommendations of the guys in my household, who are enthusiastically moving ahead in the series. It's a fascinating, beautifully written tale of ordinary life meeting a magical realm with a twist – Narnia and Harry Potter all grown up. I'm also reading, much more slowly, the first GAME OF THRONES — this too on the urging of the Guys, who are all big readers. I like to keep up with the family conversations, and they make me curious to read the original, even though I'm watching the series (yes, I can take it, though now and then I have to look away, but the story power alone is worth it, I think). I was reluctant to read the first novel (and feeling a bit overwhelmed at the undertaking), but it's a fast read, far beyond the cable version, and powerfully written. I am in awe.      

Mary Jo says:  I just finished reading Anna Jacobs' five book Trader Series.  Jacobs is a writer of British sagas, a form of historical women's fiction that often features working class women from Northern England who struggle to improve their lives.  Her research is impeccable and she's known for her happy endings, so there tend to be a lot of nice romances in her broad cast of characters!  I love her strong heroines.   Jacobs was born in Lancashire, spent most of her adult life in Western Australia, and now has homes in both countries, so it's not surprising that a number of her books are about people emigrating to Australia in search of a better life.  The popular Trader series is built around a clever Irish groom, Bram Deagan, who travels to the East as a servant and decides to stay and become a trader based in the Swan River Colony, which is now Western Australia.   

300px-Brown_last_of_englandAt the suggestion of a wise Chinese merchant in Singapore, Bram marries the English Isabella Saunders, a match that grows from a marriage of convenience into a true and loving partnership.  Finding success in his trading, he wants to bring over family members so they, too, can have more opportunities.  This takes five books to accomplish <G>, and other interesting characters are met–and married off!–along the way.  

Jacobs has the gift of creating engaging characters, and I loved visiting Bram's world.  Partly that's because I love Australia, but also because the underlying dynamic of braving a long and frightening journey into the unknown in search of a better life resonates in my American soul since we are also a nation of immigrants.  A good symbol for these stories is Ford Madox Brown's famous painting, The Last of England, as a young couple modeled on Brown and his wife look steadfastly ahead from a ship, their expressions a little sad but determined.   19830705

If you'd like to try Anna Jacobs' version of romantic historical women's fiction, a good place to start would be with The Trader's Wife, first in the Trader series.  Though Anna Jacobs' books are to some extent available in the US, if you like print, the best way to get them is through The Book Depository in Britain.  The company does free shipping around the world, and here a link for The Trader's Wife.   All five books feature a woman looking out to her future.

Listening-womanJoanna here:  I didn't get much reading done this month, I'm afraid. However, I did just finish Tony Hillerman's 'Listening Woman'. For those of you who haven't read Hillerman, he writes a series of mystery book based in the American western desert on AmerIndian tribal lands. Leaphorn, the Navaho policeman, solves murders using a combination of logical deduction and traditional wisdom. Great stories from Hillerman. Very fine writing.

Anne here. I've been continuing my glom of Maggie Osborne's western historicals, alternating them with Lisa Kleypas's contemporaries. I've always been a big fan of her historicals, but now I'm enjoying her contemporaries—especially the Travis family series set in Texas, just as much. Fabulous fun.

Courtney Milan is someone I read when she first came out, but not having had an e-reader until fairly recently, I wasn't up to date with her self-published e-books. She's a very fine writer who comes at historicals from a fresh and original angle. If you haven't read her books, she's well worth trying. To start you off, here's a free novella.Governess+affair

Lastly, on the advice of a friend, I'm reading Lee Child. I was in a bit of a reading slump where very little pleased me, and my friend suggested I should read some male writers of popular fiction because, she said, they write very differently. So I read Lee Child's first book Killing Floor, and found it very engaging and a real pageturner. I've since acquired several more Lee Child books.

So that's it from us. Now, over to you — what books have you read and enjoyed this month?

160 thoughts on “WWR—What we’ve read in June”

  1. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump too Anne so I re-read one of my comport reads, SEPs Breathing Room. I also read a biography of Daphne du Maurier and her sisters which was fascinating. Love Lee Child.

    Reply
  2. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump too Anne so I re-read one of my comport reads, SEPs Breathing Room. I also read a biography of Daphne du Maurier and her sisters which was fascinating. Love Lee Child.

    Reply
  3. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump too Anne so I re-read one of my comport reads, SEPs Breathing Room. I also read a biography of Daphne du Maurier and her sisters which was fascinating. Love Lee Child.

    Reply
  4. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump too Anne so I re-read one of my comport reads, SEPs Breathing Room. I also read a biography of Daphne du Maurier and her sisters which was fascinating. Love Lee Child.

    Reply
  5. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump too Anne so I re-read one of my comport reads, SEPs Breathing Room. I also read a biography of Daphne du Maurier and her sisters which was fascinating. Love Lee Child.

    Reply
  6. Thanks, Keziah
    SEP is one of my comfort reads, too — in fact I have one on my TBR pile at the moment, only it's a TBReread for the umpteenth time.
    The Daphne DuMaurier book sounds interesting.

    Reply
  7. Thanks, Keziah
    SEP is one of my comfort reads, too — in fact I have one on my TBR pile at the moment, only it's a TBReread for the umpteenth time.
    The Daphne DuMaurier book sounds interesting.

    Reply
  8. Thanks, Keziah
    SEP is one of my comfort reads, too — in fact I have one on my TBR pile at the moment, only it's a TBReread for the umpteenth time.
    The Daphne DuMaurier book sounds interesting.

    Reply
  9. Thanks, Keziah
    SEP is one of my comfort reads, too — in fact I have one on my TBR pile at the moment, only it's a TBReread for the umpteenth time.
    The Daphne DuMaurier book sounds interesting.

    Reply
  10. Thanks, Keziah
    SEP is one of my comfort reads, too — in fact I have one on my TBR pile at the moment, only it's a TBReread for the umpteenth time.
    The Daphne DuMaurier book sounds interesting.

    Reply
  11. Recently finished Anna Quindlen’s Still Life With Breadcrumbs and loved it. I had just read one of those sugary new-girl-in-town-local-boy-with-issues summer romances, and Quindlen’s book was the adult version, even though the other book had people sleeping all over. For the most part though I’m into revisiting old friends like Barbara Pym. I read that Donna Andrews book as Murder With Peacocks many years ago, and laughed myself silly because the hero could have been modeled on a fellow I knew well at the time.

    Reply
  12. Recently finished Anna Quindlen’s Still Life With Breadcrumbs and loved it. I had just read one of those sugary new-girl-in-town-local-boy-with-issues summer romances, and Quindlen’s book was the adult version, even though the other book had people sleeping all over. For the most part though I’m into revisiting old friends like Barbara Pym. I read that Donna Andrews book as Murder With Peacocks many years ago, and laughed myself silly because the hero could have been modeled on a fellow I knew well at the time.

    Reply
  13. Recently finished Anna Quindlen’s Still Life With Breadcrumbs and loved it. I had just read one of those sugary new-girl-in-town-local-boy-with-issues summer romances, and Quindlen’s book was the adult version, even though the other book had people sleeping all over. For the most part though I’m into revisiting old friends like Barbara Pym. I read that Donna Andrews book as Murder With Peacocks many years ago, and laughed myself silly because the hero could have been modeled on a fellow I knew well at the time.

    Reply
  14. Recently finished Anna Quindlen’s Still Life With Breadcrumbs and loved it. I had just read one of those sugary new-girl-in-town-local-boy-with-issues summer romances, and Quindlen’s book was the adult version, even though the other book had people sleeping all over. For the most part though I’m into revisiting old friends like Barbara Pym. I read that Donna Andrews book as Murder With Peacocks many years ago, and laughed myself silly because the hero could have been modeled on a fellow I knew well at the time.

    Reply
  15. Recently finished Anna Quindlen’s Still Life With Breadcrumbs and loved it. I had just read one of those sugary new-girl-in-town-local-boy-with-issues summer romances, and Quindlen’s book was the adult version, even though the other book had people sleeping all over. For the most part though I’m into revisiting old friends like Barbara Pym. I read that Donna Andrews book as Murder With Peacocks many years ago, and laughed myself silly because the hero could have been modeled on a fellow I knew well at the time.

    Reply
  16. I’ve just come across Barbara Cleverly’s books and have been working my way through from the beginning. Definitely series to be read in sequence. Particularly like the early Joe Sandiland books, set in India, and the Leatitia Talbot books set in Greece.

    Reply
  17. I’ve just come across Barbara Cleverly’s books and have been working my way through from the beginning. Definitely series to be read in sequence. Particularly like the early Joe Sandiland books, set in India, and the Leatitia Talbot books set in Greece.

    Reply
  18. I’ve just come across Barbara Cleverly’s books and have been working my way through from the beginning. Definitely series to be read in sequence. Particularly like the early Joe Sandiland books, set in India, and the Leatitia Talbot books set in Greece.

    Reply
  19. I’ve just come across Barbara Cleverly’s books and have been working my way through from the beginning. Definitely series to be read in sequence. Particularly like the early Joe Sandiland books, set in India, and the Leatitia Talbot books set in Greece.

    Reply
  20. I’ve just come across Barbara Cleverly’s books and have been working my way through from the beginning. Definitely series to be read in sequence. Particularly like the early Joe Sandiland books, set in India, and the Leatitia Talbot books set in Greece.

    Reply
  21. More books to check out! I’ve read all of Dorothy Sayers’ boos, including all the Lord Peter Wimsey, and I’ve also read the excellent continuing books by Jill Paton Walsh, and there’s a NEW one of those out this month. I’m going to hope over there and buy it right now.
    More books going on the TBR pile….

    Reply
  22. More books to check out! I’ve read all of Dorothy Sayers’ boos, including all the Lord Peter Wimsey, and I’ve also read the excellent continuing books by Jill Paton Walsh, and there’s a NEW one of those out this month. I’m going to hope over there and buy it right now.
    More books going on the TBR pile….

    Reply
  23. More books to check out! I’ve read all of Dorothy Sayers’ boos, including all the Lord Peter Wimsey, and I’ve also read the excellent continuing books by Jill Paton Walsh, and there’s a NEW one of those out this month. I’m going to hope over there and buy it right now.
    More books going on the TBR pile….

    Reply
  24. More books to check out! I’ve read all of Dorothy Sayers’ boos, including all the Lord Peter Wimsey, and I’ve also read the excellent continuing books by Jill Paton Walsh, and there’s a NEW one of those out this month. I’m going to hope over there and buy it right now.
    More books going on the TBR pile….

    Reply
  25. More books to check out! I’ve read all of Dorothy Sayers’ boos, including all the Lord Peter Wimsey, and I’ve also read the excellent continuing books by Jill Paton Walsh, and there’s a NEW one of those out this month. I’m going to hope over there and buy it right now.
    More books going on the TBR pile….

    Reply
  26. Thanks, Artemisia
    I haven't read Quindlan, but I love the title, "Still Life With Breadcrumbs."
    Barbara Pym has been a favourite for years, ever since I read her Excellent Women. But it's been so long since I've read her, it might be time for a revisit. Thank you.

    Reply
  27. Thanks, Artemisia
    I haven't read Quindlan, but I love the title, "Still Life With Breadcrumbs."
    Barbara Pym has been a favourite for years, ever since I read her Excellent Women. But it's been so long since I've read her, it might be time for a revisit. Thank you.

    Reply
  28. Thanks, Artemisia
    I haven't read Quindlan, but I love the title, "Still Life With Breadcrumbs."
    Barbara Pym has been a favourite for years, ever since I read her Excellent Women. But it's been so long since I've read her, it might be time for a revisit. Thank you.

    Reply
  29. Thanks, Artemisia
    I haven't read Quindlan, but I love the title, "Still Life With Breadcrumbs."
    Barbara Pym has been a favourite for years, ever since I read her Excellent Women. But it's been so long since I've read her, it might be time for a revisit. Thank you.

    Reply
  30. Thanks, Artemisia
    I haven't read Quindlan, but I love the title, "Still Life With Breadcrumbs."
    Barbara Pym has been a favourite for years, ever since I read her Excellent Women. But it's been so long since I've read her, it might be time for a revisit. Thank you.

    Reply
  31. More great books to add to my list! Thanks for compiling this month’s list, Annes.
    Susan King, I’m so glad you’re enjoying The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King. I have most of the Holmes/Russell series in audiobooks and they’re great fun to listen to. She does a good job portraying Sherlock Holmes, staying true to character and not overly romanticizing him or his relationship with Mary Russell.

    Reply
  32. More great books to add to my list! Thanks for compiling this month’s list, Annes.
    Susan King, I’m so glad you’re enjoying The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King. I have most of the Holmes/Russell series in audiobooks and they’re great fun to listen to. She does a good job portraying Sherlock Holmes, staying true to character and not overly romanticizing him or his relationship with Mary Russell.

    Reply
  33. More great books to add to my list! Thanks for compiling this month’s list, Annes.
    Susan King, I’m so glad you’re enjoying The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King. I have most of the Holmes/Russell series in audiobooks and they’re great fun to listen to. She does a good job portraying Sherlock Holmes, staying true to character and not overly romanticizing him or his relationship with Mary Russell.

    Reply
  34. More great books to add to my list! Thanks for compiling this month’s list, Annes.
    Susan King, I’m so glad you’re enjoying The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King. I have most of the Holmes/Russell series in audiobooks and they’re great fun to listen to. She does a good job portraying Sherlock Holmes, staying true to character and not overly romanticizing him or his relationship with Mary Russell.

    Reply
  35. More great books to add to my list! Thanks for compiling this month’s list, Annes.
    Susan King, I’m so glad you’re enjoying The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King. I have most of the Holmes/Russell series in audiobooks and they’re great fun to listen to. She does a good job portraying Sherlock Holmes, staying true to character and not overly romanticizing him or his relationship with Mary Russell.

    Reply
  36. I read Valour and Vanity by Mary Robinette Kowel. She’s a great writer, and not afraid to take risks with her main characters. I think you do have to start the series at the beginning though, and V&V is book 4. I have been having a streak of good luck with some bargain e-books on Amazon. “Indiscreet” by Carolyn Jewel had a fascinating setting in the Ottoman Empire and a bluestocking heroine. “The Duke’s Holiday” by Maggie Fenton is a screwball comedy with an OCD hero and a heroine who drives him crazy. And I’ve just started “The Notorious Lady Anne” by Sharon Cullen, but it seems very promising, a female pirate heroine! The Trader’s Wife sounds great, and I’m probably due for a reread of some Dorothy Sayers books too.

    Reply
  37. I read Valour and Vanity by Mary Robinette Kowel. She’s a great writer, and not afraid to take risks with her main characters. I think you do have to start the series at the beginning though, and V&V is book 4. I have been having a streak of good luck with some bargain e-books on Amazon. “Indiscreet” by Carolyn Jewel had a fascinating setting in the Ottoman Empire and a bluestocking heroine. “The Duke’s Holiday” by Maggie Fenton is a screwball comedy with an OCD hero and a heroine who drives him crazy. And I’ve just started “The Notorious Lady Anne” by Sharon Cullen, but it seems very promising, a female pirate heroine! The Trader’s Wife sounds great, and I’m probably due for a reread of some Dorothy Sayers books too.

    Reply
  38. I read Valour and Vanity by Mary Robinette Kowel. She’s a great writer, and not afraid to take risks with her main characters. I think you do have to start the series at the beginning though, and V&V is book 4. I have been having a streak of good luck with some bargain e-books on Amazon. “Indiscreet” by Carolyn Jewel had a fascinating setting in the Ottoman Empire and a bluestocking heroine. “The Duke’s Holiday” by Maggie Fenton is a screwball comedy with an OCD hero and a heroine who drives him crazy. And I’ve just started “The Notorious Lady Anne” by Sharon Cullen, but it seems very promising, a female pirate heroine! The Trader’s Wife sounds great, and I’m probably due for a reread of some Dorothy Sayers books too.

    Reply
  39. I read Valour and Vanity by Mary Robinette Kowel. She’s a great writer, and not afraid to take risks with her main characters. I think you do have to start the series at the beginning though, and V&V is book 4. I have been having a streak of good luck with some bargain e-books on Amazon. “Indiscreet” by Carolyn Jewel had a fascinating setting in the Ottoman Empire and a bluestocking heroine. “The Duke’s Holiday” by Maggie Fenton is a screwball comedy with an OCD hero and a heroine who drives him crazy. And I’ve just started “The Notorious Lady Anne” by Sharon Cullen, but it seems very promising, a female pirate heroine! The Trader’s Wife sounds great, and I’m probably due for a reread of some Dorothy Sayers books too.

    Reply
  40. I read Valour and Vanity by Mary Robinette Kowel. She’s a great writer, and not afraid to take risks with her main characters. I think you do have to start the series at the beginning though, and V&V is book 4. I have been having a streak of good luck with some bargain e-books on Amazon. “Indiscreet” by Carolyn Jewel had a fascinating setting in the Ottoman Empire and a bluestocking heroine. “The Duke’s Holiday” by Maggie Fenton is a screwball comedy with an OCD hero and a heroine who drives him crazy. And I’ve just started “The Notorious Lady Anne” by Sharon Cullen, but it seems very promising, a female pirate heroine! The Trader’s Wife sounds great, and I’m probably due for a reread of some Dorothy Sayers books too.

    Reply
  41. Anne, my husband introduced me to a Lee Child’s book and I was surprised to find I couldn’t put it down! Reading another now but the violence is a bit off putting. Time for Georgette Heyer to restore my faith in humanity!

    Reply
  42. Anne, my husband introduced me to a Lee Child’s book and I was surprised to find I couldn’t put it down! Reading another now but the violence is a bit off putting. Time for Georgette Heyer to restore my faith in humanity!

    Reply
  43. Anne, my husband introduced me to a Lee Child’s book and I was surprised to find I couldn’t put it down! Reading another now but the violence is a bit off putting. Time for Georgette Heyer to restore my faith in humanity!

    Reply
  44. Anne, my husband introduced me to a Lee Child’s book and I was surprised to find I couldn’t put it down! Reading another now but the violence is a bit off putting. Time for Georgette Heyer to restore my faith in humanity!

    Reply
  45. Anne, my husband introduced me to a Lee Child’s book and I was surprised to find I couldn’t put it down! Reading another now but the violence is a bit off putting. Time for Georgette Heyer to restore my faith in humanity!

    Reply
  46. Really need to look into those Anna Jacobs books…
    I’m about halfway through a book set in the Georgian era (1760ish), which is a bit earlier than I usually go. I’m really enjoying all the differences from my “comfort” time periods.

    Reply
  47. Really need to look into those Anna Jacobs books…
    I’m about halfway through a book set in the Georgian era (1760ish), which is a bit earlier than I usually go. I’m really enjoying all the differences from my “comfort” time periods.

    Reply
  48. Really need to look into those Anna Jacobs books…
    I’m about halfway through a book set in the Georgian era (1760ish), which is a bit earlier than I usually go. I’m really enjoying all the differences from my “comfort” time periods.

    Reply
  49. Really need to look into those Anna Jacobs books…
    I’m about halfway through a book set in the Georgian era (1760ish), which is a bit earlier than I usually go. I’m really enjoying all the differences from my “comfort” time periods.

    Reply
  50. Really need to look into those Anna Jacobs books…
    I’m about halfway through a book set in the Georgian era (1760ish), which is a bit earlier than I usually go. I’m really enjoying all the differences from my “comfort” time periods.

    Reply
  51. I’ve been reading other people’s recommendations, all in historical romance. A couple of those books stand out.
    Grace Burrowes Worth (the 11th in her lonely lords series) was a delight. Worth (love the play on the name) is a businessman who wants to woo his housekeeper but finds himself tied up with financial matters (one that borders on the unethical but necessary because of his duty to friends, family, and “king”). His housekeeper is in the process of returning to take care of her family after five years away.
    I realized Susan King had released books 3 and 4 in her Celtic Nights series. I absolutely feel in love with Laird of the Wind. Besides the love story, there is the parallel tale of the two training a wild, temperamental goshawk.
    I remembered liking Diane Gaston’s books back when I would get Harlequins at Walmart before they opened a bookstore where I lived. A Marriage of Notoriety and A Reputation for Notoriety. My favorite of the two is the reverse beauty and the beast story with Phillipa covering her scarred face with with a mask and playing at the club and the “Adonis” Xavier protecting her when she performs and travels back home from the club. Amazon delivered the third book in the series to my Kindle today.
    And I spent the weekend with Mary Jo Putney’s Uncommon Vows. It was a weekend well spent.

    Reply
  52. I’ve been reading other people’s recommendations, all in historical romance. A couple of those books stand out.
    Grace Burrowes Worth (the 11th in her lonely lords series) was a delight. Worth (love the play on the name) is a businessman who wants to woo his housekeeper but finds himself tied up with financial matters (one that borders on the unethical but necessary because of his duty to friends, family, and “king”). His housekeeper is in the process of returning to take care of her family after five years away.
    I realized Susan King had released books 3 and 4 in her Celtic Nights series. I absolutely feel in love with Laird of the Wind. Besides the love story, there is the parallel tale of the two training a wild, temperamental goshawk.
    I remembered liking Diane Gaston’s books back when I would get Harlequins at Walmart before they opened a bookstore where I lived. A Marriage of Notoriety and A Reputation for Notoriety. My favorite of the two is the reverse beauty and the beast story with Phillipa covering her scarred face with with a mask and playing at the club and the “Adonis” Xavier protecting her when she performs and travels back home from the club. Amazon delivered the third book in the series to my Kindle today.
    And I spent the weekend with Mary Jo Putney’s Uncommon Vows. It was a weekend well spent.

    Reply
  53. I’ve been reading other people’s recommendations, all in historical romance. A couple of those books stand out.
    Grace Burrowes Worth (the 11th in her lonely lords series) was a delight. Worth (love the play on the name) is a businessman who wants to woo his housekeeper but finds himself tied up with financial matters (one that borders on the unethical but necessary because of his duty to friends, family, and “king”). His housekeeper is in the process of returning to take care of her family after five years away.
    I realized Susan King had released books 3 and 4 in her Celtic Nights series. I absolutely feel in love with Laird of the Wind. Besides the love story, there is the parallel tale of the two training a wild, temperamental goshawk.
    I remembered liking Diane Gaston’s books back when I would get Harlequins at Walmart before they opened a bookstore where I lived. A Marriage of Notoriety and A Reputation for Notoriety. My favorite of the two is the reverse beauty and the beast story with Phillipa covering her scarred face with with a mask and playing at the club and the “Adonis” Xavier protecting her when she performs and travels back home from the club. Amazon delivered the third book in the series to my Kindle today.
    And I spent the weekend with Mary Jo Putney’s Uncommon Vows. It was a weekend well spent.

    Reply
  54. I’ve been reading other people’s recommendations, all in historical romance. A couple of those books stand out.
    Grace Burrowes Worth (the 11th in her lonely lords series) was a delight. Worth (love the play on the name) is a businessman who wants to woo his housekeeper but finds himself tied up with financial matters (one that borders on the unethical but necessary because of his duty to friends, family, and “king”). His housekeeper is in the process of returning to take care of her family after five years away.
    I realized Susan King had released books 3 and 4 in her Celtic Nights series. I absolutely feel in love with Laird of the Wind. Besides the love story, there is the parallel tale of the two training a wild, temperamental goshawk.
    I remembered liking Diane Gaston’s books back when I would get Harlequins at Walmart before they opened a bookstore where I lived. A Marriage of Notoriety and A Reputation for Notoriety. My favorite of the two is the reverse beauty and the beast story with Phillipa covering her scarred face with with a mask and playing at the club and the “Adonis” Xavier protecting her when she performs and travels back home from the club. Amazon delivered the third book in the series to my Kindle today.
    And I spent the weekend with Mary Jo Putney’s Uncommon Vows. It was a weekend well spent.

    Reply
  55. I’ve been reading other people’s recommendations, all in historical romance. A couple of those books stand out.
    Grace Burrowes Worth (the 11th in her lonely lords series) was a delight. Worth (love the play on the name) is a businessman who wants to woo his housekeeper but finds himself tied up with financial matters (one that borders on the unethical but necessary because of his duty to friends, family, and “king”). His housekeeper is in the process of returning to take care of her family after five years away.
    I realized Susan King had released books 3 and 4 in her Celtic Nights series. I absolutely feel in love with Laird of the Wind. Besides the love story, there is the parallel tale of the two training a wild, temperamental goshawk.
    I remembered liking Diane Gaston’s books back when I would get Harlequins at Walmart before they opened a bookstore where I lived. A Marriage of Notoriety and A Reputation for Notoriety. My favorite of the two is the reverse beauty and the beast story with Phillipa covering her scarred face with with a mask and playing at the club and the “Adonis” Xavier protecting her when she performs and travels back home from the club. Amazon delivered the third book in the series to my Kindle today.
    And I spent the weekend with Mary Jo Putney’s Uncommon Vows. It was a weekend well spent.

    Reply
  56. Hi Beryl — I think I deal with the violence in books much the same as I do those sex scenes that seem to go on forever: flip the pages a bit faster. *g* But Lee Child is certainly an absolute pageturner, isn't he? And how lovely to balance the palate with Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  57. Hi Beryl — I think I deal with the violence in books much the same as I do those sex scenes that seem to go on forever: flip the pages a bit faster. *g* But Lee Child is certainly an absolute pageturner, isn't he? And how lovely to balance the palate with Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  58. Hi Beryl — I think I deal with the violence in books much the same as I do those sex scenes that seem to go on forever: flip the pages a bit faster. *g* But Lee Child is certainly an absolute pageturner, isn't he? And how lovely to balance the palate with Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  59. Hi Beryl — I think I deal with the violence in books much the same as I do those sex scenes that seem to go on forever: flip the pages a bit faster. *g* But Lee Child is certainly an absolute pageturner, isn't he? And how lovely to balance the palate with Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  60. Hi Beryl — I think I deal with the violence in books much the same as I do those sex scenes that seem to go on forever: flip the pages a bit faster. *g* But Lee Child is certainly an absolute pageturner, isn't he? And how lovely to balance the palate with Georgette Heyer.

    Reply
  61. Sonya, that's interesting. You made me think about my "comfort" time period, which I suppose is Regency, but I also enjoy a more varied era diet.
    A friend of mine is writing medievals and I'd almost forgotten how much I enjoy medievals, until reading the drafts of her stories reminded me. I won't mention her name as they're not yet published — she's a multi-published author who's just started writing again after a long hiatus, and is planning to self e-publish the new stories.
    Might have to reread MJP's newly repub'd one and maybe Elizabeth Lowell's Enchanted, Untamed and Forbidden books, which are gorgeous. And then if I need another medieval hit, Madeline Hunter's medievals are superb.

    Reply
  62. Sonya, that's interesting. You made me think about my "comfort" time period, which I suppose is Regency, but I also enjoy a more varied era diet.
    A friend of mine is writing medievals and I'd almost forgotten how much I enjoy medievals, until reading the drafts of her stories reminded me. I won't mention her name as they're not yet published — she's a multi-published author who's just started writing again after a long hiatus, and is planning to self e-publish the new stories.
    Might have to reread MJP's newly repub'd one and maybe Elizabeth Lowell's Enchanted, Untamed and Forbidden books, which are gorgeous. And then if I need another medieval hit, Madeline Hunter's medievals are superb.

    Reply
  63. Sonya, that's interesting. You made me think about my "comfort" time period, which I suppose is Regency, but I also enjoy a more varied era diet.
    A friend of mine is writing medievals and I'd almost forgotten how much I enjoy medievals, until reading the drafts of her stories reminded me. I won't mention her name as they're not yet published — she's a multi-published author who's just started writing again after a long hiatus, and is planning to self e-publish the new stories.
    Might have to reread MJP's newly repub'd one and maybe Elizabeth Lowell's Enchanted, Untamed and Forbidden books, which are gorgeous. And then if I need another medieval hit, Madeline Hunter's medievals are superb.

    Reply
  64. Sonya, that's interesting. You made me think about my "comfort" time period, which I suppose is Regency, but I also enjoy a more varied era diet.
    A friend of mine is writing medievals and I'd almost forgotten how much I enjoy medievals, until reading the drafts of her stories reminded me. I won't mention her name as they're not yet published — she's a multi-published author who's just started writing again after a long hiatus, and is planning to self e-publish the new stories.
    Might have to reread MJP's newly repub'd one and maybe Elizabeth Lowell's Enchanted, Untamed and Forbidden books, which are gorgeous. And then if I need another medieval hit, Madeline Hunter's medievals are superb.

    Reply
  65. Sonya, that's interesting. You made me think about my "comfort" time period, which I suppose is Regency, but I also enjoy a more varied era diet.
    A friend of mine is writing medievals and I'd almost forgotten how much I enjoy medievals, until reading the drafts of her stories reminded me. I won't mention her name as they're not yet published — she's a multi-published author who's just started writing again after a long hiatus, and is planning to self e-publish the new stories.
    Might have to reread MJP's newly repub'd one and maybe Elizabeth Lowell's Enchanted, Untamed and Forbidden books, which are gorgeous. And then if I need another medieval hit, Madeline Hunter's medievals are superb.

    Reply
  66. Shannon, that sounds like a lovely lot of reading – quite a wenches-and-friends feast. I think I'm envious. I've been so busy lately I haven't done as much reading as I need/would like to.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I don't know how Grace Burrowes does it — she's so wonderfully prolific.
    And Susan's books are magic, aren't they?

    Reply
  67. Shannon, that sounds like a lovely lot of reading – quite a wenches-and-friends feast. I think I'm envious. I've been so busy lately I haven't done as much reading as I need/would like to.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I don't know how Grace Burrowes does it — she's so wonderfully prolific.
    And Susan's books are magic, aren't they?

    Reply
  68. Shannon, that sounds like a lovely lot of reading – quite a wenches-and-friends feast. I think I'm envious. I've been so busy lately I haven't done as much reading as I need/would like to.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I don't know how Grace Burrowes does it — she's so wonderfully prolific.
    And Susan's books are magic, aren't they?

    Reply
  69. Shannon, that sounds like a lovely lot of reading – quite a wenches-and-friends feast. I think I'm envious. I've been so busy lately I haven't done as much reading as I need/would like to.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I don't know how Grace Burrowes does it — she's so wonderfully prolific.
    And Susan's books are magic, aren't they?

    Reply
  70. Shannon, that sounds like a lovely lot of reading – quite a wenches-and-friends feast. I think I'm envious. I've been so busy lately I haven't done as much reading as I need/would like to.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I don't know how Grace Burrowes does it — she's so wonderfully prolific.
    And Susan's books are magic, aren't they?

    Reply
  71. Hi Shannon – thank you, I’m glad you loved Laird of the Wind! That little hawk was so much fun to write. 🙂
    I totally agree about your other choices – which reminds me, I have Diane Gaston’s new book in my TBR pile…

    Reply
  72. Hi Shannon – thank you, I’m glad you loved Laird of the Wind! That little hawk was so much fun to write. 🙂
    I totally agree about your other choices – which reminds me, I have Diane Gaston’s new book in my TBR pile…

    Reply
  73. Hi Shannon – thank you, I’m glad you loved Laird of the Wind! That little hawk was so much fun to write. 🙂
    I totally agree about your other choices – which reminds me, I have Diane Gaston’s new book in my TBR pile…

    Reply
  74. Hi Shannon – thank you, I’m glad you loved Laird of the Wind! That little hawk was so much fun to write. 🙂
    I totally agree about your other choices – which reminds me, I have Diane Gaston’s new book in my TBR pile…

    Reply
  75. Hi Shannon – thank you, I’m glad you loved Laird of the Wind! That little hawk was so much fun to write. 🙂
    I totally agree about your other choices – which reminds me, I have Diane Gaston’s new book in my TBR pile…

    Reply
  76. I love this post – best way to get introduced to new authors. Anna Jacobs’ books sound great and I will investigate if can get them from the local library. My discovery of the month was Rachel Bach and her Fortune series, which I devoured over 4 days (thank god it was a long weekend otherwise I would have been wrecked at work). Discovered the series thru the recommendation of Ilona Andrews, but those series of books were so good, nothing else has caught my interest (I am not including the new Thea Harrison short stories – those were merely an amuse bouche and not a proper meal). Here’s hoping Anna Jacobs might take me out of my slump.

    Reply
  77. I love this post – best way to get introduced to new authors. Anna Jacobs’ books sound great and I will investigate if can get them from the local library. My discovery of the month was Rachel Bach and her Fortune series, which I devoured over 4 days (thank god it was a long weekend otherwise I would have been wrecked at work). Discovered the series thru the recommendation of Ilona Andrews, but those series of books were so good, nothing else has caught my interest (I am not including the new Thea Harrison short stories – those were merely an amuse bouche and not a proper meal). Here’s hoping Anna Jacobs might take me out of my slump.

    Reply
  78. I love this post – best way to get introduced to new authors. Anna Jacobs’ books sound great and I will investigate if can get them from the local library. My discovery of the month was Rachel Bach and her Fortune series, which I devoured over 4 days (thank god it was a long weekend otherwise I would have been wrecked at work). Discovered the series thru the recommendation of Ilona Andrews, but those series of books were so good, nothing else has caught my interest (I am not including the new Thea Harrison short stories – those were merely an amuse bouche and not a proper meal). Here’s hoping Anna Jacobs might take me out of my slump.

    Reply
  79. I love this post – best way to get introduced to new authors. Anna Jacobs’ books sound great and I will investigate if can get them from the local library. My discovery of the month was Rachel Bach and her Fortune series, which I devoured over 4 days (thank god it was a long weekend otherwise I would have been wrecked at work). Discovered the series thru the recommendation of Ilona Andrews, but those series of books were so good, nothing else has caught my interest (I am not including the new Thea Harrison short stories – those were merely an amuse bouche and not a proper meal). Here’s hoping Anna Jacobs might take me out of my slump.

    Reply
  80. I love this post – best way to get introduced to new authors. Anna Jacobs’ books sound great and I will investigate if can get them from the local library. My discovery of the month was Rachel Bach and her Fortune series, which I devoured over 4 days (thank god it was a long weekend otherwise I would have been wrecked at work). Discovered the series thru the recommendation of Ilona Andrews, but those series of books were so good, nothing else has caught my interest (I am not including the new Thea Harrison short stories – those were merely an amuse bouche and not a proper meal). Here’s hoping Anna Jacobs might take me out of my slump.

    Reply
  81. In the romance genre, this month I’d highligh:
    – Loretta Chase.- I re-read ‘Lord of Scoundrels’ in order to write a review for my blog. I enjoyed it as much as the first time. And an older Regency trad, ‘The Devil’s Delilah’. Wonderful bookish hero, rare for that time.
    – Mary Stewart.- ‘Nine Coaches Waiting’. After reading your ‘Ode to Mary Stewart’ I decided to give her a try. I discovered she was translated in the 1960s and 1970s, so I looked for those old books in second-hand bookshops. Thank you for discovering such an author for me. She had a wonderful sense of the setting.
    – Sth completely different, from Down Under: ‘Tigers and Devils’ by Sean Kennedy. I wanted to read some m/m romance and discovered this book. Loved it. Very funny secondary characters, and Melbourne as another character of the book.
    I really like it when the time & place are also an important part of the novel. Nowadays, many books look like scripts for sit-coms!

    Reply
  82. In the romance genre, this month I’d highligh:
    – Loretta Chase.- I re-read ‘Lord of Scoundrels’ in order to write a review for my blog. I enjoyed it as much as the first time. And an older Regency trad, ‘The Devil’s Delilah’. Wonderful bookish hero, rare for that time.
    – Mary Stewart.- ‘Nine Coaches Waiting’. After reading your ‘Ode to Mary Stewart’ I decided to give her a try. I discovered she was translated in the 1960s and 1970s, so I looked for those old books in second-hand bookshops. Thank you for discovering such an author for me. She had a wonderful sense of the setting.
    – Sth completely different, from Down Under: ‘Tigers and Devils’ by Sean Kennedy. I wanted to read some m/m romance and discovered this book. Loved it. Very funny secondary characters, and Melbourne as another character of the book.
    I really like it when the time & place are also an important part of the novel. Nowadays, many books look like scripts for sit-coms!

    Reply
  83. In the romance genre, this month I’d highligh:
    – Loretta Chase.- I re-read ‘Lord of Scoundrels’ in order to write a review for my blog. I enjoyed it as much as the first time. And an older Regency trad, ‘The Devil’s Delilah’. Wonderful bookish hero, rare for that time.
    – Mary Stewart.- ‘Nine Coaches Waiting’. After reading your ‘Ode to Mary Stewart’ I decided to give her a try. I discovered she was translated in the 1960s and 1970s, so I looked for those old books in second-hand bookshops. Thank you for discovering such an author for me. She had a wonderful sense of the setting.
    – Sth completely different, from Down Under: ‘Tigers and Devils’ by Sean Kennedy. I wanted to read some m/m romance and discovered this book. Loved it. Very funny secondary characters, and Melbourne as another character of the book.
    I really like it when the time & place are also an important part of the novel. Nowadays, many books look like scripts for sit-coms!

    Reply
  84. In the romance genre, this month I’d highligh:
    – Loretta Chase.- I re-read ‘Lord of Scoundrels’ in order to write a review for my blog. I enjoyed it as much as the first time. And an older Regency trad, ‘The Devil’s Delilah’. Wonderful bookish hero, rare for that time.
    – Mary Stewart.- ‘Nine Coaches Waiting’. After reading your ‘Ode to Mary Stewart’ I decided to give her a try. I discovered she was translated in the 1960s and 1970s, so I looked for those old books in second-hand bookshops. Thank you for discovering such an author for me. She had a wonderful sense of the setting.
    – Sth completely different, from Down Under: ‘Tigers and Devils’ by Sean Kennedy. I wanted to read some m/m romance and discovered this book. Loved it. Very funny secondary characters, and Melbourne as another character of the book.
    I really like it when the time & place are also an important part of the novel. Nowadays, many books look like scripts for sit-coms!

    Reply
  85. In the romance genre, this month I’d highligh:
    – Loretta Chase.- I re-read ‘Lord of Scoundrels’ in order to write a review for my blog. I enjoyed it as much as the first time. And an older Regency trad, ‘The Devil’s Delilah’. Wonderful bookish hero, rare for that time.
    – Mary Stewart.- ‘Nine Coaches Waiting’. After reading your ‘Ode to Mary Stewart’ I decided to give her a try. I discovered she was translated in the 1960s and 1970s, so I looked for those old books in second-hand bookshops. Thank you for discovering such an author for me. She had a wonderful sense of the setting.
    – Sth completely different, from Down Under: ‘Tigers and Devils’ by Sean Kennedy. I wanted to read some m/m romance and discovered this book. Loved it. Very funny secondary characters, and Melbourne as another character of the book.
    I really like it when the time & place are also an important part of the novel. Nowadays, many books look like scripts for sit-coms!

    Reply
  86. I, too, loved The Beekeeper’s Apprentice which I read years ago. I avoided it for a long time because I don’t like people taking liberties with Sherlock, but I think Laurie King’s Mary is a great creation and a good partner for Holmes.

    Reply
  87. I, too, loved The Beekeeper’s Apprentice which I read years ago. I avoided it for a long time because I don’t like people taking liberties with Sherlock, but I think Laurie King’s Mary is a great creation and a good partner for Holmes.

    Reply
  88. I, too, loved The Beekeeper’s Apprentice which I read years ago. I avoided it for a long time because I don’t like people taking liberties with Sherlock, but I think Laurie King’s Mary is a great creation and a good partner for Holmes.

    Reply
  89. I, too, loved The Beekeeper’s Apprentice which I read years ago. I avoided it for a long time because I don’t like people taking liberties with Sherlock, but I think Laurie King’s Mary is a great creation and a good partner for Holmes.

    Reply
  90. I, too, loved The Beekeeper’s Apprentice which I read years ago. I avoided it for a long time because I don’t like people taking liberties with Sherlock, but I think Laurie King’s Mary is a great creation and a good partner for Holmes.

    Reply
  91. Ooh, Mary’s so good…read her The Ivy Tree which is what I call an “Anastasia story” as the female character turns up claiming she’s a long lost heiress. It’s romantic suspense at its best. Kay Hooper’s Amanda is so similar, it must be a tribute!

    Reply
  92. Ooh, Mary’s so good…read her The Ivy Tree which is what I call an “Anastasia story” as the female character turns up claiming she’s a long lost heiress. It’s romantic suspense at its best. Kay Hooper’s Amanda is so similar, it must be a tribute!

    Reply
  93. Ooh, Mary’s so good…read her The Ivy Tree which is what I call an “Anastasia story” as the female character turns up claiming she’s a long lost heiress. It’s romantic suspense at its best. Kay Hooper’s Amanda is so similar, it must be a tribute!

    Reply
  94. Ooh, Mary’s so good…read her The Ivy Tree which is what I call an “Anastasia story” as the female character turns up claiming she’s a long lost heiress. It’s romantic suspense at its best. Kay Hooper’s Amanda is so similar, it must be a tribute!

    Reply
  95. Ooh, Mary’s so good…read her The Ivy Tree which is what I call an “Anastasia story” as the female character turns up claiming she’s a long lost heiress. It’s romantic suspense at its best. Kay Hooper’s Amanda is so similar, it must be a tribute!

    Reply
  96. It's interesting, isn't it, Lee Ann, how many spinoffs there are lately on Sherlock. I must confess I didn't like the movies with Robert Downey Jun. as Sherlock — they were fun and escapist etc, but I wanted it to be more clever and deductive, rather than an action movie. And I believe there are hundreds of Sherlock spin-offs in the fan fic world.
    But when a writer takes a new line on a beloved old book, and does it with wit and sensitivity and originality, it can be a thing of joy. I'm also thinking of Jean Rhys's The Wide Sargasso Sea, which is a spin-off of Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  97. It's interesting, isn't it, Lee Ann, how many spinoffs there are lately on Sherlock. I must confess I didn't like the movies with Robert Downey Jun. as Sherlock — they were fun and escapist etc, but I wanted it to be more clever and deductive, rather than an action movie. And I believe there are hundreds of Sherlock spin-offs in the fan fic world.
    But when a writer takes a new line on a beloved old book, and does it with wit and sensitivity and originality, it can be a thing of joy. I'm also thinking of Jean Rhys's The Wide Sargasso Sea, which is a spin-off of Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  98. It's interesting, isn't it, Lee Ann, how many spinoffs there are lately on Sherlock. I must confess I didn't like the movies with Robert Downey Jun. as Sherlock — they were fun and escapist etc, but I wanted it to be more clever and deductive, rather than an action movie. And I believe there are hundreds of Sherlock spin-offs in the fan fic world.
    But when a writer takes a new line on a beloved old book, and does it with wit and sensitivity and originality, it can be a thing of joy. I'm also thinking of Jean Rhys's The Wide Sargasso Sea, which is a spin-off of Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  99. It's interesting, isn't it, Lee Ann, how many spinoffs there are lately on Sherlock. I must confess I didn't like the movies with Robert Downey Jun. as Sherlock — they were fun and escapist etc, but I wanted it to be more clever and deductive, rather than an action movie. And I believe there are hundreds of Sherlock spin-offs in the fan fic world.
    But when a writer takes a new line on a beloved old book, and does it with wit and sensitivity and originality, it can be a thing of joy. I'm also thinking of Jean Rhys's The Wide Sargasso Sea, which is a spin-off of Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  100. It's interesting, isn't it, Lee Ann, how many spinoffs there are lately on Sherlock. I must confess I didn't like the movies with Robert Downey Jun. as Sherlock — they were fun and escapist etc, but I wanted it to be more clever and deductive, rather than an action movie. And I believe there are hundreds of Sherlock spin-offs in the fan fic world.
    But when a writer takes a new line on a beloved old book, and does it with wit and sensitivity and originality, it can be a thing of joy. I'm also thinking of Jean Rhys's The Wide Sargasso Sea, which is a spin-off of Jane Eyre.

    Reply
  101. Yes, the wenches had quite an off-loop discussion of the Ivy Tree a while back, which involved some of us rereading it for the writerly cleverness. I'd devoured all of Mary Stewart years before I became a writer, when I'd read her simply for story. I've recently reread her, and am blown away again by her elegant prose, storytelling and sense of location.
    I didn't know about that Kay Hooper book. I like Kay Hooper, so I'll hunt it down. Thanks for contributing to the discussion.

    Reply
  102. Yes, the wenches had quite an off-loop discussion of the Ivy Tree a while back, which involved some of us rereading it for the writerly cleverness. I'd devoured all of Mary Stewart years before I became a writer, when I'd read her simply for story. I've recently reread her, and am blown away again by her elegant prose, storytelling and sense of location.
    I didn't know about that Kay Hooper book. I like Kay Hooper, so I'll hunt it down. Thanks for contributing to the discussion.

    Reply
  103. Yes, the wenches had quite an off-loop discussion of the Ivy Tree a while back, which involved some of us rereading it for the writerly cleverness. I'd devoured all of Mary Stewart years before I became a writer, when I'd read her simply for story. I've recently reread her, and am blown away again by her elegant prose, storytelling and sense of location.
    I didn't know about that Kay Hooper book. I like Kay Hooper, so I'll hunt it down. Thanks for contributing to the discussion.

    Reply
  104. Yes, the wenches had quite an off-loop discussion of the Ivy Tree a while back, which involved some of us rereading it for the writerly cleverness. I'd devoured all of Mary Stewart years before I became a writer, when I'd read her simply for story. I've recently reread her, and am blown away again by her elegant prose, storytelling and sense of location.
    I didn't know about that Kay Hooper book. I like Kay Hooper, so I'll hunt it down. Thanks for contributing to the discussion.

    Reply
  105. Yes, the wenches had quite an off-loop discussion of the Ivy Tree a while back, which involved some of us rereading it for the writerly cleverness. I'd devoured all of Mary Stewart years before I became a writer, when I'd read her simply for story. I've recently reread her, and am blown away again by her elegant prose, storytelling and sense of location.
    I didn't know about that Kay Hooper book. I like Kay Hooper, so I'll hunt it down. Thanks for contributing to the discussion.

    Reply
  106. Bona,I'm glad you're enjoying some of the suggestions. It's why we enjoy this regular end-of-the-month column, I think — we're all eager readers and love to swap suggestions — and it's all genuine — not for any kind of promo. I'm so pleased you're enjoying Mary Stewart. Her sense of place is superb, I agree — in fact a friend of mine is going to the south of France soon and mentioned she was staying in Montpellier, and I had an instant image of a big grey car with GB plates sliding into the traffic. 🙂 I think I might get my friend a copy of Madam Will You Talk to take with her. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  107. Bona,I'm glad you're enjoying some of the suggestions. It's why we enjoy this regular end-of-the-month column, I think — we're all eager readers and love to swap suggestions — and it's all genuine — not for any kind of promo. I'm so pleased you're enjoying Mary Stewart. Her sense of place is superb, I agree — in fact a friend of mine is going to the south of France soon and mentioned she was staying in Montpellier, and I had an instant image of a big grey car with GB plates sliding into the traffic. 🙂 I think I might get my friend a copy of Madam Will You Talk to take with her. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  108. Bona,I'm glad you're enjoying some of the suggestions. It's why we enjoy this regular end-of-the-month column, I think — we're all eager readers and love to swap suggestions — and it's all genuine — not for any kind of promo. I'm so pleased you're enjoying Mary Stewart. Her sense of place is superb, I agree — in fact a friend of mine is going to the south of France soon and mentioned she was staying in Montpellier, and I had an instant image of a big grey car with GB plates sliding into the traffic. 🙂 I think I might get my friend a copy of Madam Will You Talk to take with her. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  109. Bona,I'm glad you're enjoying some of the suggestions. It's why we enjoy this regular end-of-the-month column, I think — we're all eager readers and love to swap suggestions — and it's all genuine — not for any kind of promo. I'm so pleased you're enjoying Mary Stewart. Her sense of place is superb, I agree — in fact a friend of mine is going to the south of France soon and mentioned she was staying in Montpellier, and I had an instant image of a big grey car with GB plates sliding into the traffic. 🙂 I think I might get my friend a copy of Madam Will You Talk to take with her. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply
  110. Bona,I'm glad you're enjoying some of the suggestions. It's why we enjoy this regular end-of-the-month column, I think — we're all eager readers and love to swap suggestions — and it's all genuine — not for any kind of promo. I'm so pleased you're enjoying Mary Stewart. Her sense of place is superb, I agree — in fact a friend of mine is going to the south of France soon and mentioned she was staying in Montpellier, and I had an instant image of a big grey car with GB plates sliding into the traffic. 🙂 I think I might get my friend a copy of Madam Will You Talk to take with her. Thanks for dropping by.

    Reply

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