WWR – What we’ve read in February

Anne here, reporting on what some of the wenches have been reading during the month of February. I say "some of the wenches" because several of us are storming towards an imminent deadline. And this month we have a lovely mixed bag for you — non-fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, alternate reality, historical and contemporaries.

We start with Andrea/Cara. Hidden Figures
This month my reading has been about heroines, though in very different contexts . . . First off, was Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly, the inspiring story of the Black women mathematicians who played such a critical—yet unsung—part in not only the U.S. Mercury and Apollo Space programs, but also in the aeronautic innovations that helped win WWII. It’s a truly amazing panorama, with heartwarming (and heartbreaking) stories of the individual women who faced the dual prejudices of race and gender but ultimately triumphed in pursuing their dreams of fulfilling their remarkable talents through courage, grace, grit and the sheer force of their brilliance.

But it’s not simply a story of brilliant women. The author paints an eye-opening portrait of segregation in the South, and how the black communities banded together to create a whole network of opportunities in business and education which allowed them to excel and achieve despite all the obstacles in their way. It’s one of the most moving books I’ve read in a long time. It ought to be required reading in schools, for it tells a story in American history that’s been hidden for far too long. (The movie is wonderful, too—I highly recommend it!)

A Twist in TimeTotally switching gears, I got an ARC of A Twist in Time by Julie McElwain, a time slip novel which features a a crack female FBI agent who slips through a “wormhole" in time in an English castle while pursuing a serial killer and finds herself in the Regency era.

This is the second book (I haven’t yet gone back to read the first one) so I don’t have all the backstory, but basically, she was lucky enough that the castle's Regency owner is a duke who’s very interested in science, and he comes to believe her story. He’s made her his ‘ward” and while she’s desperately trying to figure out how to find the hole to return to modern times, she has to try to learn Regency rules governing what a woman can and cannot do—which as you can imagine has some amusing scenes. In this book, she’s drawn in to helping prove the duke's nephew (the love interest in the book) didn’t commit an heinous murder.

Suffice it to say, it’s a fun read, with a smart, gritty female trying to fit into a totally strange world. The author does a very good job with the Regency manners and rules, and how the heroine works with a Bow Street Runner to solve the crime is well done. The cast of supporting characters is interesting, too. I’ll definitely be going back to read the first book, A Murder in Time. Penric'sDemon

Next is Mary Jo, who says: I'm a huge fan of Lois McMaster Bujold's writing, in particular her wonderful space opera Vorkosigan series, but also her fantasy novels.  Her book The Curse of Chalion is one of my all time favorite novels.    Now she's writing a series of novellas set in the same world as Chalion featuring young Penric.  Three novellas have been published and a fourth is on the way; I assume when LMB has enough, she'll publish a collection of the stories so we can watch Penric's growth.   

Here's the description of the first story, Penric's Demon:  
On his way to his betrothal, young Lord Penric comes upon a riding accident with an elderly lady on the ground, her maidservant and guardsmen distraught. As he approaches to help, he discovers that the lady is a Temple divine, servant to the five gods of this world. Her avowed god is The Bastard, "master of all disasters out of season", and with her dying breath she bequeaths her mysterious powers to Penric.  

Poor Penric!  The Temple divine's demon leaps to Penric as the best available host, and he suddenly finds that inside his head is a demon who has lived ten lives–as well as two as a horse and lioness–and they were all female.  It's like having a bunch of bossy, ribald aunts trying to run his life.  Embarrassing! But also useful since the demon carries the knowledge and experiences of those women.  This first story shows how Penric works to come to terms with the transformation of his life, and how he and the demon can become partners.  The story is a lot of fun, and it is followed by two more: Penric and the Shaman and Penric's Mission.   Penric is a very nice fellow who struggles to do his best on his unexpected path–and his best is very good!  I look forward to his continuing adventures.  

Also, for those of you who are fans of Lucy Parker's first book, ACT LIKE IT, her second, PRETTY FACE, was released recently. ($3.99)  I'd preordered it so it slid neatly onto my Kindle just as I was posting today's blog.   I've read 24% and so far it's as sharp and funny as Act Like It.

DigitaldivideNext we have Pat Rice who is recommending DIGITAL DIVIDE. Pat says: " Digital Divide is not a romance—I hesitate to even call it urban fantasy or futuristic. Perhaps Alternate Reality. The setting is very much Washington DC. The people are contemporary police and federal agents.

But before the book begins, a “mad social scientist” had created a brain implant that allows brains to connect with technology automagically. (Just think, and the computer writes your book!)

The experimental program was ended after 500 implants, leaving many of the “cyborgs” abandoned and/or not functional. Those still operating form an organization that is trying to integrate with normal society. All the cyborgs are people who were once top in their professions. They are now attempting to re-enter a world they’d once conquered when they were fully human.

The protagonist of this book was military intelligence and is attempting to fit in with normal cops. The story is action/adventure, but the cyborgs are fascinatingly human, trying to develop relationships outside of the “hive” mind. Since characterization is my favorite part of a book, I totally endorse this one!"

Susan King says: Now and then, reading so many historicals and mysteries, I just want the quick energy hit of an enjoyable contemporary, and that's what I found in Sophie Kinsella's newest, My Not So Perfect Life. I'm a Kinsella fan (particularly her delightful, romantic comedy stand-alone novels like I've Got Your Number and Wedding Night – I'm not so keen on the Shopaholic series). Kinsella

My Not So Perfect Life is one of her best, a fresh, funny and touching read. Katie Brenner is a marketing professional in London whose life isn't even close to perfect, much as she tries. The romance thread in this is truly yummy, but takes a secondary role at times. The real focus is the evolution of a conflict with her boss, the haughty Demeter, that challenges Katie to look beyond perfection to discover compassion–and her own strengths. It's a refreshing, endearing story full of surprises, and I loved it. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Fiona Hardingham, whose reading is scrumptious–and perfect for this. 

Book of kellsOn the historical side, I picked up an older book, The Book of Kells by R.A. MacAvoy, and I'm happily working my way through it. This is a time-slip tale of an Irish professor and Canadian artist who discover a mysterious portal that brings, first, a girl from ancient Ireland into the artist's bathroom–and shortly enough, brings all of them back to her time. As they travel through early Ireland fighting Viking invaders and looking for a way back to the modern world, the mystical properties of Celtic art spiral into a mystery holding the secret of their destinies. This is an old-school, richly detailed novel, beautifully wrought, and I'm loving it and wondering why I didn't read it years ago!  

Anne here. I've been reading books for the RITA competition and also the R*BY competition (from Romance writers of America, and RWAustralia respectively) and thus I can't discuss them. So as a result I don't have as many books to talk about as usual. On SecondThought

I did manage to squeeze in Kristan Higgins' ON SECOND THOUGHT, which was, as always, a very good read. Kristin has the knack of exploring some of the issues that women today face, and somehow manages to do it with a light enough touch that it's an enjoyable and entertaining read—and sometimes laugh out loud— while still going deep. This is more towards the "womens fiction" end of the spectrum than romance, but still highly recommended.

I've also recently glommed a series by Ilona Andrews, the first two books of which are CLEAN SWEEP and SWEEP IN PEACE. I have the third waiting on my kindle. These are paranormals with an element of sci-fi as well, with aliens and space thrown in. Entertaining, with good characterization and world building, I'm looking forward to reading the third book in the series, which is waiting on my kindle. I'll also definitely read more of Ilona Andrews.

GuernseyPotatoPeelPieFinally I recently reread The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows. If you haven't read it, I recommend you try at once. With a very subtle and gently evolving romance, it's really about people in small island community, and reveals through a series of letters from a range of people, a little of what it was like in Guernsey under the Nazi occupation — something I knew nothing about. But it's not a gut-wrenching torrid read — it's heart-warming and uplifting and delightful. 

And that's it for us this month. So, over to you, what have you been reading in the last month, and what do you recommend?

180 thoughts on “WWR – What we’ve read in February”

  1. I gobbled up Lisa Kleypas’s Devil in Spring and loved every page. It is light-hearted and lovely with an unconventional heroine and a swoon-worthy hero. I love these second-generation romances from James and Kleypas. I just started Sarah Morgan’s New York, Actually. She is one of my favorite contemporary romance writers, so my expectations are high. I have another ARC that I am both eager and reluctant to read–Jo Beverley’s Merely a Marriage. I know it will be a great read, but knowing it is her final book makes me sad.
    Another book that is stirring mixed emotions is To the Left of Time, the last poetry collection of Thomas Lux, who died earlier this month. Many of the poems are true gems, wise and witty. I love the way some of them offer an understated narrative and end with a revelatory couplet. I’d love the collection if only for this line: “In fact, I believe algebra is a conspiracy.” 🙂 But there is much more to enjoy, to ponder, and to feel sad that his voice is now silent.
    On a more cheerful note, congratulations to Wench Anne on her spectacular five (!) Australian Romance Readers Awards.

    Reply
  2. I gobbled up Lisa Kleypas’s Devil in Spring and loved every page. It is light-hearted and lovely with an unconventional heroine and a swoon-worthy hero. I love these second-generation romances from James and Kleypas. I just started Sarah Morgan’s New York, Actually. She is one of my favorite contemporary romance writers, so my expectations are high. I have another ARC that I am both eager and reluctant to read–Jo Beverley’s Merely a Marriage. I know it will be a great read, but knowing it is her final book makes me sad.
    Another book that is stirring mixed emotions is To the Left of Time, the last poetry collection of Thomas Lux, who died earlier this month. Many of the poems are true gems, wise and witty. I love the way some of them offer an understated narrative and end with a revelatory couplet. I’d love the collection if only for this line: “In fact, I believe algebra is a conspiracy.” 🙂 But there is much more to enjoy, to ponder, and to feel sad that his voice is now silent.
    On a more cheerful note, congratulations to Wench Anne on her spectacular five (!) Australian Romance Readers Awards.

    Reply
  3. I gobbled up Lisa Kleypas’s Devil in Spring and loved every page. It is light-hearted and lovely with an unconventional heroine and a swoon-worthy hero. I love these second-generation romances from James and Kleypas. I just started Sarah Morgan’s New York, Actually. She is one of my favorite contemporary romance writers, so my expectations are high. I have another ARC that I am both eager and reluctant to read–Jo Beverley’s Merely a Marriage. I know it will be a great read, but knowing it is her final book makes me sad.
    Another book that is stirring mixed emotions is To the Left of Time, the last poetry collection of Thomas Lux, who died earlier this month. Many of the poems are true gems, wise and witty. I love the way some of them offer an understated narrative and end with a revelatory couplet. I’d love the collection if only for this line: “In fact, I believe algebra is a conspiracy.” 🙂 But there is much more to enjoy, to ponder, and to feel sad that his voice is now silent.
    On a more cheerful note, congratulations to Wench Anne on her spectacular five (!) Australian Romance Readers Awards.

    Reply
  4. I gobbled up Lisa Kleypas’s Devil in Spring and loved every page. It is light-hearted and lovely with an unconventional heroine and a swoon-worthy hero. I love these second-generation romances from James and Kleypas. I just started Sarah Morgan’s New York, Actually. She is one of my favorite contemporary romance writers, so my expectations are high. I have another ARC that I am both eager and reluctant to read–Jo Beverley’s Merely a Marriage. I know it will be a great read, but knowing it is her final book makes me sad.
    Another book that is stirring mixed emotions is To the Left of Time, the last poetry collection of Thomas Lux, who died earlier this month. Many of the poems are true gems, wise and witty. I love the way some of them offer an understated narrative and end with a revelatory couplet. I’d love the collection if only for this line: “In fact, I believe algebra is a conspiracy.” 🙂 But there is much more to enjoy, to ponder, and to feel sad that his voice is now silent.
    On a more cheerful note, congratulations to Wench Anne on her spectacular five (!) Australian Romance Readers Awards.

    Reply
  5. I gobbled up Lisa Kleypas’s Devil in Spring and loved every page. It is light-hearted and lovely with an unconventional heroine and a swoon-worthy hero. I love these second-generation romances from James and Kleypas. I just started Sarah Morgan’s New York, Actually. She is one of my favorite contemporary romance writers, so my expectations are high. I have another ARC that I am both eager and reluctant to read–Jo Beverley’s Merely a Marriage. I know it will be a great read, but knowing it is her final book makes me sad.
    Another book that is stirring mixed emotions is To the Left of Time, the last poetry collection of Thomas Lux, who died earlier this month. Many of the poems are true gems, wise and witty. I love the way some of them offer an understated narrative and end with a revelatory couplet. I’d love the collection if only for this line: “In fact, I believe algebra is a conspiracy.” 🙂 But there is much more to enjoy, to ponder, and to feel sad that his voice is now silent.
    On a more cheerful note, congratulations to Wench Anne on her spectacular five (!) Australian Romance Readers Awards.

    Reply
  6. Janga–as always, you have many wonderful suggestions! Like Word Wench readers, I also look forward to the month’s recommendations, and always find intriguing new things. I do like the idea that “algebra is a conspiracy.” *G*

    Reply
  7. Janga–as always, you have many wonderful suggestions! Like Word Wench readers, I also look forward to the month’s recommendations, and always find intriguing new things. I do like the idea that “algebra is a conspiracy.” *G*

    Reply
  8. Janga–as always, you have many wonderful suggestions! Like Word Wench readers, I also look forward to the month’s recommendations, and always find intriguing new things. I do like the idea that “algebra is a conspiracy.” *G*

    Reply
  9. Janga–as always, you have many wonderful suggestions! Like Word Wench readers, I also look forward to the month’s recommendations, and always find intriguing new things. I do like the idea that “algebra is a conspiracy.” *G*

    Reply
  10. Janga–as always, you have many wonderful suggestions! Like Word Wench readers, I also look forward to the month’s recommendations, and always find intriguing new things. I do like the idea that “algebra is a conspiracy.” *G*

    Reply
  11. Thank you for those recommendations, Janga. I’ve been eying off the new Lisa Kleypas (she’s one of my auto-buy authors) but haven’t had time yet. A reward to come. And I also have Jo’s last book and have been too sad to read it.And I’ve enjoyed all of Sarah Morgan’s New York books and am looking forward to the next one.
    “Algebra is a conspiracy” is wonderful. I heartily concur. 😉
    And thanks for your kind congratulations on the ARRA awards. It was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  12. Thank you for those recommendations, Janga. I’ve been eying off the new Lisa Kleypas (she’s one of my auto-buy authors) but haven’t had time yet. A reward to come. And I also have Jo’s last book and have been too sad to read it.And I’ve enjoyed all of Sarah Morgan’s New York books and am looking forward to the next one.
    “Algebra is a conspiracy” is wonderful. I heartily concur. 😉
    And thanks for your kind congratulations on the ARRA awards. It was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  13. Thank you for those recommendations, Janga. I’ve been eying off the new Lisa Kleypas (she’s one of my auto-buy authors) but haven’t had time yet. A reward to come. And I also have Jo’s last book and have been too sad to read it.And I’ve enjoyed all of Sarah Morgan’s New York books and am looking forward to the next one.
    “Algebra is a conspiracy” is wonderful. I heartily concur. 😉
    And thanks for your kind congratulations on the ARRA awards. It was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  14. Thank you for those recommendations, Janga. I’ve been eying off the new Lisa Kleypas (she’s one of my auto-buy authors) but haven’t had time yet. A reward to come. And I also have Jo’s last book and have been too sad to read it.And I’ve enjoyed all of Sarah Morgan’s New York books and am looking forward to the next one.
    “Algebra is a conspiracy” is wonderful. I heartily concur. 😉
    And thanks for your kind congratulations on the ARRA awards. It was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  15. Thank you for those recommendations, Janga. I’ve been eying off the new Lisa Kleypas (she’s one of my auto-buy authors) but haven’t had time yet. A reward to come. And I also have Jo’s last book and have been too sad to read it.And I’ve enjoyed all of Sarah Morgan’s New York books and am looking forward to the next one.
    “Algebra is a conspiracy” is wonderful. I heartily concur. 😉
    And thanks for your kind congratulations on the ARRA awards. It was a very exciting night for me.

    Reply
  16. I settled into reading some of Nicholas Sparks that were waiting in my to be read pile. I read “Nights in Rodanthe”, “Message in a Bottle”, and “The Wedding” all this month. I have enjoyed all of his books and read all but a couple of his newer ones. They all were wonderful insights at different loves. “The Wedding” I think was one of my favorites since it was about a couple already married instead of just finding the love of your life. I also read Jodi Picoult’s “Salem Falls” which I just finished today so the last book I will be reading for the month. Also had a touch of romance in it. Definitely enjoyed all the books I read this month and looking forward to next month’s reading, not sure what books will be picked off my pile but sure they will be enjoyable!

    Reply
  17. I settled into reading some of Nicholas Sparks that were waiting in my to be read pile. I read “Nights in Rodanthe”, “Message in a Bottle”, and “The Wedding” all this month. I have enjoyed all of his books and read all but a couple of his newer ones. They all were wonderful insights at different loves. “The Wedding” I think was one of my favorites since it was about a couple already married instead of just finding the love of your life. I also read Jodi Picoult’s “Salem Falls” which I just finished today so the last book I will be reading for the month. Also had a touch of romance in it. Definitely enjoyed all the books I read this month and looking forward to next month’s reading, not sure what books will be picked off my pile but sure they will be enjoyable!

    Reply
  18. I settled into reading some of Nicholas Sparks that were waiting in my to be read pile. I read “Nights in Rodanthe”, “Message in a Bottle”, and “The Wedding” all this month. I have enjoyed all of his books and read all but a couple of his newer ones. They all were wonderful insights at different loves. “The Wedding” I think was one of my favorites since it was about a couple already married instead of just finding the love of your life. I also read Jodi Picoult’s “Salem Falls” which I just finished today so the last book I will be reading for the month. Also had a touch of romance in it. Definitely enjoyed all the books I read this month and looking forward to next month’s reading, not sure what books will be picked off my pile but sure they will be enjoyable!

    Reply
  19. I settled into reading some of Nicholas Sparks that were waiting in my to be read pile. I read “Nights in Rodanthe”, “Message in a Bottle”, and “The Wedding” all this month. I have enjoyed all of his books and read all but a couple of his newer ones. They all were wonderful insights at different loves. “The Wedding” I think was one of my favorites since it was about a couple already married instead of just finding the love of your life. I also read Jodi Picoult’s “Salem Falls” which I just finished today so the last book I will be reading for the month. Also had a touch of romance in it. Definitely enjoyed all the books I read this month and looking forward to next month’s reading, not sure what books will be picked off my pile but sure they will be enjoyable!

    Reply
  20. I settled into reading some of Nicholas Sparks that were waiting in my to be read pile. I read “Nights in Rodanthe”, “Message in a Bottle”, and “The Wedding” all this month. I have enjoyed all of his books and read all but a couple of his newer ones. They all were wonderful insights at different loves. “The Wedding” I think was one of my favorites since it was about a couple already married instead of just finding the love of your life. I also read Jodi Picoult’s “Salem Falls” which I just finished today so the last book I will be reading for the month. Also had a touch of romance in it. Definitely enjoyed all the books I read this month and looking forward to next month’s reading, not sure what books will be picked off my pile but sure they will be enjoyable!

    Reply
  21. Some recent reads here ~
    — Once Upon A Dream by Mary Balogh and Grace Burrowes: a collection of two historical romance novellas. I enjoyed the Mary Balogh story a bit more as some of the characters have appeared in other of her books.
    — I also finished and very much enjoyed Scrap Metal by Harper Fox which is a contemporary romance featuring two men. This is a book I’ll likely re-read.
    — I began three young adult books recently all of which I’ve put aside after reading about 100 pages or so. I may give them a try some other time as all seemed intriguing but just weren’t right for me now. Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton, Iceling by Sasha Stephenson, and Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee
    — the historical romance The Virgin and the Viscount: The Bachelor Lords of London by Charis Michaels. It was an enjoyable read but likely not a book I’ll re-read; there were a few too many coincidences for my taste.
    — re-read Strong Signal (Cyberlove Book 1) by Megan Erickson and Santino Hassell
    — The Queen of Blood: Book One of The Queens of Renthia by Sarah Beth Durst: really enjoyed it. I look forward to reading on in what I think will be a five book series.
    — enjoyed the male/male romance Whiteout (Seasons of Love Book 1) by Elyse Springer. I wasn’t quite sure where the story was going which was a pleasant change also there was a Rent (a favorite musical) connection.
    — the historical romance Lady Claire Is All That by Maya Rodale. It was a pleasant read but not a book I expect to re-read. It was rather anachronistic.
    — the historical romance Duke of Pleasure (Maiden Lane) by Elizabeth Hoyt which I enjoyed. This is the twelfth book in the Maiden Lane series, but it stands alone pretty well. The setting is London in the 1740s.
    — re-read the male/male regency era romance The Soldier’s Scoundrel by Cat Sebastian
    — a couple of shorter works ~ My favorite of the two was the historical romance Wanted, A Gentleman by KJ Charles. This was set in London in 1805 and was fairly unique in that it featured a free Black man (an ex-slave) as one of its heroes; the other main lead was the owner of a matrimonial wants ads publication. I enjoyed it and will almost certainly re-read it. I also read Unwrapping Her Perfect Match: A London Legends Christmas Romance by Kat Latham. I enjoyed this, but I don’t think I’ll be re-reading it.
    — I just finished a book that might interest some others here.
    It has ~
    — magical realism as a character sees words (names, dates, stories) written on the faces and bodies of others
    — an Eastern European connection as part of the story (a small part, admittedly) takes place in Lithuania
    — a mystery (not a who done it? but rather a what really happened?)
    — a pilgrimage
    — a young man who reads Latin
    — a pair of red shoes
    — blurbs by some big names such as Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Gail Godwin, three-time National Book Award finalist
    It was an excellent read, and I recommend it. Indelible by Adelia Saunders

    Reply
  22. Some recent reads here ~
    — Once Upon A Dream by Mary Balogh and Grace Burrowes: a collection of two historical romance novellas. I enjoyed the Mary Balogh story a bit more as some of the characters have appeared in other of her books.
    — I also finished and very much enjoyed Scrap Metal by Harper Fox which is a contemporary romance featuring two men. This is a book I’ll likely re-read.
    — I began three young adult books recently all of which I’ve put aside after reading about 100 pages or so. I may give them a try some other time as all seemed intriguing but just weren’t right for me now. Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton, Iceling by Sasha Stephenson, and Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee
    — the historical romance The Virgin and the Viscount: The Bachelor Lords of London by Charis Michaels. It was an enjoyable read but likely not a book I’ll re-read; there were a few too many coincidences for my taste.
    — re-read Strong Signal (Cyberlove Book 1) by Megan Erickson and Santino Hassell
    — The Queen of Blood: Book One of The Queens of Renthia by Sarah Beth Durst: really enjoyed it. I look forward to reading on in what I think will be a five book series.
    — enjoyed the male/male romance Whiteout (Seasons of Love Book 1) by Elyse Springer. I wasn’t quite sure where the story was going which was a pleasant change also there was a Rent (a favorite musical) connection.
    — the historical romance Lady Claire Is All That by Maya Rodale. It was a pleasant read but not a book I expect to re-read. It was rather anachronistic.
    — the historical romance Duke of Pleasure (Maiden Lane) by Elizabeth Hoyt which I enjoyed. This is the twelfth book in the Maiden Lane series, but it stands alone pretty well. The setting is London in the 1740s.
    — re-read the male/male regency era romance The Soldier’s Scoundrel by Cat Sebastian
    — a couple of shorter works ~ My favorite of the two was the historical romance Wanted, A Gentleman by KJ Charles. This was set in London in 1805 and was fairly unique in that it featured a free Black man (an ex-slave) as one of its heroes; the other main lead was the owner of a matrimonial wants ads publication. I enjoyed it and will almost certainly re-read it. I also read Unwrapping Her Perfect Match: A London Legends Christmas Romance by Kat Latham. I enjoyed this, but I don’t think I’ll be re-reading it.
    — I just finished a book that might interest some others here.
    It has ~
    — magical realism as a character sees words (names, dates, stories) written on the faces and bodies of others
    — an Eastern European connection as part of the story (a small part, admittedly) takes place in Lithuania
    — a mystery (not a who done it? but rather a what really happened?)
    — a pilgrimage
    — a young man who reads Latin
    — a pair of red shoes
    — blurbs by some big names such as Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Gail Godwin, three-time National Book Award finalist
    It was an excellent read, and I recommend it. Indelible by Adelia Saunders

    Reply
  23. Some recent reads here ~
    — Once Upon A Dream by Mary Balogh and Grace Burrowes: a collection of two historical romance novellas. I enjoyed the Mary Balogh story a bit more as some of the characters have appeared in other of her books.
    — I also finished and very much enjoyed Scrap Metal by Harper Fox which is a contemporary romance featuring two men. This is a book I’ll likely re-read.
    — I began three young adult books recently all of which I’ve put aside after reading about 100 pages or so. I may give them a try some other time as all seemed intriguing but just weren’t right for me now. Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton, Iceling by Sasha Stephenson, and Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee
    — the historical romance The Virgin and the Viscount: The Bachelor Lords of London by Charis Michaels. It was an enjoyable read but likely not a book I’ll re-read; there were a few too many coincidences for my taste.
    — re-read Strong Signal (Cyberlove Book 1) by Megan Erickson and Santino Hassell
    — The Queen of Blood: Book One of The Queens of Renthia by Sarah Beth Durst: really enjoyed it. I look forward to reading on in what I think will be a five book series.
    — enjoyed the male/male romance Whiteout (Seasons of Love Book 1) by Elyse Springer. I wasn’t quite sure where the story was going which was a pleasant change also there was a Rent (a favorite musical) connection.
    — the historical romance Lady Claire Is All That by Maya Rodale. It was a pleasant read but not a book I expect to re-read. It was rather anachronistic.
    — the historical romance Duke of Pleasure (Maiden Lane) by Elizabeth Hoyt which I enjoyed. This is the twelfth book in the Maiden Lane series, but it stands alone pretty well. The setting is London in the 1740s.
    — re-read the male/male regency era romance The Soldier’s Scoundrel by Cat Sebastian
    — a couple of shorter works ~ My favorite of the two was the historical romance Wanted, A Gentleman by KJ Charles. This was set in London in 1805 and was fairly unique in that it featured a free Black man (an ex-slave) as one of its heroes; the other main lead was the owner of a matrimonial wants ads publication. I enjoyed it and will almost certainly re-read it. I also read Unwrapping Her Perfect Match: A London Legends Christmas Romance by Kat Latham. I enjoyed this, but I don’t think I’ll be re-reading it.
    — I just finished a book that might interest some others here.
    It has ~
    — magical realism as a character sees words (names, dates, stories) written on the faces and bodies of others
    — an Eastern European connection as part of the story (a small part, admittedly) takes place in Lithuania
    — a mystery (not a who done it? but rather a what really happened?)
    — a pilgrimage
    — a young man who reads Latin
    — a pair of red shoes
    — blurbs by some big names such as Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Gail Godwin, three-time National Book Award finalist
    It was an excellent read, and I recommend it. Indelible by Adelia Saunders

    Reply
  24. Some recent reads here ~
    — Once Upon A Dream by Mary Balogh and Grace Burrowes: a collection of two historical romance novellas. I enjoyed the Mary Balogh story a bit more as some of the characters have appeared in other of her books.
    — I also finished and very much enjoyed Scrap Metal by Harper Fox which is a contemporary romance featuring two men. This is a book I’ll likely re-read.
    — I began three young adult books recently all of which I’ve put aside after reading about 100 pages or so. I may give them a try some other time as all seemed intriguing but just weren’t right for me now. Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton, Iceling by Sasha Stephenson, and Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee
    — the historical romance The Virgin and the Viscount: The Bachelor Lords of London by Charis Michaels. It was an enjoyable read but likely not a book I’ll re-read; there were a few too many coincidences for my taste.
    — re-read Strong Signal (Cyberlove Book 1) by Megan Erickson and Santino Hassell
    — The Queen of Blood: Book One of The Queens of Renthia by Sarah Beth Durst: really enjoyed it. I look forward to reading on in what I think will be a five book series.
    — enjoyed the male/male romance Whiteout (Seasons of Love Book 1) by Elyse Springer. I wasn’t quite sure where the story was going which was a pleasant change also there was a Rent (a favorite musical) connection.
    — the historical romance Lady Claire Is All That by Maya Rodale. It was a pleasant read but not a book I expect to re-read. It was rather anachronistic.
    — the historical romance Duke of Pleasure (Maiden Lane) by Elizabeth Hoyt which I enjoyed. This is the twelfth book in the Maiden Lane series, but it stands alone pretty well. The setting is London in the 1740s.
    — re-read the male/male regency era romance The Soldier’s Scoundrel by Cat Sebastian
    — a couple of shorter works ~ My favorite of the two was the historical romance Wanted, A Gentleman by KJ Charles. This was set in London in 1805 and was fairly unique in that it featured a free Black man (an ex-slave) as one of its heroes; the other main lead was the owner of a matrimonial wants ads publication. I enjoyed it and will almost certainly re-read it. I also read Unwrapping Her Perfect Match: A London Legends Christmas Romance by Kat Latham. I enjoyed this, but I don’t think I’ll be re-reading it.
    — I just finished a book that might interest some others here.
    It has ~
    — magical realism as a character sees words (names, dates, stories) written on the faces and bodies of others
    — an Eastern European connection as part of the story (a small part, admittedly) takes place in Lithuania
    — a mystery (not a who done it? but rather a what really happened?)
    — a pilgrimage
    — a young man who reads Latin
    — a pair of red shoes
    — blurbs by some big names such as Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Gail Godwin, three-time National Book Award finalist
    It was an excellent read, and I recommend it. Indelible by Adelia Saunders

    Reply
  25. Some recent reads here ~
    — Once Upon A Dream by Mary Balogh and Grace Burrowes: a collection of two historical romance novellas. I enjoyed the Mary Balogh story a bit more as some of the characters have appeared in other of her books.
    — I also finished and very much enjoyed Scrap Metal by Harper Fox which is a contemporary romance featuring two men. This is a book I’ll likely re-read.
    — I began three young adult books recently all of which I’ve put aside after reading about 100 pages or so. I may give them a try some other time as all seemed intriguing but just weren’t right for me now. Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton, Iceling by Sasha Stephenson, and Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee
    — the historical romance The Virgin and the Viscount: The Bachelor Lords of London by Charis Michaels. It was an enjoyable read but likely not a book I’ll re-read; there were a few too many coincidences for my taste.
    — re-read Strong Signal (Cyberlove Book 1) by Megan Erickson and Santino Hassell
    — The Queen of Blood: Book One of The Queens of Renthia by Sarah Beth Durst: really enjoyed it. I look forward to reading on in what I think will be a five book series.
    — enjoyed the male/male romance Whiteout (Seasons of Love Book 1) by Elyse Springer. I wasn’t quite sure where the story was going which was a pleasant change also there was a Rent (a favorite musical) connection.
    — the historical romance Lady Claire Is All That by Maya Rodale. It was a pleasant read but not a book I expect to re-read. It was rather anachronistic.
    — the historical romance Duke of Pleasure (Maiden Lane) by Elizabeth Hoyt which I enjoyed. This is the twelfth book in the Maiden Lane series, but it stands alone pretty well. The setting is London in the 1740s.
    — re-read the male/male regency era romance The Soldier’s Scoundrel by Cat Sebastian
    — a couple of shorter works ~ My favorite of the two was the historical romance Wanted, A Gentleman by KJ Charles. This was set in London in 1805 and was fairly unique in that it featured a free Black man (an ex-slave) as one of its heroes; the other main lead was the owner of a matrimonial wants ads publication. I enjoyed it and will almost certainly re-read it. I also read Unwrapping Her Perfect Match: A London Legends Christmas Romance by Kat Latham. I enjoyed this, but I don’t think I’ll be re-reading it.
    — I just finished a book that might interest some others here.
    It has ~
    — magical realism as a character sees words (names, dates, stories) written on the faces and bodies of others
    — an Eastern European connection as part of the story (a small part, admittedly) takes place in Lithuania
    — a mystery (not a who done it? but rather a what really happened?)
    — a pilgrimage
    — a young man who reads Latin
    — a pair of red shoes
    — blurbs by some big names such as Viet Thanh Nguyen, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Gail Godwin, three-time National Book Award finalist
    It was an excellent read, and I recommend it. Indelible by Adelia Saunders

    Reply
  26. I read an ARC of A Letter from Italy by Pamela Hart, set in 1917 during WW1. Its got adventure and romance and features both the terror of war and one woman’s determination to become a war correspondent even although the position was closed to women. Rebecca Quinn’s character was inspired by the true story of Louise Mack, the world’s first woman war journalist. Most of all it’s really beautifully written. I really felt I had stepped back in time. It was a book that I just wanted to hold close to my heart and treasure once I’d read the final page and not start anything else – at least for a few days :). Pamela has written 3 books set in this era, all standalone. The War Bride is short-listed for a RoNA from the British Romantic Novelists Association.
    In the interests of full disclosure, I read A Letter from Italy for work – but most work books definitely don’t touch my heart like this one.

    Reply
  27. I read an ARC of A Letter from Italy by Pamela Hart, set in 1917 during WW1. Its got adventure and romance and features both the terror of war and one woman’s determination to become a war correspondent even although the position was closed to women. Rebecca Quinn’s character was inspired by the true story of Louise Mack, the world’s first woman war journalist. Most of all it’s really beautifully written. I really felt I had stepped back in time. It was a book that I just wanted to hold close to my heart and treasure once I’d read the final page and not start anything else – at least for a few days :). Pamela has written 3 books set in this era, all standalone. The War Bride is short-listed for a RoNA from the British Romantic Novelists Association.
    In the interests of full disclosure, I read A Letter from Italy for work – but most work books definitely don’t touch my heart like this one.

    Reply
  28. I read an ARC of A Letter from Italy by Pamela Hart, set in 1917 during WW1. Its got adventure and romance and features both the terror of war and one woman’s determination to become a war correspondent even although the position was closed to women. Rebecca Quinn’s character was inspired by the true story of Louise Mack, the world’s first woman war journalist. Most of all it’s really beautifully written. I really felt I had stepped back in time. It was a book that I just wanted to hold close to my heart and treasure once I’d read the final page and not start anything else – at least for a few days :). Pamela has written 3 books set in this era, all standalone. The War Bride is short-listed for a RoNA from the British Romantic Novelists Association.
    In the interests of full disclosure, I read A Letter from Italy for work – but most work books definitely don’t touch my heart like this one.

    Reply
  29. I read an ARC of A Letter from Italy by Pamela Hart, set in 1917 during WW1. Its got adventure and romance and features both the terror of war and one woman’s determination to become a war correspondent even although the position was closed to women. Rebecca Quinn’s character was inspired by the true story of Louise Mack, the world’s first woman war journalist. Most of all it’s really beautifully written. I really felt I had stepped back in time. It was a book that I just wanted to hold close to my heart and treasure once I’d read the final page and not start anything else – at least for a few days :). Pamela has written 3 books set in this era, all standalone. The War Bride is short-listed for a RoNA from the British Romantic Novelists Association.
    In the interests of full disclosure, I read A Letter from Italy for work – but most work books definitely don’t touch my heart like this one.

    Reply
  30. I read an ARC of A Letter from Italy by Pamela Hart, set in 1917 during WW1. Its got adventure and romance and features both the terror of war and one woman’s determination to become a war correspondent even although the position was closed to women. Rebecca Quinn’s character was inspired by the true story of Louise Mack, the world’s first woman war journalist. Most of all it’s really beautifully written. I really felt I had stepped back in time. It was a book that I just wanted to hold close to my heart and treasure once I’d read the final page and not start anything else – at least for a few days :). Pamela has written 3 books set in this era, all standalone. The War Bride is short-listed for a RoNA from the British Romantic Novelists Association.
    In the interests of full disclosure, I read A Letter from Italy for work – but most work books definitely don’t touch my heart like this one.

    Reply
  31. I don’t have any new recommendations this month. I am enjoying a splurge of Jo Beverley novels. I have discovered a new-to-me manner of reading during such a splurge. I read two novels, set in the Malloren world than two novels set in the Rogues world. It has been fun reading this way!

    Reply
  32. I don’t have any new recommendations this month. I am enjoying a splurge of Jo Beverley novels. I have discovered a new-to-me manner of reading during such a splurge. I read two novels, set in the Malloren world than two novels set in the Rogues world. It has been fun reading this way!

    Reply
  33. I don’t have any new recommendations this month. I am enjoying a splurge of Jo Beverley novels. I have discovered a new-to-me manner of reading during such a splurge. I read two novels, set in the Malloren world than two novels set in the Rogues world. It has been fun reading this way!

    Reply
  34. I don’t have any new recommendations this month. I am enjoying a splurge of Jo Beverley novels. I have discovered a new-to-me manner of reading during such a splurge. I read two novels, set in the Malloren world than two novels set in the Rogues world. It has been fun reading this way!

    Reply
  35. I don’t have any new recommendations this month. I am enjoying a splurge of Jo Beverley novels. I have discovered a new-to-me manner of reading during such a splurge. I read two novels, set in the Malloren world than two novels set in the Rogues world. It has been fun reading this way!

    Reply
  36. I always look forward to this column for the wonderful recommendations from the wenches AND their readers! I finally followed many such recommendations and tried Darynda Jones and liked her very much. I’m looking forward to starting the 2nd book soon. I also devoured Sherry Thomas’ The One in My Heart (I’m pretty sure I could read her shopping lists if she published them). She’s experimented with multiple genres and has succeeded in all of them. Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue had been on a list of Obama’s favorite books, and I found it to be touching and thought-provoking, and I was very glad I read it. And The Likeness by Tana French proved to be, as many reviews said, even better than her first book. For me it passed an important test: it was a long book that I hesitated to read, and even when I started it wasn’t sure I could persevere, but when I finished it, I hated saying good-bye. Now I’ve got to run and look up Indelible, A Twist in Time, and a few others. Thank you!!!

    Reply
  37. I always look forward to this column for the wonderful recommendations from the wenches AND their readers! I finally followed many such recommendations and tried Darynda Jones and liked her very much. I’m looking forward to starting the 2nd book soon. I also devoured Sherry Thomas’ The One in My Heart (I’m pretty sure I could read her shopping lists if she published them). She’s experimented with multiple genres and has succeeded in all of them. Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue had been on a list of Obama’s favorite books, and I found it to be touching and thought-provoking, and I was very glad I read it. And The Likeness by Tana French proved to be, as many reviews said, even better than her first book. For me it passed an important test: it was a long book that I hesitated to read, and even when I started it wasn’t sure I could persevere, but when I finished it, I hated saying good-bye. Now I’ve got to run and look up Indelible, A Twist in Time, and a few others. Thank you!!!

    Reply
  38. I always look forward to this column for the wonderful recommendations from the wenches AND their readers! I finally followed many such recommendations and tried Darynda Jones and liked her very much. I’m looking forward to starting the 2nd book soon. I also devoured Sherry Thomas’ The One in My Heart (I’m pretty sure I could read her shopping lists if she published them). She’s experimented with multiple genres and has succeeded in all of them. Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue had been on a list of Obama’s favorite books, and I found it to be touching and thought-provoking, and I was very glad I read it. And The Likeness by Tana French proved to be, as many reviews said, even better than her first book. For me it passed an important test: it was a long book that I hesitated to read, and even when I started it wasn’t sure I could persevere, but when I finished it, I hated saying good-bye. Now I’ve got to run and look up Indelible, A Twist in Time, and a few others. Thank you!!!

    Reply
  39. I always look forward to this column for the wonderful recommendations from the wenches AND their readers! I finally followed many such recommendations and tried Darynda Jones and liked her very much. I’m looking forward to starting the 2nd book soon. I also devoured Sherry Thomas’ The One in My Heart (I’m pretty sure I could read her shopping lists if she published them). She’s experimented with multiple genres and has succeeded in all of them. Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue had been on a list of Obama’s favorite books, and I found it to be touching and thought-provoking, and I was very glad I read it. And The Likeness by Tana French proved to be, as many reviews said, even better than her first book. For me it passed an important test: it was a long book that I hesitated to read, and even when I started it wasn’t sure I could persevere, but when I finished it, I hated saying good-bye. Now I’ve got to run and look up Indelible, A Twist in Time, and a few others. Thank you!!!

    Reply
  40. I always look forward to this column for the wonderful recommendations from the wenches AND their readers! I finally followed many such recommendations and tried Darynda Jones and liked her very much. I’m looking forward to starting the 2nd book soon. I also devoured Sherry Thomas’ The One in My Heart (I’m pretty sure I could read her shopping lists if she published them). She’s experimented with multiple genres and has succeeded in all of them. Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue had been on a list of Obama’s favorite books, and I found it to be touching and thought-provoking, and I was very glad I read it. And The Likeness by Tana French proved to be, as many reviews said, even better than her first book. For me it passed an important test: it was a long book that I hesitated to read, and even when I started it wasn’t sure I could persevere, but when I finished it, I hated saying good-bye. Now I’ve got to run and look up Indelible, A Twist in Time, and a few others. Thank you!!!

    Reply
  41. Thanks to everyone for adding to my huge list of TBR’s. I recently finished Someone To Hold by Mary Balogh. An oldie Cheltenham Square Murder by John Bude. Murder in a Cornish Alehouse by Kathy Lynn Emerson. And Four Nights with the Duke by Eloisa James. All of those were terrific reads. I also read some others which did not excite me so much.
    I agree that I am so pleased for Anne and her honors. G

    Reply
  42. Thanks to everyone for adding to my huge list of TBR’s. I recently finished Someone To Hold by Mary Balogh. An oldie Cheltenham Square Murder by John Bude. Murder in a Cornish Alehouse by Kathy Lynn Emerson. And Four Nights with the Duke by Eloisa James. All of those were terrific reads. I also read some others which did not excite me so much.
    I agree that I am so pleased for Anne and her honors. G

    Reply
  43. Thanks to everyone for adding to my huge list of TBR’s. I recently finished Someone To Hold by Mary Balogh. An oldie Cheltenham Square Murder by John Bude. Murder in a Cornish Alehouse by Kathy Lynn Emerson. And Four Nights with the Duke by Eloisa James. All of those were terrific reads. I also read some others which did not excite me so much.
    I agree that I am so pleased for Anne and her honors. G

    Reply
  44. Thanks to everyone for adding to my huge list of TBR’s. I recently finished Someone To Hold by Mary Balogh. An oldie Cheltenham Square Murder by John Bude. Murder in a Cornish Alehouse by Kathy Lynn Emerson. And Four Nights with the Duke by Eloisa James. All of those were terrific reads. I also read some others which did not excite me so much.
    I agree that I am so pleased for Anne and her honors. G

    Reply
  45. Thanks to everyone for adding to my huge list of TBR’s. I recently finished Someone To Hold by Mary Balogh. An oldie Cheltenham Square Murder by John Bude. Murder in a Cornish Alehouse by Kathy Lynn Emerson. And Four Nights with the Duke by Eloisa James. All of those were terrific reads. I also read some others which did not excite me so much.
    I agree that I am so pleased for Anne and her honors. G

    Reply
  46. Look at all those lovely recommendations! And bonus for all the time slip novels, since that’s what I write and someday hope to get published 🙂 Thanks to the Word Wenches for being a constant source of delight and inspiration.

    Reply
  47. Look at all those lovely recommendations! And bonus for all the time slip novels, since that’s what I write and someday hope to get published 🙂 Thanks to the Word Wenches for being a constant source of delight and inspiration.

    Reply
  48. Look at all those lovely recommendations! And bonus for all the time slip novels, since that’s what I write and someday hope to get published 🙂 Thanks to the Word Wenches for being a constant source of delight and inspiration.

    Reply
  49. Look at all those lovely recommendations! And bonus for all the time slip novels, since that’s what I write and someday hope to get published 🙂 Thanks to the Word Wenches for being a constant source of delight and inspiration.

    Reply
  50. Look at all those lovely recommendations! And bonus for all the time slip novels, since that’s what I write and someday hope to get published 🙂 Thanks to the Word Wenches for being a constant source of delight and inspiration.

    Reply
  51. I love when ye do these ‘what we’ve been reading’ posts. I get so many new recommendations. I haven’t read Hidden Figures yet but I’ve seen the film. It’s fantastic!!! I’d recommend it to anyone.
    Looking forward to Twist in Time and Book of Kells.

    Reply
  52. I love when ye do these ‘what we’ve been reading’ posts. I get so many new recommendations. I haven’t read Hidden Figures yet but I’ve seen the film. It’s fantastic!!! I’d recommend it to anyone.
    Looking forward to Twist in Time and Book of Kells.

    Reply
  53. I love when ye do these ‘what we’ve been reading’ posts. I get so many new recommendations. I haven’t read Hidden Figures yet but I’ve seen the film. It’s fantastic!!! I’d recommend it to anyone.
    Looking forward to Twist in Time and Book of Kells.

    Reply
  54. I love when ye do these ‘what we’ve been reading’ posts. I get so many new recommendations. I haven’t read Hidden Figures yet but I’ve seen the film. It’s fantastic!!! I’d recommend it to anyone.
    Looking forward to Twist in Time and Book of Kells.

    Reply
  55. I love when ye do these ‘what we’ve been reading’ posts. I get so many new recommendations. I haven’t read Hidden Figures yet but I’ve seen the film. It’s fantastic!!! I’d recommend it to anyone.
    Looking forward to Twist in Time and Book of Kells.

    Reply
  56. I read a bunch of stuff during February, but I haven’t exactly kept an organized list of them.
    The outstanding one in the non-genre list was Everyone Brave Is Forgiven by Chris Cleave, set during WW2; it does have a romance in it but that’s not the real focus of the novel.
    I started the Crispin Guest medieval mystery series by Jeri Westerson with Veil of Lies.
    In genre romance, I read two old Sylvia Thorpes, Romantic Lady and The Scandalous Lady Robin. I am very fond of Sylvia Thorpe and Mira Stables-type regencies and am mystified that no one has e-booked these authors yet. I too read Someone to Hold by Mary Balogh. I also read Bound by Duty by Diane Gaston, and have the sequel on hand. I read a Harlequin Historical by a first time author, Catherine Tinley, called Waltzing with the Earl (Harlequin does love those generic titles, don’t they?), and would watch for future books by her. Right now I’m halfway through Duke of Dark Desires by Miranda Neville, the last in that series.
    I am always dipping in and out of old favorites when I get reminded about them, so I’ve reread Mansfield Park and bits and pieces of several Heyer titles.

    Reply
  57. I read a bunch of stuff during February, but I haven’t exactly kept an organized list of them.
    The outstanding one in the non-genre list was Everyone Brave Is Forgiven by Chris Cleave, set during WW2; it does have a romance in it but that’s not the real focus of the novel.
    I started the Crispin Guest medieval mystery series by Jeri Westerson with Veil of Lies.
    In genre romance, I read two old Sylvia Thorpes, Romantic Lady and The Scandalous Lady Robin. I am very fond of Sylvia Thorpe and Mira Stables-type regencies and am mystified that no one has e-booked these authors yet. I too read Someone to Hold by Mary Balogh. I also read Bound by Duty by Diane Gaston, and have the sequel on hand. I read a Harlequin Historical by a first time author, Catherine Tinley, called Waltzing with the Earl (Harlequin does love those generic titles, don’t they?), and would watch for future books by her. Right now I’m halfway through Duke of Dark Desires by Miranda Neville, the last in that series.
    I am always dipping in and out of old favorites when I get reminded about them, so I’ve reread Mansfield Park and bits and pieces of several Heyer titles.

    Reply
  58. I read a bunch of stuff during February, but I haven’t exactly kept an organized list of them.
    The outstanding one in the non-genre list was Everyone Brave Is Forgiven by Chris Cleave, set during WW2; it does have a romance in it but that’s not the real focus of the novel.
    I started the Crispin Guest medieval mystery series by Jeri Westerson with Veil of Lies.
    In genre romance, I read two old Sylvia Thorpes, Romantic Lady and The Scandalous Lady Robin. I am very fond of Sylvia Thorpe and Mira Stables-type regencies and am mystified that no one has e-booked these authors yet. I too read Someone to Hold by Mary Balogh. I also read Bound by Duty by Diane Gaston, and have the sequel on hand. I read a Harlequin Historical by a first time author, Catherine Tinley, called Waltzing with the Earl (Harlequin does love those generic titles, don’t they?), and would watch for future books by her. Right now I’m halfway through Duke of Dark Desires by Miranda Neville, the last in that series.
    I am always dipping in and out of old favorites when I get reminded about them, so I’ve reread Mansfield Park and bits and pieces of several Heyer titles.

    Reply
  59. I read a bunch of stuff during February, but I haven’t exactly kept an organized list of them.
    The outstanding one in the non-genre list was Everyone Brave Is Forgiven by Chris Cleave, set during WW2; it does have a romance in it but that’s not the real focus of the novel.
    I started the Crispin Guest medieval mystery series by Jeri Westerson with Veil of Lies.
    In genre romance, I read two old Sylvia Thorpes, Romantic Lady and The Scandalous Lady Robin. I am very fond of Sylvia Thorpe and Mira Stables-type regencies and am mystified that no one has e-booked these authors yet. I too read Someone to Hold by Mary Balogh. I also read Bound by Duty by Diane Gaston, and have the sequel on hand. I read a Harlequin Historical by a first time author, Catherine Tinley, called Waltzing with the Earl (Harlequin does love those generic titles, don’t they?), and would watch for future books by her. Right now I’m halfway through Duke of Dark Desires by Miranda Neville, the last in that series.
    I am always dipping in and out of old favorites when I get reminded about them, so I’ve reread Mansfield Park and bits and pieces of several Heyer titles.

    Reply
  60. I read a bunch of stuff during February, but I haven’t exactly kept an organized list of them.
    The outstanding one in the non-genre list was Everyone Brave Is Forgiven by Chris Cleave, set during WW2; it does have a romance in it but that’s not the real focus of the novel.
    I started the Crispin Guest medieval mystery series by Jeri Westerson with Veil of Lies.
    In genre romance, I read two old Sylvia Thorpes, Romantic Lady and The Scandalous Lady Robin. I am very fond of Sylvia Thorpe and Mira Stables-type regencies and am mystified that no one has e-booked these authors yet. I too read Someone to Hold by Mary Balogh. I also read Bound by Duty by Diane Gaston, and have the sequel on hand. I read a Harlequin Historical by a first time author, Catherine Tinley, called Waltzing with the Earl (Harlequin does love those generic titles, don’t they?), and would watch for future books by her. Right now I’m halfway through Duke of Dark Desires by Miranda Neville, the last in that series.
    I am always dipping in and out of old favorites when I get reminded about them, so I’ve reread Mansfield Park and bits and pieces of several Heyer titles.

    Reply
  61. Thanks for that recommendation, Laura — it sounds wonderful, and I can think of several friends in particular who would love this. And as one has a birthday coming up soon, I might just buy it for her. I love giving books as gifts.

    Reply
  62. Thanks for that recommendation, Laura — it sounds wonderful, and I can think of several friends in particular who would love this. And as one has a birthday coming up soon, I might just buy it for her. I love giving books as gifts.

    Reply
  63. Thanks for that recommendation, Laura — it sounds wonderful, and I can think of several friends in particular who would love this. And as one has a birthday coming up soon, I might just buy it for her. I love giving books as gifts.

    Reply
  64. Thanks for that recommendation, Laura — it sounds wonderful, and I can think of several friends in particular who would love this. And as one has a birthday coming up soon, I might just buy it for her. I love giving books as gifts.

    Reply
  65. Thanks for that recommendation, Laura — it sounds wonderful, and I can think of several friends in particular who would love this. And as one has a birthday coming up soon, I might just buy it for her. I love giving books as gifts.

    Reply
  66. Thanks, Barbara, its the third of fourth time Ive read the Guernsey Potato Peel Pie book and I was surprised how much I enjoyed it all over again. And Im eager to start on the Penric books, which I had not discovered, even though I love LMB.

    Reply
  67. Thanks, Barbara, its the third of fourth time Ive read the Guernsey Potato Peel Pie book and I was surprised how much I enjoyed it all over again. And Im eager to start on the Penric books, which I had not discovered, even though I love LMB.

    Reply
  68. Thanks, Barbara, its the third of fourth time Ive read the Guernsey Potato Peel Pie book and I was surprised how much I enjoyed it all over again. And Im eager to start on the Penric books, which I had not discovered, even though I love LMB.

    Reply
  69. Thanks, Barbara, its the third of fourth time Ive read the Guernsey Potato Peel Pie book and I was surprised how much I enjoyed it all over again. And Im eager to start on the Penric books, which I had not discovered, even though I love LMB.

    Reply
  70. Thanks, Barbara, its the third of fourth time Ive read the Guernsey Potato Peel Pie book and I was surprised how much I enjoyed it all over again. And Im eager to start on the Penric books, which I had not discovered, even though I love LMB.

    Reply
  71. Thanks, Annette. I have the Eloisa James waiting for me — so many good books waiting until Ive finished my RITA reading, not to mention dealing with a looming deadline for my next books. And In our March newsletter, Mary Jo posted a short except of her new book which has me salivating. The wench newsletter comes out shortly.

    Reply
  72. Thanks, Annette. I have the Eloisa James waiting for me — so many good books waiting until Ive finished my RITA reading, not to mention dealing with a looming deadline for my next books. And In our March newsletter, Mary Jo posted a short except of her new book which has me salivating. The wench newsletter comes out shortly.

    Reply
  73. Thanks, Annette. I have the Eloisa James waiting for me — so many good books waiting until Ive finished my RITA reading, not to mention dealing with a looming deadline for my next books. And In our March newsletter, Mary Jo posted a short except of her new book which has me salivating. The wench newsletter comes out shortly.

    Reply
  74. Thanks, Annette. I have the Eloisa James waiting for me — so many good books waiting until Ive finished my RITA reading, not to mention dealing with a looming deadline for my next books. And In our March newsletter, Mary Jo posted a short except of her new book which has me salivating. The wench newsletter comes out shortly.

    Reply
  75. Thanks, Annette. I have the Eloisa James waiting for me — so many good books waiting until Ive finished my RITA reading, not to mention dealing with a looming deadline for my next books. And In our March newsletter, Mary Jo posted a short except of her new book which has me salivating. The wench newsletter comes out shortly.

    Reply
  76. Teresa, I suspect we do it as much for our own pleasure as for our blog readers. Certainly we wenches have a flurry of book-shopping around this time, and between wench and reader recommendations, my credit card is well exercised.

    Reply
  77. Teresa, I suspect we do it as much for our own pleasure as for our blog readers. Certainly we wenches have a flurry of book-shopping around this time, and between wench and reader recommendations, my credit card is well exercised.

    Reply
  78. Teresa, I suspect we do it as much for our own pleasure as for our blog readers. Certainly we wenches have a flurry of book-shopping around this time, and between wench and reader recommendations, my credit card is well exercised.

    Reply
  79. Teresa, I suspect we do it as much for our own pleasure as for our blog readers. Certainly we wenches have a flurry of book-shopping around this time, and between wench and reader recommendations, my credit card is well exercised.

    Reply
  80. Teresa, I suspect we do it as much for our own pleasure as for our blog readers. Certainly we wenches have a flurry of book-shopping around this time, and between wench and reader recommendations, my credit card is well exercised.

    Reply
  81. Thanks, Janice. There are quite a few authors who I want to stalk and nag them to e-publish. I think some of the older authors just havent thought of it — they think its too hard — and no doubt their publishers have relinquished the rights, so they cant e-publish. But its a shame, I agree.

    Reply
  82. Thanks, Janice. There are quite a few authors who I want to stalk and nag them to e-publish. I think some of the older authors just havent thought of it — they think its too hard — and no doubt their publishers have relinquished the rights, so they cant e-publish. But its a shame, I agree.

    Reply
  83. Thanks, Janice. There are quite a few authors who I want to stalk and nag them to e-publish. I think some of the older authors just havent thought of it — they think its too hard — and no doubt their publishers have relinquished the rights, so they cant e-publish. But its a shame, I agree.

    Reply
  84. Thanks, Janice. There are quite a few authors who I want to stalk and nag them to e-publish. I think some of the older authors just havent thought of it — they think its too hard — and no doubt their publishers have relinquished the rights, so they cant e-publish. But its a shame, I agree.

    Reply
  85. Thanks, Janice. There are quite a few authors who I want to stalk and nag them to e-publish. I think some of the older authors just havent thought of it — they think its too hard — and no doubt their publishers have relinquished the rights, so they cant e-publish. But its a shame, I agree.

    Reply
  86. Thanks for the recommendations, which I will add to the groaning pile. I read two Carla Kelly books which were set in the 18th century Spanish colony of New Mexico, “The Double Cross” and “Marco and the Devil’s Bargain” which is a sequel to the first one. The romance is sweet, but the setting is not! It depicts a very harsh society on the frontier, with everything from Indian massacres to smallpox epidemic. As much as I love and recommend whatever Kelly writes, some parts were just gruesome to modern sensibilities. Fascinating history, though.
    After that it was delightful to read two light novellas, “In the Stars” by Ava Stone and “Look to the Stars” by Olivia Kelly. and an old fashioned Regency by Elizabeth Mansfield, “My Lord Murderer”.
    I’m in the middle of “And Then Mine Enemy” by Alison Stuart, an English civil war era story.
    And I’m just starting the “Gambled Away” anthology, I’m going to read Jo’s contribution first, naturally, since it features a young Hawker!

    Reply
  87. Thanks for the recommendations, which I will add to the groaning pile. I read two Carla Kelly books which were set in the 18th century Spanish colony of New Mexico, “The Double Cross” and “Marco and the Devil’s Bargain” which is a sequel to the first one. The romance is sweet, but the setting is not! It depicts a very harsh society on the frontier, with everything from Indian massacres to smallpox epidemic. As much as I love and recommend whatever Kelly writes, some parts were just gruesome to modern sensibilities. Fascinating history, though.
    After that it was delightful to read two light novellas, “In the Stars” by Ava Stone and “Look to the Stars” by Olivia Kelly. and an old fashioned Regency by Elizabeth Mansfield, “My Lord Murderer”.
    I’m in the middle of “And Then Mine Enemy” by Alison Stuart, an English civil war era story.
    And I’m just starting the “Gambled Away” anthology, I’m going to read Jo’s contribution first, naturally, since it features a young Hawker!

    Reply
  88. Thanks for the recommendations, which I will add to the groaning pile. I read two Carla Kelly books which were set in the 18th century Spanish colony of New Mexico, “The Double Cross” and “Marco and the Devil’s Bargain” which is a sequel to the first one. The romance is sweet, but the setting is not! It depicts a very harsh society on the frontier, with everything from Indian massacres to smallpox epidemic. As much as I love and recommend whatever Kelly writes, some parts were just gruesome to modern sensibilities. Fascinating history, though.
    After that it was delightful to read two light novellas, “In the Stars” by Ava Stone and “Look to the Stars” by Olivia Kelly. and an old fashioned Regency by Elizabeth Mansfield, “My Lord Murderer”.
    I’m in the middle of “And Then Mine Enemy” by Alison Stuart, an English civil war era story.
    And I’m just starting the “Gambled Away” anthology, I’m going to read Jo’s contribution first, naturally, since it features a young Hawker!

    Reply
  89. Thanks for the recommendations, which I will add to the groaning pile. I read two Carla Kelly books which were set in the 18th century Spanish colony of New Mexico, “The Double Cross” and “Marco and the Devil’s Bargain” which is a sequel to the first one. The romance is sweet, but the setting is not! It depicts a very harsh society on the frontier, with everything from Indian massacres to smallpox epidemic. As much as I love and recommend whatever Kelly writes, some parts were just gruesome to modern sensibilities. Fascinating history, though.
    After that it was delightful to read two light novellas, “In the Stars” by Ava Stone and “Look to the Stars” by Olivia Kelly. and an old fashioned Regency by Elizabeth Mansfield, “My Lord Murderer”.
    I’m in the middle of “And Then Mine Enemy” by Alison Stuart, an English civil war era story.
    And I’m just starting the “Gambled Away” anthology, I’m going to read Jo’s contribution first, naturally, since it features a young Hawker!

    Reply
  90. Thanks for the recommendations, which I will add to the groaning pile. I read two Carla Kelly books which were set in the 18th century Spanish colony of New Mexico, “The Double Cross” and “Marco and the Devil’s Bargain” which is a sequel to the first one. The romance is sweet, but the setting is not! It depicts a very harsh society on the frontier, with everything from Indian massacres to smallpox epidemic. As much as I love and recommend whatever Kelly writes, some parts were just gruesome to modern sensibilities. Fascinating history, though.
    After that it was delightful to read two light novellas, “In the Stars” by Ava Stone and “Look to the Stars” by Olivia Kelly. and an old fashioned Regency by Elizabeth Mansfield, “My Lord Murderer”.
    I’m in the middle of “And Then Mine Enemy” by Alison Stuart, an English civil war era story.
    And I’m just starting the “Gambled Away” anthology, I’m going to read Jo’s contribution first, naturally, since it features a young Hawker!

    Reply
  91. Thanks, Karin — Ive read Carla Kellys Double Cross too and it was grim, but still wonderful, and I will read her next one as well. In fact Ill read any and all Carla Kelly books *g* Thanks for the other recommendations, too.

    Reply
  92. Thanks, Karin — Ive read Carla Kellys Double Cross too and it was grim, but still wonderful, and I will read her next one as well. In fact Ill read any and all Carla Kelly books *g* Thanks for the other recommendations, too.

    Reply
  93. Thanks, Karin — Ive read Carla Kellys Double Cross too and it was grim, but still wonderful, and I will read her next one as well. In fact Ill read any and all Carla Kelly books *g* Thanks for the other recommendations, too.

    Reply
  94. Thanks, Karin — Ive read Carla Kellys Double Cross too and it was grim, but still wonderful, and I will read her next one as well. In fact Ill read any and all Carla Kelly books *g* Thanks for the other recommendations, too.

    Reply
  95. Thanks, Karin — Ive read Carla Kellys Double Cross too and it was grim, but still wonderful, and I will read her next one as well. In fact Ill read any and all Carla Kelly books *g* Thanks for the other recommendations, too.

    Reply
  96. I too really love the monthly “what have you been reading” post. This month has mostly been a series of re-reads and ho-hum books.
    Sharon Sala – Queen is a contemporary romance. I love that book and re-read it quite frequently.
    Read a couple of Lori Foster, Jayne Castle, Jayne Ann Krentz…. all re-reads of course.
    One new to me author was Jennifer Ashley. I read The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie and enjoyed it very much. Luckily it is the beginning of a series so now I have to see if I can track the rest down.
    With all the rave reviews of Hidden Figures I will have to put my name on the book when it goes through the Family Book Swap. Apparently my mom liked it so much she stayed up past her bed time to finish reading it and my dad says he plans on reading it next.
    Love Sue McCormick’s idea of reading two of the Mallorean series than 2 of Rogues series. That would work for other authors too.

    Reply
  97. I too really love the monthly “what have you been reading” post. This month has mostly been a series of re-reads and ho-hum books.
    Sharon Sala – Queen is a contemporary romance. I love that book and re-read it quite frequently.
    Read a couple of Lori Foster, Jayne Castle, Jayne Ann Krentz…. all re-reads of course.
    One new to me author was Jennifer Ashley. I read The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie and enjoyed it very much. Luckily it is the beginning of a series so now I have to see if I can track the rest down.
    With all the rave reviews of Hidden Figures I will have to put my name on the book when it goes through the Family Book Swap. Apparently my mom liked it so much she stayed up past her bed time to finish reading it and my dad says he plans on reading it next.
    Love Sue McCormick’s idea of reading two of the Mallorean series than 2 of Rogues series. That would work for other authors too.

    Reply
  98. I too really love the monthly “what have you been reading” post. This month has mostly been a series of re-reads and ho-hum books.
    Sharon Sala – Queen is a contemporary romance. I love that book and re-read it quite frequently.
    Read a couple of Lori Foster, Jayne Castle, Jayne Ann Krentz…. all re-reads of course.
    One new to me author was Jennifer Ashley. I read The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie and enjoyed it very much. Luckily it is the beginning of a series so now I have to see if I can track the rest down.
    With all the rave reviews of Hidden Figures I will have to put my name on the book when it goes through the Family Book Swap. Apparently my mom liked it so much she stayed up past her bed time to finish reading it and my dad says he plans on reading it next.
    Love Sue McCormick’s idea of reading two of the Mallorean series than 2 of Rogues series. That would work for other authors too.

    Reply
  99. I too really love the monthly “what have you been reading” post. This month has mostly been a series of re-reads and ho-hum books.
    Sharon Sala – Queen is a contemporary romance. I love that book and re-read it quite frequently.
    Read a couple of Lori Foster, Jayne Castle, Jayne Ann Krentz…. all re-reads of course.
    One new to me author was Jennifer Ashley. I read The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie and enjoyed it very much. Luckily it is the beginning of a series so now I have to see if I can track the rest down.
    With all the rave reviews of Hidden Figures I will have to put my name on the book when it goes through the Family Book Swap. Apparently my mom liked it so much she stayed up past her bed time to finish reading it and my dad says he plans on reading it next.
    Love Sue McCormick’s idea of reading two of the Mallorean series than 2 of Rogues series. That would work for other authors too.

    Reply
  100. I too really love the monthly “what have you been reading” post. This month has mostly been a series of re-reads and ho-hum books.
    Sharon Sala – Queen is a contemporary romance. I love that book and re-read it quite frequently.
    Read a couple of Lori Foster, Jayne Castle, Jayne Ann Krentz…. all re-reads of course.
    One new to me author was Jennifer Ashley. I read The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie and enjoyed it very much. Luckily it is the beginning of a series so now I have to see if I can track the rest down.
    With all the rave reviews of Hidden Figures I will have to put my name on the book when it goes through the Family Book Swap. Apparently my mom liked it so much she stayed up past her bed time to finish reading it and my dad says he plans on reading it next.
    Love Sue McCormick’s idea of reading two of the Mallorean series than 2 of Rogues series. That would work for other authors too.

    Reply
  101. Well, to be fair to the older authors, death has slowed down their activity level quite a bit 🙂 What is needed is for someone who knows how to champion their works, as Greg Bear did for Elizabeth Chater; he had known her at work and liked her. Or as Susie Felber is doing for her mom, Edith Layton. Older regencies without the explicit and graphic sexual content are popular with a large and underserved reading public. Though I do wish we could think of a better term than “sweet”; a novel without graphic sex does not have to be Disneyesque; Georgette Heyer got by without it 🙂
    There should be room for all sorts.

    Reply
  102. Well, to be fair to the older authors, death has slowed down their activity level quite a bit 🙂 What is needed is for someone who knows how to champion their works, as Greg Bear did for Elizabeth Chater; he had known her at work and liked her. Or as Susie Felber is doing for her mom, Edith Layton. Older regencies without the explicit and graphic sexual content are popular with a large and underserved reading public. Though I do wish we could think of a better term than “sweet”; a novel without graphic sex does not have to be Disneyesque; Georgette Heyer got by without it 🙂
    There should be room for all sorts.

    Reply
  103. Well, to be fair to the older authors, death has slowed down their activity level quite a bit 🙂 What is needed is for someone who knows how to champion their works, as Greg Bear did for Elizabeth Chater; he had known her at work and liked her. Or as Susie Felber is doing for her mom, Edith Layton. Older regencies without the explicit and graphic sexual content are popular with a large and underserved reading public. Though I do wish we could think of a better term than “sweet”; a novel without graphic sex does not have to be Disneyesque; Georgette Heyer got by without it 🙂
    There should be room for all sorts.

    Reply
  104. Well, to be fair to the older authors, death has slowed down their activity level quite a bit 🙂 What is needed is for someone who knows how to champion their works, as Greg Bear did for Elizabeth Chater; he had known her at work and liked her. Or as Susie Felber is doing for her mom, Edith Layton. Older regencies without the explicit and graphic sexual content are popular with a large and underserved reading public. Though I do wish we could think of a better term than “sweet”; a novel without graphic sex does not have to be Disneyesque; Georgette Heyer got by without it 🙂
    There should be room for all sorts.

    Reply
  105. Well, to be fair to the older authors, death has slowed down their activity level quite a bit 🙂 What is needed is for someone who knows how to champion their works, as Greg Bear did for Elizabeth Chater; he had known her at work and liked her. Or as Susie Felber is doing for her mom, Edith Layton. Older regencies without the explicit and graphic sexual content are popular with a large and underserved reading public. Though I do wish we could think of a better term than “sweet”; a novel without graphic sex does not have to be Disneyesque; Georgette Heyer got by without it 🙂
    There should be room for all sorts.

    Reply
  106. Meant to add that I had an email exchange with Sara(h) McCulloch, aka Jean Ure, and she did say that it did sound to her like it would be more trouble than it was worth, and she didn’t think anybody would be that interested in her now forgotten Corgi Georgians anyway.

    Reply
  107. Meant to add that I had an email exchange with Sara(h) McCulloch, aka Jean Ure, and she did say that it did sound to her like it would be more trouble than it was worth, and she didn’t think anybody would be that interested in her now forgotten Corgi Georgians anyway.

    Reply
  108. Meant to add that I had an email exchange with Sara(h) McCulloch, aka Jean Ure, and she did say that it did sound to her like it would be more trouble than it was worth, and she didn’t think anybody would be that interested in her now forgotten Corgi Georgians anyway.

    Reply
  109. Meant to add that I had an email exchange with Sara(h) McCulloch, aka Jean Ure, and she did say that it did sound to her like it would be more trouble than it was worth, and she didn’t think anybody would be that interested in her now forgotten Corgi Georgians anyway.

    Reply
  110. Meant to add that I had an email exchange with Sara(h) McCulloch, aka Jean Ure, and she did say that it did sound to her like it would be more trouble than it was worth, and she didn’t think anybody would be that interested in her now forgotten Corgi Georgians anyway.

    Reply
  111. Vickie L.: All the Jennifer Ashely Mackenzie stories are in eBook form. I have them all on my Nook, so they’re probably available on Kindle also.
    And thank you for your comment about my reading pattern.

    Reply
  112. Vickie L.: All the Jennifer Ashely Mackenzie stories are in eBook form. I have them all on my Nook, so they’re probably available on Kindle also.
    And thank you for your comment about my reading pattern.

    Reply
  113. Vickie L.: All the Jennifer Ashely Mackenzie stories are in eBook form. I have them all on my Nook, so they’re probably available on Kindle also.
    And thank you for your comment about my reading pattern.

    Reply
  114. Vickie L.: All the Jennifer Ashely Mackenzie stories are in eBook form. I have them all on my Nook, so they’re probably available on Kindle also.
    And thank you for your comment about my reading pattern.

    Reply
  115. Vickie L.: All the Jennifer Ashely Mackenzie stories are in eBook form. I have them all on my Nook, so they’re probably available on Kindle also.
    And thank you for your comment about my reading pattern.

    Reply
  116. I agree with you re the sweet categorization, Janice, and I also hate the term thats being bandied around in some places — clean romance. Because Ive never thought that sex is dirty which is the implication. But I agree that we do need a good descriptive term for books with no explicit sex scenes, so that readers can find them.
    Re the death of older authors — I suppose the families need to be tech savvy enough to organize it, or at least publishing-or reading-savvy enough to realize theres a demand.

    Reply
  117. I agree with you re the sweet categorization, Janice, and I also hate the term thats being bandied around in some places — clean romance. Because Ive never thought that sex is dirty which is the implication. But I agree that we do need a good descriptive term for books with no explicit sex scenes, so that readers can find them.
    Re the death of older authors — I suppose the families need to be tech savvy enough to organize it, or at least publishing-or reading-savvy enough to realize theres a demand.

    Reply
  118. I agree with you re the sweet categorization, Janice, and I also hate the term thats being bandied around in some places — clean romance. Because Ive never thought that sex is dirty which is the implication. But I agree that we do need a good descriptive term for books with no explicit sex scenes, so that readers can find them.
    Re the death of older authors — I suppose the families need to be tech savvy enough to organize it, or at least publishing-or reading-savvy enough to realize theres a demand.

    Reply
  119. I agree with you re the sweet categorization, Janice, and I also hate the term thats being bandied around in some places — clean romance. Because Ive never thought that sex is dirty which is the implication. But I agree that we do need a good descriptive term for books with no explicit sex scenes, so that readers can find them.
    Re the death of older authors — I suppose the families need to be tech savvy enough to organize it, or at least publishing-or reading-savvy enough to realize theres a demand.

    Reply
  120. I agree with you re the sweet categorization, Janice, and I also hate the term thats being bandied around in some places — clean romance. Because Ive never thought that sex is dirty which is the implication. But I agree that we do need a good descriptive term for books with no explicit sex scenes, so that readers can find them.
    Re the death of older authors — I suppose the families need to be tech savvy enough to organize it, or at least publishing-or reading-savvy enough to realize theres a demand.

    Reply
  121. Thanks for those suggestions, Vicki. I’ve recommended a number of Jennifer Ashley books in the past — and definitely The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. It’s wonderful isn’t it? She also writes good paranormals if you like them, and has a Regency-era mystery series under the name of Ashley Gardiner.

    Reply
  122. Thanks for those suggestions, Vicki. I’ve recommended a number of Jennifer Ashley books in the past — and definitely The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. It’s wonderful isn’t it? She also writes good paranormals if you like them, and has a Regency-era mystery series under the name of Ashley Gardiner.

    Reply
  123. Thanks for those suggestions, Vicki. I’ve recommended a number of Jennifer Ashley books in the past — and definitely The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. It’s wonderful isn’t it? She also writes good paranormals if you like them, and has a Regency-era mystery series under the name of Ashley Gardiner.

    Reply
  124. Thanks for those suggestions, Vicki. I’ve recommended a number of Jennifer Ashley books in the past — and definitely The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. It’s wonderful isn’t it? She also writes good paranormals if you like them, and has a Regency-era mystery series under the name of Ashley Gardiner.

    Reply
  125. Thanks for those suggestions, Vicki. I’ve recommended a number of Jennifer Ashley books in the past — and definitely The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. It’s wonderful isn’t it? She also writes good paranormals if you like them, and has a Regency-era mystery series under the name of Ashley Gardiner.

    Reply

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