Word Witches, Halloween 2013

Anne here, bubble bubbling, toil and troubling, as we wenches turn a little witchly at Halloween. Actually the wenchly calendar has a sense of humor, placing me to blog on Halloween — the one wench who lives in a place where Halloween is barely celebrated, and then only in recent years by kids who learned from US TV shows that trick or treat is legalized larceny.
HalloweenCats

Even so, they usually only go to their friends' houses, because the rest of us won't have any lollies (ie candy or sweets) handy and are more likely to stare in bewilderment and say, "Trick or what?" Or read them a lecture about watching too much TV. Most years when little kids have knocked at my door, I've had to apologize and admit there wasn't a thing in the house for them.

The one year I remembered it was Halloween it was because as I was heading off to the supermarket, I saw flocks of little kids all dressed up in ghoulish and ghastly costumes, looking terribly cute, though of course I'd never tell them that. They were intent on Being Fearsome. That year I triumphantly bought a stack of lollies and chocolate and waited. And, you guessed it — nobpdy knocked. So guess who had to eat her way through the piles of chocolate I'd bought to give away? It was terrible!  

So here are some stories from word witches who know how Halloween is supposed to be done. (The gorgeous pic above right is © Marilyn Scott -Waters, The Toymaker and you can see more of her wonderful designs here)

Mary Jo says . . .
 
Halloween is really a rather odd sort of holiday.  When I was a kid, it was all about dressing up in rather amateur costumes and stomping along the state highway in the farm country were I lived.  (Since the end of October was pretty darned cold in Upstate New York, we were always wearing coats, so the costumes were covered up anyhow.) 
 

The point of the exercise was to get enough candy to last us until Easter.  <G>  Certainly we didn't understand the deep historical roots of All Hallows Eve–both Christian, and beyond that, pagan.  I suspect that late autumn falling into the long night of winter seemed an appropriate time to remember the dead.  In Mexico and other Spanish speaking the countries, the Day of the Dead (Dia de Muertos) is an occasion for families and friends to gather and celebrate the lives of the dear departed, with visits to cemeteries and even picnics there, I understand.
 

What bemuses me is how what was a kids' holiday when I was a kid has morphed into an adult celebration with costumes and parties and much whooping.  I suspect that this is another sign that baby boomers don't want to grow up, and any excuse for a party will do. <G> 
 

What bemused me even more was when I moved to England, I found that Halloween wasn't much of a holiday, though the Jack o'Lantern was known.  This site explains the origins of Jack of the Lantern, and how the original European jack o'lanterns were carved from turnips, parsnips, or other root vegetables.  That had to be a lot of work!  No wonder when settlers arrived in North American and discovered the pumpkin, they realized how much easier to was to carve one!
 


Eclipse over AshdownNicola knows there are ghosts . . .
  

My mother-in-law claims I am fey. Certainly I seem to have had more than my fair share of supernatural experiences, whether I want them or not. Living in a haunted cottage tested both my nerves and my husband's ability to explain everything through science! There are some things that connot be explained.

Ashdown House, where I work as a guide for the National Trust, has always had a number of stories of ghosts and hauntings. There are tales that the stables are haunted by the ghost of a groom whose footsteps can be heard on the cobbles of the yard and whose cheerful whistling belies the fact that there is no one there. There is also a ghostly child who cries in the woods. I've heard that one and it really does chill the blood. One summer evening a group of us were doing a wildlife walk in the grounds of the house and we all saw a ghostly white figure looking out of one of the first floor windows of the house. This was particularly spooky as the house was empty and locked and the shutters had been closed yet we all saw it looking out at us.
 (The pic on the left, eclipse over Ashdown House, was taken by Nicola's husband.)

Since the conservation project on the house took place last year there has been an increase in the supernatural disturbances there. Experts think it is because the roof was taken off the house and the walls repaired; it is as though the changes to the fabric of the house has upset someone or something. One of my colleagues experienced a lady dressed in a seventeenth century clothes approaching her in the grounds and even felt her skirts brush against her. "I'm so glad you are here," the ghost said to her, and then it vanished. On a couple of occasions I have been welcoming groups of visitors and when I say "Let's go inside the house now" the door has swung open of its own accord as though to invite us in. That really impresses the visitors! But on one occasion it was as though there was a poltergeist in the house, with doors slamming and blowing open and the crash of objects falling and the noise of footsteps echoing all around. I would love to know which of the Craven family or their visitors is haunting Ashdown and what we can do to help them feel more peaceful. And as I am guiding the Halloween tour parties I am wondering what will happen…

Jo Beverly recalls. . .
When we arrived in Canada in 1976 we found Halloween rather scary. There were marauding hordes shouting, "Trick or treat!" in a very menacing manner, all seeming to be high on something. They were, on pure excitement!
Cbkhall

Once we had children we got into it, and it was a lovely neighborhood event.
Our Cabbage Patch Kids got into the act, of course. Here's Charlie and Billy ready to play!

By the way, I have a Halloween story out in e-book. Lord Samhain's Night is a Regency ghost story I wrote many years ago.  A .99cent treat.   

Pat Rice says. . .
While I have no reason not to believe in ectoplasmic critters that go bump in the night, I have no good reason to believe either. Yes, I feel the spiritual pain and horror on the  Gettysburg battlefield, but I have a vivid imagination. Sure, I’ve felt the odd sensations in an old hotel like the Monteleone in New Orleans, but no ghost physically tugged my hair. And yes, I once had an unseen hand nearly tip me over in the basement of our old Kentucky home, but why a spirit would materialize just that once to do something so silly is harder for me to understand than it is to believe in ghosts.

So to me, Halloween is simply an entertaining holiday that allows children–and maybe a few adults— to run around and pretend they’re someone else for an evening. I’m in favor of any opportunity to encourage creativity and make-believe!

Susan Fraser King had a Haunted Garage.
For years, Halloween in our house was the biggest, busiest, noisiest, craziest day of all — the day my three sons looked forward to more than any other, including Christmas, as they got ready for their annual "Haunted Garage." 
Skeleton

From the time the three were in elementary school, middle school and then through high school, when ghosts, ghouls, vampires, zombies, aliens and anything scary and creep-crawly had huge appeal (and still does for them, what can I say) — they'd get their friends together and begin planning. They'd start in the summer with a theme, wish lists, drawings, costume designs, and jobs for all. Weeks went into making costumes and staging the garage (and the porch, the lawn and the driveway), and they did most of the work, with money earned from odd jobs (and parents). By Halloween night, these hardworking committees of very creative kids would have transformed the garage with big rolls of paper taped to the walls and painted like castle walls, sheets draped everywhere, fog machines, fake fireplaces and torches, spooky lighting, ghoulish music, cobwebs, plastic spiders, floating ghoul heads, vampire blood – you name it, it showed up in the Haunted Garage one year or the next. 

A popular feature was The Haunted Maze, constructed of sheets strung on lines — you would follow the twists and turns —  a ghost might pop out, a lurking vampire would pounce, snakes would drop from above, lightning and thunder would flash — and at the end was the mad chemist holding a bowl filled with green glowing smoke, which would contain candy for your trick or treat bag. Before you could approach The Maze, you had to get through The Gauntlet— a double row of lawn chairs, in which sat newspaper-stuffed dummies dressed in old shirts, jeans, boots, gloves and hats — harmless scarecrow dummies — until one of them jumped up to scare the living crikey out of you. A lookout was posted, and if small trick-or-treaters walked the gauntlet, word would spread and none of the dummies would move. 

A favorite was The Roadkill display — a plywood sheet with a hole in it topped a hollow table, through which lay one of the guys, lower body missing in bluidy tatters and spaghetti and sausage entrails (this was not Mom's favorite display). The giant demon was also a favorite — an enormous, gruesome head and shoulders worn by the tallest kid dressed in furs, chain mail and leather (or whatever passed for that). He was a jolly demon, though, who gave out candy and treats.   

The Haunted Garage grew each year and more features were added, until we had lines of people waiting at the end of our driveway (and you can just imagine how many bags of candy we had to buy to reward everyone who visited). Every year, the kids had a blast . . . until clean up time, but they did that job well enough to be allowed to repeat the event the next year. Now they're in college and well beyond, and the Haunted Garage is a thing of the past. We still have boxes of ghoulish stuff in the basement, though all we need to do these days is hand out candy to the little fairies, princesses, superheroes and ghouls who come to the door. You'd think that would be preferable to fending off an invasion of vampires and zombies — but I kinda miss them.  

For Andrea/Cara it's all about Art. . .  I've have to say, I've never been that entranced by halloween—yes, of course I loved dressing up as a kid and trick-or-treating with my friends. But only for the sweets, not because I was into ghouls or ghosts or goblins. The supernatural doesn't have that much allure for me—maybe that's why, unlike some of the Wenches, I can't claim any spooky happenings—otherworldly spirits find me boring!
Jack-o-lantern-FR

BUT, I've always loved the ritual of carving pumpkins into jack 'o lanterns! (Must be my art background.) One of my fondest memories of Halloween was the time one of my grad school professors brought pumpkins into our design class and told us the assignment for the day was to come up with a unique face. Oh, how I wish I had a photo of the results! It was quite an amazing display when we turned out the lights and lit candles in our finished lanterns!

And last but far from least, we have Joanna, sharing a little history. . .

I'm fascinated by the origins of Halloween.  There are customs from many places, many cultures, but some of what we do on Halloween goes back to the ancient Celts.

Drop back a couple thousand years and that night at the end of October is full of revellers going from house to house.  There are ghosts involved.  And food treats.  And masks.  And skeleton costumes. 

Samhain — the Celtic fall festival — marks the beginning of winter, the beginning of the darker half of the year.  After this, every night is longer; every day is shorter.   Is it surprising this night opened the doors between the World of the Dead and the World of the Living?  Naturally, spirits would take the opportunity to come wandering through town.  Malignant spirits might show up at the door and need to be propitiated with food.  The souls of honored ancestors might come to visit and it was best to set a place for them at the table on Samhain night.

So you got yer rowdier elements out mumming and guising on Samhain, which is to say, dressing up — maybe as spirits — and going from house to house, singing songs, making veiled threats of minor mayhem, and requesting food.   This sounds somehow familiar. 

I like to think, when I'm handing over tiny BabyRuths and Butterfingers to six-year-olds dressed as skeletons, that I'm part of an ancient tradition, just doing my bit to deal with the doors opening to the Otherworld.  Any ghosts that drop by can have a pack of Reese's Pieces. 

Anne again — so what will you be doing this Halloween? What are your favorite Halloween rituals or memories?

105 thoughts on “Word Witches, Halloween 2013”

  1. I’m wearing orange to work with halloween socks.
    What I remember is trick or treating with a light snow falling. All too often, the first snow came Halloween night.

    Reply
  2. I’m wearing orange to work with halloween socks.
    What I remember is trick or treating with a light snow falling. All too often, the first snow came Halloween night.

    Reply
  3. I’m wearing orange to work with halloween socks.
    What I remember is trick or treating with a light snow falling. All too often, the first snow came Halloween night.

    Reply
  4. I’m wearing orange to work with halloween socks.
    What I remember is trick or treating with a light snow falling. All too often, the first snow came Halloween night.

    Reply
  5. I’m wearing orange to work with halloween socks.
    What I remember is trick or treating with a light snow falling. All too often, the first snow came Halloween night.

    Reply
  6. As Anne says, the whole US style Halloween thing is steadily infiltrating Down Under. All of a sudden, in October, there are carving pumpkins in Aussie supermarkets – and of course, the 4 yo noticed – so this year, for the first time ever, we carved a jack o lantern.
    It’s a bit weird, having a manic grinning pumpkin in the dining room, completely out of any kind of traditional context. I do like the look of those Jack O Lantern Parsnips though!!! Might Have to have a go whipping up some come end of April next year, to properly welcome Southern Hemisphere winter.

    Reply
  7. As Anne says, the whole US style Halloween thing is steadily infiltrating Down Under. All of a sudden, in October, there are carving pumpkins in Aussie supermarkets – and of course, the 4 yo noticed – so this year, for the first time ever, we carved a jack o lantern.
    It’s a bit weird, having a manic grinning pumpkin in the dining room, completely out of any kind of traditional context. I do like the look of those Jack O Lantern Parsnips though!!! Might Have to have a go whipping up some come end of April next year, to properly welcome Southern Hemisphere winter.

    Reply
  8. As Anne says, the whole US style Halloween thing is steadily infiltrating Down Under. All of a sudden, in October, there are carving pumpkins in Aussie supermarkets – and of course, the 4 yo noticed – so this year, for the first time ever, we carved a jack o lantern.
    It’s a bit weird, having a manic grinning pumpkin in the dining room, completely out of any kind of traditional context. I do like the look of those Jack O Lantern Parsnips though!!! Might Have to have a go whipping up some come end of April next year, to properly welcome Southern Hemisphere winter.

    Reply
  9. As Anne says, the whole US style Halloween thing is steadily infiltrating Down Under. All of a sudden, in October, there are carving pumpkins in Aussie supermarkets – and of course, the 4 yo noticed – so this year, for the first time ever, we carved a jack o lantern.
    It’s a bit weird, having a manic grinning pumpkin in the dining room, completely out of any kind of traditional context. I do like the look of those Jack O Lantern Parsnips though!!! Might Have to have a go whipping up some come end of April next year, to properly welcome Southern Hemisphere winter.

    Reply
  10. As Anne says, the whole US style Halloween thing is steadily infiltrating Down Under. All of a sudden, in October, there are carving pumpkins in Aussie supermarkets – and of course, the 4 yo noticed – so this year, for the first time ever, we carved a jack o lantern.
    It’s a bit weird, having a manic grinning pumpkin in the dining room, completely out of any kind of traditional context. I do like the look of those Jack O Lantern Parsnips though!!! Might Have to have a go whipping up some come end of April next year, to properly welcome Southern Hemisphere winter.

    Reply
  11. It is strange how new holidays emerge. Halloween was never a big thing here in the UK either until maybe 5 or 10 years ago. When I was a child it was all about “Mischief Night,” which is 4th November. That was when we had trick or treat. Guy Fawkes Night was the biggest festival this time of year. Now the US style Halloween is big here too. Last year we made Jack O Lanterns with our niece and nephew and Halloween cookies.

    Reply
  12. It is strange how new holidays emerge. Halloween was never a big thing here in the UK either until maybe 5 or 10 years ago. When I was a child it was all about “Mischief Night,” which is 4th November. That was when we had trick or treat. Guy Fawkes Night was the biggest festival this time of year. Now the US style Halloween is big here too. Last year we made Jack O Lanterns with our niece and nephew and Halloween cookies.

    Reply
  13. It is strange how new holidays emerge. Halloween was never a big thing here in the UK either until maybe 5 or 10 years ago. When I was a child it was all about “Mischief Night,” which is 4th November. That was when we had trick or treat. Guy Fawkes Night was the biggest festival this time of year. Now the US style Halloween is big here too. Last year we made Jack O Lanterns with our niece and nephew and Halloween cookies.

    Reply
  14. It is strange how new holidays emerge. Halloween was never a big thing here in the UK either until maybe 5 or 10 years ago. When I was a child it was all about “Mischief Night,” which is 4th November. That was when we had trick or treat. Guy Fawkes Night was the biggest festival this time of year. Now the US style Halloween is big here too. Last year we made Jack O Lanterns with our niece and nephew and Halloween cookies.

    Reply
  15. It is strange how new holidays emerge. Halloween was never a big thing here in the UK either until maybe 5 or 10 years ago. When I was a child it was all about “Mischief Night,” which is 4th November. That was when we had trick or treat. Guy Fawkes Night was the biggest festival this time of year. Now the US style Halloween is big here too. Last year we made Jack O Lanterns with our niece and nephew and Halloween cookies.

    Reply
  16. Shannon, yes, that’s true. And I’d love to see your carved Jack o’lantern. For non-aussies, when she mentions “carving pumpkins” — that’s to distinguish them from the many other eating pumpkins that are in the supermarket year round. We aussies love our pumpkins, mostly eaten as a savoury vegetable– steamed, baked, mashed or some other way.
    Halloween and trick or treating is a bit irresistible and I can’t blame the kids at all for pinching it from US TV shows– what’s not to like about dressing up in scary fun costumes, and harassing your neighbours for chocolate?

    Reply
  17. Shannon, yes, that’s true. And I’d love to see your carved Jack o’lantern. For non-aussies, when she mentions “carving pumpkins” — that’s to distinguish them from the many other eating pumpkins that are in the supermarket year round. We aussies love our pumpkins, mostly eaten as a savoury vegetable– steamed, baked, mashed or some other way.
    Halloween and trick or treating is a bit irresistible and I can’t blame the kids at all for pinching it from US TV shows– what’s not to like about dressing up in scary fun costumes, and harassing your neighbours for chocolate?

    Reply
  18. Shannon, yes, that’s true. And I’d love to see your carved Jack o’lantern. For non-aussies, when she mentions “carving pumpkins” — that’s to distinguish them from the many other eating pumpkins that are in the supermarket year round. We aussies love our pumpkins, mostly eaten as a savoury vegetable– steamed, baked, mashed or some other way.
    Halloween and trick or treating is a bit irresistible and I can’t blame the kids at all for pinching it from US TV shows– what’s not to like about dressing up in scary fun costumes, and harassing your neighbours for chocolate?

    Reply
  19. Shannon, yes, that’s true. And I’d love to see your carved Jack o’lantern. For non-aussies, when she mentions “carving pumpkins” — that’s to distinguish them from the many other eating pumpkins that are in the supermarket year round. We aussies love our pumpkins, mostly eaten as a savoury vegetable– steamed, baked, mashed or some other way.
    Halloween and trick or treating is a bit irresistible and I can’t blame the kids at all for pinching it from US TV shows– what’s not to like about dressing up in scary fun costumes, and harassing your neighbours for chocolate?

    Reply
  20. Shannon, yes, that’s true. And I’d love to see your carved Jack o’lantern. For non-aussies, when she mentions “carving pumpkins” — that’s to distinguish them from the many other eating pumpkins that are in the supermarket year round. We aussies love our pumpkins, mostly eaten as a savoury vegetable– steamed, baked, mashed or some other way.
    Halloween and trick or treating is a bit irresistible and I can’t blame the kids at all for pinching it from US TV shows– what’s not to like about dressing up in scary fun costumes, and harassing your neighbours for chocolate?

    Reply
  21. Nicola, in Australia we used to celebrate (if that’s the right term) Guy Fawkes night on the 5th November, but there was no mischief night or trick or treating before it. Guy Fawkes night was bonfire night and cracker night and it was the highlight of my year as a child.
    We’d gather around a giant bonfire — the nights would be mild as it we’re heading into summer in November here — and there would be crackers and fireworks and we’d stay up really late and last thing before we went to bed, we’d push potatoes into the ashes around the edge of the fire and in the morning we’d come out first thing and rake the hot baked potatoes out and eat them with butter and salt, burning our fingers as we did. It was a feast or a breakfast with something slightly illicit about it.
    I’m not sure when or why Guy Fawkes night died out here — for me it was when we moved to the city, but I suspect in the wider sense it died out when crackers and fireworks were banned for all except professionals.

    Reply
  22. Nicola, in Australia we used to celebrate (if that’s the right term) Guy Fawkes night on the 5th November, but there was no mischief night or trick or treating before it. Guy Fawkes night was bonfire night and cracker night and it was the highlight of my year as a child.
    We’d gather around a giant bonfire — the nights would be mild as it we’re heading into summer in November here — and there would be crackers and fireworks and we’d stay up really late and last thing before we went to bed, we’d push potatoes into the ashes around the edge of the fire and in the morning we’d come out first thing and rake the hot baked potatoes out and eat them with butter and salt, burning our fingers as we did. It was a feast or a breakfast with something slightly illicit about it.
    I’m not sure when or why Guy Fawkes night died out here — for me it was when we moved to the city, but I suspect in the wider sense it died out when crackers and fireworks were banned for all except professionals.

    Reply
  23. Nicola, in Australia we used to celebrate (if that’s the right term) Guy Fawkes night on the 5th November, but there was no mischief night or trick or treating before it. Guy Fawkes night was bonfire night and cracker night and it was the highlight of my year as a child.
    We’d gather around a giant bonfire — the nights would be mild as it we’re heading into summer in November here — and there would be crackers and fireworks and we’d stay up really late and last thing before we went to bed, we’d push potatoes into the ashes around the edge of the fire and in the morning we’d come out first thing and rake the hot baked potatoes out and eat them with butter and salt, burning our fingers as we did. It was a feast or a breakfast with something slightly illicit about it.
    I’m not sure when or why Guy Fawkes night died out here — for me it was when we moved to the city, but I suspect in the wider sense it died out when crackers and fireworks were banned for all except professionals.

    Reply
  24. Nicola, in Australia we used to celebrate (if that’s the right term) Guy Fawkes night on the 5th November, but there was no mischief night or trick or treating before it. Guy Fawkes night was bonfire night and cracker night and it was the highlight of my year as a child.
    We’d gather around a giant bonfire — the nights would be mild as it we’re heading into summer in November here — and there would be crackers and fireworks and we’d stay up really late and last thing before we went to bed, we’d push potatoes into the ashes around the edge of the fire and in the morning we’d come out first thing and rake the hot baked potatoes out and eat them with butter and salt, burning our fingers as we did. It was a feast or a breakfast with something slightly illicit about it.
    I’m not sure when or why Guy Fawkes night died out here — for me it was when we moved to the city, but I suspect in the wider sense it died out when crackers and fireworks were banned for all except professionals.

    Reply
  25. Nicola, in Australia we used to celebrate (if that’s the right term) Guy Fawkes night on the 5th November, but there was no mischief night or trick or treating before it. Guy Fawkes night was bonfire night and cracker night and it was the highlight of my year as a child.
    We’d gather around a giant bonfire — the nights would be mild as it we’re heading into summer in November here — and there would be crackers and fireworks and we’d stay up really late and last thing before we went to bed, we’d push potatoes into the ashes around the edge of the fire and in the morning we’d come out first thing and rake the hot baked potatoes out and eat them with butter and salt, burning our fingers as we did. It was a feast or a breakfast with something slightly illicit about it.
    I’m not sure when or why Guy Fawkes night died out here — for me it was when we moved to the city, but I suspect in the wider sense it died out when crackers and fireworks were banned for all except professionals.

    Reply
  26. Liz, are there fireworks in your area at Halloween? If so, I have sympathy. I used to have to stay home on New Years Eve when my Chloe-dog was alive because she was so frightened of the fireworks and I couldn’t bear to leave her on her own to panic.
    I think though she would have quite liked to be a trick-or-treat dog, collecting treats with flocks of little kids.She wasn’t allowed chocolate, of course, but she adored little kids. And visiting.

    Reply
  27. Liz, are there fireworks in your area at Halloween? If so, I have sympathy. I used to have to stay home on New Years Eve when my Chloe-dog was alive because she was so frightened of the fireworks and I couldn’t bear to leave her on her own to panic.
    I think though she would have quite liked to be a trick-or-treat dog, collecting treats with flocks of little kids.She wasn’t allowed chocolate, of course, but she adored little kids. And visiting.

    Reply
  28. Liz, are there fireworks in your area at Halloween? If so, I have sympathy. I used to have to stay home on New Years Eve when my Chloe-dog was alive because she was so frightened of the fireworks and I couldn’t bear to leave her on her own to panic.
    I think though she would have quite liked to be a trick-or-treat dog, collecting treats with flocks of little kids.She wasn’t allowed chocolate, of course, but she adored little kids. And visiting.

    Reply
  29. Liz, are there fireworks in your area at Halloween? If so, I have sympathy. I used to have to stay home on New Years Eve when my Chloe-dog was alive because she was so frightened of the fireworks and I couldn’t bear to leave her on her own to panic.
    I think though she would have quite liked to be a trick-or-treat dog, collecting treats with flocks of little kids.She wasn’t allowed chocolate, of course, but she adored little kids. And visiting.

    Reply
  30. Liz, are there fireworks in your area at Halloween? If so, I have sympathy. I used to have to stay home on New Years Eve when my Chloe-dog was alive because she was so frightened of the fireworks and I couldn’t bear to leave her on her own to panic.
    I think though she would have quite liked to be a trick-or-treat dog, collecting treats with flocks of little kids.She wasn’t allowed chocolate, of course, but she adored little kids. And visiting.

    Reply
  31. My favorite Halloween memory….
    After watching the Town’s Halloween parade, I was walking homwards and saw this nice full trash can…I dumped it over and flashing lights on a police car errupted.
    Policeman made me clean up the mess and then sent me homewards.
    This was at night and I was about 12ish.
    Don;t expect any Trick or Treaters…we are too far in the boonies.

    Reply
  32. My favorite Halloween memory….
    After watching the Town’s Halloween parade, I was walking homwards and saw this nice full trash can…I dumped it over and flashing lights on a police car errupted.
    Policeman made me clean up the mess and then sent me homewards.
    This was at night and I was about 12ish.
    Don;t expect any Trick or Treaters…we are too far in the boonies.

    Reply
  33. My favorite Halloween memory….
    After watching the Town’s Halloween parade, I was walking homwards and saw this nice full trash can…I dumped it over and flashing lights on a police car errupted.
    Policeman made me clean up the mess and then sent me homewards.
    This was at night and I was about 12ish.
    Don;t expect any Trick or Treaters…we are too far in the boonies.

    Reply
  34. My favorite Halloween memory….
    After watching the Town’s Halloween parade, I was walking homwards and saw this nice full trash can…I dumped it over and flashing lights on a police car errupted.
    Policeman made me clean up the mess and then sent me homewards.
    This was at night and I was about 12ish.
    Don;t expect any Trick or Treaters…we are too far in the boonies.

    Reply
  35. My favorite Halloween memory….
    After watching the Town’s Halloween parade, I was walking homwards and saw this nice full trash can…I dumped it over and flashing lights on a police car errupted.
    Policeman made me clean up the mess and then sent me homewards.
    This was at night and I was about 12ish.
    Don;t expect any Trick or Treaters…we are too far in the boonies.

    Reply
  36. Parsnips make really creepy looking Jack o’lanterns, but they’re not a patch on Nicola’s experiences! One of my friends is doing a haunted house tour tonight in Cincinnati and I await her report with bated breaath. She has a skeptical mind, though, so I’m guessing nothing too colorful will spook her. *G*

    Reply
  37. Parsnips make really creepy looking Jack o’lanterns, but they’re not a patch on Nicola’s experiences! One of my friends is doing a haunted house tour tonight in Cincinnati and I await her report with bated breaath. She has a skeptical mind, though, so I’m guessing nothing too colorful will spook her. *G*

    Reply
  38. Parsnips make really creepy looking Jack o’lanterns, but they’re not a patch on Nicola’s experiences! One of my friends is doing a haunted house tour tonight in Cincinnati and I await her report with bated breaath. She has a skeptical mind, though, so I’m guessing nothing too colorful will spook her. *G*

    Reply
  39. Parsnips make really creepy looking Jack o’lanterns, but they’re not a patch on Nicola’s experiences! One of my friends is doing a haunted house tour tonight in Cincinnati and I await her report with bated breaath. She has a skeptical mind, though, so I’m guessing nothing too colorful will spook her. *G*

    Reply
  40. Parsnips make really creepy looking Jack o’lanterns, but they’re not a patch on Nicola’s experiences! One of my friends is doing a haunted house tour tonight in Cincinnati and I await her report with bated breaath. She has a skeptical mind, though, so I’m guessing nothing too colorful will spook her. *G*

    Reply
  41. I am never on the right page for Halloween…if I have candy, no kids come, if I don’t have candy, there are more kids than I ever have noticed in the neighborhood. So…I just buy the candy I like and enjoy the excuse to eat it, lol. True to form…I included candy in my adopted soldier’s box for Halloween this year…but she is back home early (hooray) so the candy is wandering around in limbo…hopefully it will find someone to enjoy it.

    Reply
  42. I am never on the right page for Halloween…if I have candy, no kids come, if I don’t have candy, there are more kids than I ever have noticed in the neighborhood. So…I just buy the candy I like and enjoy the excuse to eat it, lol. True to form…I included candy in my adopted soldier’s box for Halloween this year…but she is back home early (hooray) so the candy is wandering around in limbo…hopefully it will find someone to enjoy it.

    Reply
  43. I am never on the right page for Halloween…if I have candy, no kids come, if I don’t have candy, there are more kids than I ever have noticed in the neighborhood. So…I just buy the candy I like and enjoy the excuse to eat it, lol. True to form…I included candy in my adopted soldier’s box for Halloween this year…but she is back home early (hooray) so the candy is wandering around in limbo…hopefully it will find someone to enjoy it.

    Reply
  44. I am never on the right page for Halloween…if I have candy, no kids come, if I don’t have candy, there are more kids than I ever have noticed in the neighborhood. So…I just buy the candy I like and enjoy the excuse to eat it, lol. True to form…I included candy in my adopted soldier’s box for Halloween this year…but she is back home early (hooray) so the candy is wandering around in limbo…hopefully it will find someone to enjoy it.

    Reply
  45. I am never on the right page for Halloween…if I have candy, no kids come, if I don’t have candy, there are more kids than I ever have noticed in the neighborhood. So…I just buy the candy I like and enjoy the excuse to eat it, lol. True to form…I included candy in my adopted soldier’s box for Halloween this year…but she is back home early (hooray) so the candy is wandering around in limbo…hopefully it will find someone to enjoy it.

    Reply
  46. We moved from the suburbs to the country and my daughter really missed trick or treating. It is not safe on windy country roads with no sidewalks. I gather others miss it too, so my elementary school did trunk or treat. Parents bought candy, dressed up and decorated their cars. We met in the parking lot and the kids could safely trick or treat from one car to the next. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  47. We moved from the suburbs to the country and my daughter really missed trick or treating. It is not safe on windy country roads with no sidewalks. I gather others miss it too, so my elementary school did trunk or treat. Parents bought candy, dressed up and decorated their cars. We met in the parking lot and the kids could safely trick or treat from one car to the next. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  48. We moved from the suburbs to the country and my daughter really missed trick or treating. It is not safe on windy country roads with no sidewalks. I gather others miss it too, so my elementary school did trunk or treat. Parents bought candy, dressed up and decorated their cars. We met in the parking lot and the kids could safely trick or treat from one car to the next. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  49. We moved from the suburbs to the country and my daughter really missed trick or treating. It is not safe on windy country roads with no sidewalks. I gather others miss it too, so my elementary school did trunk or treat. Parents bought candy, dressed up and decorated their cars. We met in the parking lot and the kids could safely trick or treat from one car to the next. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  50. We moved from the suburbs to the country and my daughter really missed trick or treating. It is not safe on windy country roads with no sidewalks. I gather others miss it too, so my elementary school did trunk or treat. Parents bought candy, dressed up and decorated their cars. We met in the parking lot and the kids could safely trick or treat from one car to the next. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  51. I had a routine medical appointment yesterday. Most of the female staff were wearing beautifully decorated witch hats with their scrubs! One had painted a cat nose and whiskers, and had pulled her hair up to make little cat ears! Such fun! And they work so hard. They never stop moving.

    Reply
  52. I had a routine medical appointment yesterday. Most of the female staff were wearing beautifully decorated witch hats with their scrubs! One had painted a cat nose and whiskers, and had pulled her hair up to make little cat ears! Such fun! And they work so hard. They never stop moving.

    Reply
  53. I had a routine medical appointment yesterday. Most of the female staff were wearing beautifully decorated witch hats with their scrubs! One had painted a cat nose and whiskers, and had pulled her hair up to make little cat ears! Such fun! And they work so hard. They never stop moving.

    Reply
  54. I had a routine medical appointment yesterday. Most of the female staff were wearing beautifully decorated witch hats with their scrubs! One had painted a cat nose and whiskers, and had pulled her hair up to make little cat ears! Such fun! And they work so hard. They never stop moving.

    Reply
  55. I had a routine medical appointment yesterday. Most of the female staff were wearing beautifully decorated witch hats with their scrubs! One had painted a cat nose and whiskers, and had pulled her hair up to make little cat ears! Such fun! And they work so hard. They never stop moving.

    Reply
  56. It’s been a long time since I’ve lived in a place that celebrated Halloween. But when my son was young, we lived in a nice, children-full neighborhood near Ft. Bragg. Following my mother’s tradition, I made all my son’s costumes, using make up instead of a mask. I miss Halloween, but have never been into adult parties.

    Reply
  57. It’s been a long time since I’ve lived in a place that celebrated Halloween. But when my son was young, we lived in a nice, children-full neighborhood near Ft. Bragg. Following my mother’s tradition, I made all my son’s costumes, using make up instead of a mask. I miss Halloween, but have never been into adult parties.

    Reply
  58. It’s been a long time since I’ve lived in a place that celebrated Halloween. But when my son was young, we lived in a nice, children-full neighborhood near Ft. Bragg. Following my mother’s tradition, I made all my son’s costumes, using make up instead of a mask. I miss Halloween, but have never been into adult parties.

    Reply
  59. It’s been a long time since I’ve lived in a place that celebrated Halloween. But when my son was young, we lived in a nice, children-full neighborhood near Ft. Bragg. Following my mother’s tradition, I made all my son’s costumes, using make up instead of a mask. I miss Halloween, but have never been into adult parties.

    Reply
  60. It’s been a long time since I’ve lived in a place that celebrated Halloween. But when my son was young, we lived in a nice, children-full neighborhood near Ft. Bragg. Following my mother’s tradition, I made all my son’s costumes, using make up instead of a mask. I miss Halloween, but have never been into adult parties.

    Reply
  61. I live so far out in the country I never see trick or treaters. And without that excuse I try very hard to avoid the Halloween candy on display all over Walmart!
    I think I have already posted the story of the house we lived in in England and my youngest brother’s “friendship” with the resident ghost.
    The elder of my two brothers was never really a believe until odd things started happening in the 100 plus year old house where he and his wife live now. They’ve even had a paranormal research team out there!

    Reply
  62. I live so far out in the country I never see trick or treaters. And without that excuse I try very hard to avoid the Halloween candy on display all over Walmart!
    I think I have already posted the story of the house we lived in in England and my youngest brother’s “friendship” with the resident ghost.
    The elder of my two brothers was never really a believe until odd things started happening in the 100 plus year old house where he and his wife live now. They’ve even had a paranormal research team out there!

    Reply
  63. I live so far out in the country I never see trick or treaters. And without that excuse I try very hard to avoid the Halloween candy on display all over Walmart!
    I think I have already posted the story of the house we lived in in England and my youngest brother’s “friendship” with the resident ghost.
    The elder of my two brothers was never really a believe until odd things started happening in the 100 plus year old house where he and his wife live now. They’ve even had a paranormal research team out there!

    Reply
  64. I live so far out in the country I never see trick or treaters. And without that excuse I try very hard to avoid the Halloween candy on display all over Walmart!
    I think I have already posted the story of the house we lived in in England and my youngest brother’s “friendship” with the resident ghost.
    The elder of my two brothers was never really a believe until odd things started happening in the 100 plus year old house where he and his wife live now. They’ve even had a paranormal research team out there!

    Reply
  65. I live so far out in the country I never see trick or treaters. And without that excuse I try very hard to avoid the Halloween candy on display all over Walmart!
    I think I have already posted the story of the house we lived in in England and my youngest brother’s “friendship” with the resident ghost.
    The elder of my two brothers was never really a believe until odd things started happening in the 100 plus year old house where he and his wife live now. They’ve even had a paranormal research team out there!

    Reply
  66. Louis, well, that *was* a trick! Good thing that policeman was there, otherwise you might have gone down a baaaad road
    Mary Jo, I can never really buy those haunted house tours, and I guess your friend will probably feel the same. Its not that I disbelieve in ghosts, but I don’t think they turn up for tour groups.

    Reply
  67. Louis, well, that *was* a trick! Good thing that policeman was there, otherwise you might have gone down a baaaad road
    Mary Jo, I can never really buy those haunted house tours, and I guess your friend will probably feel the same. Its not that I disbelieve in ghosts, but I don’t think they turn up for tour groups.

    Reply
  68. Louis, well, that *was* a trick! Good thing that policeman was there, otherwise you might have gone down a baaaad road
    Mary Jo, I can never really buy those haunted house tours, and I guess your friend will probably feel the same. Its not that I disbelieve in ghosts, but I don’t think they turn up for tour groups.

    Reply
  69. Louis, well, that *was* a trick! Good thing that policeman was there, otherwise you might have gone down a baaaad road
    Mary Jo, I can never really buy those haunted house tours, and I guess your friend will probably feel the same. Its not that I disbelieve in ghosts, but I don’t think they turn up for tour groups.

    Reply
  70. Louis, well, that *was* a trick! Good thing that policeman was there, otherwise you might have gone down a baaaad road
    Mary Jo, I can never really buy those haunted house tours, and I guess your friend will probably feel the same. Its not that I disbelieve in ghosts, but I don’t think they turn up for tour groups.

    Reply
  71. ELF, I’m the same. I was talking about trick or treat with friends of mine last night and one said she always gave the kids carrot sticks and celery. LOL. I don’t suppose she’s the most popular neighbor around.
    Lovely that you have an adopted soldier and great that she’s on her way home. I’m sure that candy will find a good home.

    Reply
  72. ELF, I’m the same. I was talking about trick or treat with friends of mine last night and one said she always gave the kids carrot sticks and celery. LOL. I don’t suppose she’s the most popular neighbor around.
    Lovely that you have an adopted soldier and great that she’s on her way home. I’m sure that candy will find a good home.

    Reply
  73. ELF, I’m the same. I was talking about trick or treat with friends of mine last night and one said she always gave the kids carrot sticks and celery. LOL. I don’t suppose she’s the most popular neighbor around.
    Lovely that you have an adopted soldier and great that she’s on her way home. I’m sure that candy will find a good home.

    Reply
  74. ELF, I’m the same. I was talking about trick or treat with friends of mine last night and one said she always gave the kids carrot sticks and celery. LOL. I don’t suppose she’s the most popular neighbor around.
    Lovely that you have an adopted soldier and great that she’s on her way home. I’m sure that candy will find a good home.

    Reply
  75. ELF, I’m the same. I was talking about trick or treat with friends of mine last night and one said she always gave the kids carrot sticks and celery. LOL. I don’t suppose she’s the most popular neighbor around.
    Lovely that you have an adopted soldier and great that she’s on her way home. I’m sure that candy will find a good home.

    Reply
  76. Lyn, what a great solution to scattered homes. I’m sure everyone had a fun time.
    Artemisia, I love it when people enter into the spirit of a holiday like that — I’m sure it gives most people a smile and I bet it makes the day go faster.

    Reply
  77. Lyn, what a great solution to scattered homes. I’m sure everyone had a fun time.
    Artemisia, I love it when people enter into the spirit of a holiday like that — I’m sure it gives most people a smile and I bet it makes the day go faster.

    Reply
  78. Lyn, what a great solution to scattered homes. I’m sure everyone had a fun time.
    Artemisia, I love it when people enter into the spirit of a holiday like that — I’m sure it gives most people a smile and I bet it makes the day go faster.

    Reply
  79. Lyn, what a great solution to scattered homes. I’m sure everyone had a fun time.
    Artemisia, I love it when people enter into the spirit of a holiday like that — I’m sure it gives most people a smile and I bet it makes the day go faster.

    Reply
  80. Lyn, what a great solution to scattered homes. I’m sure everyone had a fun time.
    Artemisia, I love it when people enter into the spirit of a holiday like that — I’m sure it gives most people a smile and I bet it makes the day go faster.

    Reply
  81. Ella, if you ever come to a RWA conference in Australia, the Friday night cocktail party is a costume affair, and most people get into the spirit of it. It’s an excellent icebreaker.
    Louisa, that’s the kind of ghost story I *do* find plausible. I’m not so sure I’d like to live in a haunted house though.

    Reply
  82. Ella, if you ever come to a RWA conference in Australia, the Friday night cocktail party is a costume affair, and most people get into the spirit of it. It’s an excellent icebreaker.
    Louisa, that’s the kind of ghost story I *do* find plausible. I’m not so sure I’d like to live in a haunted house though.

    Reply
  83. Ella, if you ever come to a RWA conference in Australia, the Friday night cocktail party is a costume affair, and most people get into the spirit of it. It’s an excellent icebreaker.
    Louisa, that’s the kind of ghost story I *do* find plausible. I’m not so sure I’d like to live in a haunted house though.

    Reply
  84. Ella, if you ever come to a RWA conference in Australia, the Friday night cocktail party is a costume affair, and most people get into the spirit of it. It’s an excellent icebreaker.
    Louisa, that’s the kind of ghost story I *do* find plausible. I’m not so sure I’d like to live in a haunted house though.

    Reply
  85. Ella, if you ever come to a RWA conference in Australia, the Friday night cocktail party is a costume affair, and most people get into the spirit of it. It’s an excellent icebreaker.
    Louisa, that’s the kind of ghost story I *do* find plausible. I’m not so sure I’d like to live in a haunted house though.

    Reply

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