Woof?!

Depositphotos_10890100_XLRandom thoughts about dogs

By Mary Jo

Anyone who knows me or has read my books probably knows I'm a cat person, but that doesn't mean I can't appreciate the wonderfulness of dogs.  Many of my friends have great dogs and I always love hearing their canine stories. We had lots of cats on the farm when I was a kid, but only one dog: a friendly family basset hound called Bootsy.  (The picture on the left isn't Bootsy, but the look is very similar.)

The name basset is French and derives from the word bas, meaning low, so they are "low hounds."  Bassets are large dogs with very short legs, so they are low but not small.  Bootsy had a baritone bark that would do credit to the Hound of the Baskervilles. <G>  (My book Shattered Rainbows had a basset known as Louis the Lazy.)

 

Dognapping!

What got me musing about dogs for this blog was a newspaper article about the canine breeds most likely to be stolen.  They tend to be small, valuable purebreds because it's a lot easier to swipe a Chihuahua than a St. Bernard.  At the top of the theft list are French bulldogs.  Last year saw the widely publicized case of three men stealing two of Lady Gaga's French bulldogs and shooting her dog walker.  The dog walker survived, barely, the dogs were returned, and five people were arrested in connection with the thefts.

The pandemic has increased dog theft as people locked down in their homes yearned for companionship and adoptable pets were much in demand.  Valuable purebreds can be resold profitably after they're stolen. The listing of breeds popular for thefts included French bulldogs, Pembroke Welsh Corgis, the bichon frise, and the Norwegian Lundehund.

Whoa, the Norwegian Lundehund?

I'd never heard of this breed, so I visited my friends at Wikipedia to find out more.  Lundehunds turned out to be quite fascinating.  They were bred to hunt Lundehundpuffins and the name means "puffin dog."  It's small, only about 15 pounds, lighter than cats I've had. 

Puffins live in craggy coastal areas, and the Lundehund was bred to pursue the birds into rocky crevices and paths.  They're amazingly agile and have extra toes and it sounds like they can probably go straight up cliffs.  The breed almost went extinct, but has now been bred and nurtured back to valuable life, They are the rarest dog breed in the world, which is why they are targets for dognappers. (I found the image on the right in several places on the internet, but couldn't find copyright information so I hope this isn't a violation. But isn't it amazing the way this Lundehund can stretch his forelegs out?)

Reading about the Lundehund made me think about how dogs have been bred for many kinds of work.  Welsh corgis are short and sturdy and are great herding dogs, Their low height helps them avoid kicks of the cattle they're herding, a fact I learned when I wrote Angel Rogue, a story which included cattle drovers and their dogs.  ("Corgi" is Welsh for dwarf dog.)

Hunting dogs Red_Smooth_Saluki.jpg--Wikipedia

There are so many, many breeds of dogs, often bred for special usage, particularly hunting.  "Sight hounds", as the name suggests, hunt by spotting game and racing after it. They are sleek and fast and elegant, like greyhounds, salukis, and whippets. (Here's a Wikipedia image of a saluki. Gorgeous, and built for speed!)

"Scent hounds" obviously hunt by scent and include beagles, bassets, bloodhounds and other breeds with extra sensitive noses.  Beagles often hunt in packs, nose to the ground to follow the scent of the prey. Often they run with their white tipped tails up in the air so it can be seen in tall grass like a little flag.  <G>

Rescued by Ruby

Another reason I'm musing about dogs was that I just found a newly released Netflix original movie called Rescued by Ruby. Rescued_by_Ruby

Based on a true story, it tells of a young Rhode Island state trooper named Dan who really, really wanted to be part of the state K-9 corps, but he'd never been accepted for training.  Plus, he didn't have a dog and the state didn't have the funds to buy one of the specially bred dogs from Europe, which cost around $10,000.

Undeterred, Dan goes to a local dog rescue hoping to find a German Shepherd he can train, but the shelter doesn't have many purebreds.  Dan ends up adopting Ruby, a wildly hyperactive cross between an Australian Shepherd and a Border Collie.  Basically, this is a dog with endless energy and so smart that if you leave it in the house alone, you might come home and find your pooch has rewired your house and subscribed to every streaming service in existence. <G>

Ruby had been taken home by five different families who ended up returning her because she was so manic and uncontrollable.  Dan is dyslexic and AHDH, so he figures he understands her, and after many trials and tribulations, they get accepted in the state K9 corps–and Ruby saves a boy's life when she does search and rescue.  It's a great story, and mostly true, I think. Delightful!

Do you have some great dog stories?  Tell us about them!

Mary Jo

95 thoughts on “Woof?!”

  1. Like you, Mary Jo, I’m a cat person. But I’ve frequented the occasional dog show, and always gravitated to the obedience trials.
    I once watched an Afghan hound, an elegant, intelligent breed, as its trainer made hand signals to the various obstacles to be jumped over, run around, or fetched. She (the trainer) would fling an arm out, with a pointing finger, to indicate which obstacle to jump.
    “Jump!, she called, sweeping her arm to the right. The Afghan obediently trotted over to the right-hand gate and floated over it. Just as efficiently, it mastered several more commands, until the last one, a fence that looked a lot like the first one but on the left.
    Arm fling to the left. “Jump!” Dog just sat there, head propped to side. Arm fling, jump command, several more times. Same reaction. Timekeeper gave warning.
    Now desperate, the trainer FLUNG her whole body to the LEFT and yelled “JUMP!!!” one last time.
    The Afghan shrugged (I swear) its non-existent shoulder, walked (!) over to the RIGHT hand gate and daintily hopped over it!
    Later, I shared this with an Afghan breeder. “Well,” she said. “I’m amazed anyone would put an Afghan through obedience training. They’re so smart, they think if they’ve done something once, why bother doing it again?”

    Reply
  2. Like you, Mary Jo, I’m a cat person. But I’ve frequented the occasional dog show, and always gravitated to the obedience trials.
    I once watched an Afghan hound, an elegant, intelligent breed, as its trainer made hand signals to the various obstacles to be jumped over, run around, or fetched. She (the trainer) would fling an arm out, with a pointing finger, to indicate which obstacle to jump.
    “Jump!, she called, sweeping her arm to the right. The Afghan obediently trotted over to the right-hand gate and floated over it. Just as efficiently, it mastered several more commands, until the last one, a fence that looked a lot like the first one but on the left.
    Arm fling to the left. “Jump!” Dog just sat there, head propped to side. Arm fling, jump command, several more times. Same reaction. Timekeeper gave warning.
    Now desperate, the trainer FLUNG her whole body to the LEFT and yelled “JUMP!!!” one last time.
    The Afghan shrugged (I swear) its non-existent shoulder, walked (!) over to the RIGHT hand gate and daintily hopped over it!
    Later, I shared this with an Afghan breeder. “Well,” she said. “I’m amazed anyone would put an Afghan through obedience training. They’re so smart, they think if they’ve done something once, why bother doing it again?”

    Reply
  3. Like you, Mary Jo, I’m a cat person. But I’ve frequented the occasional dog show, and always gravitated to the obedience trials.
    I once watched an Afghan hound, an elegant, intelligent breed, as its trainer made hand signals to the various obstacles to be jumped over, run around, or fetched. She (the trainer) would fling an arm out, with a pointing finger, to indicate which obstacle to jump.
    “Jump!, she called, sweeping her arm to the right. The Afghan obediently trotted over to the right-hand gate and floated over it. Just as efficiently, it mastered several more commands, until the last one, a fence that looked a lot like the first one but on the left.
    Arm fling to the left. “Jump!” Dog just sat there, head propped to side. Arm fling, jump command, several more times. Same reaction. Timekeeper gave warning.
    Now desperate, the trainer FLUNG her whole body to the LEFT and yelled “JUMP!!!” one last time.
    The Afghan shrugged (I swear) its non-existent shoulder, walked (!) over to the RIGHT hand gate and daintily hopped over it!
    Later, I shared this with an Afghan breeder. “Well,” she said. “I’m amazed anyone would put an Afghan through obedience training. They’re so smart, they think if they’ve done something once, why bother doing it again?”

    Reply
  4. Like you, Mary Jo, I’m a cat person. But I’ve frequented the occasional dog show, and always gravitated to the obedience trials.
    I once watched an Afghan hound, an elegant, intelligent breed, as its trainer made hand signals to the various obstacles to be jumped over, run around, or fetched. She (the trainer) would fling an arm out, with a pointing finger, to indicate which obstacle to jump.
    “Jump!, she called, sweeping her arm to the right. The Afghan obediently trotted over to the right-hand gate and floated over it. Just as efficiently, it mastered several more commands, until the last one, a fence that looked a lot like the first one but on the left.
    Arm fling to the left. “Jump!” Dog just sat there, head propped to side. Arm fling, jump command, several more times. Same reaction. Timekeeper gave warning.
    Now desperate, the trainer FLUNG her whole body to the LEFT and yelled “JUMP!!!” one last time.
    The Afghan shrugged (I swear) its non-existent shoulder, walked (!) over to the RIGHT hand gate and daintily hopped over it!
    Later, I shared this with an Afghan breeder. “Well,” she said. “I’m amazed anyone would put an Afghan through obedience training. They’re so smart, they think if they’ve done something once, why bother doing it again?”

    Reply
  5. Like you, Mary Jo, I’m a cat person. But I’ve frequented the occasional dog show, and always gravitated to the obedience trials.
    I once watched an Afghan hound, an elegant, intelligent breed, as its trainer made hand signals to the various obstacles to be jumped over, run around, or fetched. She (the trainer) would fling an arm out, with a pointing finger, to indicate which obstacle to jump.
    “Jump!, she called, sweeping her arm to the right. The Afghan obediently trotted over to the right-hand gate and floated over it. Just as efficiently, it mastered several more commands, until the last one, a fence that looked a lot like the first one but on the left.
    Arm fling to the left. “Jump!” Dog just sat there, head propped to side. Arm fling, jump command, several more times. Same reaction. Timekeeper gave warning.
    Now desperate, the trainer FLUNG her whole body to the LEFT and yelled “JUMP!!!” one last time.
    The Afghan shrugged (I swear) its non-existent shoulder, walked (!) over to the RIGHT hand gate and daintily hopped over it!
    Later, I shared this with an Afghan breeder. “Well,” she said. “I’m amazed anyone would put an Afghan through obedience training. They’re so smart, they think if they’ve done something once, why bother doing it again?”

    Reply
  6. What a wonderful blog post, Mary Jo! You know what a great dog lover I am and I can’t wait to see Rescued by Ruby. It sounds as though it celebrates the many things I love about dogs, namely that sense of dog and person bringing out the best in each other, sharing joy and doing good along the way.
    I have many great dog stories, as you might imagine. Some of my favourites are about guide dogs who, whilst being very well behaved of course, manage to slip in some typical dog behaviour unbeknownst to their owners. One of the most famous was the guide dog belonging to a former government minister who would always take the route home via a pie shop where she knew they had the wares on a display outside in the summer. The dog was able to turn her head, steal a pie from a low shelf and carry on without breaking step at all. Everyone knew what she was doing but no one told the minister for years.
    On a personal note, I remember trying to teach one of our guide dog puppies how to retrieve a toy and bring it back to me. I’d throw the toy and say “FETCH” and he would just look at me blankly. Eventually after about five fails, our pet dog Angus, who was watching, got up, walked over to the toy, picked it up very deliberately, walked back and solemnly handed it to me. He then looked at the puppy as if to say “That’s how you do it, youngster.” They learned such a lot from him, bless him!

    Reply
  7. What a wonderful blog post, Mary Jo! You know what a great dog lover I am and I can’t wait to see Rescued by Ruby. It sounds as though it celebrates the many things I love about dogs, namely that sense of dog and person bringing out the best in each other, sharing joy and doing good along the way.
    I have many great dog stories, as you might imagine. Some of my favourites are about guide dogs who, whilst being very well behaved of course, manage to slip in some typical dog behaviour unbeknownst to their owners. One of the most famous was the guide dog belonging to a former government minister who would always take the route home via a pie shop where she knew they had the wares on a display outside in the summer. The dog was able to turn her head, steal a pie from a low shelf and carry on without breaking step at all. Everyone knew what she was doing but no one told the minister for years.
    On a personal note, I remember trying to teach one of our guide dog puppies how to retrieve a toy and bring it back to me. I’d throw the toy and say “FETCH” and he would just look at me blankly. Eventually after about five fails, our pet dog Angus, who was watching, got up, walked over to the toy, picked it up very deliberately, walked back and solemnly handed it to me. He then looked at the puppy as if to say “That’s how you do it, youngster.” They learned such a lot from him, bless him!

    Reply
  8. What a wonderful blog post, Mary Jo! You know what a great dog lover I am and I can’t wait to see Rescued by Ruby. It sounds as though it celebrates the many things I love about dogs, namely that sense of dog and person bringing out the best in each other, sharing joy and doing good along the way.
    I have many great dog stories, as you might imagine. Some of my favourites are about guide dogs who, whilst being very well behaved of course, manage to slip in some typical dog behaviour unbeknownst to their owners. One of the most famous was the guide dog belonging to a former government minister who would always take the route home via a pie shop where she knew they had the wares on a display outside in the summer. The dog was able to turn her head, steal a pie from a low shelf and carry on without breaking step at all. Everyone knew what she was doing but no one told the minister for years.
    On a personal note, I remember trying to teach one of our guide dog puppies how to retrieve a toy and bring it back to me. I’d throw the toy and say “FETCH” and he would just look at me blankly. Eventually after about five fails, our pet dog Angus, who was watching, got up, walked over to the toy, picked it up very deliberately, walked back and solemnly handed it to me. He then looked at the puppy as if to say “That’s how you do it, youngster.” They learned such a lot from him, bless him!

    Reply
  9. What a wonderful blog post, Mary Jo! You know what a great dog lover I am and I can’t wait to see Rescued by Ruby. It sounds as though it celebrates the many things I love about dogs, namely that sense of dog and person bringing out the best in each other, sharing joy and doing good along the way.
    I have many great dog stories, as you might imagine. Some of my favourites are about guide dogs who, whilst being very well behaved of course, manage to slip in some typical dog behaviour unbeknownst to their owners. One of the most famous was the guide dog belonging to a former government minister who would always take the route home via a pie shop where she knew they had the wares on a display outside in the summer. The dog was able to turn her head, steal a pie from a low shelf and carry on without breaking step at all. Everyone knew what she was doing but no one told the minister for years.
    On a personal note, I remember trying to teach one of our guide dog puppies how to retrieve a toy and bring it back to me. I’d throw the toy and say “FETCH” and he would just look at me blankly. Eventually after about five fails, our pet dog Angus, who was watching, got up, walked over to the toy, picked it up very deliberately, walked back and solemnly handed it to me. He then looked at the puppy as if to say “That’s how you do it, youngster.” They learned such a lot from him, bless him!

    Reply
  10. What a wonderful blog post, Mary Jo! You know what a great dog lover I am and I can’t wait to see Rescued by Ruby. It sounds as though it celebrates the many things I love about dogs, namely that sense of dog and person bringing out the best in each other, sharing joy and doing good along the way.
    I have many great dog stories, as you might imagine. Some of my favourites are about guide dogs who, whilst being very well behaved of course, manage to slip in some typical dog behaviour unbeknownst to their owners. One of the most famous was the guide dog belonging to a former government minister who would always take the route home via a pie shop where she knew they had the wares on a display outside in the summer. The dog was able to turn her head, steal a pie from a low shelf and carry on without breaking step at all. Everyone knew what she was doing but no one told the minister for years.
    On a personal note, I remember trying to teach one of our guide dog puppies how to retrieve a toy and bring it back to me. I’d throw the toy and say “FETCH” and he would just look at me blankly. Eventually after about five fails, our pet dog Angus, who was watching, got up, walked over to the toy, picked it up very deliberately, walked back and solemnly handed it to me. He then looked at the puppy as if to say “That’s how you do it, youngster.” They learned such a lot from him, bless him!

    Reply
  11. Lovely post, Mary Jo! We had a rough collie when I lived in Tokyo and most Japanese people had never seen one in real life at that time. They always exclaimed “Lassie!” at the sight of him, as the film was popular there, but although his real name was Timmy (yes, named after the dog in Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series), he didn’t mind. He just lapped up the attention. (Rough collies are a LOT calmer than border collies – very laid-back indeed). While we were there, the real Lassie actually came for an official visit to Japan and he stayed in a suite at the best hotel – lucky dog!

    Reply
  12. Lovely post, Mary Jo! We had a rough collie when I lived in Tokyo and most Japanese people had never seen one in real life at that time. They always exclaimed “Lassie!” at the sight of him, as the film was popular there, but although his real name was Timmy (yes, named after the dog in Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series), he didn’t mind. He just lapped up the attention. (Rough collies are a LOT calmer than border collies – very laid-back indeed). While we were there, the real Lassie actually came for an official visit to Japan and he stayed in a suite at the best hotel – lucky dog!

    Reply
  13. Lovely post, Mary Jo! We had a rough collie when I lived in Tokyo and most Japanese people had never seen one in real life at that time. They always exclaimed “Lassie!” at the sight of him, as the film was popular there, but although his real name was Timmy (yes, named after the dog in Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series), he didn’t mind. He just lapped up the attention. (Rough collies are a LOT calmer than border collies – very laid-back indeed). While we were there, the real Lassie actually came for an official visit to Japan and he stayed in a suite at the best hotel – lucky dog!

    Reply
  14. Lovely post, Mary Jo! We had a rough collie when I lived in Tokyo and most Japanese people had never seen one in real life at that time. They always exclaimed “Lassie!” at the sight of him, as the film was popular there, but although his real name was Timmy (yes, named after the dog in Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series), he didn’t mind. He just lapped up the attention. (Rough collies are a LOT calmer than border collies – very laid-back indeed). While we were there, the real Lassie actually came for an official visit to Japan and he stayed in a suite at the best hotel – lucky dog!

    Reply
  15. Lovely post, Mary Jo! We had a rough collie when I lived in Tokyo and most Japanese people had never seen one in real life at that time. They always exclaimed “Lassie!” at the sight of him, as the film was popular there, but although his real name was Timmy (yes, named after the dog in Enid Blyton’s Famous Five series), he didn’t mind. He just lapped up the attention. (Rough collies are a LOT calmer than border collies – very laid-back indeed). While we were there, the real Lassie actually came for an official visit to Japan and he stayed in a suite at the best hotel – lucky dog!

    Reply
  16. In another life, Mr Wonderful and I showed Cocker Spaniel dogs. They are fun dogs and beautiful and we had a good time with them. We got a Boxer girl from Florida. She was a beautiful girl and we took her to puppy classes and got her all trained and ready to go.
    Getting Cockers ready to show is a long process. They have lots of hair and they must be clipped in order to show their heads and necks. Those are areas which are important in their judging.
    Bunny, our Boxer watched everything carefully. Getting a Boxer ready means bathing and maybe trimming whiskers. That was not enough for Bunny.
    At a show, she had to be lifted up on the grooming table, and brushed and petted and told how pretty she was. If those rinky little Cockers were going to be given special treatment, than so was she.
    In reality, although she was beautiful, her actual purpose in life was being best friend to our son. She believed that the two of them should do everything together. She was right. They had a love for one another, and even years later, she was the Boxer who got him into rescuing Boxer dogs.
    Hope everyone is happy. Have you hugged your cat/dog today?

    Reply
  17. In another life, Mr Wonderful and I showed Cocker Spaniel dogs. They are fun dogs and beautiful and we had a good time with them. We got a Boxer girl from Florida. She was a beautiful girl and we took her to puppy classes and got her all trained and ready to go.
    Getting Cockers ready to show is a long process. They have lots of hair and they must be clipped in order to show their heads and necks. Those are areas which are important in their judging.
    Bunny, our Boxer watched everything carefully. Getting a Boxer ready means bathing and maybe trimming whiskers. That was not enough for Bunny.
    At a show, she had to be lifted up on the grooming table, and brushed and petted and told how pretty she was. If those rinky little Cockers were going to be given special treatment, than so was she.
    In reality, although she was beautiful, her actual purpose in life was being best friend to our son. She believed that the two of them should do everything together. She was right. They had a love for one another, and even years later, she was the Boxer who got him into rescuing Boxer dogs.
    Hope everyone is happy. Have you hugged your cat/dog today?

    Reply
  18. In another life, Mr Wonderful and I showed Cocker Spaniel dogs. They are fun dogs and beautiful and we had a good time with them. We got a Boxer girl from Florida. She was a beautiful girl and we took her to puppy classes and got her all trained and ready to go.
    Getting Cockers ready to show is a long process. They have lots of hair and they must be clipped in order to show their heads and necks. Those are areas which are important in their judging.
    Bunny, our Boxer watched everything carefully. Getting a Boxer ready means bathing and maybe trimming whiskers. That was not enough for Bunny.
    At a show, she had to be lifted up on the grooming table, and brushed and petted and told how pretty she was. If those rinky little Cockers were going to be given special treatment, than so was she.
    In reality, although she was beautiful, her actual purpose in life was being best friend to our son. She believed that the two of them should do everything together. She was right. They had a love for one another, and even years later, she was the Boxer who got him into rescuing Boxer dogs.
    Hope everyone is happy. Have you hugged your cat/dog today?

    Reply
  19. In another life, Mr Wonderful and I showed Cocker Spaniel dogs. They are fun dogs and beautiful and we had a good time with them. We got a Boxer girl from Florida. She was a beautiful girl and we took her to puppy classes and got her all trained and ready to go.
    Getting Cockers ready to show is a long process. They have lots of hair and they must be clipped in order to show their heads and necks. Those are areas which are important in their judging.
    Bunny, our Boxer watched everything carefully. Getting a Boxer ready means bathing and maybe trimming whiskers. That was not enough for Bunny.
    At a show, she had to be lifted up on the grooming table, and brushed and petted and told how pretty she was. If those rinky little Cockers were going to be given special treatment, than so was she.
    In reality, although she was beautiful, her actual purpose in life was being best friend to our son. She believed that the two of them should do everything together. She was right. They had a love for one another, and even years later, she was the Boxer who got him into rescuing Boxer dogs.
    Hope everyone is happy. Have you hugged your cat/dog today?

    Reply
  20. In another life, Mr Wonderful and I showed Cocker Spaniel dogs. They are fun dogs and beautiful and we had a good time with them. We got a Boxer girl from Florida. She was a beautiful girl and we took her to puppy classes and got her all trained and ready to go.
    Getting Cockers ready to show is a long process. They have lots of hair and they must be clipped in order to show their heads and necks. Those are areas which are important in their judging.
    Bunny, our Boxer watched everything carefully. Getting a Boxer ready means bathing and maybe trimming whiskers. That was not enough for Bunny.
    At a show, she had to be lifted up on the grooming table, and brushed and petted and told how pretty she was. If those rinky little Cockers were going to be given special treatment, than so was she.
    In reality, although she was beautiful, her actual purpose in life was being best friend to our son. She believed that the two of them should do everything together. She was right. They had a love for one another, and even years later, she was the Boxer who got him into rescuing Boxer dogs.
    Hope everyone is happy. Have you hugged your cat/dog today?

    Reply
  21. When I was a kid, we always had both dogs and cats. When I left home and lived in a series of apartments for years, I could not have animals (sob) and I missed them. So the first thing that I did when I bought my own house was move in three roommates (one kitten and two puppies).
    Kitty, of course, knew what her litter box was for and used it right off the bat. The puppies took a little more time and patience. I used a baby gate to keep the puppies in the kitchen at night until they were potty-trained.
    One morning shortly before Christmas, I awoke to find both of my boys in bed with me (what happened to the baby gate?). They both had ribbons and bows, from the presents under the Christmas tree, in their mouths. They seemed so proud of themselves I couldn’t get mad at them. I was just grateful that they left the presents themselves intact. And one of them had actually left a “gift” for me on the carpet in front of the tree (smile).

    Reply
  22. When I was a kid, we always had both dogs and cats. When I left home and lived in a series of apartments for years, I could not have animals (sob) and I missed them. So the first thing that I did when I bought my own house was move in three roommates (one kitten and two puppies).
    Kitty, of course, knew what her litter box was for and used it right off the bat. The puppies took a little more time and patience. I used a baby gate to keep the puppies in the kitchen at night until they were potty-trained.
    One morning shortly before Christmas, I awoke to find both of my boys in bed with me (what happened to the baby gate?). They both had ribbons and bows, from the presents under the Christmas tree, in their mouths. They seemed so proud of themselves I couldn’t get mad at them. I was just grateful that they left the presents themselves intact. And one of them had actually left a “gift” for me on the carpet in front of the tree (smile).

    Reply
  23. When I was a kid, we always had both dogs and cats. When I left home and lived in a series of apartments for years, I could not have animals (sob) and I missed them. So the first thing that I did when I bought my own house was move in three roommates (one kitten and two puppies).
    Kitty, of course, knew what her litter box was for and used it right off the bat. The puppies took a little more time and patience. I used a baby gate to keep the puppies in the kitchen at night until they were potty-trained.
    One morning shortly before Christmas, I awoke to find both of my boys in bed with me (what happened to the baby gate?). They both had ribbons and bows, from the presents under the Christmas tree, in their mouths. They seemed so proud of themselves I couldn’t get mad at them. I was just grateful that they left the presents themselves intact. And one of them had actually left a “gift” for me on the carpet in front of the tree (smile).

    Reply
  24. When I was a kid, we always had both dogs and cats. When I left home and lived in a series of apartments for years, I could not have animals (sob) and I missed them. So the first thing that I did when I bought my own house was move in three roommates (one kitten and two puppies).
    Kitty, of course, knew what her litter box was for and used it right off the bat. The puppies took a little more time and patience. I used a baby gate to keep the puppies in the kitchen at night until they were potty-trained.
    One morning shortly before Christmas, I awoke to find both of my boys in bed with me (what happened to the baby gate?). They both had ribbons and bows, from the presents under the Christmas tree, in their mouths. They seemed so proud of themselves I couldn’t get mad at them. I was just grateful that they left the presents themselves intact. And one of them had actually left a “gift” for me on the carpet in front of the tree (smile).

    Reply
  25. When I was a kid, we always had both dogs and cats. When I left home and lived in a series of apartments for years, I could not have animals (sob) and I missed them. So the first thing that I did when I bought my own house was move in three roommates (one kitten and two puppies).
    Kitty, of course, knew what her litter box was for and used it right off the bat. The puppies took a little more time and patience. I used a baby gate to keep the puppies in the kitchen at night until they were potty-trained.
    One morning shortly before Christmas, I awoke to find both of my boys in bed with me (what happened to the baby gate?). They both had ribbons and bows, from the presents under the Christmas tree, in their mouths. They seemed so proud of themselves I couldn’t get mad at them. I was just grateful that they left the presents themselves intact. And one of them had actually left a “gift” for me on the carpet in front of the tree (smile).

    Reply
  26. I love animals, all types but there’s something special about a dog. I lost my little Labrador Cross two weeks before Christmas and I thought my heart would break. He was a lovely, loyal, happy little dog and so clever. Tell him a thing once and he had it!
    His companion, who we lost three years ago was an Irish Wolfhound. HE was a sight hound. If he took off after something, that was it! Gone! No amount of calling would bring him back until he was ready.
    I enjoyed this post. Some lovely stories. I do like the idea of Angus just giving a big sigh and doing the job himself:)

    Reply
  27. I love animals, all types but there’s something special about a dog. I lost my little Labrador Cross two weeks before Christmas and I thought my heart would break. He was a lovely, loyal, happy little dog and so clever. Tell him a thing once and he had it!
    His companion, who we lost three years ago was an Irish Wolfhound. HE was a sight hound. If he took off after something, that was it! Gone! No amount of calling would bring him back until he was ready.
    I enjoyed this post. Some lovely stories. I do like the idea of Angus just giving a big sigh and doing the job himself:)

    Reply
  28. I love animals, all types but there’s something special about a dog. I lost my little Labrador Cross two weeks before Christmas and I thought my heart would break. He was a lovely, loyal, happy little dog and so clever. Tell him a thing once and he had it!
    His companion, who we lost three years ago was an Irish Wolfhound. HE was a sight hound. If he took off after something, that was it! Gone! No amount of calling would bring him back until he was ready.
    I enjoyed this post. Some lovely stories. I do like the idea of Angus just giving a big sigh and doing the job himself:)

    Reply
  29. I love animals, all types but there’s something special about a dog. I lost my little Labrador Cross two weeks before Christmas and I thought my heart would break. He was a lovely, loyal, happy little dog and so clever. Tell him a thing once and he had it!
    His companion, who we lost three years ago was an Irish Wolfhound. HE was a sight hound. If he took off after something, that was it! Gone! No amount of calling would bring him back until he was ready.
    I enjoyed this post. Some lovely stories. I do like the idea of Angus just giving a big sigh and doing the job himself:)

    Reply
  30. I love animals, all types but there’s something special about a dog. I lost my little Labrador Cross two weeks before Christmas and I thought my heart would break. He was a lovely, loyal, happy little dog and so clever. Tell him a thing once and he had it!
    His companion, who we lost three years ago was an Irish Wolfhound. HE was a sight hound. If he took off after something, that was it! Gone! No amount of calling would bring him back until he was ready.
    I enjoyed this post. Some lovely stories. I do like the idea of Angus just giving a big sigh and doing the job himself:)

    Reply
  31. Nicola, I think you’ll love RESCUED BY RUBY–it’s a happy, positive story. LOL about the minister’s guide dog! I suppose the shop owner was willing to let this go on indefinitely. *G*
    As for Angus–what a great mentor for future guide dog puppies!

    Reply
  32. Nicola, I think you’ll love RESCUED BY RUBY–it’s a happy, positive story. LOL about the minister’s guide dog! I suppose the shop owner was willing to let this go on indefinitely. *G*
    As for Angus–what a great mentor for future guide dog puppies!

    Reply
  33. Nicola, I think you’ll love RESCUED BY RUBY–it’s a happy, positive story. LOL about the minister’s guide dog! I suppose the shop owner was willing to let this go on indefinitely. *G*
    As for Angus–what a great mentor for future guide dog puppies!

    Reply
  34. Nicola, I think you’ll love RESCUED BY RUBY–it’s a happy, positive story. LOL about the minister’s guide dog! I suppose the shop owner was willing to let this go on indefinitely. *G*
    As for Angus–what a great mentor for future guide dog puppies!

    Reply
  35. Nicola, I think you’ll love RESCUED BY RUBY–it’s a happy, positive story. LOL about the minister’s guide dog! I suppose the shop owner was willing to let this go on indefinitely. *G*
    As for Angus–what a great mentor for future guide dog puppies!

    Reply
  36. Christina, rough collies are gorgeous and the ones I’ve known are indeed much more relaxed than border collies, which are very focused and high energy! Lucky Lassie to get a premier suite, but that’s show business! When you’re a star, you’re a star!

    Reply
  37. Christina, rough collies are gorgeous and the ones I’ve known are indeed much more relaxed than border collies, which are very focused and high energy! Lucky Lassie to get a premier suite, but that’s show business! When you’re a star, you’re a star!

    Reply
  38. Christina, rough collies are gorgeous and the ones I’ve known are indeed much more relaxed than border collies, which are very focused and high energy! Lucky Lassie to get a premier suite, but that’s show business! When you’re a star, you’re a star!

    Reply
  39. Christina, rough collies are gorgeous and the ones I’ve known are indeed much more relaxed than border collies, which are very focused and high energy! Lucky Lassie to get a premier suite, but that’s show business! When you’re a star, you’re a star!

    Reply
  40. Christina, rough collies are gorgeous and the ones I’ve known are indeed much more relaxed than border collies, which are very focused and high energy! Lucky Lassie to get a premier suite, but that’s show business! When you’re a star, you’re a star!

    Reply
  41. Annette, how funny about Bunny! (No poetry intended.) Of course she wanted lot of attention–she deserved it! Boxer are indeed lovely, and equally lovely now that your son is a Boxer rescuer.

    Reply
  42. Annette, how funny about Bunny! (No poetry intended.) Of course she wanted lot of attention–she deserved it! Boxer are indeed lovely, and equally lovely now that your son is a Boxer rescuer.

    Reply
  43. Annette, how funny about Bunny! (No poetry intended.) Of course she wanted lot of attention–she deserved it! Boxer are indeed lovely, and equally lovely now that your son is a Boxer rescuer.

    Reply
  44. Annette, how funny about Bunny! (No poetry intended.) Of course she wanted lot of attention–she deserved it! Boxer are indeed lovely, and equally lovely now that your son is a Boxer rescuer.

    Reply
  45. Annette, how funny about Bunny! (No poetry intended.) Of course she wanted lot of attention–she deserved it! Boxer are indeed lovely, and equally lovely now that your son is a Boxer rescuer.

    Reply
  46. Mary T, one of the many reasons I love cats is how easy they are to house break! So clever of the puppies to come cuddle you in bed on Christmas Eve. As for the present–well, they were only little. *G*

    Reply
  47. Mary T, one of the many reasons I love cats is how easy they are to house break! So clever of the puppies to come cuddle you in bed on Christmas Eve. As for the present–well, they were only little. *G*

    Reply
  48. Mary T, one of the many reasons I love cats is how easy they are to house break! So clever of the puppies to come cuddle you in bed on Christmas Eve. As for the present–well, they were only little. *G*

    Reply
  49. Mary T, one of the many reasons I love cats is how easy they are to house break! So clever of the puppies to come cuddle you in bed on Christmas Eve. As for the present–well, they were only little. *G*

    Reply
  50. Mary T, one of the many reasons I love cats is how easy they are to house break! So clever of the puppies to come cuddle you in bed on Christmas Eve. As for the present–well, they were only little. *G*

    Reply
  51. Teresa, I’ so sorry you lost your little buddy! He sounds lovely. (Presumably the Labrador was crossed with a smaller breed.) Irish Wolfhounds are CLASSIC sight hounds–I suspect they took off like jet engines!

    Reply
  52. Teresa, I’ so sorry you lost your little buddy! He sounds lovely. (Presumably the Labrador was crossed with a smaller breed.) Irish Wolfhounds are CLASSIC sight hounds–I suspect they took off like jet engines!

    Reply
  53. Teresa, I’ so sorry you lost your little buddy! He sounds lovely. (Presumably the Labrador was crossed with a smaller breed.) Irish Wolfhounds are CLASSIC sight hounds–I suspect they took off like jet engines!

    Reply
  54. Teresa, I’ so sorry you lost your little buddy! He sounds lovely. (Presumably the Labrador was crossed with a smaller breed.) Irish Wolfhounds are CLASSIC sight hounds–I suspect they took off like jet engines!

    Reply
  55. Teresa, I’ so sorry you lost your little buddy! He sounds lovely. (Presumably the Labrador was crossed with a smaller breed.) Irish Wolfhounds are CLASSIC sight hounds–I suspect they took off like jet engines!

    Reply
  56. Magic, a Chocolate Lab, decided to adopt my husband Gordon and me when she was 4 years old. Gordon trained her for retrieving trials. Smart, she learned fast but didn’t like the water (she’d look at us as if to say, “Do you realize this stuff is WET?”) At her first trial she saw that someone was throwing ducks into the water from a pail that rested on a piece of land. Magic knew she had to retrieve a duck and bring it to my husband. So at the signal she ran to the bucket, grabbed a duck, ran back, and daintily handed it to Gordon…and amid the laughter was eliminated.

    Reply
  57. Magic, a Chocolate Lab, decided to adopt my husband Gordon and me when she was 4 years old. Gordon trained her for retrieving trials. Smart, she learned fast but didn’t like the water (she’d look at us as if to say, “Do you realize this stuff is WET?”) At her first trial she saw that someone was throwing ducks into the water from a pail that rested on a piece of land. Magic knew she had to retrieve a duck and bring it to my husband. So at the signal she ran to the bucket, grabbed a duck, ran back, and daintily handed it to Gordon…and amid the laughter was eliminated.

    Reply
  58. Magic, a Chocolate Lab, decided to adopt my husband Gordon and me when she was 4 years old. Gordon trained her for retrieving trials. Smart, she learned fast but didn’t like the water (she’d look at us as if to say, “Do you realize this stuff is WET?”) At her first trial she saw that someone was throwing ducks into the water from a pail that rested on a piece of land. Magic knew she had to retrieve a duck and bring it to my husband. So at the signal she ran to the bucket, grabbed a duck, ran back, and daintily handed it to Gordon…and amid the laughter was eliminated.

    Reply
  59. Magic, a Chocolate Lab, decided to adopt my husband Gordon and me when she was 4 years old. Gordon trained her for retrieving trials. Smart, she learned fast but didn’t like the water (she’d look at us as if to say, “Do you realize this stuff is WET?”) At her first trial she saw that someone was throwing ducks into the water from a pail that rested on a piece of land. Magic knew she had to retrieve a duck and bring it to my husband. So at the signal she ran to the bucket, grabbed a duck, ran back, and daintily handed it to Gordon…and amid the laughter was eliminated.

    Reply
  60. Magic, a Chocolate Lab, decided to adopt my husband Gordon and me when she was 4 years old. Gordon trained her for retrieving trials. Smart, she learned fast but didn’t like the water (she’d look at us as if to say, “Do you realize this stuff is WET?”) At her first trial she saw that someone was throwing ducks into the water from a pail that rested on a piece of land. Magic knew she had to retrieve a duck and bring it to my husband. So at the signal she ran to the bucket, grabbed a duck, ran back, and daintily handed it to Gordon…and amid the laughter was eliminated.

    Reply
  61. Thanks Mary Jo. There were quite a few different elements in Merlin so I don’t know what he was crossed with:) But he wasn’t a full size Lab. He ate like one though! Boy did he love his food.
    And yes, Fionn was a sight to behold in full flight.

    Reply
  62. Thanks Mary Jo. There were quite a few different elements in Merlin so I don’t know what he was crossed with:) But he wasn’t a full size Lab. He ate like one though! Boy did he love his food.
    And yes, Fionn was a sight to behold in full flight.

    Reply
  63. Thanks Mary Jo. There were quite a few different elements in Merlin so I don’t know what he was crossed with:) But he wasn’t a full size Lab. He ate like one though! Boy did he love his food.
    And yes, Fionn was a sight to behold in full flight.

    Reply
  64. Thanks Mary Jo. There were quite a few different elements in Merlin so I don’t know what he was crossed with:) But he wasn’t a full size Lab. He ate like one though! Boy did he love his food.
    And yes, Fionn was a sight to behold in full flight.

    Reply
  65. Thanks Mary Jo. There were quite a few different elements in Merlin so I don’t know what he was crossed with:) But he wasn’t a full size Lab. He ate like one though! Boy did he love his food.
    And yes, Fionn was a sight to behold in full flight.

    Reply
  66. Teresa, it’s amusing how Labs and Lab mixes are famous for their willing to eat anything, including their own dog houses and the bumpers of cars!
    I would love to have seen Fionn in full flight….

    Reply
  67. Teresa, it’s amusing how Labs and Lab mixes are famous for their willing to eat anything, including their own dog houses and the bumpers of cars!
    I would love to have seen Fionn in full flight….

    Reply
  68. Teresa, it’s amusing how Labs and Lab mixes are famous for their willing to eat anything, including their own dog houses and the bumpers of cars!
    I would love to have seen Fionn in full flight….

    Reply
  69. Teresa, it’s amusing how Labs and Lab mixes are famous for their willing to eat anything, including their own dog houses and the bumpers of cars!
    I would love to have seen Fionn in full flight….

    Reply
  70. Teresa, it’s amusing how Labs and Lab mixes are famous for their willing to eat anything, including their own dog houses and the bumpers of cars!
    I would love to have seen Fionn in full flight….

    Reply

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