Woman of Mystery

Stays2During those few weeks I spent under wraps as the “Mystery Wench”, I started thinking of all the unheralded women of history who really were “women of mystery”—like Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand.

I came across Mrs. Ferrand by pure chance. As part of my research for A Desperate Fortune I was reading through a stack of letters written to and from James Waldegrave, the British Ambassador to France in the autumn and winter of 1731/32, and in one October letter an informer was offering to give information about “a woman now at Paris who makes it her business to go backwards and forwards, with letters of the Pretender’s friends, from hence to England.”

“The Pretender” was King James III, a man I’ve grown quite fond of in my years of research, so I was naturally prepared to like this mystery woman, and I kept an eye out for her as I continued my reading.

By late December the informer had given the British her surname, and told them she was a woman of about 60 years old, with a fair complexion. She was at that minute, he said, on her way to Dover from Paris, and would be carrying letters in the service of King James.

The British had her picked up and arrested when she landed. Her interrogation, or “examination” as they liked to call it, was recorded and suggests she was clever AND obstinate, which made me like her even better.
 
When the Messenger who’d arrested her testified he’d found several letters, “some in her Pockets, & two pind up in a paper in part which he affirms he took from behind her Back concealed in her Stays”, she saw fit to correct him. They’d been in the SIDES of her stays, she said firmly. Not the back.

And she’d only put them there because her pockets were “full of other things that she had been buying”.

Why, they asked her, was one of the letters not addressed? Well, she was given the address separately, on a little slip of paper, and was supposed to have someone with better handwriting write it on the actual letter.
 
MrsFerrandSo where was the little slip of paper? You tell me, she told them, in effect, reminding them they were the ones who had taken the papers from her and if, “having laid them down promiscuously upon a Table”, they’d gone and lost the slip with the address on it they could hardly blame HER.

When asked what she’d been up to in France, she replied she’d gone to see her grandson James, in Paris, where he was at school. And she’d planned to do a bit of matchmaking for her son Thomas as well, with the daughter of the landlord of the Silver Lyon Inn at Calais.

Oh yes, and she’d spent a considerable amount of time visiting friends, “particularly the Countess of Sandwich who lives at Paris”. As in, the Countess of Sandwich who was the daughter of the poet, celebrated rake, and libertine extraordinaire of Charles II’s court, the Earl of Rochester. THAT Countess of Sandwich.

So by now, I’m forming a mental picture of Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand that looks a lot like this:

Dreamstime_xl_59645367

© Chriscintron | Dreamstime.com

And I’m intrigued.

I want to know more about her. I want to know whether her son ever married the innkeeper’s daughter, and who the unaddressed letter was actually for, and how she first became a courier, and how many years she’d been doing it, and how she’d come to know the Countess of Sandwich, and…

But she’s gone, and the history books didn’t think she was important enough to record what she did after that.

She isn’t even mentioned in the will of her husband, Thomas Ferrand, who died in March 1758, leaving money to various relations at Paris (including his grandson James, who was still there and working as a servant), and to the former chaplain of the Spanish ambassador.

Elizabeth, presumably, had died some time before him.

There are countless Elizabeth Ferrands in history—fascinating women who led full and fascinating lives, and briefly left their mark for us to glimpse.

I love them because they remind me that few lives are actually ordinary.

Have you ever come across an historical “woman of mystery”, or even met a real-life one in the present day? Someone who turned out to be more interesting than you imagined they’d be?

130 thoughts on “Woman of Mystery”

  1. At the moment I’m doing my own research concerning a Wallachian princess who got captured by the Moldavians in 1473. At first I read the history books I already had at home and then everything I could find on the internet – as a result, I thought I had a pretty good idea of who she had been and what had happened to her.
    But then I visited the local museum for a work-related issue and I got to talk to an actual expert in medieval Moldavia (and Wallachia) and I found out that almost everything I thought I knew was wrong: her age, her status and relationships, and even her children. So I’ve started all over again. I’m meeting the expert again (today), so he could give me a list of books and documents about her, and I’ve also been reading a couple of books which seem to be better-documented than the previous ones.
    Now I’m thinking: why is everything on public record wrong (the documents this guy is going to show me being… not so public)? It seems 1. people posting stuff on the internet don’t normally bother to talk to actual historians (but then I’ve got a couple of old books written by historians – which say more or less the same thing as Wikipedia, for instance); 2. many documents have become available to our historians only in recent years, so older historians, lacking the info, must have ‘improvised’ in order to fill in any historical gaps, basing their writings on mere speculation.
    I’ll probably have to change much of the plot so it could fit the new information I’m uncovering, but I’m clearly not changing the heroine. 🙂 She is still 100% interesting.

    Reply
  2. At the moment I’m doing my own research concerning a Wallachian princess who got captured by the Moldavians in 1473. At first I read the history books I already had at home and then everything I could find on the internet – as a result, I thought I had a pretty good idea of who she had been and what had happened to her.
    But then I visited the local museum for a work-related issue and I got to talk to an actual expert in medieval Moldavia (and Wallachia) and I found out that almost everything I thought I knew was wrong: her age, her status and relationships, and even her children. So I’ve started all over again. I’m meeting the expert again (today), so he could give me a list of books and documents about her, and I’ve also been reading a couple of books which seem to be better-documented than the previous ones.
    Now I’m thinking: why is everything on public record wrong (the documents this guy is going to show me being… not so public)? It seems 1. people posting stuff on the internet don’t normally bother to talk to actual historians (but then I’ve got a couple of old books written by historians – which say more or less the same thing as Wikipedia, for instance); 2. many documents have become available to our historians only in recent years, so older historians, lacking the info, must have ‘improvised’ in order to fill in any historical gaps, basing their writings on mere speculation.
    I’ll probably have to change much of the plot so it could fit the new information I’m uncovering, but I’m clearly not changing the heroine. 🙂 She is still 100% interesting.

    Reply
  3. At the moment I’m doing my own research concerning a Wallachian princess who got captured by the Moldavians in 1473. At first I read the history books I already had at home and then everything I could find on the internet – as a result, I thought I had a pretty good idea of who she had been and what had happened to her.
    But then I visited the local museum for a work-related issue and I got to talk to an actual expert in medieval Moldavia (and Wallachia) and I found out that almost everything I thought I knew was wrong: her age, her status and relationships, and even her children. So I’ve started all over again. I’m meeting the expert again (today), so he could give me a list of books and documents about her, and I’ve also been reading a couple of books which seem to be better-documented than the previous ones.
    Now I’m thinking: why is everything on public record wrong (the documents this guy is going to show me being… not so public)? It seems 1. people posting stuff on the internet don’t normally bother to talk to actual historians (but then I’ve got a couple of old books written by historians – which say more or less the same thing as Wikipedia, for instance); 2. many documents have become available to our historians only in recent years, so older historians, lacking the info, must have ‘improvised’ in order to fill in any historical gaps, basing their writings on mere speculation.
    I’ll probably have to change much of the plot so it could fit the new information I’m uncovering, but I’m clearly not changing the heroine. 🙂 She is still 100% interesting.

    Reply
  4. At the moment I’m doing my own research concerning a Wallachian princess who got captured by the Moldavians in 1473. At first I read the history books I already had at home and then everything I could find on the internet – as a result, I thought I had a pretty good idea of who she had been and what had happened to her.
    But then I visited the local museum for a work-related issue and I got to talk to an actual expert in medieval Moldavia (and Wallachia) and I found out that almost everything I thought I knew was wrong: her age, her status and relationships, and even her children. So I’ve started all over again. I’m meeting the expert again (today), so he could give me a list of books and documents about her, and I’ve also been reading a couple of books which seem to be better-documented than the previous ones.
    Now I’m thinking: why is everything on public record wrong (the documents this guy is going to show me being… not so public)? It seems 1. people posting stuff on the internet don’t normally bother to talk to actual historians (but then I’ve got a couple of old books written by historians – which say more or less the same thing as Wikipedia, for instance); 2. many documents have become available to our historians only in recent years, so older historians, lacking the info, must have ‘improvised’ in order to fill in any historical gaps, basing their writings on mere speculation.
    I’ll probably have to change much of the plot so it could fit the new information I’m uncovering, but I’m clearly not changing the heroine. 🙂 She is still 100% interesting.

    Reply
  5. At the moment I’m doing my own research concerning a Wallachian princess who got captured by the Moldavians in 1473. At first I read the history books I already had at home and then everything I could find on the internet – as a result, I thought I had a pretty good idea of who she had been and what had happened to her.
    But then I visited the local museum for a work-related issue and I got to talk to an actual expert in medieval Moldavia (and Wallachia) and I found out that almost everything I thought I knew was wrong: her age, her status and relationships, and even her children. So I’ve started all over again. I’m meeting the expert again (today), so he could give me a list of books and documents about her, and I’ve also been reading a couple of books which seem to be better-documented than the previous ones.
    Now I’m thinking: why is everything on public record wrong (the documents this guy is going to show me being… not so public)? It seems 1. people posting stuff on the internet don’t normally bother to talk to actual historians (but then I’ve got a couple of old books written by historians – which say more or less the same thing as Wikipedia, for instance); 2. many documents have become available to our historians only in recent years, so older historians, lacking the info, must have ‘improvised’ in order to fill in any historical gaps, basing their writings on mere speculation.
    I’ll probably have to change much of the plot so it could fit the new information I’m uncovering, but I’m clearly not changing the heroine. 🙂 She is still 100% interesting.

    Reply
  6. Fascinating blog, Susanna. I think I would like Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand VERY much. (Love her responses to the interrogation.
    I was recently reading a book on the spy ring in NYC that is credited with saving the American Revolution in the uncertain days after Washington was forced to retreat from the city. The inside information provided by the brave Culper ring about troops movement and upcoming plans was critical in helping the American army survive. All of the members of these early American heroes are now known—except for Agent 355, who was—of course—a woman . . . and perhaps the most critical of all, as apparently she attended the swanky parties and could chat up the high ranking British officers.
    I’m sure there are countless mystery women in history. We all know the reasons why—it’s usually men who write history. It’s wonderful when careful research like yours helps bring their stories to life.

    Reply
  7. Fascinating blog, Susanna. I think I would like Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand VERY much. (Love her responses to the interrogation.
    I was recently reading a book on the spy ring in NYC that is credited with saving the American Revolution in the uncertain days after Washington was forced to retreat from the city. The inside information provided by the brave Culper ring about troops movement and upcoming plans was critical in helping the American army survive. All of the members of these early American heroes are now known—except for Agent 355, who was—of course—a woman . . . and perhaps the most critical of all, as apparently she attended the swanky parties and could chat up the high ranking British officers.
    I’m sure there are countless mystery women in history. We all know the reasons why—it’s usually men who write history. It’s wonderful when careful research like yours helps bring their stories to life.

    Reply
  8. Fascinating blog, Susanna. I think I would like Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand VERY much. (Love her responses to the interrogation.
    I was recently reading a book on the spy ring in NYC that is credited with saving the American Revolution in the uncertain days after Washington was forced to retreat from the city. The inside information provided by the brave Culper ring about troops movement and upcoming plans was critical in helping the American army survive. All of the members of these early American heroes are now known—except for Agent 355, who was—of course—a woman . . . and perhaps the most critical of all, as apparently she attended the swanky parties and could chat up the high ranking British officers.
    I’m sure there are countless mystery women in history. We all know the reasons why—it’s usually men who write history. It’s wonderful when careful research like yours helps bring their stories to life.

    Reply
  9. Fascinating blog, Susanna. I think I would like Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand VERY much. (Love her responses to the interrogation.
    I was recently reading a book on the spy ring in NYC that is credited with saving the American Revolution in the uncertain days after Washington was forced to retreat from the city. The inside information provided by the brave Culper ring about troops movement and upcoming plans was critical in helping the American army survive. All of the members of these early American heroes are now known—except for Agent 355, who was—of course—a woman . . . and perhaps the most critical of all, as apparently she attended the swanky parties and could chat up the high ranking British officers.
    I’m sure there are countless mystery women in history. We all know the reasons why—it’s usually men who write history. It’s wonderful when careful research like yours helps bring their stories to life.

    Reply
  10. Fascinating blog, Susanna. I think I would like Mrs. Elizabeth Ferrand VERY much. (Love her responses to the interrogation.
    I was recently reading a book on the spy ring in NYC that is credited with saving the American Revolution in the uncertain days after Washington was forced to retreat from the city. The inside information provided by the brave Culper ring about troops movement and upcoming plans was critical in helping the American army survive. All of the members of these early American heroes are now known—except for Agent 355, who was—of course—a woman . . . and perhaps the most critical of all, as apparently she attended the swanky parties and could chat up the high ranking British officers.
    I’m sure there are countless mystery women in history. We all know the reasons why—it’s usually men who write history. It’s wonderful when careful research like yours helps bring their stories to life.

    Reply
  11. Andrea, the entire examination makes for wonderful reading. The frustration of the men in the room is palpable 🙂
    And it’s funny you should mention the Culper spy ring because one of the buildings in the book I’m writing now is modelled on the home of one of the Culper spies–Raynham Hall Museum, in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Here’s their link on the spy ring: http://raynhamhallmuseum.org/history/culper-spy-ring/
    My book is set before the Revolution, but that doesn’t stop my imagination, like yours, from being intrigued by Agent 355…

    Reply
  12. Andrea, the entire examination makes for wonderful reading. The frustration of the men in the room is palpable 🙂
    And it’s funny you should mention the Culper spy ring because one of the buildings in the book I’m writing now is modelled on the home of one of the Culper spies–Raynham Hall Museum, in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Here’s their link on the spy ring: http://raynhamhallmuseum.org/history/culper-spy-ring/
    My book is set before the Revolution, but that doesn’t stop my imagination, like yours, from being intrigued by Agent 355…

    Reply
  13. Andrea, the entire examination makes for wonderful reading. The frustration of the men in the room is palpable 🙂
    And it’s funny you should mention the Culper spy ring because one of the buildings in the book I’m writing now is modelled on the home of one of the Culper spies–Raynham Hall Museum, in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Here’s their link on the spy ring: http://raynhamhallmuseum.org/history/culper-spy-ring/
    My book is set before the Revolution, but that doesn’t stop my imagination, like yours, from being intrigued by Agent 355…

    Reply
  14. Andrea, the entire examination makes for wonderful reading. The frustration of the men in the room is palpable 🙂
    And it’s funny you should mention the Culper spy ring because one of the buildings in the book I’m writing now is modelled on the home of one of the Culper spies–Raynham Hall Museum, in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Here’s their link on the spy ring: http://raynhamhallmuseum.org/history/culper-spy-ring/
    My book is set before the Revolution, but that doesn’t stop my imagination, like yours, from being intrigued by Agent 355…

    Reply
  15. Andrea, the entire examination makes for wonderful reading. The frustration of the men in the room is palpable 🙂
    And it’s funny you should mention the Culper spy ring because one of the buildings in the book I’m writing now is modelled on the home of one of the Culper spies–Raynham Hall Museum, in Oyster Bay, Long Island. Here’s their link on the spy ring: http://raynhamhallmuseum.org/history/culper-spy-ring/
    My book is set before the Revolution, but that doesn’t stop my imagination, like yours, from being intrigued by Agent 355…

    Reply
  16. Oana-Maria, yes, it can be difficult at times to figure out what truly happened.
    The trick is to sort out the biases of the people who were (and are) writing the history books, and then factor that into your research, like adjusting the lenses on a pair of eyeglasses so you can properly focus.
    For example, much of what was written about King James II (Bonnie Prince Charlie’s grandfather) and his son James III, who were both Catholics, was written by English Protestant historians who were writing to justify the Protestant rebellion that had been fought against James II. It’s only when you get back to the primary sources–the original letters and journals kept by those who knew both men–that you find anything written about them in a positive light.
    And even with the primary sources, you have to be aware of the agenda of the person who is writing. Someone’s friend is going to write a very different account of them than their enemy.
    Truth is a relative thing, and all history is filtered by historians deciding which voices to listen to, and which ones to ignore.
    If one historian writes down a “fact”, then the next generation of historians often repeats that same “fact” in their own books without bothering to verify it.
    My favourite part of any history book is the bibliography, which leads me back to the original sources that historian used, so I can go find them and read them myself 🙂

    Reply
  17. Oana-Maria, yes, it can be difficult at times to figure out what truly happened.
    The trick is to sort out the biases of the people who were (and are) writing the history books, and then factor that into your research, like adjusting the lenses on a pair of eyeglasses so you can properly focus.
    For example, much of what was written about King James II (Bonnie Prince Charlie’s grandfather) and his son James III, who were both Catholics, was written by English Protestant historians who were writing to justify the Protestant rebellion that had been fought against James II. It’s only when you get back to the primary sources–the original letters and journals kept by those who knew both men–that you find anything written about them in a positive light.
    And even with the primary sources, you have to be aware of the agenda of the person who is writing. Someone’s friend is going to write a very different account of them than their enemy.
    Truth is a relative thing, and all history is filtered by historians deciding which voices to listen to, and which ones to ignore.
    If one historian writes down a “fact”, then the next generation of historians often repeats that same “fact” in their own books without bothering to verify it.
    My favourite part of any history book is the bibliography, which leads me back to the original sources that historian used, so I can go find them and read them myself 🙂

    Reply
  18. Oana-Maria, yes, it can be difficult at times to figure out what truly happened.
    The trick is to sort out the biases of the people who were (and are) writing the history books, and then factor that into your research, like adjusting the lenses on a pair of eyeglasses so you can properly focus.
    For example, much of what was written about King James II (Bonnie Prince Charlie’s grandfather) and his son James III, who were both Catholics, was written by English Protestant historians who were writing to justify the Protestant rebellion that had been fought against James II. It’s only when you get back to the primary sources–the original letters and journals kept by those who knew both men–that you find anything written about them in a positive light.
    And even with the primary sources, you have to be aware of the agenda of the person who is writing. Someone’s friend is going to write a very different account of them than their enemy.
    Truth is a relative thing, and all history is filtered by historians deciding which voices to listen to, and which ones to ignore.
    If one historian writes down a “fact”, then the next generation of historians often repeats that same “fact” in their own books without bothering to verify it.
    My favourite part of any history book is the bibliography, which leads me back to the original sources that historian used, so I can go find them and read them myself 🙂

    Reply
  19. Oana-Maria, yes, it can be difficult at times to figure out what truly happened.
    The trick is to sort out the biases of the people who were (and are) writing the history books, and then factor that into your research, like adjusting the lenses on a pair of eyeglasses so you can properly focus.
    For example, much of what was written about King James II (Bonnie Prince Charlie’s grandfather) and his son James III, who were both Catholics, was written by English Protestant historians who were writing to justify the Protestant rebellion that had been fought against James II. It’s only when you get back to the primary sources–the original letters and journals kept by those who knew both men–that you find anything written about them in a positive light.
    And even with the primary sources, you have to be aware of the agenda of the person who is writing. Someone’s friend is going to write a very different account of them than their enemy.
    Truth is a relative thing, and all history is filtered by historians deciding which voices to listen to, and which ones to ignore.
    If one historian writes down a “fact”, then the next generation of historians often repeats that same “fact” in their own books without bothering to verify it.
    My favourite part of any history book is the bibliography, which leads me back to the original sources that historian used, so I can go find them and read them myself 🙂

    Reply
  20. Oana-Maria, yes, it can be difficult at times to figure out what truly happened.
    The trick is to sort out the biases of the people who were (and are) writing the history books, and then factor that into your research, like adjusting the lenses on a pair of eyeglasses so you can properly focus.
    For example, much of what was written about King James II (Bonnie Prince Charlie’s grandfather) and his son James III, who were both Catholics, was written by English Protestant historians who were writing to justify the Protestant rebellion that had been fought against James II. It’s only when you get back to the primary sources–the original letters and journals kept by those who knew both men–that you find anything written about them in a positive light.
    And even with the primary sources, you have to be aware of the agenda of the person who is writing. Someone’s friend is going to write a very different account of them than their enemy.
    Truth is a relative thing, and all history is filtered by historians deciding which voices to listen to, and which ones to ignore.
    If one historian writes down a “fact”, then the next generation of historians often repeats that same “fact” in their own books without bothering to verify it.
    My favourite part of any history book is the bibliography, which leads me back to the original sources that historian used, so I can go find them and read them myself 🙂

    Reply
  21. True. Sometimes it’s the lack of documents, sometimes it’s the historian’s point of view…
    But MY point here was that because of all that my heroine has become… rather mysterious. :p Not on purpose, of course, but because now I need to do a lot of digging to find out who she was and what happened to her. As a princess of both Wallachia and Moldavia (later), she should be remembered, but there are few things we actually know about her. Historians hardly know who her father was, nor do they know when she was born. On public record she is said to have been a certain prince’s daughter, when in fact she was his wife. And so on. That makes her my ‘woman of mystery’. :p I hope I’ll unearth more about her – and then I’ll probably use my imagination to make her come alive.

    Reply
  22. True. Sometimes it’s the lack of documents, sometimes it’s the historian’s point of view…
    But MY point here was that because of all that my heroine has become… rather mysterious. :p Not on purpose, of course, but because now I need to do a lot of digging to find out who she was and what happened to her. As a princess of both Wallachia and Moldavia (later), she should be remembered, but there are few things we actually know about her. Historians hardly know who her father was, nor do they know when she was born. On public record she is said to have been a certain prince’s daughter, when in fact she was his wife. And so on. That makes her my ‘woman of mystery’. :p I hope I’ll unearth more about her – and then I’ll probably use my imagination to make her come alive.

    Reply
  23. True. Sometimes it’s the lack of documents, sometimes it’s the historian’s point of view…
    But MY point here was that because of all that my heroine has become… rather mysterious. :p Not on purpose, of course, but because now I need to do a lot of digging to find out who she was and what happened to her. As a princess of both Wallachia and Moldavia (later), she should be remembered, but there are few things we actually know about her. Historians hardly know who her father was, nor do they know when she was born. On public record she is said to have been a certain prince’s daughter, when in fact she was his wife. And so on. That makes her my ‘woman of mystery’. :p I hope I’ll unearth more about her – and then I’ll probably use my imagination to make her come alive.

    Reply
  24. True. Sometimes it’s the lack of documents, sometimes it’s the historian’s point of view…
    But MY point here was that because of all that my heroine has become… rather mysterious. :p Not on purpose, of course, but because now I need to do a lot of digging to find out who she was and what happened to her. As a princess of both Wallachia and Moldavia (later), she should be remembered, but there are few things we actually know about her. Historians hardly know who her father was, nor do they know when she was born. On public record she is said to have been a certain prince’s daughter, when in fact she was his wife. And so on. That makes her my ‘woman of mystery’. :p I hope I’ll unearth more about her – and then I’ll probably use my imagination to make her come alive.

    Reply
  25. True. Sometimes it’s the lack of documents, sometimes it’s the historian’s point of view…
    But MY point here was that because of all that my heroine has become… rather mysterious. :p Not on purpose, of course, but because now I need to do a lot of digging to find out who she was and what happened to her. As a princess of both Wallachia and Moldavia (later), she should be remembered, but there are few things we actually know about her. Historians hardly know who her father was, nor do they know when she was born. On public record she is said to have been a certain prince’s daughter, when in fact she was his wife. And so on. That makes her my ‘woman of mystery’. :p I hope I’ll unearth more about her – and then I’ll probably use my imagination to make her come alive.

    Reply
  26. I like your Elizabeth Ferrand. She was a woman who knew how to complete a task to the best of her ability.
    For me, though she is not a woman of mystery, I am a fan of Martha Washington. I always felt that she was written about as though she were part of the wallpaper. In reality, she was a strong determined woman who was willing to sacrifice not just for her husband, but for his army and the new nation. She had no illusions but she did have faith in George and in the people who were working so hard to win the right to a new nation.
    But, in reality, every woman who was a part of the Revolution was a strong, determined person who sacrificed for the new nation. And most of them are nameless to us.

    Reply
  27. I like your Elizabeth Ferrand. She was a woman who knew how to complete a task to the best of her ability.
    For me, though she is not a woman of mystery, I am a fan of Martha Washington. I always felt that she was written about as though she were part of the wallpaper. In reality, she was a strong determined woman who was willing to sacrifice not just for her husband, but for his army and the new nation. She had no illusions but she did have faith in George and in the people who were working so hard to win the right to a new nation.
    But, in reality, every woman who was a part of the Revolution was a strong, determined person who sacrificed for the new nation. And most of them are nameless to us.

    Reply
  28. I like your Elizabeth Ferrand. She was a woman who knew how to complete a task to the best of her ability.
    For me, though she is not a woman of mystery, I am a fan of Martha Washington. I always felt that she was written about as though she were part of the wallpaper. In reality, she was a strong determined woman who was willing to sacrifice not just for her husband, but for his army and the new nation. She had no illusions but she did have faith in George and in the people who were working so hard to win the right to a new nation.
    But, in reality, every woman who was a part of the Revolution was a strong, determined person who sacrificed for the new nation. And most of them are nameless to us.

    Reply
  29. I like your Elizabeth Ferrand. She was a woman who knew how to complete a task to the best of her ability.
    For me, though she is not a woman of mystery, I am a fan of Martha Washington. I always felt that she was written about as though she were part of the wallpaper. In reality, she was a strong determined woman who was willing to sacrifice not just for her husband, but for his army and the new nation. She had no illusions but she did have faith in George and in the people who were working so hard to win the right to a new nation.
    But, in reality, every woman who was a part of the Revolution was a strong, determined person who sacrificed for the new nation. And most of them are nameless to us.

    Reply
  30. I like your Elizabeth Ferrand. She was a woman who knew how to complete a task to the best of her ability.
    For me, though she is not a woman of mystery, I am a fan of Martha Washington. I always felt that she was written about as though she were part of the wallpaper. In reality, she was a strong determined woman who was willing to sacrifice not just for her husband, but for his army and the new nation. She had no illusions but she did have faith in George and in the people who were working so hard to win the right to a new nation.
    But, in reality, every woman who was a part of the Revolution was a strong, determined person who sacrificed for the new nation. And most of them are nameless to us.

    Reply
  31. I don’t believe I have ever encountered a true-life woman of mystery , although perhaps it’s because I never thought to look for one! Mrs Ferrand intrigues me, as does Agent 355 and Oana-Maria’s Wallachian/Moldavian princess? Thanks for the heads up on looking for more!
    On a side note, Susanna, it is due to your powers of writing that I am as familiar with the Jacobites as I am. I am distinctly NOT a fan of that movement. (I don’t like the actions taken by Parliament either!) The entire era tends to exasperate me! Yet I have reread Firebird and Every Desparate thing more than once. As well as The Rose Garden. Your writing wins out!

    Reply
  32. I don’t believe I have ever encountered a true-life woman of mystery , although perhaps it’s because I never thought to look for one! Mrs Ferrand intrigues me, as does Agent 355 and Oana-Maria’s Wallachian/Moldavian princess? Thanks for the heads up on looking for more!
    On a side note, Susanna, it is due to your powers of writing that I am as familiar with the Jacobites as I am. I am distinctly NOT a fan of that movement. (I don’t like the actions taken by Parliament either!) The entire era tends to exasperate me! Yet I have reread Firebird and Every Desparate thing more than once. As well as The Rose Garden. Your writing wins out!

    Reply
  33. I don’t believe I have ever encountered a true-life woman of mystery , although perhaps it’s because I never thought to look for one! Mrs Ferrand intrigues me, as does Agent 355 and Oana-Maria’s Wallachian/Moldavian princess? Thanks for the heads up on looking for more!
    On a side note, Susanna, it is due to your powers of writing that I am as familiar with the Jacobites as I am. I am distinctly NOT a fan of that movement. (I don’t like the actions taken by Parliament either!) The entire era tends to exasperate me! Yet I have reread Firebird and Every Desparate thing more than once. As well as The Rose Garden. Your writing wins out!

    Reply
  34. I don’t believe I have ever encountered a true-life woman of mystery , although perhaps it’s because I never thought to look for one! Mrs Ferrand intrigues me, as does Agent 355 and Oana-Maria’s Wallachian/Moldavian princess? Thanks for the heads up on looking for more!
    On a side note, Susanna, it is due to your powers of writing that I am as familiar with the Jacobites as I am. I am distinctly NOT a fan of that movement. (I don’t like the actions taken by Parliament either!) The entire era tends to exasperate me! Yet I have reread Firebird and Every Desparate thing more than once. As well as The Rose Garden. Your writing wins out!

    Reply
  35. I don’t believe I have ever encountered a true-life woman of mystery , although perhaps it’s because I never thought to look for one! Mrs Ferrand intrigues me, as does Agent 355 and Oana-Maria’s Wallachian/Moldavian princess? Thanks for the heads up on looking for more!
    On a side note, Susanna, it is due to your powers of writing that I am as familiar with the Jacobites as I am. I am distinctly NOT a fan of that movement. (I don’t like the actions taken by Parliament either!) The entire era tends to exasperate me! Yet I have reread Firebird and Every Desparate thing more than once. As well as The Rose Garden. Your writing wins out!

    Reply
  36. What you’re saying encourages me to write this book and do my best to get it published: it seems there may be people interested in reading it. 🙂 And even if I don’t manage to find a publisher, I can probably email it to those who want it :p (when it’s finished).

    Reply
  37. What you’re saying encourages me to write this book and do my best to get it published: it seems there may be people interested in reading it. 🙂 And even if I don’t manage to find a publisher, I can probably email it to those who want it :p (when it’s finished).

    Reply
  38. What you’re saying encourages me to write this book and do my best to get it published: it seems there may be people interested in reading it. 🙂 And even if I don’t manage to find a publisher, I can probably email it to those who want it :p (when it’s finished).

    Reply
  39. What you’re saying encourages me to write this book and do my best to get it published: it seems there may be people interested in reading it. 🙂 And even if I don’t manage to find a publisher, I can probably email it to those who want it :p (when it’s finished).

    Reply
  40. What you’re saying encourages me to write this book and do my best to get it published: it seems there may be people interested in reading it. 🙂 And even if I don’t manage to find a publisher, I can probably email it to those who want it :p (when it’s finished).

    Reply
  41. Thanks, Sue. I’m honoured 🙂
    I don’t get caught up in the movements so much as I get attached to the people, through their letters and journals and bits left behind of their everyday lives.
    And there just seem to be a larger number of people on the Jacobite side who have worked their way into my heart.

    Reply
  42. Thanks, Sue. I’m honoured 🙂
    I don’t get caught up in the movements so much as I get attached to the people, through their letters and journals and bits left behind of their everyday lives.
    And there just seem to be a larger number of people on the Jacobite side who have worked their way into my heart.

    Reply
  43. Thanks, Sue. I’m honoured 🙂
    I don’t get caught up in the movements so much as I get attached to the people, through their letters and journals and bits left behind of their everyday lives.
    And there just seem to be a larger number of people on the Jacobite side who have worked their way into my heart.

    Reply
  44. Thanks, Sue. I’m honoured 🙂
    I don’t get caught up in the movements so much as I get attached to the people, through their letters and journals and bits left behind of their everyday lives.
    And there just seem to be a larger number of people on the Jacobite side who have worked their way into my heart.

    Reply
  45. Thanks, Sue. I’m honoured 🙂
    I don’t get caught up in the movements so much as I get attached to the people, through their letters and journals and bits left behind of their everyday lives.
    And there just seem to be a larger number of people on the Jacobite side who have worked their way into my heart.

    Reply
  46. What a fascinating woman! And she sounds like a great character and a very singular woman.
    I actually have known a great woman of mystery. My grad school voice coach was a very young opera singer during World War II. When I say young, she debuted at the Met at the age of 17. She spent a great deal of time singing in Europe, particularly France as she spoke fluent French. Our composer in residence at USM was very close to her and he told us this young contralto coded and decoded messages and carried them back and forth between the French resistance and the allies. When we would ask her about it she would simply smile and say “Back to the lesson.” She was and remains one of the most fascinating and amazing women I have ever known. And frankly I would not have had the opportunities to sing in Europe that I had without her.

    Reply
  47. What a fascinating woman! And she sounds like a great character and a very singular woman.
    I actually have known a great woman of mystery. My grad school voice coach was a very young opera singer during World War II. When I say young, she debuted at the Met at the age of 17. She spent a great deal of time singing in Europe, particularly France as she spoke fluent French. Our composer in residence at USM was very close to her and he told us this young contralto coded and decoded messages and carried them back and forth between the French resistance and the allies. When we would ask her about it she would simply smile and say “Back to the lesson.” She was and remains one of the most fascinating and amazing women I have ever known. And frankly I would not have had the opportunities to sing in Europe that I had without her.

    Reply
  48. What a fascinating woman! And she sounds like a great character and a very singular woman.
    I actually have known a great woman of mystery. My grad school voice coach was a very young opera singer during World War II. When I say young, she debuted at the Met at the age of 17. She spent a great deal of time singing in Europe, particularly France as she spoke fluent French. Our composer in residence at USM was very close to her and he told us this young contralto coded and decoded messages and carried them back and forth between the French resistance and the allies. When we would ask her about it she would simply smile and say “Back to the lesson.” She was and remains one of the most fascinating and amazing women I have ever known. And frankly I would not have had the opportunities to sing in Europe that I had without her.

    Reply
  49. What a fascinating woman! And she sounds like a great character and a very singular woman.
    I actually have known a great woman of mystery. My grad school voice coach was a very young opera singer during World War II. When I say young, she debuted at the Met at the age of 17. She spent a great deal of time singing in Europe, particularly France as she spoke fluent French. Our composer in residence at USM was very close to her and he told us this young contralto coded and decoded messages and carried them back and forth between the French resistance and the allies. When we would ask her about it she would simply smile and say “Back to the lesson.” She was and remains one of the most fascinating and amazing women I have ever known. And frankly I would not have had the opportunities to sing in Europe that I had without her.

    Reply
  50. What a fascinating woman! And she sounds like a great character and a very singular woman.
    I actually have known a great woman of mystery. My grad school voice coach was a very young opera singer during World War II. When I say young, she debuted at the Met at the age of 17. She spent a great deal of time singing in Europe, particularly France as she spoke fluent French. Our composer in residence at USM was very close to her and he told us this young contralto coded and decoded messages and carried them back and forth between the French resistance and the allies. When we would ask her about it she would simply smile and say “Back to the lesson.” She was and remains one of the most fascinating and amazing women I have ever known. And frankly I would not have had the opportunities to sing in Europe that I had without her.

    Reply
  51. One of my favorite quotes is from Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, “well-behaved women seldom make history.” It’s been kidnapped for bumper stickers and the like to mean “well-behaved” in the modern sense, but her original point was that unless women did something extra-ordinary (i.e. out of the ordinary), women are generally invisible in documents.
    Even women like Mrs. Farrand, who step on the stage momentarily and are most definitely not ordinary :), only are on the stage for bits and pieces.
    It makes me wonder about all the women who lived their lives and slipped through history without us knowing about it, and how extraordinary are the ones who made it into the records.

    Reply
  52. One of my favorite quotes is from Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, “well-behaved women seldom make history.” It’s been kidnapped for bumper stickers and the like to mean “well-behaved” in the modern sense, but her original point was that unless women did something extra-ordinary (i.e. out of the ordinary), women are generally invisible in documents.
    Even women like Mrs. Farrand, who step on the stage momentarily and are most definitely not ordinary :), only are on the stage for bits and pieces.
    It makes me wonder about all the women who lived their lives and slipped through history without us knowing about it, and how extraordinary are the ones who made it into the records.

    Reply
  53. One of my favorite quotes is from Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, “well-behaved women seldom make history.” It’s been kidnapped for bumper stickers and the like to mean “well-behaved” in the modern sense, but her original point was that unless women did something extra-ordinary (i.e. out of the ordinary), women are generally invisible in documents.
    Even women like Mrs. Farrand, who step on the stage momentarily and are most definitely not ordinary :), only are on the stage for bits and pieces.
    It makes me wonder about all the women who lived their lives and slipped through history without us knowing about it, and how extraordinary are the ones who made it into the records.

    Reply
  54. One of my favorite quotes is from Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, “well-behaved women seldom make history.” It’s been kidnapped for bumper stickers and the like to mean “well-behaved” in the modern sense, but her original point was that unless women did something extra-ordinary (i.e. out of the ordinary), women are generally invisible in documents.
    Even women like Mrs. Farrand, who step on the stage momentarily and are most definitely not ordinary :), only are on the stage for bits and pieces.
    It makes me wonder about all the women who lived their lives and slipped through history without us knowing about it, and how extraordinary are the ones who made it into the records.

    Reply
  55. One of my favorite quotes is from Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, “well-behaved women seldom make history.” It’s been kidnapped for bumper stickers and the like to mean “well-behaved” in the modern sense, but her original point was that unless women did something extra-ordinary (i.e. out of the ordinary), women are generally invisible in documents.
    Even women like Mrs. Farrand, who step on the stage momentarily and are most definitely not ordinary :), only are on the stage for bits and pieces.
    It makes me wonder about all the women who lived their lives and slipped through history without us knowing about it, and how extraordinary are the ones who made it into the records.

    Reply
  56. Romantic novelist Mary Burchall was a sort of woman of mystery. She looked like a cosy lower middle class good girl, living at home with her parents and sister and writing pleasant romantic novels for Mills & Boon. But she was also a huge opera fan and, in the last year or so before the war she helped Jewish people escape from Germany by smuggling their valuables to England and by campaigning to get British individuals to sponsor them to come to England. Her cover story was that she was visiting Germany to attend performances of opera.
    She writes about it in her autobiography, republished and retitled a few years ago as Safe Passage [and credited under her real name Ida Cook, instead of her romance pen name]. You can feel how frightened she was. It comes off the page. But she went back and back again until war was declared. I can’t imagine being that brave.

    Reply
  57. Romantic novelist Mary Burchall was a sort of woman of mystery. She looked like a cosy lower middle class good girl, living at home with her parents and sister and writing pleasant romantic novels for Mills & Boon. But she was also a huge opera fan and, in the last year or so before the war she helped Jewish people escape from Germany by smuggling their valuables to England and by campaigning to get British individuals to sponsor them to come to England. Her cover story was that she was visiting Germany to attend performances of opera.
    She writes about it in her autobiography, republished and retitled a few years ago as Safe Passage [and credited under her real name Ida Cook, instead of her romance pen name]. You can feel how frightened she was. It comes off the page. But she went back and back again until war was declared. I can’t imagine being that brave.

    Reply
  58. Romantic novelist Mary Burchall was a sort of woman of mystery. She looked like a cosy lower middle class good girl, living at home with her parents and sister and writing pleasant romantic novels for Mills & Boon. But she was also a huge opera fan and, in the last year or so before the war she helped Jewish people escape from Germany by smuggling their valuables to England and by campaigning to get British individuals to sponsor them to come to England. Her cover story was that she was visiting Germany to attend performances of opera.
    She writes about it in her autobiography, republished and retitled a few years ago as Safe Passage [and credited under her real name Ida Cook, instead of her romance pen name]. You can feel how frightened she was. It comes off the page. But she went back and back again until war was declared. I can’t imagine being that brave.

    Reply
  59. Romantic novelist Mary Burchall was a sort of woman of mystery. She looked like a cosy lower middle class good girl, living at home with her parents and sister and writing pleasant romantic novels for Mills & Boon. But she was also a huge opera fan and, in the last year or so before the war she helped Jewish people escape from Germany by smuggling their valuables to England and by campaigning to get British individuals to sponsor them to come to England. Her cover story was that she was visiting Germany to attend performances of opera.
    She writes about it in her autobiography, republished and retitled a few years ago as Safe Passage [and credited under her real name Ida Cook, instead of her romance pen name]. You can feel how frightened she was. It comes off the page. But she went back and back again until war was declared. I can’t imagine being that brave.

    Reply
  60. Romantic novelist Mary Burchall was a sort of woman of mystery. She looked like a cosy lower middle class good girl, living at home with her parents and sister and writing pleasant romantic novels for Mills & Boon. But she was also a huge opera fan and, in the last year or so before the war she helped Jewish people escape from Germany by smuggling their valuables to England and by campaigning to get British individuals to sponsor them to come to England. Her cover story was that she was visiting Germany to attend performances of opera.
    She writes about it in her autobiography, republished and retitled a few years ago as Safe Passage [and credited under her real name Ida Cook, instead of her romance pen name]. You can feel how frightened she was. It comes off the page. But she went back and back again until war was declared. I can’t imagine being that brave.

    Reply
  61. Louisa, there were so many women who did great things in wartime and then never, ever talked about it.
    I had the privilege of meeting several of them when I was researching my thriller Every Secret Thing, and while they were amazingly generous with their stories and information, they were still so impressively protective of the classified details of what they’d done.
    They’d sworn an oath to keep those secrets when they’d taken on the job in wartime, and they’d taken that oath seriously.
    Some of them had parents who died years later never knowing what their daughters had done for the war effort, because the women never told them.
    Very humbling.

    Reply
  62. Louisa, there were so many women who did great things in wartime and then never, ever talked about it.
    I had the privilege of meeting several of them when I was researching my thriller Every Secret Thing, and while they were amazingly generous with their stories and information, they were still so impressively protective of the classified details of what they’d done.
    They’d sworn an oath to keep those secrets when they’d taken on the job in wartime, and they’d taken that oath seriously.
    Some of them had parents who died years later never knowing what their daughters had done for the war effort, because the women never told them.
    Very humbling.

    Reply
  63. Louisa, there were so many women who did great things in wartime and then never, ever talked about it.
    I had the privilege of meeting several of them when I was researching my thriller Every Secret Thing, and while they were amazingly generous with their stories and information, they were still so impressively protective of the classified details of what they’d done.
    They’d sworn an oath to keep those secrets when they’d taken on the job in wartime, and they’d taken that oath seriously.
    Some of them had parents who died years later never knowing what their daughters had done for the war effort, because the women never told them.
    Very humbling.

    Reply
  64. Louisa, there were so many women who did great things in wartime and then never, ever talked about it.
    I had the privilege of meeting several of them when I was researching my thriller Every Secret Thing, and while they were amazingly generous with their stories and information, they were still so impressively protective of the classified details of what they’d done.
    They’d sworn an oath to keep those secrets when they’d taken on the job in wartime, and they’d taken that oath seriously.
    Some of them had parents who died years later never knowing what their daughters had done for the war effort, because the women never told them.
    Very humbling.

    Reply
  65. Louisa, there were so many women who did great things in wartime and then never, ever talked about it.
    I had the privilege of meeting several of them when I was researching my thriller Every Secret Thing, and while they were amazingly generous with their stories and information, they were still so impressively protective of the classified details of what they’d done.
    They’d sworn an oath to keep those secrets when they’d taken on the job in wartime, and they’d taken that oath seriously.
    Some of them had parents who died years later never knowing what their daughters had done for the war effort, because the women never told them.
    Very humbling.

    Reply
  66. I’m writing something in the Victorian era right now and I came across a mention of an Indian princess named Sophia Duleep Singh, whose grandfather had been a maharaja of the Punjab.Sophia’s father was forced to give up the throne and taken to England, where Sophia and her siblings were born and raised, but Sophia went on to live an extraordinary life as a suffragette. My Indian-American best friend was immediately intrigued when I told her and said she hadn’t ever heard of Sophia before.

    Reply
  67. I’m writing something in the Victorian era right now and I came across a mention of an Indian princess named Sophia Duleep Singh, whose grandfather had been a maharaja of the Punjab.Sophia’s father was forced to give up the throne and taken to England, where Sophia and her siblings were born and raised, but Sophia went on to live an extraordinary life as a suffragette. My Indian-American best friend was immediately intrigued when I told her and said she hadn’t ever heard of Sophia before.

    Reply
  68. I’m writing something in the Victorian era right now and I came across a mention of an Indian princess named Sophia Duleep Singh, whose grandfather had been a maharaja of the Punjab.Sophia’s father was forced to give up the throne and taken to England, where Sophia and her siblings were born and raised, but Sophia went on to live an extraordinary life as a suffragette. My Indian-American best friend was immediately intrigued when I told her and said she hadn’t ever heard of Sophia before.

    Reply
  69. I’m writing something in the Victorian era right now and I came across a mention of an Indian princess named Sophia Duleep Singh, whose grandfather had been a maharaja of the Punjab.Sophia’s father was forced to give up the throne and taken to England, where Sophia and her siblings were born and raised, but Sophia went on to live an extraordinary life as a suffragette. My Indian-American best friend was immediately intrigued when I told her and said she hadn’t ever heard of Sophia before.

    Reply
  70. I’m writing something in the Victorian era right now and I came across a mention of an Indian princess named Sophia Duleep Singh, whose grandfather had been a maharaja of the Punjab.Sophia’s father was forced to give up the throne and taken to England, where Sophia and her siblings were born and raised, but Sophia went on to live an extraordinary life as a suffragette. My Indian-American best friend was immediately intrigued when I told her and said she hadn’t ever heard of Sophia before.

    Reply
  71. I’m late to the party… Everyone called my mystery woman “Auntie.” She was a man’s mistress for 50 years. Yes, she has a name, but I still feel protective of her even though she has been dead for many years as has her married lover. They met at Julliard and he played 1st trumpet in the NYC Philharmonic. She was in her late 70s when I met her and lived with relatives–friends of ours–in a western state. At this time she was still making trips back to NYC to visit him. In appearance Auntie was regal, her hair was snow white and she wore bright, red lipstick. Loved the color purple. He never told his children about her, even after his wife died. She remained loyal to him until she could no longer remember he existed. We were at a party once and I was sitting with her, having a cocktail, and she asked a female acquaintance about her young son. The lady gave Auntie a glowing report and Auntie smiled and nodded and when the lady left us, Auntie looked at me and said with her bright, red lips, “He’s a hellion.”

    Reply
  72. I’m late to the party… Everyone called my mystery woman “Auntie.” She was a man’s mistress for 50 years. Yes, she has a name, but I still feel protective of her even though she has been dead for many years as has her married lover. They met at Julliard and he played 1st trumpet in the NYC Philharmonic. She was in her late 70s when I met her and lived with relatives–friends of ours–in a western state. At this time she was still making trips back to NYC to visit him. In appearance Auntie was regal, her hair was snow white and she wore bright, red lipstick. Loved the color purple. He never told his children about her, even after his wife died. She remained loyal to him until she could no longer remember he existed. We were at a party once and I was sitting with her, having a cocktail, and she asked a female acquaintance about her young son. The lady gave Auntie a glowing report and Auntie smiled and nodded and when the lady left us, Auntie looked at me and said with her bright, red lips, “He’s a hellion.”

    Reply
  73. I’m late to the party… Everyone called my mystery woman “Auntie.” She was a man’s mistress for 50 years. Yes, she has a name, but I still feel protective of her even though she has been dead for many years as has her married lover. They met at Julliard and he played 1st trumpet in the NYC Philharmonic. She was in her late 70s when I met her and lived with relatives–friends of ours–in a western state. At this time she was still making trips back to NYC to visit him. In appearance Auntie was regal, her hair was snow white and she wore bright, red lipstick. Loved the color purple. He never told his children about her, even after his wife died. She remained loyal to him until she could no longer remember he existed. We were at a party once and I was sitting with her, having a cocktail, and she asked a female acquaintance about her young son. The lady gave Auntie a glowing report and Auntie smiled and nodded and when the lady left us, Auntie looked at me and said with her bright, red lips, “He’s a hellion.”

    Reply
  74. I’m late to the party… Everyone called my mystery woman “Auntie.” She was a man’s mistress for 50 years. Yes, she has a name, but I still feel protective of her even though she has been dead for many years as has her married lover. They met at Julliard and he played 1st trumpet in the NYC Philharmonic. She was in her late 70s when I met her and lived with relatives–friends of ours–in a western state. At this time she was still making trips back to NYC to visit him. In appearance Auntie was regal, her hair was snow white and she wore bright, red lipstick. Loved the color purple. He never told his children about her, even after his wife died. She remained loyal to him until she could no longer remember he existed. We were at a party once and I was sitting with her, having a cocktail, and she asked a female acquaintance about her young son. The lady gave Auntie a glowing report and Auntie smiled and nodded and when the lady left us, Auntie looked at me and said with her bright, red lips, “He’s a hellion.”

    Reply
  75. I’m late to the party… Everyone called my mystery woman “Auntie.” She was a man’s mistress for 50 years. Yes, she has a name, but I still feel protective of her even though she has been dead for many years as has her married lover. They met at Julliard and he played 1st trumpet in the NYC Philharmonic. She was in her late 70s when I met her and lived with relatives–friends of ours–in a western state. At this time she was still making trips back to NYC to visit him. In appearance Auntie was regal, her hair was snow white and she wore bright, red lipstick. Loved the color purple. He never told his children about her, even after his wife died. She remained loyal to him until she could no longer remember he existed. We were at a party once and I was sitting with her, having a cocktail, and she asked a female acquaintance about her young son. The lady gave Auntie a glowing report and Auntie smiled and nodded and when the lady left us, Auntie looked at me and said with her bright, red lips, “He’s a hellion.”

    Reply
  76. She’ll briefly interact with my (fictional) main character, who is British but born in India. I haven’t read the bio yet but there was a documentary about her presented by Anita Anand that I saw on YouTube.

    Reply
  77. She’ll briefly interact with my (fictional) main character, who is British but born in India. I haven’t read the bio yet but there was a documentary about her presented by Anita Anand that I saw on YouTube.

    Reply
  78. She’ll briefly interact with my (fictional) main character, who is British but born in India. I haven’t read the bio yet but there was a documentary about her presented by Anita Anand that I saw on YouTube.

    Reply
  79. She’ll briefly interact with my (fictional) main character, who is British but born in India. I haven’t read the bio yet but there was a documentary about her presented by Anita Anand that I saw on YouTube.

    Reply
  80. She’ll briefly interact with my (fictional) main character, who is British but born in India. I haven’t read the bio yet but there was a documentary about her presented by Anita Anand that I saw on YouTube.

    Reply
  81. Oana-Maria, your replies here on Word Wenches are so fascinating whether they are about your country’s history during your own lifetime, or as in today’s reply to Susanna’s very interesting posting. It is like a history lesson in itself. I found today’s reply completely compelling and I truly hope you don’t give up on getting it published when it is done. You have definitely sparked my interest.

    Reply
  82. Oana-Maria, your replies here on Word Wenches are so fascinating whether they are about your country’s history during your own lifetime, or as in today’s reply to Susanna’s very interesting posting. It is like a history lesson in itself. I found today’s reply completely compelling and I truly hope you don’t give up on getting it published when it is done. You have definitely sparked my interest.

    Reply
  83. Oana-Maria, your replies here on Word Wenches are so fascinating whether they are about your country’s history during your own lifetime, or as in today’s reply to Susanna’s very interesting posting. It is like a history lesson in itself. I found today’s reply completely compelling and I truly hope you don’t give up on getting it published when it is done. You have definitely sparked my interest.

    Reply
  84. Oana-Maria, your replies here on Word Wenches are so fascinating whether they are about your country’s history during your own lifetime, or as in today’s reply to Susanna’s very interesting posting. It is like a history lesson in itself. I found today’s reply completely compelling and I truly hope you don’t give up on getting it published when it is done. You have definitely sparked my interest.

    Reply
  85. Oana-Maria, your replies here on Word Wenches are so fascinating whether they are about your country’s history during your own lifetime, or as in today’s reply to Susanna’s very interesting posting. It is like a history lesson in itself. I found today’s reply completely compelling and I truly hope you don’t give up on getting it published when it is done. You have definitely sparked my interest.

    Reply
  86. Michelle, isn’t it a neat feeling to find a whole person stepping from behind that single mention?
    And how great that you also have a best friend who can help and advise you in crafting that character.
    Have fun with the writing!

    Reply
  87. Michelle, isn’t it a neat feeling to find a whole person stepping from behind that single mention?
    And how great that you also have a best friend who can help and advise you in crafting that character.
    Have fun with the writing!

    Reply
  88. Michelle, isn’t it a neat feeling to find a whole person stepping from behind that single mention?
    And how great that you also have a best friend who can help and advise you in crafting that character.
    Have fun with the writing!

    Reply
  89. Michelle, isn’t it a neat feeling to find a whole person stepping from behind that single mention?
    And how great that you also have a best friend who can help and advise you in crafting that character.
    Have fun with the writing!

    Reply
  90. Michelle, isn’t it a neat feeling to find a whole person stepping from behind that single mention?
    And how great that you also have a best friend who can help and advise you in crafting that character.
    Have fun with the writing!

    Reply

Leave a Comment