With a Cider Beside Her

Cat 243 Doverby Mary Jo

Cider, Part 1

Apples grow well in Upstate New York, where I was raised, and fresh pressed apple cider was a favorite autumn treat. Sometimes we'd drive out to a cider mill in a rambling old barn and buy it fresh from the press. The result was tangy, cloudy with apple particles, and delicious. Even as a kid, I found cider more tasty than apple juice, which was filtered to clearness, too sweet, and not very interesting.

Sometimes the cider would turn a little "hard," meaning fermentation was adding Cider apples a bit of alcoholic kick, but for us, it was basically a non-alcoholic beverage. I still enjoy this kind of cider, and if I have guests around the holidays, I'll often heat up a gallon, adding whole spices like stick cinnamon and cloves and allspice. I'll also slice up an orange into pretty round circles and simmer it all together for a hot cider punch. Nice!

Cider, Part 2

When I moved to England, I discovered a new kind of cider: a traditional alcoholic beverage that goes way back in history. Fermentation is basically an anaerobic chemical reaction involving sugar and yeast, and the sugar can come from many sources, including grapes and malted grains, which are used in wine and beer respectively.  Drinks similar to cider can be made from other fruits–perry, which I've never tried but would like to, is made from pears, and I gather peaches can be used as well. I'd love to sample that!

Woodpecker-HardThe modern version of British cider is a bottled beverage that is filtered so it hasn't the cloudiness I was used to. Commercial varieties have specific alcohol levels–usually, but not always, on the light side. Bulmer's Woodpecker Cider is popular and widely available, including in the US. It was first brewed in Herefordshire–good apple country!–in 1894.

When I lived in Oxford, guests at student parties would bring bottles of alcoholic beverages to contribute to the refreshments. Top of the pecking order was a bottle of wine, followed by beer, with cider brought by those for whom money was particularly tight. The drinks would be finished off in that order, too, with cider bottles the last to be emptied. A ditty I learned at the time said, "Beer on cider, is a good rider. Cider on beer, will reappear." I think it was a warning. <G>

Apples, heirlooms

Cider, Part 3

Now cider is turning into an artisanal beverage, which I discovered when the Mayhem Consultant suggested we visit the Millstone Cellars in the farm country half an hour or so north of us. Millstone is in a handsomely remodeled historical barn, and it handcrafts ciders and meads, just as vintners and boutique beer brewers make their beverages. Way fun!

We learned that different kinds of apples are used, and that cider apples are often too tannic to be good eating apples. Millstone seeks out farmers who raise heirloom apple varieties, and they continually experiment to come up with new flavors. Adding ginger strikes me as a fine idea, and they had a batch aging with stalks of lemongrass, which looked like bamboo.  (Pictures below are from the Millstone site.)

Cider Barrels

I bought a bottle of Cherrykriek, which combines sour cherries with cider made from Rome Beauty and York Imperial apples. It has a pinkish tone and a pleasant fruity tang. The MC went for Blossom, made with Jonathan and McIntosh apples and wildflower honey.

I don't know much about the mead, which is made from honey and is one of the most ancient and widely made fermented beverages of all. I'd read about it in books, and when I lived in California many years ago, I saw a bottle in a store and bought it out of curiosity. It was ghastly. <G>

Falcon meadBut now mead has become another artisanal beverage and is being made with sophistication and creativity. Different varieties of honey will give different flavors for a base, and additional flavorings can be added. When we got married, a friend gave us a bottle of boutique mead made by her brother's company in Santa Fe, and it was a very different and much more interesting proposition from the mead I'd had years earlier.

I find it fascinating how these older drinks are being reborn in new ways, and are being made with the same care as wine and beer. Are you a fan of cider? Was it part of your childhood?  Have you tried mead? What do you think of them?

Bargain, KensingtonMy book The Bargain has a scene when the hero and heroine are enjoying a picnic that includes cider made on his Hereford estate. So just for fun, I'll give away a copy of the book to one person who comments between now and Thursday midnight. And maybe tonight I'll open my bottle of Cherrykriek cider!

Mary Jo

195 thoughts on “With a Cider Beside Her”

  1. Its funny about cider. I always think I like it, but when it comes to drinking it, it isn’t quite so good. I think the problem is I like drinks in small quantities, but a glass of cider is too big.
    I have had Peri wine years ago, and it was lovely. It was actually made at a vineyard in Victoria (Australia) and at the time we wished we had bought more than the one bottle.
    Mead, on the other hand, should be drunk while reading a good medieval historical. But then again, it is just as good when left in the bottle or jar and looked at. There is good mead and bad mead, and it has been my luck to get the bad stuff more often than not.
    Your hot cider punch sounds great Mary Jo. Just right for Christmas. I will try it as where I live we have lots of apples and apple juice and cider. I will hunt and find some.

    Reply
  2. Its funny about cider. I always think I like it, but when it comes to drinking it, it isn’t quite so good. I think the problem is I like drinks in small quantities, but a glass of cider is too big.
    I have had Peri wine years ago, and it was lovely. It was actually made at a vineyard in Victoria (Australia) and at the time we wished we had bought more than the one bottle.
    Mead, on the other hand, should be drunk while reading a good medieval historical. But then again, it is just as good when left in the bottle or jar and looked at. There is good mead and bad mead, and it has been my luck to get the bad stuff more often than not.
    Your hot cider punch sounds great Mary Jo. Just right for Christmas. I will try it as where I live we have lots of apples and apple juice and cider. I will hunt and find some.

    Reply
  3. Its funny about cider. I always think I like it, but when it comes to drinking it, it isn’t quite so good. I think the problem is I like drinks in small quantities, but a glass of cider is too big.
    I have had Peri wine years ago, and it was lovely. It was actually made at a vineyard in Victoria (Australia) and at the time we wished we had bought more than the one bottle.
    Mead, on the other hand, should be drunk while reading a good medieval historical. But then again, it is just as good when left in the bottle or jar and looked at. There is good mead and bad mead, and it has been my luck to get the bad stuff more often than not.
    Your hot cider punch sounds great Mary Jo. Just right for Christmas. I will try it as where I live we have lots of apples and apple juice and cider. I will hunt and find some.

    Reply
  4. Its funny about cider. I always think I like it, but when it comes to drinking it, it isn’t quite so good. I think the problem is I like drinks in small quantities, but a glass of cider is too big.
    I have had Peri wine years ago, and it was lovely. It was actually made at a vineyard in Victoria (Australia) and at the time we wished we had bought more than the one bottle.
    Mead, on the other hand, should be drunk while reading a good medieval historical. But then again, it is just as good when left in the bottle or jar and looked at. There is good mead and bad mead, and it has been my luck to get the bad stuff more often than not.
    Your hot cider punch sounds great Mary Jo. Just right for Christmas. I will try it as where I live we have lots of apples and apple juice and cider. I will hunt and find some.

    Reply
  5. Its funny about cider. I always think I like it, but when it comes to drinking it, it isn’t quite so good. I think the problem is I like drinks in small quantities, but a glass of cider is too big.
    I have had Peri wine years ago, and it was lovely. It was actually made at a vineyard in Victoria (Australia) and at the time we wished we had bought more than the one bottle.
    Mead, on the other hand, should be drunk while reading a good medieval historical. But then again, it is just as good when left in the bottle or jar and looked at. There is good mead and bad mead, and it has been my luck to get the bad stuff more often than not.
    Your hot cider punch sounds great Mary Jo. Just right for Christmas. I will try it as where I live we have lots of apples and apple juice and cider. I will hunt and find some.

    Reply
  6. When I read about cider I think of two things: The Wurzels (“I am a Cider Drinker” – apologies for the ear-worm!) and scrumpy. I’m not sure how the term is used now, but scrumpy used to be rougher, more alcoholic cider, often made locally. I can remember hearing of one known as Hand-Grenade, apparently because it didn’t feel too strong while you were drinking it but it kicked in later. I can’t comment, because I don’t like cider!
    (I already own The Bargain.)

    Reply
  7. When I read about cider I think of two things: The Wurzels (“I am a Cider Drinker” – apologies for the ear-worm!) and scrumpy. I’m not sure how the term is used now, but scrumpy used to be rougher, more alcoholic cider, often made locally. I can remember hearing of one known as Hand-Grenade, apparently because it didn’t feel too strong while you were drinking it but it kicked in later. I can’t comment, because I don’t like cider!
    (I already own The Bargain.)

    Reply
  8. When I read about cider I think of two things: The Wurzels (“I am a Cider Drinker” – apologies for the ear-worm!) and scrumpy. I’m not sure how the term is used now, but scrumpy used to be rougher, more alcoholic cider, often made locally. I can remember hearing of one known as Hand-Grenade, apparently because it didn’t feel too strong while you were drinking it but it kicked in later. I can’t comment, because I don’t like cider!
    (I already own The Bargain.)

    Reply
  9. When I read about cider I think of two things: The Wurzels (“I am a Cider Drinker” – apologies for the ear-worm!) and scrumpy. I’m not sure how the term is used now, but scrumpy used to be rougher, more alcoholic cider, often made locally. I can remember hearing of one known as Hand-Grenade, apparently because it didn’t feel too strong while you were drinking it but it kicked in later. I can’t comment, because I don’t like cider!
    (I already own The Bargain.)

    Reply
  10. When I read about cider I think of two things: The Wurzels (“I am a Cider Drinker” – apologies for the ear-worm!) and scrumpy. I’m not sure how the term is used now, but scrumpy used to be rougher, more alcoholic cider, often made locally. I can remember hearing of one known as Hand-Grenade, apparently because it didn’t feel too strong while you were drinking it but it kicked in later. I can’t comment, because I don’t like cider!
    (I already own The Bargain.)

    Reply
  11. I’ve never tried cider, but my mom made mead -or sima as we Finns call it- every year for Vappu (May Day). Home made sima is way better than any of the stuff they sell in the supermarkets.

    Reply
  12. I’ve never tried cider, but my mom made mead -or sima as we Finns call it- every year for Vappu (May Day). Home made sima is way better than any of the stuff they sell in the supermarkets.

    Reply
  13. I’ve never tried cider, but my mom made mead -or sima as we Finns call it- every year for Vappu (May Day). Home made sima is way better than any of the stuff they sell in the supermarkets.

    Reply
  14. I’ve never tried cider, but my mom made mead -or sima as we Finns call it- every year for Vappu (May Day). Home made sima is way better than any of the stuff they sell in the supermarkets.

    Reply
  15. I’ve never tried cider, but my mom made mead -or sima as we Finns call it- every year for Vappu (May Day). Home made sima is way better than any of the stuff they sell in the supermarkets.

    Reply
  16. I have not tried cider but after reading your article I want to. I haven’t tried mead either but I’d be willing to based on your second experience with it.

    Reply
  17. I have not tried cider but after reading your article I want to. I haven’t tried mead either but I’d be willing to based on your second experience with it.

    Reply
  18. I have not tried cider but after reading your article I want to. I haven’t tried mead either but I’d be willing to based on your second experience with it.

    Reply
  19. I have not tried cider but after reading your article I want to. I haven’t tried mead either but I’d be willing to based on your second experience with it.

    Reply
  20. I have not tried cider but after reading your article I want to. I haven’t tried mead either but I’d be willing to based on your second experience with it.

    Reply
  21. I live in a university town where one of the professors was interested in mead and began making it about 30 years ago… his family now owns a winery [still making mead] that has won national/international accolades for their wines and mead. Oh, and we’re regular visitors..

    Reply
  22. I live in a university town where one of the professors was interested in mead and began making it about 30 years ago… his family now owns a winery [still making mead] that has won national/international accolades for their wines and mead. Oh, and we’re regular visitors..

    Reply
  23. I live in a university town where one of the professors was interested in mead and began making it about 30 years ago… his family now owns a winery [still making mead] that has won national/international accolades for their wines and mead. Oh, and we’re regular visitors..

    Reply
  24. I live in a university town where one of the professors was interested in mead and began making it about 30 years ago… his family now owns a winery [still making mead] that has won national/international accolades for their wines and mead. Oh, and we’re regular visitors..

    Reply
  25. I live in a university town where one of the professors was interested in mead and began making it about 30 years ago… his family now owns a winery [still making mead] that has won national/international accolades for their wines and mead. Oh, and we’re regular visitors..

    Reply
  26. I’m a regular cider drinker in the UK (never got the taste for beer…) In New York earlier this year, a bartender introduced me to a Molly Malone – a pint of cider with a shot of (Irish) whisky in it, because I mentioned that US style hard cider was much sweeter than the cider I’m used to. As far as I can remember, it worked – knocked the sweetness back and the pint tasted much more crisp, but I don’t remember much after the second pint!

    Reply
  27. I’m a regular cider drinker in the UK (never got the taste for beer…) In New York earlier this year, a bartender introduced me to a Molly Malone – a pint of cider with a shot of (Irish) whisky in it, because I mentioned that US style hard cider was much sweeter than the cider I’m used to. As far as I can remember, it worked – knocked the sweetness back and the pint tasted much more crisp, but I don’t remember much after the second pint!

    Reply
  28. I’m a regular cider drinker in the UK (never got the taste for beer…) In New York earlier this year, a bartender introduced me to a Molly Malone – a pint of cider with a shot of (Irish) whisky in it, because I mentioned that US style hard cider was much sweeter than the cider I’m used to. As far as I can remember, it worked – knocked the sweetness back and the pint tasted much more crisp, but I don’t remember much after the second pint!

    Reply
  29. I’m a regular cider drinker in the UK (never got the taste for beer…) In New York earlier this year, a bartender introduced me to a Molly Malone – a pint of cider with a shot of (Irish) whisky in it, because I mentioned that US style hard cider was much sweeter than the cider I’m used to. As far as I can remember, it worked – knocked the sweetness back and the pint tasted much more crisp, but I don’t remember much after the second pint!

    Reply
  30. I’m a regular cider drinker in the UK (never got the taste for beer…) In New York earlier this year, a bartender introduced me to a Molly Malone – a pint of cider with a shot of (Irish) whisky in it, because I mentioned that US style hard cider was much sweeter than the cider I’m used to. As far as I can remember, it worked – knocked the sweetness back and the pint tasted much more crisp, but I don’t remember much after the second pint!

    Reply
  31. I like cider, but not fermented cider. I am a fan of fruit drinks in general. I have not had mead. But I must say, I am impressed with the knowledge everyone has about this topic – I believe when I read about something called a Hand Grenade – and it is a drink which people actually survive, that is impressive.

    Reply
  32. I like cider, but not fermented cider. I am a fan of fruit drinks in general. I have not had mead. But I must say, I am impressed with the knowledge everyone has about this topic – I believe when I read about something called a Hand Grenade – and it is a drink which people actually survive, that is impressive.

    Reply
  33. I like cider, but not fermented cider. I am a fan of fruit drinks in general. I have not had mead. But I must say, I am impressed with the knowledge everyone has about this topic – I believe when I read about something called a Hand Grenade – and it is a drink which people actually survive, that is impressive.

    Reply
  34. I like cider, but not fermented cider. I am a fan of fruit drinks in general. I have not had mead. But I must say, I am impressed with the knowledge everyone has about this topic – I believe when I read about something called a Hand Grenade – and it is a drink which people actually survive, that is impressive.

    Reply
  35. I like cider, but not fermented cider. I am a fan of fruit drinks in general. I have not had mead. But I must say, I am impressed with the knowledge everyone has about this topic – I believe when I read about something called a Hand Grenade – and it is a drink which people actually survive, that is impressive.

    Reply
  36. When I lived in England, many years ago, I tried “hard” cider but did not care for it. Now I find my local supermarket promoting it. I have heard about the new artisinal ciders and think I must give them a try. As I live outside DC, I will make a point to visit Millstone.
    Thank you for making me aware of them.

    Reply
  37. When I lived in England, many years ago, I tried “hard” cider but did not care for it. Now I find my local supermarket promoting it. I have heard about the new artisinal ciders and think I must give them a try. As I live outside DC, I will make a point to visit Millstone.
    Thank you for making me aware of them.

    Reply
  38. When I lived in England, many years ago, I tried “hard” cider but did not care for it. Now I find my local supermarket promoting it. I have heard about the new artisinal ciders and think I must give them a try. As I live outside DC, I will make a point to visit Millstone.
    Thank you for making me aware of them.

    Reply
  39. When I lived in England, many years ago, I tried “hard” cider but did not care for it. Now I find my local supermarket promoting it. I have heard about the new artisinal ciders and think I must give them a try. As I live outside DC, I will make a point to visit Millstone.
    Thank you for making me aware of them.

    Reply
  40. When I lived in England, many years ago, I tried “hard” cider but did not care for it. Now I find my local supermarket promoting it. I have heard about the new artisinal ciders and think I must give them a try. As I live outside DC, I will make a point to visit Millstone.
    Thank you for making me aware of them.

    Reply
  41. I grew up very near an orchard and cider mill, so fresh pressed cider was always a Fall tradition. (My brother loved having my parents bring jugs to his prep school—of course the boys had figured out how to hang the unfiltered stuff out their windows so it would ferment and turn alcoholic!)
    I totally agree that apple juice is bland and sweet, while cider is wonderful. I’ve tried a few of the bottled hard ciders, which aren’t bad, but would love to try some of the artisanal brews.
    Hmmm, it’s cold here, so I think I’ll go warm up some of the cider in my fridge and add some cinnamon and cloves!

    Reply
  42. I grew up very near an orchard and cider mill, so fresh pressed cider was always a Fall tradition. (My brother loved having my parents bring jugs to his prep school—of course the boys had figured out how to hang the unfiltered stuff out their windows so it would ferment and turn alcoholic!)
    I totally agree that apple juice is bland and sweet, while cider is wonderful. I’ve tried a few of the bottled hard ciders, which aren’t bad, but would love to try some of the artisanal brews.
    Hmmm, it’s cold here, so I think I’ll go warm up some of the cider in my fridge and add some cinnamon and cloves!

    Reply
  43. I grew up very near an orchard and cider mill, so fresh pressed cider was always a Fall tradition. (My brother loved having my parents bring jugs to his prep school—of course the boys had figured out how to hang the unfiltered stuff out their windows so it would ferment and turn alcoholic!)
    I totally agree that apple juice is bland and sweet, while cider is wonderful. I’ve tried a few of the bottled hard ciders, which aren’t bad, but would love to try some of the artisanal brews.
    Hmmm, it’s cold here, so I think I’ll go warm up some of the cider in my fridge and add some cinnamon and cloves!

    Reply
  44. I grew up very near an orchard and cider mill, so fresh pressed cider was always a Fall tradition. (My brother loved having my parents bring jugs to his prep school—of course the boys had figured out how to hang the unfiltered stuff out their windows so it would ferment and turn alcoholic!)
    I totally agree that apple juice is bland and sweet, while cider is wonderful. I’ve tried a few of the bottled hard ciders, which aren’t bad, but would love to try some of the artisanal brews.
    Hmmm, it’s cold here, so I think I’ll go warm up some of the cider in my fridge and add some cinnamon and cloves!

    Reply
  45. I grew up very near an orchard and cider mill, so fresh pressed cider was always a Fall tradition. (My brother loved having my parents bring jugs to his prep school—of course the boys had figured out how to hang the unfiltered stuff out their windows so it would ferment and turn alcoholic!)
    I totally agree that apple juice is bland and sweet, while cider is wonderful. I’ve tried a few of the bottled hard ciders, which aren’t bad, but would love to try some of the artisanal brews.
    Hmmm, it’s cold here, so I think I’ll go warm up some of the cider in my fridge and add some cinnamon and cloves!

    Reply
  46. When my siblings and I were little we visited Michigan where my mom grew up. She was so delighted to get jugs of “real” cider. The stuff at the grocery store was not as good. However on the trip back to Georgia it started to turn. Several glasses into the stuff, Mom had to pull over. It wasn’t safe to drive. I still drink cider, but make sure it is kept in the fridge.

    Reply
  47. When my siblings and I were little we visited Michigan where my mom grew up. She was so delighted to get jugs of “real” cider. The stuff at the grocery store was not as good. However on the trip back to Georgia it started to turn. Several glasses into the stuff, Mom had to pull over. It wasn’t safe to drive. I still drink cider, but make sure it is kept in the fridge.

    Reply
  48. When my siblings and I were little we visited Michigan where my mom grew up. She was so delighted to get jugs of “real” cider. The stuff at the grocery store was not as good. However on the trip back to Georgia it started to turn. Several glasses into the stuff, Mom had to pull over. It wasn’t safe to drive. I still drink cider, but make sure it is kept in the fridge.

    Reply
  49. When my siblings and I were little we visited Michigan where my mom grew up. She was so delighted to get jugs of “real” cider. The stuff at the grocery store was not as good. However on the trip back to Georgia it started to turn. Several glasses into the stuff, Mom had to pull over. It wasn’t safe to drive. I still drink cider, but make sure it is kept in the fridge.

    Reply
  50. When my siblings and I were little we visited Michigan where my mom grew up. She was so delighted to get jugs of “real” cider. The stuff at the grocery store was not as good. However on the trip back to Georgia it started to turn. Several glasses into the stuff, Mom had to pull over. It wasn’t safe to drive. I still drink cider, but make sure it is kept in the fridge.

    Reply
  51. Ah,now you have answered something that had bothered me.In several books (Could they be yours?) The heroine has squaffed glasses of ‘cider’ in country inns and farms without landing on her back with her legs in the air singing ribald ditties which if it was English country cider she definitely would be doing!!Proper west country scrumpy (not the commercial stuff brewed for the tourists)is lethal!!Unless you have an extremely hard head half a pint would put the average girl under the table.The cloudyness covers all sorts of sins and if you ever saw the barrel it was brewed in you would run screaming !Now this stuff is what a regency farm or inn would be serving and health and safety would these days shut the premises down !! Here in Dorset we were more civilised and brewed lots of beer but I can remember when I was at college in Somerset the locals in the pub having a good laugh at the expense of the ‘northeners’ who should have listened to me when I said only buy the bottled cider even if it did cost more!I think the stuff had old socks in at the very least tho someone mentioned dead rats!!

    Reply
  52. Ah,now you have answered something that had bothered me.In several books (Could they be yours?) The heroine has squaffed glasses of ‘cider’ in country inns and farms without landing on her back with her legs in the air singing ribald ditties which if it was English country cider she definitely would be doing!!Proper west country scrumpy (not the commercial stuff brewed for the tourists)is lethal!!Unless you have an extremely hard head half a pint would put the average girl under the table.The cloudyness covers all sorts of sins and if you ever saw the barrel it was brewed in you would run screaming !Now this stuff is what a regency farm or inn would be serving and health and safety would these days shut the premises down !! Here in Dorset we were more civilised and brewed lots of beer but I can remember when I was at college in Somerset the locals in the pub having a good laugh at the expense of the ‘northeners’ who should have listened to me when I said only buy the bottled cider even if it did cost more!I think the stuff had old socks in at the very least tho someone mentioned dead rats!!

    Reply
  53. Ah,now you have answered something that had bothered me.In several books (Could they be yours?) The heroine has squaffed glasses of ‘cider’ in country inns and farms without landing on her back with her legs in the air singing ribald ditties which if it was English country cider she definitely would be doing!!Proper west country scrumpy (not the commercial stuff brewed for the tourists)is lethal!!Unless you have an extremely hard head half a pint would put the average girl under the table.The cloudyness covers all sorts of sins and if you ever saw the barrel it was brewed in you would run screaming !Now this stuff is what a regency farm or inn would be serving and health and safety would these days shut the premises down !! Here in Dorset we were more civilised and brewed lots of beer but I can remember when I was at college in Somerset the locals in the pub having a good laugh at the expense of the ‘northeners’ who should have listened to me when I said only buy the bottled cider even if it did cost more!I think the stuff had old socks in at the very least tho someone mentioned dead rats!!

    Reply
  54. Ah,now you have answered something that had bothered me.In several books (Could they be yours?) The heroine has squaffed glasses of ‘cider’ in country inns and farms without landing on her back with her legs in the air singing ribald ditties which if it was English country cider she definitely would be doing!!Proper west country scrumpy (not the commercial stuff brewed for the tourists)is lethal!!Unless you have an extremely hard head half a pint would put the average girl under the table.The cloudyness covers all sorts of sins and if you ever saw the barrel it was brewed in you would run screaming !Now this stuff is what a regency farm or inn would be serving and health and safety would these days shut the premises down !! Here in Dorset we were more civilised and brewed lots of beer but I can remember when I was at college in Somerset the locals in the pub having a good laugh at the expense of the ‘northeners’ who should have listened to me when I said only buy the bottled cider even if it did cost more!I think the stuff had old socks in at the very least tho someone mentioned dead rats!!

    Reply
  55. Ah,now you have answered something that had bothered me.In several books (Could they be yours?) The heroine has squaffed glasses of ‘cider’ in country inns and farms without landing on her back with her legs in the air singing ribald ditties which if it was English country cider she definitely would be doing!!Proper west country scrumpy (not the commercial stuff brewed for the tourists)is lethal!!Unless you have an extremely hard head half a pint would put the average girl under the table.The cloudyness covers all sorts of sins and if you ever saw the barrel it was brewed in you would run screaming !Now this stuff is what a regency farm or inn would be serving and health and safety would these days shut the premises down !! Here in Dorset we were more civilised and brewed lots of beer but I can remember when I was at college in Somerset the locals in the pub having a good laugh at the expense of the ‘northeners’ who should have listened to me when I said only buy the bottled cider even if it did cost more!I think the stuff had old socks in at the very least tho someone mentioned dead rats!!

    Reply
  56. Oh my purple prose seems to have dissappeared into the ether again ! What I said was you have now answered a question I have had having encountered in several books (Yours?) a heroine happily squaffing down glasses of ‘cider’ offered to her in inns and farmhouses in Regency England and not landing on the floor with her legs in the air singing – which she definitely would have done if she really did drink english farmhouse cider as it was made then (or now if you look in the right place)Scrumpy as it is called (the proper stuff not the stuff brewed for the tourist) is practically lethal.The alchohol content varies but generally is pretty high on the rhicter scale ! And what exactly is hidden from view by the cloudiness – – surfice to say it usually got strained before drinking!

    Reply
  57. Oh my purple prose seems to have dissappeared into the ether again ! What I said was you have now answered a question I have had having encountered in several books (Yours?) a heroine happily squaffing down glasses of ‘cider’ offered to her in inns and farmhouses in Regency England and not landing on the floor with her legs in the air singing – which she definitely would have done if she really did drink english farmhouse cider as it was made then (or now if you look in the right place)Scrumpy as it is called (the proper stuff not the stuff brewed for the tourist) is practically lethal.The alchohol content varies but generally is pretty high on the rhicter scale ! And what exactly is hidden from view by the cloudiness – – surfice to say it usually got strained before drinking!

    Reply
  58. Oh my purple prose seems to have dissappeared into the ether again ! What I said was you have now answered a question I have had having encountered in several books (Yours?) a heroine happily squaffing down glasses of ‘cider’ offered to her in inns and farmhouses in Regency England and not landing on the floor with her legs in the air singing – which she definitely would have done if she really did drink english farmhouse cider as it was made then (or now if you look in the right place)Scrumpy as it is called (the proper stuff not the stuff brewed for the tourist) is practically lethal.The alchohol content varies but generally is pretty high on the rhicter scale ! And what exactly is hidden from view by the cloudiness – – surfice to say it usually got strained before drinking!

    Reply
  59. Oh my purple prose seems to have dissappeared into the ether again ! What I said was you have now answered a question I have had having encountered in several books (Yours?) a heroine happily squaffing down glasses of ‘cider’ offered to her in inns and farmhouses in Regency England and not landing on the floor with her legs in the air singing – which she definitely would have done if she really did drink english farmhouse cider as it was made then (or now if you look in the right place)Scrumpy as it is called (the proper stuff not the stuff brewed for the tourist) is practically lethal.The alchohol content varies but generally is pretty high on the rhicter scale ! And what exactly is hidden from view by the cloudiness – – surfice to say it usually got strained before drinking!

    Reply
  60. Oh my purple prose seems to have dissappeared into the ether again ! What I said was you have now answered a question I have had having encountered in several books (Yours?) a heroine happily squaffing down glasses of ‘cider’ offered to her in inns and farmhouses in Regency England and not landing on the floor with her legs in the air singing – which she definitely would have done if she really did drink english farmhouse cider as it was made then (or now if you look in the right place)Scrumpy as it is called (the proper stuff not the stuff brewed for the tourist) is practically lethal.The alchohol content varies but generally is pretty high on the rhicter scale ! And what exactly is hidden from view by the cloudiness – – surfice to say it usually got strained before drinking!

    Reply
  61. Jenny–
    Like you, I tend to like my cider is smallish quantities since I really don’t usually drink sweet drinks, much less flagons of them. The Peri wince sounds lovely! Good luck with the cider punch–you can use the mulling spices that show up in some supermarkets at this time of year, and just add the sliced oranges. On a cold day, people really glug this down! (I use a strainer to keep random spices out of the drinking much.

    Reply
  62. Jenny–
    Like you, I tend to like my cider is smallish quantities since I really don’t usually drink sweet drinks, much less flagons of them. The Peri wince sounds lovely! Good luck with the cider punch–you can use the mulling spices that show up in some supermarkets at this time of year, and just add the sliced oranges. On a cold day, people really glug this down! (I use a strainer to keep random spices out of the drinking much.

    Reply
  63. Jenny–
    Like you, I tend to like my cider is smallish quantities since I really don’t usually drink sweet drinks, much less flagons of them. The Peri wince sounds lovely! Good luck with the cider punch–you can use the mulling spices that show up in some supermarkets at this time of year, and just add the sliced oranges. On a cold day, people really glug this down! (I use a strainer to keep random spices out of the drinking much.

    Reply
  64. Jenny–
    Like you, I tend to like my cider is smallish quantities since I really don’t usually drink sweet drinks, much less flagons of them. The Peri wince sounds lovely! Good luck with the cider punch–you can use the mulling spices that show up in some supermarkets at this time of year, and just add the sliced oranges. On a cold day, people really glug this down! (I use a strainer to keep random spices out of the drinking much.

    Reply
  65. Jenny–
    Like you, I tend to like my cider is smallish quantities since I really don’t usually drink sweet drinks, much less flagons of them. The Peri wince sounds lovely! Good luck with the cider punch–you can use the mulling spices that show up in some supermarkets at this time of year, and just add the sliced oranges. On a cold day, people really glug this down! (I use a strainer to keep random spices out of the drinking much.

    Reply
  66. I always served warm spiced cider at our Christmas party. When we moved to Europe, I had to explain that it was non-alcoholic. Hubby discovered Kriek on a trip to Belgium. They make theirs using lambric beer.
    Cheers!!

    Reply
  67. I always served warm spiced cider at our Christmas party. When we moved to Europe, I had to explain that it was non-alcoholic. Hubby discovered Kriek on a trip to Belgium. They make theirs using lambric beer.
    Cheers!!

    Reply
  68. I always served warm spiced cider at our Christmas party. When we moved to Europe, I had to explain that it was non-alcoholic. Hubby discovered Kriek on a trip to Belgium. They make theirs using lambric beer.
    Cheers!!

    Reply
  69. I always served warm spiced cider at our Christmas party. When we moved to Europe, I had to explain that it was non-alcoholic. Hubby discovered Kriek on a trip to Belgium. They make theirs using lambric beer.
    Cheers!!

    Reply
  70. I always served warm spiced cider at our Christmas party. When we moved to Europe, I had to explain that it was non-alcoholic. Hubby discovered Kriek on a trip to Belgium. They make theirs using lambric beer.
    Cheers!!

    Reply
  71. HJ–
    You just led me down a fascinating West Country rabbit hole! I’d heard of scrumpy but never encountered it–according to Wikipedia,these days it means a more small scale, local cider as opposed to the big commercial brand, but the high alcohol content was mentioned. *G* It sounds rather like the cider I grew up with, only allowed to go very hard. *G*
    I’d never heard of the Wurzels, so I was spared the ear worm, but I looked them up, too. I see they’re representatives of a style called “Scrumpy and Western,” which is West Country electric, based on the Youtube clip I found. I liked the music, too! Their sort of a West Country version of The Chieftains. *G* Thanks for the new information.

    Reply
  72. HJ–
    You just led me down a fascinating West Country rabbit hole! I’d heard of scrumpy but never encountered it–according to Wikipedia,these days it means a more small scale, local cider as opposed to the big commercial brand, but the high alcohol content was mentioned. *G* It sounds rather like the cider I grew up with, only allowed to go very hard. *G*
    I’d never heard of the Wurzels, so I was spared the ear worm, but I looked them up, too. I see they’re representatives of a style called “Scrumpy and Western,” which is West Country electric, based on the Youtube clip I found. I liked the music, too! Their sort of a West Country version of The Chieftains. *G* Thanks for the new information.

    Reply
  73. HJ–
    You just led me down a fascinating West Country rabbit hole! I’d heard of scrumpy but never encountered it–according to Wikipedia,these days it means a more small scale, local cider as opposed to the big commercial brand, but the high alcohol content was mentioned. *G* It sounds rather like the cider I grew up with, only allowed to go very hard. *G*
    I’d never heard of the Wurzels, so I was spared the ear worm, but I looked them up, too. I see they’re representatives of a style called “Scrumpy and Western,” which is West Country electric, based on the Youtube clip I found. I liked the music, too! Their sort of a West Country version of The Chieftains. *G* Thanks for the new information.

    Reply
  74. HJ–
    You just led me down a fascinating West Country rabbit hole! I’d heard of scrumpy but never encountered it–according to Wikipedia,these days it means a more small scale, local cider as opposed to the big commercial brand, but the high alcohol content was mentioned. *G* It sounds rather like the cider I grew up with, only allowed to go very hard. *G*
    I’d never heard of the Wurzels, so I was spared the ear worm, but I looked them up, too. I see they’re representatives of a style called “Scrumpy and Western,” which is West Country electric, based on the Youtube clip I found. I liked the music, too! Their sort of a West Country version of The Chieftains. *G* Thanks for the new information.

    Reply
  75. HJ–
    You just led me down a fascinating West Country rabbit hole! I’d heard of scrumpy but never encountered it–according to Wikipedia,these days it means a more small scale, local cider as opposed to the big commercial brand, but the high alcohol content was mentioned. *G* It sounds rather like the cider I grew up with, only allowed to go very hard. *G*
    I’d never heard of the Wurzels, so I was spared the ear worm, but I looked them up, too. I see they’re representatives of a style called “Scrumpy and Western,” which is West Country electric, based on the Youtube clip I found. I liked the music, too! Their sort of a West Country version of The Chieftains. *G* Thanks for the new information.

    Reply
  76. Minna–
    I’d not heard of sima, but apparently alcoholic honey drinks are made just about everywhere and have been for a very long time. I’d think a glass of Sima would go very well after a Finnish sauna!

    Reply
  77. Minna–
    I’d not heard of sima, but apparently alcoholic honey drinks are made just about everywhere and have been for a very long time. I’d think a glass of Sima would go very well after a Finnish sauna!

    Reply
  78. Minna–
    I’d not heard of sima, but apparently alcoholic honey drinks are made just about everywhere and have been for a very long time. I’d think a glass of Sima would go very well after a Finnish sauna!

    Reply
  79. Minna–
    I’d not heard of sima, but apparently alcoholic honey drinks are made just about everywhere and have been for a very long time. I’d think a glass of Sima would go very well after a Finnish sauna!

    Reply
  80. Minna–
    I’d not heard of sima, but apparently alcoholic honey drinks are made just about everywhere and have been for a very long time. I’d think a glass of Sima would go very well after a Finnish sauna!

    Reply
  81. The quality varies widely, Jackie, but for those of inquiring mind, it’s worth looking for the good stuff. I recently read that there are hundreds of craft meaderies in the US. I don’t know if craft cider makers are as common, but given this it’s a beverage that benefits by loving attention, I expect there will be more. A commercial cider that the Mayhem Consultant likes is called Angry Orchard, and it has a bright apple flavor with a bit of a kick to it.

    Reply
  82. The quality varies widely, Jackie, but for those of inquiring mind, it’s worth looking for the good stuff. I recently read that there are hundreds of craft meaderies in the US. I don’t know if craft cider makers are as common, but given this it’s a beverage that benefits by loving attention, I expect there will be more. A commercial cider that the Mayhem Consultant likes is called Angry Orchard, and it has a bright apple flavor with a bit of a kick to it.

    Reply
  83. The quality varies widely, Jackie, but for those of inquiring mind, it’s worth looking for the good stuff. I recently read that there are hundreds of craft meaderies in the US. I don’t know if craft cider makers are as common, but given this it’s a beverage that benefits by loving attention, I expect there will be more. A commercial cider that the Mayhem Consultant likes is called Angry Orchard, and it has a bright apple flavor with a bit of a kick to it.

    Reply
  84. The quality varies widely, Jackie, but for those of inquiring mind, it’s worth looking for the good stuff. I recently read that there are hundreds of craft meaderies in the US. I don’t know if craft cider makers are as common, but given this it’s a beverage that benefits by loving attention, I expect there will be more. A commercial cider that the Mayhem Consultant likes is called Angry Orchard, and it has a bright apple flavor with a bit of a kick to it.

    Reply
  85. The quality varies widely, Jackie, but for those of inquiring mind, it’s worth looking for the good stuff. I recently read that there are hundreds of craft meaderies in the US. I don’t know if craft cider makers are as common, but given this it’s a beverage that benefits by loving attention, I expect there will be more. A commercial cider that the Mayhem Consultant likes is called Angry Orchard, and it has a bright apple flavor with a bit of a kick to it.

    Reply
  86. Worth trying. A pleasant commercial cider that is non-alcoholic is sparkling cider. (Martindale’s?) My local RWA group used to meet in a library where alcohol wasn’t allowed, so when someone sold her first book, we’d toast her in sparkling cider. (Which I like better than champagne anyhow. *G*)

    Reply
  87. Worth trying. A pleasant commercial cider that is non-alcoholic is sparkling cider. (Martindale’s?) My local RWA group used to meet in a library where alcohol wasn’t allowed, so when someone sold her first book, we’d toast her in sparkling cider. (Which I like better than champagne anyhow. *G*)

    Reply
  88. Worth trying. A pleasant commercial cider that is non-alcoholic is sparkling cider. (Martindale’s?) My local RWA group used to meet in a library where alcohol wasn’t allowed, so when someone sold her first book, we’d toast her in sparkling cider. (Which I like better than champagne anyhow. *G*)

    Reply
  89. Worth trying. A pleasant commercial cider that is non-alcoholic is sparkling cider. (Martindale’s?) My local RWA group used to meet in a library where alcohol wasn’t allowed, so when someone sold her first book, we’d toast her in sparkling cider. (Which I like better than champagne anyhow. *G*)

    Reply
  90. Worth trying. A pleasant commercial cider that is non-alcoholic is sparkling cider. (Martindale’s?) My local RWA group used to meet in a library where alcohol wasn’t allowed, so when someone sold her first book, we’d toast her in sparkling cider. (Which I like better than champagne anyhow. *G*)

    Reply
  91. LOL! I’ll pass on the Hand Grenade, but there is definitely a whole area of Cider Knowledge out there. Like you, I enjoy fruit drinks; my favorite would be mango juice with a small dash of run, consumed on a tropical beach–a very pleasant prospect after the snow and icy weather we’ve been having!

    Reply
  92. LOL! I’ll pass on the Hand Grenade, but there is definitely a whole area of Cider Knowledge out there. Like you, I enjoy fruit drinks; my favorite would be mango juice with a small dash of run, consumed on a tropical beach–a very pleasant prospect after the snow and icy weather we’ve been having!

    Reply
  93. LOL! I’ll pass on the Hand Grenade, but there is definitely a whole area of Cider Knowledge out there. Like you, I enjoy fruit drinks; my favorite would be mango juice with a small dash of run, consumed on a tropical beach–a very pleasant prospect after the snow and icy weather we’ve been having!

    Reply
  94. LOL! I’ll pass on the Hand Grenade, but there is definitely a whole area of Cider Knowledge out there. Like you, I enjoy fruit drinks; my favorite would be mango juice with a small dash of run, consumed on a tropical beach–a very pleasant prospect after the snow and icy weather we’ve been having!

    Reply
  95. LOL! I’ll pass on the Hand Grenade, but there is definitely a whole area of Cider Knowledge out there. Like you, I enjoy fruit drinks; my favorite would be mango juice with a small dash of run, consumed on a tropical beach–a very pleasant prospect after the snow and icy weather we’ve been having!

    Reply
  96. I hadn’t realized how much cider was a Northern thing, Andrea, but based on the comments here, it’s clearly found more in New England and parts due west, like Upstate New York and Michigan. I got a chuckle out of your brother’s classmates, the budding young chemists. *G*
    Enjoy your hot spiced cider! It’s perfect on a day like today.

    Reply
  97. I hadn’t realized how much cider was a Northern thing, Andrea, but based on the comments here, it’s clearly found more in New England and parts due west, like Upstate New York and Michigan. I got a chuckle out of your brother’s classmates, the budding young chemists. *G*
    Enjoy your hot spiced cider! It’s perfect on a day like today.

    Reply
  98. I hadn’t realized how much cider was a Northern thing, Andrea, but based on the comments here, it’s clearly found more in New England and parts due west, like Upstate New York and Michigan. I got a chuckle out of your brother’s classmates, the budding young chemists. *G*
    Enjoy your hot spiced cider! It’s perfect on a day like today.

    Reply
  99. I hadn’t realized how much cider was a Northern thing, Andrea, but based on the comments here, it’s clearly found more in New England and parts due west, like Upstate New York and Michigan. I got a chuckle out of your brother’s classmates, the budding young chemists. *G*
    Enjoy your hot spiced cider! It’s perfect on a day like today.

    Reply
  100. I hadn’t realized how much cider was a Northern thing, Andrea, but based on the comments here, it’s clearly found more in New England and parts due west, like Upstate New York and Michigan. I got a chuckle out of your brother’s classmates, the budding young chemists. *G*
    Enjoy your hot spiced cider! It’s perfect on a day like today.

    Reply
  101. Jo–I have the impression that the cider one of my heroines would drink would be the equivalent of the small beer or ale that was drunk with many meals. Though if left to sit long enough, I’m sure it did turn lethal!

    Reply
  102. Jo–I have the impression that the cider one of my heroines would drink would be the equivalent of the small beer or ale that was drunk with many meals. Though if left to sit long enough, I’m sure it did turn lethal!

    Reply
  103. Jo–I have the impression that the cider one of my heroines would drink would be the equivalent of the small beer or ale that was drunk with many meals. Though if left to sit long enough, I’m sure it did turn lethal!

    Reply
  104. Jo–I have the impression that the cider one of my heroines would drink would be the equivalent of the small beer or ale that was drunk with many meals. Though if left to sit long enough, I’m sure it did turn lethal!

    Reply
  105. Jo–I have the impression that the cider one of my heroines would drink would be the equivalent of the small beer or ale that was drunk with many meals. Though if left to sit long enough, I’m sure it did turn lethal!

    Reply
  106. Oooh, now I know more about Kriek! I wondered at the name. I’m getting the idea that non-alcoholic cider is more of an American thing, Still another division between the hemispheres. But the non-alcolic warm spice cider is great at Christmas.

    Reply
  107. Oooh, now I know more about Kriek! I wondered at the name. I’m getting the idea that non-alcoholic cider is more of an American thing, Still another division between the hemispheres. But the non-alcolic warm spice cider is great at Christmas.

    Reply
  108. Oooh, now I know more about Kriek! I wondered at the name. I’m getting the idea that non-alcoholic cider is more of an American thing, Still another division between the hemispheres. But the non-alcolic warm spice cider is great at Christmas.

    Reply
  109. Oooh, now I know more about Kriek! I wondered at the name. I’m getting the idea that non-alcoholic cider is more of an American thing, Still another division between the hemispheres. But the non-alcolic warm spice cider is great at Christmas.

    Reply
  110. Oooh, now I know more about Kriek! I wondered at the name. I’m getting the idea that non-alcoholic cider is more of an American thing, Still another division between the hemispheres. But the non-alcolic warm spice cider is great at Christmas.

    Reply
  111. I’ve never tried mead — it is on my bucket list of drinks though. I do love good cider — both hard and fresh. I think the best hard cider I’ve had was in a pub in a tiny village outside of Bath. Wish I could remember the name. 🙂

    Reply
  112. I’ve never tried mead — it is on my bucket list of drinks though. I do love good cider — both hard and fresh. I think the best hard cider I’ve had was in a pub in a tiny village outside of Bath. Wish I could remember the name. 🙂

    Reply
  113. I’ve never tried mead — it is on my bucket list of drinks though. I do love good cider — both hard and fresh. I think the best hard cider I’ve had was in a pub in a tiny village outside of Bath. Wish I could remember the name. 🙂

    Reply
  114. I’ve never tried mead — it is on my bucket list of drinks though. I do love good cider — both hard and fresh. I think the best hard cider I’ve had was in a pub in a tiny village outside of Bath. Wish I could remember the name. 🙂

    Reply
  115. I’ve never tried mead — it is on my bucket list of drinks though. I do love good cider — both hard and fresh. I think the best hard cider I’ve had was in a pub in a tiny village outside of Bath. Wish I could remember the name. 🙂

    Reply
  116. Glenda–
    When I lived in England, I never had any of the good cider–only the bottled stuff that was drunk last at parties. *G* Next time I’m there, I’ll have to make an effort to find more of the good cider. I’m not much of a drinker, but I do like the British beers that are “from the wood.” Sometimes, anyhow!

    Reply
  117. Glenda–
    When I lived in England, I never had any of the good cider–only the bottled stuff that was drunk last at parties. *G* Next time I’m there, I’ll have to make an effort to find more of the good cider. I’m not much of a drinker, but I do like the British beers that are “from the wood.” Sometimes, anyhow!

    Reply
  118. Glenda–
    When I lived in England, I never had any of the good cider–only the bottled stuff that was drunk last at parties. *G* Next time I’m there, I’ll have to make an effort to find more of the good cider. I’m not much of a drinker, but I do like the British beers that are “from the wood.” Sometimes, anyhow!

    Reply
  119. Glenda–
    When I lived in England, I never had any of the good cider–only the bottled stuff that was drunk last at parties. *G* Next time I’m there, I’ll have to make an effort to find more of the good cider. I’m not much of a drinker, but I do like the British beers that are “from the wood.” Sometimes, anyhow!

    Reply
  120. Glenda–
    When I lived in England, I never had any of the good cider–only the bottled stuff that was drunk last at parties. *G* Next time I’m there, I’ll have to make an effort to find more of the good cider. I’m not much of a drinker, but I do like the British beers that are “from the wood.” Sometimes, anyhow!

    Reply
  121. I think non-alcoholic cider is an American thing. I remember reading the Bobbsey Twins books as a child and being utterly scandalised that they were allowed to drink cider!

    Reply
  122. I think non-alcoholic cider is an American thing. I remember reading the Bobbsey Twins books as a child and being utterly scandalised that they were allowed to drink cider!

    Reply
  123. I think non-alcoholic cider is an American thing. I remember reading the Bobbsey Twins books as a child and being utterly scandalised that they were allowed to drink cider!

    Reply
  124. I think non-alcoholic cider is an American thing. I remember reading the Bobbsey Twins books as a child and being utterly scandalised that they were allowed to drink cider!

    Reply
  125. I think non-alcoholic cider is an American thing. I remember reading the Bobbsey Twins books as a child and being utterly scandalised that they were allowed to drink cider!

    Reply
  126. Jenny–
    I’m chuckling at the thought of the Bobbsey twins being three sheets to the wind. It’s become clear from the comments to this blog that non-alcoholic cider is definitely American, possibly related to the country’s Puritan ancestry. But it still beats processed apple juice!

    Reply
  127. Jenny–
    I’m chuckling at the thought of the Bobbsey twins being three sheets to the wind. It’s become clear from the comments to this blog that non-alcoholic cider is definitely American, possibly related to the country’s Puritan ancestry. But it still beats processed apple juice!

    Reply
  128. Jenny–
    I’m chuckling at the thought of the Bobbsey twins being three sheets to the wind. It’s become clear from the comments to this blog that non-alcoholic cider is definitely American, possibly related to the country’s Puritan ancestry. But it still beats processed apple juice!

    Reply
  129. Jenny–
    I’m chuckling at the thought of the Bobbsey twins being three sheets to the wind. It’s become clear from the comments to this blog that non-alcoholic cider is definitely American, possibly related to the country’s Puritan ancestry. But it still beats processed apple juice!

    Reply
  130. Jenny–
    I’m chuckling at the thought of the Bobbsey twins being three sheets to the wind. It’s become clear from the comments to this blog that non-alcoholic cider is definitely American, possibly related to the country’s Puritan ancestry. But it still beats processed apple juice!

    Reply
  131. Being English, I’ve always found the idea of non-alcoholic cider odd, but in Canada I found it was a tasty apple juice. When I was in my twenties scrumpy was only to be found in the West Country, and if a stranger asked for some they got a very small glass!
    In fact, in my April book, which is partly set in Devon the heroine is honored by some of the good stuff and is decidely tipsy on the way back up the cliff!
    I like cider, but a lot of the popular stuff is too fizzy.
    Jo

    Reply
  132. Being English, I’ve always found the idea of non-alcoholic cider odd, but in Canada I found it was a tasty apple juice. When I was in my twenties scrumpy was only to be found in the West Country, and if a stranger asked for some they got a very small glass!
    In fact, in my April book, which is partly set in Devon the heroine is honored by some of the good stuff and is decidely tipsy on the way back up the cliff!
    I like cider, but a lot of the popular stuff is too fizzy.
    Jo

    Reply
  133. Being English, I’ve always found the idea of non-alcoholic cider odd, but in Canada I found it was a tasty apple juice. When I was in my twenties scrumpy was only to be found in the West Country, and if a stranger asked for some they got a very small glass!
    In fact, in my April book, which is partly set in Devon the heroine is honored by some of the good stuff and is decidely tipsy on the way back up the cliff!
    I like cider, but a lot of the popular stuff is too fizzy.
    Jo

    Reply
  134. Being English, I’ve always found the idea of non-alcoholic cider odd, but in Canada I found it was a tasty apple juice. When I was in my twenties scrumpy was only to be found in the West Country, and if a stranger asked for some they got a very small glass!
    In fact, in my April book, which is partly set in Devon the heroine is honored by some of the good stuff and is decidely tipsy on the way back up the cliff!
    I like cider, but a lot of the popular stuff is too fizzy.
    Jo

    Reply
  135. Being English, I’ve always found the idea of non-alcoholic cider odd, but in Canada I found it was a tasty apple juice. When I was in my twenties scrumpy was only to be found in the West Country, and if a stranger asked for some they got a very small glass!
    In fact, in my April book, which is partly set in Devon the heroine is honored by some of the good stuff and is decidely tipsy on the way back up the cliff!
    I like cider, but a lot of the popular stuff is too fizzy.
    Jo

    Reply
  136. Jo–
    Good of them to serve the lethal stuff in smaller quantities! I agree with you about the fizziness of commercial cider–it’s sort of like beer, and I really don’t like fizzy drinks. Natural cider that’s maybe a little bit hard is the ideal.

    Reply
  137. Jo–
    Good of them to serve the lethal stuff in smaller quantities! I agree with you about the fizziness of commercial cider–it’s sort of like beer, and I really don’t like fizzy drinks. Natural cider that’s maybe a little bit hard is the ideal.

    Reply
  138. Jo–
    Good of them to serve the lethal stuff in smaller quantities! I agree with you about the fizziness of commercial cider–it’s sort of like beer, and I really don’t like fizzy drinks. Natural cider that’s maybe a little bit hard is the ideal.

    Reply
  139. Jo–
    Good of them to serve the lethal stuff in smaller quantities! I agree with you about the fizziness of commercial cider–it’s sort of like beer, and I really don’t like fizzy drinks. Natural cider that’s maybe a little bit hard is the ideal.

    Reply
  140. Jo–
    Good of them to serve the lethal stuff in smaller quantities! I agree with you about the fizziness of commercial cider–it’s sort of like beer, and I really don’t like fizzy drinks. Natural cider that’s maybe a little bit hard is the ideal.

    Reply
  141. Raquel–
    I’m sure you’ll have fun trying different meads. The awful I had in California many years ago was sticky and sweet, but the new generation can be dry as well as sweet, and have various subtle flavors. Or so it is said. I must admit that I know a lot more about spiced cider than mead. *G*

    Reply
  142. Raquel–
    I’m sure you’ll have fun trying different meads. The awful I had in California many years ago was sticky and sweet, but the new generation can be dry as well as sweet, and have various subtle flavors. Or so it is said. I must admit that I know a lot more about spiced cider than mead. *G*

    Reply
  143. Raquel–
    I’m sure you’ll have fun trying different meads. The awful I had in California many years ago was sticky and sweet, but the new generation can be dry as well as sweet, and have various subtle flavors. Or so it is said. I must admit that I know a lot more about spiced cider than mead. *G*

    Reply
  144. Raquel–
    I’m sure you’ll have fun trying different meads. The awful I had in California many years ago was sticky and sweet, but the new generation can be dry as well as sweet, and have various subtle flavors. Or so it is said. I must admit that I know a lot more about spiced cider than mead. *G*

    Reply
  145. Raquel–
    I’m sure you’ll have fun trying different meads. The awful I had in California many years ago was sticky and sweet, but the new generation can be dry as well as sweet, and have various subtle flavors. Or so it is said. I must admit that I know a lot more about spiced cider than mead. *G*

    Reply
  146. I now this about cider and believe me the cider they sell now is pasteurized apple juice. What got me the most is the apple names from upstate NY. I grew up in Oneida. Dad and I went to the mill in Verona every year and got that awesome, rough fresh just gone thru the press REAL cider.

    Reply
  147. I now this about cider and believe me the cider they sell now is pasteurized apple juice. What got me the most is the apple names from upstate NY. I grew up in Oneida. Dad and I went to the mill in Verona every year and got that awesome, rough fresh just gone thru the press REAL cider.

    Reply
  148. I now this about cider and believe me the cider they sell now is pasteurized apple juice. What got me the most is the apple names from upstate NY. I grew up in Oneida. Dad and I went to the mill in Verona every year and got that awesome, rough fresh just gone thru the press REAL cider.

    Reply
  149. I now this about cider and believe me the cider they sell now is pasteurized apple juice. What got me the most is the apple names from upstate NY. I grew up in Oneida. Dad and I went to the mill in Verona every year and got that awesome, rough fresh just gone thru the press REAL cider.

    Reply
  150. I now this about cider and believe me the cider they sell now is pasteurized apple juice. What got me the most is the apple names from upstate NY. I grew up in Oneida. Dad and I went to the mill in Verona every year and got that awesome, rough fresh just gone thru the press REAL cider.

    Reply

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