Window Dressing!

Rose window 1Nicola here and today I’m talking about curtains. I think the topic popped into my mind when I was lying awake early this morning reflecting on the fact that now it’s lighter in the mornings, I’m going to need to get some thicker curtains to ensure I get my required eight hours sleep!  Either that or I could resort to what our ancestors did and have a curtained bed instead of curtains at the window (or both.) It fascinates me to think that we are still using a way of keeping light out and warmth in that was invented hundreds of years ago.

Windows have perhaps entered our consciousness more because of lockdown. We’ve been spending more time looking out of them at the world outside than we might normally do. Often this view is framed by a blind or a curtain or a shutter, some sort of covering that offers privacy and keeps light and draughts out.

The first curtains were apparently hung from doorways and known as portieres. Evidence from the Ancient Roman and Greek worlds Portiere
show curtains hung on metal rods above arches that acted as room dividers. Window curtains were a much later invention. The earliest form of medieval window covering, in England at least, was a wooden shutter or later, a leather panel threaded onto an iron rod. The word window comes from the Anglo-Saxon “vindr eage” meaning wind’s eye, so you can see why a curtain might be needed to block it out. It’s a very descriptive word!

State bed DyrhamIt was the invention of window glass in the 13th century that turned an item that had been a practical way to cover an opening into something that could be decorative as well as useful. This did not mean, however, that curtains were common in the medieval period. In fact you were far more likely to find them around a medieval bed than at a window. A record from 1400 gives details of bed curtains at Dartington Hall. Each bed had three curtains of various different materials and quality: the richest was called tartarin and was silk or brocade dyed in vibrant colours. The less posh beds had worsted hangings or ones made of “card” which was a sort of linen. The state bed shown here, at Dyrham Park, really was fit for a Queen.

It was different if you were royal or noble, of course. In 1530, Greenwich palace had satin window curtains in black, purple and white. Yet even Bess of Hardwick at Hardwick Hall only had curtains in her bedroom not in any other part of the house. They were scarlet though!

Many houses, especially down the social scale, had wooden shutters well into the 18th century. Sometimes these were popular even in higher status buildings where it was simply more practical to have shutters than curtains. However by 1720 curtains were Window becoming more common and the style of pairing two matching ones and hanging them from a rail was replaced by a more modern fashion: Pull up festoon blinds, which needed 5 pulleys to operate them. These were considered smarter and more modern. They also required fancy pelmets to hide the working mechanisms. A marvellous story is told by Maureen Waller in her book “1700” that thieves used special hooks to poke through the windows of rich houses and pull out the curtains as the fabric material was very valuable!

FestoonBy the end of the 18th century, festoons were out of fashion and paired curtains were back in, but this time with lots of extra swags, drapes, tassels and fringes. Curtains often had two layers, an outer one that was more lightweight and decorative, and an inner one that was heavier for insulation.

The Victorians took this idea of insulating a step further with very thick and cosy curtains that created a “world within” the house. They tended to be heavy and dark, very opulent and often made of velvet. On a bright summer day, however, it must have been rather oppressive to step into such a darkened room.

So there were curtains around beds and sometimes at the windows… Let’s not forget the early Craven coach carriages, which had curtains from the medieval period onwards. Because you had to be exceptionally rich to afford a medieval coach, they were dressed up like mini moving palaces with silk curtains on the inside and leather ones on the outside in keeping with the other costly internal decoration. By the Victorian era, when this Craven carriage was made, the coach had glass windows but the interior was still decorated with a blind and matching blue velvet seats!

RupertOne thing I love is looking at curtains in paintings. Sometimes they are there to frame a view from the window. At other times they are part of the symbolism of the painting itself. How many portraits of 17th century royalty or nobility I've seen where they are posing next to a long window draped in a gold curtain! Here is Prince Rupert of the Rhine demonstrating!

When it comes to window dressing, what do you prefer? Cosy curtains, blinds, shutters or something else? Do you like to have the light pouring in or do you prefer to have total darkness for sleeping? And have you ever slept in a curtained bed?

130 thoughts on “Window Dressing!”

  1. Lovely post, Nicola! For many years I lived in an apartment in a Victorian house (built ca 1870) and when we moved in I was thrilled to discover that it had huge floor to ceiling windows with working shutters that folded flat into specially built alcoves either side of the windows. They were too nice to conceal so we never had any curtains there. If a window is beautiful in its own right (like Gothic or Georgian ones) then I think it would be a shame to cover them up.

    Reply
  2. Lovely post, Nicola! For many years I lived in an apartment in a Victorian house (built ca 1870) and when we moved in I was thrilled to discover that it had huge floor to ceiling windows with working shutters that folded flat into specially built alcoves either side of the windows. They were too nice to conceal so we never had any curtains there. If a window is beautiful in its own right (like Gothic or Georgian ones) then I think it would be a shame to cover them up.

    Reply
  3. Lovely post, Nicola! For many years I lived in an apartment in a Victorian house (built ca 1870) and when we moved in I was thrilled to discover that it had huge floor to ceiling windows with working shutters that folded flat into specially built alcoves either side of the windows. They were too nice to conceal so we never had any curtains there. If a window is beautiful in its own right (like Gothic or Georgian ones) then I think it would be a shame to cover them up.

    Reply
  4. Lovely post, Nicola! For many years I lived in an apartment in a Victorian house (built ca 1870) and when we moved in I was thrilled to discover that it had huge floor to ceiling windows with working shutters that folded flat into specially built alcoves either side of the windows. They were too nice to conceal so we never had any curtains there. If a window is beautiful in its own right (like Gothic or Georgian ones) then I think it would be a shame to cover them up.

    Reply
  5. Lovely post, Nicola! For many years I lived in an apartment in a Victorian house (built ca 1870) and when we moved in I was thrilled to discover that it had huge floor to ceiling windows with working shutters that folded flat into specially built alcoves either side of the windows. They were too nice to conceal so we never had any curtains there. If a window is beautiful in its own right (like Gothic or Georgian ones) then I think it would be a shame to cover them up.

    Reply
  6. Wow, Christina, those shutters sound very impressive. I love the fact that shutters have become so decorative and aren’t just for practical purposes. And I totally agree that a beautiful window shouldn’t be covered up!

    Reply
  7. Wow, Christina, those shutters sound very impressive. I love the fact that shutters have become so decorative and aren’t just for practical purposes. And I totally agree that a beautiful window shouldn’t be covered up!

    Reply
  8. Wow, Christina, those shutters sound very impressive. I love the fact that shutters have become so decorative and aren’t just for practical purposes. And I totally agree that a beautiful window shouldn’t be covered up!

    Reply
  9. Wow, Christina, those shutters sound very impressive. I love the fact that shutters have become so decorative and aren’t just for practical purposes. And I totally agree that a beautiful window shouldn’t be covered up!

    Reply
  10. Wow, Christina, those shutters sound very impressive. I love the fact that shutters have become so decorative and aren’t just for practical purposes. And I totally agree that a beautiful window shouldn’t be covered up!

    Reply
  11. No curtains for me ever though I do have wood blinds. They’re always either open completely or pulled up to disappear except for the bedroom. Right now, I don’t even bother closing those because of the time change. It doesn’t get light until 8am now. We’re also on a hill and no one can see in the windows anyway so I say, let the light flood in!

    Reply
  12. No curtains for me ever though I do have wood blinds. They’re always either open completely or pulled up to disappear except for the bedroom. Right now, I don’t even bother closing those because of the time change. It doesn’t get light until 8am now. We’re also on a hill and no one can see in the windows anyway so I say, let the light flood in!

    Reply
  13. No curtains for me ever though I do have wood blinds. They’re always either open completely or pulled up to disappear except for the bedroom. Right now, I don’t even bother closing those because of the time change. It doesn’t get light until 8am now. We’re also on a hill and no one can see in the windows anyway so I say, let the light flood in!

    Reply
  14. No curtains for me ever though I do have wood blinds. They’re always either open completely or pulled up to disappear except for the bedroom. Right now, I don’t even bother closing those because of the time change. It doesn’t get light until 8am now. We’re also on a hill and no one can see in the windows anyway so I say, let the light flood in!

    Reply
  15. No curtains for me ever though I do have wood blinds. They’re always either open completely or pulled up to disappear except for the bedroom. Right now, I don’t even bother closing those because of the time change. It doesn’t get light until 8am now. We’re also on a hill and no one can see in the windows anyway so I say, let the light flood in!

    Reply
  16. Thanks for a fascinating article, Nicola. Our home has a variety of curtains, blinds, and shades. I’ve never slept in a curtained bed, but oh how I wished to as a teen. That and a desk with hidden cubby holes would have made me VERY happy!

    Reply
  17. Thanks for a fascinating article, Nicola. Our home has a variety of curtains, blinds, and shades. I’ve never slept in a curtained bed, but oh how I wished to as a teen. That and a desk with hidden cubby holes would have made me VERY happy!

    Reply
  18. Thanks for a fascinating article, Nicola. Our home has a variety of curtains, blinds, and shades. I’ve never slept in a curtained bed, but oh how I wished to as a teen. That and a desk with hidden cubby holes would have made me VERY happy!

    Reply
  19. Thanks for a fascinating article, Nicola. Our home has a variety of curtains, blinds, and shades. I’ve never slept in a curtained bed, but oh how I wished to as a teen. That and a desk with hidden cubby holes would have made me VERY happy!

    Reply
  20. Thanks for a fascinating article, Nicola. Our home has a variety of curtains, blinds, and shades. I’ve never slept in a curtained bed, but oh how I wished to as a teen. That and a desk with hidden cubby holes would have made me VERY happy!

    Reply
  21. This was a very fascinating article…thank you so much for it. I especially liked the bit about the portieres! I’ll have to tell my husband we have 2 of those.
    We have an old sheet on a rod in front of a bifold door going from the garage to the basement to help keep the cold out in the winter. The other one is between the livingroom and the room I spend most of my time in to keep the heat in. I use a space heater to warm it up since I don’t see any reason to heat the whole house.
    As for the regular window coverings…I have blinds. I’m a “More light the better” type of person. They are always up except on cold nights when they are down to keep the cold out. We do have one window the sun pours in in the summer so I tend to close that blind to keep the heat out.
    I much prefer to sleep with the blinds up because I like waking up to light. Dark, light, doesn’t matter as I can sleep in any condition.
    We have no neighbors at the right angle to see in our windows so I never worry about closing them.

    Reply
  22. This was a very fascinating article…thank you so much for it. I especially liked the bit about the portieres! I’ll have to tell my husband we have 2 of those.
    We have an old sheet on a rod in front of a bifold door going from the garage to the basement to help keep the cold out in the winter. The other one is between the livingroom and the room I spend most of my time in to keep the heat in. I use a space heater to warm it up since I don’t see any reason to heat the whole house.
    As for the regular window coverings…I have blinds. I’m a “More light the better” type of person. They are always up except on cold nights when they are down to keep the cold out. We do have one window the sun pours in in the summer so I tend to close that blind to keep the heat out.
    I much prefer to sleep with the blinds up because I like waking up to light. Dark, light, doesn’t matter as I can sleep in any condition.
    We have no neighbors at the right angle to see in our windows so I never worry about closing them.

    Reply
  23. This was a very fascinating article…thank you so much for it. I especially liked the bit about the portieres! I’ll have to tell my husband we have 2 of those.
    We have an old sheet on a rod in front of a bifold door going from the garage to the basement to help keep the cold out in the winter. The other one is between the livingroom and the room I spend most of my time in to keep the heat in. I use a space heater to warm it up since I don’t see any reason to heat the whole house.
    As for the regular window coverings…I have blinds. I’m a “More light the better” type of person. They are always up except on cold nights when they are down to keep the cold out. We do have one window the sun pours in in the summer so I tend to close that blind to keep the heat out.
    I much prefer to sleep with the blinds up because I like waking up to light. Dark, light, doesn’t matter as I can sleep in any condition.
    We have no neighbors at the right angle to see in our windows so I never worry about closing them.

    Reply
  24. This was a very fascinating article…thank you so much for it. I especially liked the bit about the portieres! I’ll have to tell my husband we have 2 of those.
    We have an old sheet on a rod in front of a bifold door going from the garage to the basement to help keep the cold out in the winter. The other one is between the livingroom and the room I spend most of my time in to keep the heat in. I use a space heater to warm it up since I don’t see any reason to heat the whole house.
    As for the regular window coverings…I have blinds. I’m a “More light the better” type of person. They are always up except on cold nights when they are down to keep the cold out. We do have one window the sun pours in in the summer so I tend to close that blind to keep the heat out.
    I much prefer to sleep with the blinds up because I like waking up to light. Dark, light, doesn’t matter as I can sleep in any condition.
    We have no neighbors at the right angle to see in our windows so I never worry about closing them.

    Reply
  25. This was a very fascinating article…thank you so much for it. I especially liked the bit about the portieres! I’ll have to tell my husband we have 2 of those.
    We have an old sheet on a rod in front of a bifold door going from the garage to the basement to help keep the cold out in the winter. The other one is between the livingroom and the room I spend most of my time in to keep the heat in. I use a space heater to warm it up since I don’t see any reason to heat the whole house.
    As for the regular window coverings…I have blinds. I’m a “More light the better” type of person. They are always up except on cold nights when they are down to keep the cold out. We do have one window the sun pours in in the summer so I tend to close that blind to keep the heat out.
    I much prefer to sleep with the blinds up because I like waking up to light. Dark, light, doesn’t matter as I can sleep in any condition.
    We have no neighbors at the right angle to see in our windows so I never worry about closing them.

    Reply
  26. I love the thought of a curtained bed & for quite a while my husband & I had a canopy bed with lace curtains – but, Oh! – the dust. We don’t have that anymore. Same with the house. When we bought our downsized place here in CA we decorated with all big plantation shutters which are so easy to clean and make everything look clean & bright. I love when people do beautiful things with curtains but all I see are dust magnets! LOL.

    Reply
  27. I love the thought of a curtained bed & for quite a while my husband & I had a canopy bed with lace curtains – but, Oh! – the dust. We don’t have that anymore. Same with the house. When we bought our downsized place here in CA we decorated with all big plantation shutters which are so easy to clean and make everything look clean & bright. I love when people do beautiful things with curtains but all I see are dust magnets! LOL.

    Reply
  28. I love the thought of a curtained bed & for quite a while my husband & I had a canopy bed with lace curtains – but, Oh! – the dust. We don’t have that anymore. Same with the house. When we bought our downsized place here in CA we decorated with all big plantation shutters which are so easy to clean and make everything look clean & bright. I love when people do beautiful things with curtains but all I see are dust magnets! LOL.

    Reply
  29. I love the thought of a curtained bed & for quite a while my husband & I had a canopy bed with lace curtains – but, Oh! – the dust. We don’t have that anymore. Same with the house. When we bought our downsized place here in CA we decorated with all big plantation shutters which are so easy to clean and make everything look clean & bright. I love when people do beautiful things with curtains but all I see are dust magnets! LOL.

    Reply
  30. I love the thought of a curtained bed & for quite a while my husband & I had a canopy bed with lace curtains – but, Oh! – the dust. We don’t have that anymore. Same with the house. When we bought our downsized place here in CA we decorated with all big plantation shutters which are so easy to clean and make everything look clean & bright. I love when people do beautiful things with curtains but all I see are dust magnets! LOL.

    Reply
  31. It’s lovely not to be overlooked and I do think that when the days are shorter you want to get as much light in as you can! I notice that so much more in the winter. Love the sound of wood blinds!

    Reply
  32. It’s lovely not to be overlooked and I do think that when the days are shorter you want to get as much light in as you can! I notice that so much more in the winter. Love the sound of wood blinds!

    Reply
  33. It’s lovely not to be overlooked and I do think that when the days are shorter you want to get as much light in as you can! I notice that so much more in the winter. Love the sound of wood blinds!

    Reply
  34. It’s lovely not to be overlooked and I do think that when the days are shorter you want to get as much light in as you can! I notice that so much more in the winter. Love the sound of wood blinds!

    Reply
  35. It’s lovely not to be overlooked and I do think that when the days are shorter you want to get as much light in as you can! I notice that so much more in the winter. Love the sound of wood blinds!

    Reply
  36. Thank you, Kareni, I’m so glad you liked it! I love the idea of you as a teen wanting a desk with hidden cubby holes and a curtained bed! Fabulous!

    Reply
  37. Thank you, Kareni, I’m so glad you liked it! I love the idea of you as a teen wanting a desk with hidden cubby holes and a curtained bed! Fabulous!

    Reply
  38. Thank you, Kareni, I’m so glad you liked it! I love the idea of you as a teen wanting a desk with hidden cubby holes and a curtained bed! Fabulous!

    Reply
  39. Thank you, Kareni, I’m so glad you liked it! I love the idea of you as a teen wanting a desk with hidden cubby holes and a curtained bed! Fabulous!

    Reply
  40. Thank you, Kareni, I’m so glad you liked it! I love the idea of you as a teen wanting a desk with hidden cubby holes and a curtained bed! Fabulous!

    Reply
  41. Hi Vicki! I had no idea they were called portieres – we have one too at our front door to keep the heat in.
    I envy you being able to sleep in any condition. I’d love to have the light flooding into my bedroom but at the first glimmer, I’m awake!

    Reply
  42. Hi Vicki! I had no idea they were called portieres – we have one too at our front door to keep the heat in.
    I envy you being able to sleep in any condition. I’d love to have the light flooding into my bedroom but at the first glimmer, I’m awake!

    Reply
  43. Hi Vicki! I had no idea they were called portieres – we have one too at our front door to keep the heat in.
    I envy you being able to sleep in any condition. I’d love to have the light flooding into my bedroom but at the first glimmer, I’m awake!

    Reply
  44. Hi Vicki! I had no idea they were called portieres – we have one too at our front door to keep the heat in.
    I envy you being able to sleep in any condition. I’d love to have the light flooding into my bedroom but at the first glimmer, I’m awake!

    Reply
  45. Hi Vicki! I had no idea they were called portieres – we have one too at our front door to keep the heat in.
    I envy you being able to sleep in any condition. I’d love to have the light flooding into my bedroom but at the first glimmer, I’m awake!

    Reply
  46. That’s a very good practical point about the dust, Jeanne. Whilst a curtained bed might look romantic there’s nothing romantic about dirt and sneezing!

    Reply
  47. That’s a very good practical point about the dust, Jeanne. Whilst a curtained bed might look romantic there’s nothing romantic about dirt and sneezing!

    Reply
  48. That’s a very good practical point about the dust, Jeanne. Whilst a curtained bed might look romantic there’s nothing romantic about dirt and sneezing!

    Reply
  49. That’s a very good practical point about the dust, Jeanne. Whilst a curtained bed might look romantic there’s nothing romantic about dirt and sneezing!

    Reply
  50. That’s a very good practical point about the dust, Jeanne. Whilst a curtained bed might look romantic there’s nothing romantic about dirt and sneezing!

    Reply
  51. I love Jeane’s idea of plantation shutters. I live in a place where keeping the sun out in the heat of the summer is a good idea. But, I do not really like to be in dark rooms. I want to see the day in all its glory.
    I have never slept in a curtained bed. I have slept in a bed which allowed me to look out at the stars at night and that was one of the best things ever.
    Thanks for the post, and the pictures. I love the fist picture showing the garden.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  52. I love Jeane’s idea of plantation shutters. I live in a place where keeping the sun out in the heat of the summer is a good idea. But, I do not really like to be in dark rooms. I want to see the day in all its glory.
    I have never slept in a curtained bed. I have slept in a bed which allowed me to look out at the stars at night and that was one of the best things ever.
    Thanks for the post, and the pictures. I love the fist picture showing the garden.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  53. I love Jeane’s idea of plantation shutters. I live in a place where keeping the sun out in the heat of the summer is a good idea. But, I do not really like to be in dark rooms. I want to see the day in all its glory.
    I have never slept in a curtained bed. I have slept in a bed which allowed me to look out at the stars at night and that was one of the best things ever.
    Thanks for the post, and the pictures. I love the fist picture showing the garden.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  54. I love Jeane’s idea of plantation shutters. I live in a place where keeping the sun out in the heat of the summer is a good idea. But, I do not really like to be in dark rooms. I want to see the day in all its glory.
    I have never slept in a curtained bed. I have slept in a bed which allowed me to look out at the stars at night and that was one of the best things ever.
    Thanks for the post, and the pictures. I love the fist picture showing the garden.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  55. I love Jeane’s idea of plantation shutters. I live in a place where keeping the sun out in the heat of the summer is a good idea. But, I do not really like to be in dark rooms. I want to see the day in all its glory.
    I have never slept in a curtained bed. I have slept in a bed which allowed me to look out at the stars at night and that was one of the best things ever.
    Thanks for the post, and the pictures. I love the fist picture showing the garden.
    I hope everyone is well and happy.

    Reply
  56. We have curtains, Venetian Blinds and open windows. We have a four-poster bed, but no tester, and therefore no curtains.

    Reply
  57. We have curtains, Venetian Blinds and open windows. We have a four-poster bed, but no tester, and therefore no curtains.

    Reply
  58. We have curtains, Venetian Blinds and open windows. We have a four-poster bed, but no tester, and therefore no curtains.

    Reply
  59. We have curtains, Venetian Blinds and open windows. We have a four-poster bed, but no tester, and therefore no curtains.

    Reply
  60. We have curtains, Venetian Blinds and open windows. We have a four-poster bed, but no tester, and therefore no curtains.

    Reply
  61. I’ve never slept in a sustained bed. In the house we lived in when I was a child, the window in my room had pink sheers with tiebacks at either side and ruffles at the bottom edge. By the time I was about seven or eight, those curtains figured prominently in my imagination: I loved to play dress-up. To facilitate that, my mother gave me a long length if silky fabric that I would drape around me. But I never told her that what I really wanted was the curtains. I wanted to take them down from the curtain rod and drape them around me. Years later, when I saw Gone With the Wind, imagine my astonishment when I saw Scarlet O’Hara pulling down those green velvet curtains to use for a gown. And fans of American television might remember Carol Burnett’s take on the GWTW curtain scene in her satire, The Wind Done Gone.

    Reply
  62. I’ve never slept in a sustained bed. In the house we lived in when I was a child, the window in my room had pink sheers with tiebacks at either side and ruffles at the bottom edge. By the time I was about seven or eight, those curtains figured prominently in my imagination: I loved to play dress-up. To facilitate that, my mother gave me a long length if silky fabric that I would drape around me. But I never told her that what I really wanted was the curtains. I wanted to take them down from the curtain rod and drape them around me. Years later, when I saw Gone With the Wind, imagine my astonishment when I saw Scarlet O’Hara pulling down those green velvet curtains to use for a gown. And fans of American television might remember Carol Burnett’s take on the GWTW curtain scene in her satire, The Wind Done Gone.

    Reply
  63. I’ve never slept in a sustained bed. In the house we lived in when I was a child, the window in my room had pink sheers with tiebacks at either side and ruffles at the bottom edge. By the time I was about seven or eight, those curtains figured prominently in my imagination: I loved to play dress-up. To facilitate that, my mother gave me a long length if silky fabric that I would drape around me. But I never told her that what I really wanted was the curtains. I wanted to take them down from the curtain rod and drape them around me. Years later, when I saw Gone With the Wind, imagine my astonishment when I saw Scarlet O’Hara pulling down those green velvet curtains to use for a gown. And fans of American television might remember Carol Burnett’s take on the GWTW curtain scene in her satire, The Wind Done Gone.

    Reply
  64. I’ve never slept in a sustained bed. In the house we lived in when I was a child, the window in my room had pink sheers with tiebacks at either side and ruffles at the bottom edge. By the time I was about seven or eight, those curtains figured prominently in my imagination: I loved to play dress-up. To facilitate that, my mother gave me a long length if silky fabric that I would drape around me. But I never told her that what I really wanted was the curtains. I wanted to take them down from the curtain rod and drape them around me. Years later, when I saw Gone With the Wind, imagine my astonishment when I saw Scarlet O’Hara pulling down those green velvet curtains to use for a gown. And fans of American television might remember Carol Burnett’s take on the GWTW curtain scene in her satire, The Wind Done Gone.

    Reply
  65. I’ve never slept in a sustained bed. In the house we lived in when I was a child, the window in my room had pink sheers with tiebacks at either side and ruffles at the bottom edge. By the time I was about seven or eight, those curtains figured prominently in my imagination: I loved to play dress-up. To facilitate that, my mother gave me a long length if silky fabric that I would drape around me. But I never told her that what I really wanted was the curtains. I wanted to take them down from the curtain rod and drape them around me. Years later, when I saw Gone With the Wind, imagine my astonishment when I saw Scarlet O’Hara pulling down those green velvet curtains to use for a gown. And fans of American television might remember Carol Burnett’s take on the GWTW curtain scene in her satire, The Wind Done Gone.

    Reply
  66. For a while we lived in a Brooklyn brownstone with wooden shutters that folded into the sides of the bay windows. Not only did they save the cost of curtains but they were wonderful insulation!
    Personally I like being awakened by the sunlight and I would feel suffocated by curtains around my bed.

    Reply
  67. For a while we lived in a Brooklyn brownstone with wooden shutters that folded into the sides of the bay windows. Not only did they save the cost of curtains but they were wonderful insulation!
    Personally I like being awakened by the sunlight and I would feel suffocated by curtains around my bed.

    Reply
  68. For a while we lived in a Brooklyn brownstone with wooden shutters that folded into the sides of the bay windows. Not only did they save the cost of curtains but they were wonderful insulation!
    Personally I like being awakened by the sunlight and I would feel suffocated by curtains around my bed.

    Reply
  69. For a while we lived in a Brooklyn brownstone with wooden shutters that folded into the sides of the bay windows. Not only did they save the cost of curtains but they were wonderful insulation!
    Personally I like being awakened by the sunlight and I would feel suffocated by curtains around my bed.

    Reply
  70. For a while we lived in a Brooklyn brownstone with wooden shutters that folded into the sides of the bay windows. Not only did they save the cost of curtains but they were wonderful insulation!
    Personally I like being awakened by the sunlight and I would feel suffocated by curtains around my bed.

    Reply
  71. We live in Florida in the US. We have plantation blinds which we close at might and then open in the morning to let the light in. The house doesn’t have direct sun so it isn’t necessary to have shutters to keep out the heat. I suffered from season affective disorder when we lived in the north in Ohio. One of the reasons we bought this house specifically because it had a lot of light. No more curtains or heavy drapes.

    Reply
  72. We live in Florida in the US. We have plantation blinds which we close at might and then open in the morning to let the light in. The house doesn’t have direct sun so it isn’t necessary to have shutters to keep out the heat. I suffered from season affective disorder when we lived in the north in Ohio. One of the reasons we bought this house specifically because it had a lot of light. No more curtains or heavy drapes.

    Reply
  73. We live in Florida in the US. We have plantation blinds which we close at might and then open in the morning to let the light in. The house doesn’t have direct sun so it isn’t necessary to have shutters to keep out the heat. I suffered from season affective disorder when we lived in the north in Ohio. One of the reasons we bought this house specifically because it had a lot of light. No more curtains or heavy drapes.

    Reply
  74. We live in Florida in the US. We have plantation blinds which we close at might and then open in the morning to let the light in. The house doesn’t have direct sun so it isn’t necessary to have shutters to keep out the heat. I suffered from season affective disorder when we lived in the north in Ohio. One of the reasons we bought this house specifically because it had a lot of light. No more curtains or heavy drapes.

    Reply
  75. We live in Florida in the US. We have plantation blinds which we close at might and then open in the morning to let the light in. The house doesn’t have direct sun so it isn’t necessary to have shutters to keep out the heat. I suffered from season affective disorder when we lived in the north in Ohio. One of the reasons we bought this house specifically because it had a lot of light. No more curtains or heavy drapes.

    Reply
  76. I prefer Venetian blinds, which is what I have in my house, except for a big picture window and sliding glass door, which has vertical blinds. Yes, dusting them is a pain, but it makes it easy to control the amount and angle of light coming in the room.

    Reply
  77. I prefer Venetian blinds, which is what I have in my house, except for a big picture window and sliding glass door, which has vertical blinds. Yes, dusting them is a pain, but it makes it easy to control the amount and angle of light coming in the room.

    Reply
  78. I prefer Venetian blinds, which is what I have in my house, except for a big picture window and sliding glass door, which has vertical blinds. Yes, dusting them is a pain, but it makes it easy to control the amount and angle of light coming in the room.

    Reply
  79. I prefer Venetian blinds, which is what I have in my house, except for a big picture window and sliding glass door, which has vertical blinds. Yes, dusting them is a pain, but it makes it easy to control the amount and angle of light coming in the room.

    Reply
  80. I prefer Venetian blinds, which is what I have in my house, except for a big picture window and sliding glass door, which has vertical blinds. Yes, dusting them is a pain, but it makes it easy to control the amount and angle of light coming in the room.

    Reply
  81. Like Jeanne I live in California, with its bright summer sun, and I like that I can angle my white wooden shutters so as to reflect the blasting summer heat away. I thought they were cool when my friend’s company built them for me, along with some big custom bookcases, and I still think so, though the years are showing somewhat. Alas, as I opted for the then-chic sandblast finish, they are not easy to clean; even a vacuum won’t get all the grit out of the corners. But I like them still.
    In my complex there are big tall double wide windows in all the living rooms. Many here have opted for light plain white muslin curtains on rings which let light in and provide some privacy; you can only see moving shadows through them. But they’re inexpensive and easy to take care of.
    The window treatment I like best is on the apartment facing me. They have put up a big folding screen inside which covers most of the window and have strung white lights along its edges. I love the lights.

    Reply
  82. Like Jeanne I live in California, with its bright summer sun, and I like that I can angle my white wooden shutters so as to reflect the blasting summer heat away. I thought they were cool when my friend’s company built them for me, along with some big custom bookcases, and I still think so, though the years are showing somewhat. Alas, as I opted for the then-chic sandblast finish, they are not easy to clean; even a vacuum won’t get all the grit out of the corners. But I like them still.
    In my complex there are big tall double wide windows in all the living rooms. Many here have opted for light plain white muslin curtains on rings which let light in and provide some privacy; you can only see moving shadows through them. But they’re inexpensive and easy to take care of.
    The window treatment I like best is on the apartment facing me. They have put up a big folding screen inside which covers most of the window and have strung white lights along its edges. I love the lights.

    Reply
  83. Like Jeanne I live in California, with its bright summer sun, and I like that I can angle my white wooden shutters so as to reflect the blasting summer heat away. I thought they were cool when my friend’s company built them for me, along with some big custom bookcases, and I still think so, though the years are showing somewhat. Alas, as I opted for the then-chic sandblast finish, they are not easy to clean; even a vacuum won’t get all the grit out of the corners. But I like them still.
    In my complex there are big tall double wide windows in all the living rooms. Many here have opted for light plain white muslin curtains on rings which let light in and provide some privacy; you can only see moving shadows through them. But they’re inexpensive and easy to take care of.
    The window treatment I like best is on the apartment facing me. They have put up a big folding screen inside which covers most of the window and have strung white lights along its edges. I love the lights.

    Reply
  84. Like Jeanne I live in California, with its bright summer sun, and I like that I can angle my white wooden shutters so as to reflect the blasting summer heat away. I thought they were cool when my friend’s company built them for me, along with some big custom bookcases, and I still think so, though the years are showing somewhat. Alas, as I opted for the then-chic sandblast finish, they are not easy to clean; even a vacuum won’t get all the grit out of the corners. But I like them still.
    In my complex there are big tall double wide windows in all the living rooms. Many here have opted for light plain white muslin curtains on rings which let light in and provide some privacy; you can only see moving shadows through them. But they’re inexpensive and easy to take care of.
    The window treatment I like best is on the apartment facing me. They have put up a big folding screen inside which covers most of the window and have strung white lights along its edges. I love the lights.

    Reply
  85. Like Jeanne I live in California, with its bright summer sun, and I like that I can angle my white wooden shutters so as to reflect the blasting summer heat away. I thought they were cool when my friend’s company built them for me, along with some big custom bookcases, and I still think so, though the years are showing somewhat. Alas, as I opted for the then-chic sandblast finish, they are not easy to clean; even a vacuum won’t get all the grit out of the corners. But I like them still.
    In my complex there are big tall double wide windows in all the living rooms. Many here have opted for light plain white muslin curtains on rings which let light in and provide some privacy; you can only see moving shadows through them. But they’re inexpensive and easy to take care of.
    The window treatment I like best is on the apartment facing me. They have put up a big folding screen inside which covers most of the window and have strung white lights along its edges. I love the lights.

    Reply
  86. Annette, your comment reminded me of when we stayed in a cabin in North Norway and there was a skylight overhead so we could see the stars. It was truly magical. Lovely to let light of all sorts flood in!

    Reply
  87. Annette, your comment reminded me of when we stayed in a cabin in North Norway and there was a skylight overhead so we could see the stars. It was truly magical. Lovely to let light of all sorts flood in!

    Reply
  88. Annette, your comment reminded me of when we stayed in a cabin in North Norway and there was a skylight overhead so we could see the stars. It was truly magical. Lovely to let light of all sorts flood in!

    Reply
  89. Annette, your comment reminded me of when we stayed in a cabin in North Norway and there was a skylight overhead so we could see the stars. It was truly magical. Lovely to let light of all sorts flood in!

    Reply
  90. Annette, your comment reminded me of when we stayed in a cabin in North Norway and there was a skylight overhead so we could see the stars. It was truly magical. Lovely to let light of all sorts flood in!

    Reply
  91. Oh wow! I love the idea of you as a child imagining wrapping those curtains around you, Binnie, and the comparison with Scarlett O’Hara is wonderful!

    Reply
  92. Oh wow! I love the idea of you as a child imagining wrapping those curtains around you, Binnie, and the comparison with Scarlett O’Hara is wonderful!

    Reply
  93. Oh wow! I love the idea of you as a child imagining wrapping those curtains around you, Binnie, and the comparison with Scarlett O’Hara is wonderful!

    Reply
  94. Oh wow! I love the idea of you as a child imagining wrapping those curtains around you, Binnie, and the comparison with Scarlett O’Hara is wonderful!

    Reply
  95. Oh wow! I love the idea of you as a child imagining wrapping those curtains around you, Binnie, and the comparison with Scarlett O’Hara is wonderful!

    Reply
  96. That sounds lovely, MaryJane. All that warmth and light must be great for SAD. And Iv’e also learned about plantation shutters which I didn’t know about.

    Reply
  97. That sounds lovely, MaryJane. All that warmth and light must be great for SAD. And Iv’e also learned about plantation shutters which I didn’t know about.

    Reply
  98. That sounds lovely, MaryJane. All that warmth and light must be great for SAD. And Iv’e also learned about plantation shutters which I didn’t know about.

    Reply
  99. That sounds lovely, MaryJane. All that warmth and light must be great for SAD. And Iv’e also learned about plantation shutters which I didn’t know about.

    Reply
  100. That sounds lovely, MaryJane. All that warmth and light must be great for SAD. And Iv’e also learned about plantation shutters which I didn’t know about.

    Reply
  101. Janice, I love the sound of both your shutters and the bookcases! Beautiful. I hadn’t heard of covering windows with a folding screen. That sounds ingenious, plus having the lights on them sounds lovely.

    Reply
  102. Janice, I love the sound of both your shutters and the bookcases! Beautiful. I hadn’t heard of covering windows with a folding screen. That sounds ingenious, plus having the lights on them sounds lovely.

    Reply
  103. Janice, I love the sound of both your shutters and the bookcases! Beautiful. I hadn’t heard of covering windows with a folding screen. That sounds ingenious, plus having the lights on them sounds lovely.

    Reply
  104. Janice, I love the sound of both your shutters and the bookcases! Beautiful. I hadn’t heard of covering windows with a folding screen. That sounds ingenious, plus having the lights on them sounds lovely.

    Reply
  105. Janice, I love the sound of both your shutters and the bookcases! Beautiful. I hadn’t heard of covering windows with a folding screen. That sounds ingenious, plus having the lights on them sounds lovely.

    Reply
  106. It’s curtains in our house. Some of them are never closed as we have no immediate neighbours and our house is well in off the road.
    The bedroom ones are closed, tightly, every night as I too cannot sleep unless it’s total darkness. I actually have black out curtains in this room.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  107. It’s curtains in our house. Some of them are never closed as we have no immediate neighbours and our house is well in off the road.
    The bedroom ones are closed, tightly, every night as I too cannot sleep unless it’s total darkness. I actually have black out curtains in this room.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  108. It’s curtains in our house. Some of them are never closed as we have no immediate neighbours and our house is well in off the road.
    The bedroom ones are closed, tightly, every night as I too cannot sleep unless it’s total darkness. I actually have black out curtains in this room.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  109. It’s curtains in our house. Some of them are never closed as we have no immediate neighbours and our house is well in off the road.
    The bedroom ones are closed, tightly, every night as I too cannot sleep unless it’s total darkness. I actually have black out curtains in this room.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  110. It’s curtains in our house. Some of them are never closed as we have no immediate neighbours and our house is well in off the road.
    The bedroom ones are closed, tightly, every night as I too cannot sleep unless it’s total darkness. I actually have black out curtains in this room.
    Interesting post Nicola.

    Reply
  111. It’s interesting abut leaving curtains open. A writer friend once suggested to me that we don’t like leaving them open because our over-active imaginations are making us wonder what is lurking outside! And although I think I can’t sleep at night without darkness I can nap in the daylight…

    Reply
  112. It’s interesting abut leaving curtains open. A writer friend once suggested to me that we don’t like leaving them open because our over-active imaginations are making us wonder what is lurking outside! And although I think I can’t sleep at night without darkness I can nap in the daylight…

    Reply
  113. It’s interesting abut leaving curtains open. A writer friend once suggested to me that we don’t like leaving them open because our over-active imaginations are making us wonder what is lurking outside! And although I think I can’t sleep at night without darkness I can nap in the daylight…

    Reply
  114. It’s interesting abut leaving curtains open. A writer friend once suggested to me that we don’t like leaving them open because our over-active imaginations are making us wonder what is lurking outside! And although I think I can’t sleep at night without darkness I can nap in the daylight…

    Reply
  115. It’s interesting abut leaving curtains open. A writer friend once suggested to me that we don’t like leaving them open because our over-active imaginations are making us wonder what is lurking outside! And although I think I can’t sleep at night without darkness I can nap in the daylight…

    Reply

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