Wild in the City

by Mary Jo

Cat_243_dover

My thanks to Pat for swapping days with me.  I was scheduled for Monday, but over the weekend I spoke at a writers’ conference in Columbus, Ohio, then went down to Cincinnati to stay with a friend. Our plans were upended by a huge windstorm that knocked out electricity to 90% of the metropolitan area.  The damage is still far from repaired, and the situation inspired reflections on how life was lived in the days before electricity.  Perhaps I’ll ruminate on that another day.  (But I had a great time, even if it wasn’t exactly what my friend and I had planned on doing. <g>)

Today’s official topic is how we react to wildlife.  When people visit Kruger National Park in South Africa, one of the world’s great wildlife preserves, it’s natural for cars to cluster on the road to watch when something really cool is visible, like rhinos in a mud wallow or a band of elegant, improbable zebras drift by.  On the plains of Africa, wildlife is majestic and heart stopping (and the humans are caged in their vehicles. <G>)

Zebras_2The same thing happens on Assateague Island when any of the famous wild ponies Rhinos_4amble into view.  Less obvious is how suburbanites stop their cars to watch the woodchucks that hang out in a culvert by a street.  The woodchucks (aka, groundhogs or even whistlepigs, a great name!) like to come out and graze the grass early and late in the day.  (http://www.groundhoglearningzone.com/ )

I’ve been to KNP (I shot the pictures above) and I also know that culvert and those woodchucks.  (Originally a possum lived there, but he’s gone and the woodchucks moved in. I think the possum was a developer who fixed up the culvert, added gas heat and a fireplace, then flipped it to the woodchucks so Mr. Possum could move to Miami beach, but that’s just a theory.)  Every time I drive by, I look to see if Mr. Woodchuck or any of his family are out.   

So even though people flock to the diversity and excitement of cities, we love seeing wildlife.  The key Assateagueislandhorses is that it’s wild.  Unpredictable.  Unexpected.  Few creatures are more lovely than deer gliding out of the woods at dusk, even if you hope they don’t eat the shrubs.  One can argue how wild these deer are—some people try to chase them off with banging pots and pans and just get a bored stare in return—but they certainly aren’t domestic. 

Sophisticated city folk will stop their cars to watch a mama goose and her goslings waddle across the American20goldfinch road.  And bird watching is one of the most widespread pastimes in the country.  Not serious, life-list bird watching, but the hang-a-feeder-from-the-pine-tree-and let’s-look-at-the-goldfinches kind of watching.  And what can be more magical than a hummingbird whirring in to feed at a hanging basket of red petunias?

An_squirreleastgray Even squirrels, wicked little critters though they are, are delightful to watch.  (A shop near me that is devoted to wild bird feeding has a sign that if your check bounces, there will be a $25 fee, and ‘we’ll release two gray squirrels in your yard.’  Now that’s a threat!

We are creatures of nature, after all, and there are few among us who don’t enjoy the beauty of unexpected wildlife.  (Mosquitoes are also unexpected wildlife, but not so much fun.)

Historically, in a more agrarian world, there was a lot more nature around.  Foxes snacked on chickens, cats were kept to keep the rodent population under control, badgers went about their business.  Certainly our ancestors were more matter of fact and much less sentimental about wild animals.  The bunnies I see in my neighborhood are cute, but to predators, bunnies are the Big Macs of the food Cute_bunnychain.  It’s all in your perspective. 

When I moved to England some years back, I was startled to go to the Oxford city market and see game hanging besides stalls.  Pheasants, rabbits, hares, and even full sized deer.  (Call me a hypocrite, but I prefer my animal protein to look safely neutral.)

Wild_game_hanging To our ancestors, wild animals could be the difference between eating well and barely subsisting.  My father said that once on a hunting trip, one of his pals killed a porcupine and they cooked it.  His verdict: “It’s good for starving men.” <g>  But in a hungry January, porcupine stew might look pretty good.  A cook had to know how to clean, dress, and cook game, no wimpiness allowed. 

Perhaps it’s because modern urbanites tend to be pretty divorced from nature that we take such pleasure in animals.  Whole blogs can be written just about pets, and have been (let me tell you about Dscn0290_3 my new cat!!!), but all animals can attract our attention.   In Pamplona, Spain, the annual Running of the Bulls is a test of courage (and stupidity, frankly), while Brattlesboro, Vermont has an annual festival called The Strolling of the Heifers.  (http://www.strollingoftheheifers.org/event/index.php )

When I was a kid in the wilds of Western New York, in the fall we’d drive across the county to watch the migration of vast waves of wild geese.  Endangered peregrine falcons became celebrities when they Dscn0332_2 nested on the 33rd floor of an insurance company skyscraper in downtown Baltimore.  And movies about heavily anthropomorphized animals are reliable hits, especially with family audiences. (Babe, anyone?)

What about the animals in your life—not the pets, beloved though they are, but the wild animals?  The unexpected animals?  The working critters.  Do you have some magical memories you’d like to share?  Please do!

Mary Jo

80 thoughts on “Wild in the City”

  1. We were on vacation in CT recently and placing a lunch order when suddenly my children screamed “A CHIPMUNK!” so loud they shut the place down. I said ‘we’re not from around here’
    There are no chipmunks in South Florida.
    Back before the flush members of my family died we had a summer place in Point Lookout, MI. At the end of the season I would pile every seed and nut I could find by the chipmunk holes. My cousin’s thought it was crazy, but I was trying to save the little guys some work, thinking they could stop their frantic hoarding and enjoy what was left of the good weather.
    Too many Donald Duck films, I think.

    Reply
  2. We were on vacation in CT recently and placing a lunch order when suddenly my children screamed “A CHIPMUNK!” so loud they shut the place down. I said ‘we’re not from around here’
    There are no chipmunks in South Florida.
    Back before the flush members of my family died we had a summer place in Point Lookout, MI. At the end of the season I would pile every seed and nut I could find by the chipmunk holes. My cousin’s thought it was crazy, but I was trying to save the little guys some work, thinking they could stop their frantic hoarding and enjoy what was left of the good weather.
    Too many Donald Duck films, I think.

    Reply
  3. We were on vacation in CT recently and placing a lunch order when suddenly my children screamed “A CHIPMUNK!” so loud they shut the place down. I said ‘we’re not from around here’
    There are no chipmunks in South Florida.
    Back before the flush members of my family died we had a summer place in Point Lookout, MI. At the end of the season I would pile every seed and nut I could find by the chipmunk holes. My cousin’s thought it was crazy, but I was trying to save the little guys some work, thinking they could stop their frantic hoarding and enjoy what was left of the good weather.
    Too many Donald Duck films, I think.

    Reply
  4. We were on vacation in CT recently and placing a lunch order when suddenly my children screamed “A CHIPMUNK!” so loud they shut the place down. I said ‘we’re not from around here’
    There are no chipmunks in South Florida.
    Back before the flush members of my family died we had a summer place in Point Lookout, MI. At the end of the season I would pile every seed and nut I could find by the chipmunk holes. My cousin’s thought it was crazy, but I was trying to save the little guys some work, thinking they could stop their frantic hoarding and enjoy what was left of the good weather.
    Too many Donald Duck films, I think.

    Reply
  5. We were on vacation in CT recently and placing a lunch order when suddenly my children screamed “A CHIPMUNK!” so loud they shut the place down. I said ‘we’re not from around here’
    There are no chipmunks in South Florida.
    Back before the flush members of my family died we had a summer place in Point Lookout, MI. At the end of the season I would pile every seed and nut I could find by the chipmunk holes. My cousin’s thought it was crazy, but I was trying to save the little guys some work, thinking they could stop their frantic hoarding and enjoy what was left of the good weather.
    Too many Donald Duck films, I think.

    Reply
  6. Sherrie, here.
    We have lots of bears where I live, and they are becoming a serious problem because they are proliferating. Last year, a local bicyclist was mauled by a bear.
    My worst wild animal experience was with skunks. Every April for 4 years running, they gathered under my house to mate. My house and clothing reeked of skunk for weeks. It was awful. And embarrassing. They were very indiscreet. The female would go, “Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh! Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh!” And the male’s back kept hitting the floorboards. I’d lie in bed listening to that, and blush.
    The guy at the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife told me how to get rid of them. First, I stuck a blaring radio under the house tuned to heavy metal–they hate loud noises. Next, I filled a squirt bottle with cooking oil and added tons of cayenne pepper. I then squirted it on the ground where they were getting under the house, so that when they licked their feet to get rid of the oil, they’d get a nuclear blast on the tongue and lips. And finally, I gassed them out with perfume sprinkled under the house. According to the Fish & Wildlife guy, skunks have delicate noses and hate the smell of perfume. Go figure!

    Reply
  7. Sherrie, here.
    We have lots of bears where I live, and they are becoming a serious problem because they are proliferating. Last year, a local bicyclist was mauled by a bear.
    My worst wild animal experience was with skunks. Every April for 4 years running, they gathered under my house to mate. My house and clothing reeked of skunk for weeks. It was awful. And embarrassing. They were very indiscreet. The female would go, “Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh! Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh!” And the male’s back kept hitting the floorboards. I’d lie in bed listening to that, and blush.
    The guy at the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife told me how to get rid of them. First, I stuck a blaring radio under the house tuned to heavy metal–they hate loud noises. Next, I filled a squirt bottle with cooking oil and added tons of cayenne pepper. I then squirted it on the ground where they were getting under the house, so that when they licked their feet to get rid of the oil, they’d get a nuclear blast on the tongue and lips. And finally, I gassed them out with perfume sprinkled under the house. According to the Fish & Wildlife guy, skunks have delicate noses and hate the smell of perfume. Go figure!

    Reply
  8. Sherrie, here.
    We have lots of bears where I live, and they are becoming a serious problem because they are proliferating. Last year, a local bicyclist was mauled by a bear.
    My worst wild animal experience was with skunks. Every April for 4 years running, they gathered under my house to mate. My house and clothing reeked of skunk for weeks. It was awful. And embarrassing. They were very indiscreet. The female would go, “Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh! Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh!” And the male’s back kept hitting the floorboards. I’d lie in bed listening to that, and blush.
    The guy at the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife told me how to get rid of them. First, I stuck a blaring radio under the house tuned to heavy metal–they hate loud noises. Next, I filled a squirt bottle with cooking oil and added tons of cayenne pepper. I then squirted it on the ground where they were getting under the house, so that when they licked their feet to get rid of the oil, they’d get a nuclear blast on the tongue and lips. And finally, I gassed them out with perfume sprinkled under the house. According to the Fish & Wildlife guy, skunks have delicate noses and hate the smell of perfume. Go figure!

    Reply
  9. Sherrie, here.
    We have lots of bears where I live, and they are becoming a serious problem because they are proliferating. Last year, a local bicyclist was mauled by a bear.
    My worst wild animal experience was with skunks. Every April for 4 years running, they gathered under my house to mate. My house and clothing reeked of skunk for weeks. It was awful. And embarrassing. They were very indiscreet. The female would go, “Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh! Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh!” And the male’s back kept hitting the floorboards. I’d lie in bed listening to that, and blush.
    The guy at the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife told me how to get rid of them. First, I stuck a blaring radio under the house tuned to heavy metal–they hate loud noises. Next, I filled a squirt bottle with cooking oil and added tons of cayenne pepper. I then squirted it on the ground where they were getting under the house, so that when they licked their feet to get rid of the oil, they’d get a nuclear blast on the tongue and lips. And finally, I gassed them out with perfume sprinkled under the house. According to the Fish & Wildlife guy, skunks have delicate noses and hate the smell of perfume. Go figure!

    Reply
  10. Sherrie, here.
    We have lots of bears where I live, and they are becoming a serious problem because they are proliferating. Last year, a local bicyclist was mauled by a bear.
    My worst wild animal experience was with skunks. Every April for 4 years running, they gathered under my house to mate. My house and clothing reeked of skunk for weeks. It was awful. And embarrassing. They were very indiscreet. The female would go, “Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh! Uh, uh, uh, ooohhh!” And the male’s back kept hitting the floorboards. I’d lie in bed listening to that, and blush.
    The guy at the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife told me how to get rid of them. First, I stuck a blaring radio under the house tuned to heavy metal–they hate loud noises. Next, I filled a squirt bottle with cooking oil and added tons of cayenne pepper. I then squirted it on the ground where they were getting under the house, so that when they licked their feet to get rid of the oil, they’d get a nuclear blast on the tongue and lips. And finally, I gassed them out with perfume sprinkled under the house. According to the Fish & Wildlife guy, skunks have delicate noses and hate the smell of perfume. Go figure!

    Reply
  11. Raccoons getting into the garbage are a constant problem around here. My mother always kept the garbage can in the garage, and would complain that people weren’t careful about closing the garage door. Then one evening she was sitting outside and saw a family of raccoons come up the driveway. The biggest one (Papa Raccoon?) reached up, grabbed hold of the handle, pulled it down and popped the door open. And in they went to enjoy their dinner.
    They’re a real nuisance, but they ain’t stupid.

    Reply
  12. Raccoons getting into the garbage are a constant problem around here. My mother always kept the garbage can in the garage, and would complain that people weren’t careful about closing the garage door. Then one evening she was sitting outside and saw a family of raccoons come up the driveway. The biggest one (Papa Raccoon?) reached up, grabbed hold of the handle, pulled it down and popped the door open. And in they went to enjoy their dinner.
    They’re a real nuisance, but they ain’t stupid.

    Reply
  13. Raccoons getting into the garbage are a constant problem around here. My mother always kept the garbage can in the garage, and would complain that people weren’t careful about closing the garage door. Then one evening she was sitting outside and saw a family of raccoons come up the driveway. The biggest one (Papa Raccoon?) reached up, grabbed hold of the handle, pulled it down and popped the door open. And in they went to enjoy their dinner.
    They’re a real nuisance, but they ain’t stupid.

    Reply
  14. Raccoons getting into the garbage are a constant problem around here. My mother always kept the garbage can in the garage, and would complain that people weren’t careful about closing the garage door. Then one evening she was sitting outside and saw a family of raccoons come up the driveway. The biggest one (Papa Raccoon?) reached up, grabbed hold of the handle, pulled it down and popped the door open. And in they went to enjoy their dinner.
    They’re a real nuisance, but they ain’t stupid.

    Reply
  15. Raccoons getting into the garbage are a constant problem around here. My mother always kept the garbage can in the garage, and would complain that people weren’t careful about closing the garage door. Then one evening she was sitting outside and saw a family of raccoons come up the driveway. The biggest one (Papa Raccoon?) reached up, grabbed hold of the handle, pulled it down and popped the door open. And in they went to enjoy their dinner.
    They’re a real nuisance, but they ain’t stupid.

    Reply
  16. I like ducks, and by extension, waterfowl. One day my husband and I were by the Fens in downtown Boston. A gaggle of about fifty Canada geese walked out of the water and kept going. And kept going, and kept going.
    We followed them. I had no idea where I was going, but the geese did. They must have walked about a mile, until they finally, somehow, found the Charles River and returned to the water.
    Geese do tend to gather, and what one does, the others do, (goosie-see, goosie-do), but I’ve never seen anything like this before.

    Reply
  17. I like ducks, and by extension, waterfowl. One day my husband and I were by the Fens in downtown Boston. A gaggle of about fifty Canada geese walked out of the water and kept going. And kept going, and kept going.
    We followed them. I had no idea where I was going, but the geese did. They must have walked about a mile, until they finally, somehow, found the Charles River and returned to the water.
    Geese do tend to gather, and what one does, the others do, (goosie-see, goosie-do), but I’ve never seen anything like this before.

    Reply
  18. I like ducks, and by extension, waterfowl. One day my husband and I were by the Fens in downtown Boston. A gaggle of about fifty Canada geese walked out of the water and kept going. And kept going, and kept going.
    We followed them. I had no idea where I was going, but the geese did. They must have walked about a mile, until they finally, somehow, found the Charles River and returned to the water.
    Geese do tend to gather, and what one does, the others do, (goosie-see, goosie-do), but I’ve never seen anything like this before.

    Reply
  19. I like ducks, and by extension, waterfowl. One day my husband and I were by the Fens in downtown Boston. A gaggle of about fifty Canada geese walked out of the water and kept going. And kept going, and kept going.
    We followed them. I had no idea where I was going, but the geese did. They must have walked about a mile, until they finally, somehow, found the Charles River and returned to the water.
    Geese do tend to gather, and what one does, the others do, (goosie-see, goosie-do), but I’ve never seen anything like this before.

    Reply
  20. I like ducks, and by extension, waterfowl. One day my husband and I were by the Fens in downtown Boston. A gaggle of about fifty Canada geese walked out of the water and kept going. And kept going, and kept going.
    We followed them. I had no idea where I was going, but the geese did. They must have walked about a mile, until they finally, somehow, found the Charles River and returned to the water.
    Geese do tend to gather, and what one does, the others do, (goosie-see, goosie-do), but I’ve never seen anything like this before.

    Reply
  21. I’m fortunate enough to live a mile from a major shopping mall and yet, have deer, fox, coyote, a hawk and an owl that frequent my backyard.
    I back to a nature preserve and it’s always so nice to get up in the morning to see momma deer crossing my back yard and her three little babies wandering alongside. Or the fox that dares to come up, almost to the deck steps and peer in the back window. Funny thing though…we haven’t had but one or two rabbits for the past two years or so. Big Mac indeed.
    On a bright note though, the skunk and raccoon population is almost non-existent. 🙂
    I think the hawk has found his smorgasboard.
    I have to say though, Mary Jo, I’m with you on the protein. Somehow, I just can’t stand the thought of looking my food in the eye…then again, in many ways, we’ve become such an ‘antiseptic’ society (not quite the word, but you know what I mean). Had I been born 100 years ago, or in another country, I’m sure I’d feel differently.

    Reply
  22. I’m fortunate enough to live a mile from a major shopping mall and yet, have deer, fox, coyote, a hawk and an owl that frequent my backyard.
    I back to a nature preserve and it’s always so nice to get up in the morning to see momma deer crossing my back yard and her three little babies wandering alongside. Or the fox that dares to come up, almost to the deck steps and peer in the back window. Funny thing though…we haven’t had but one or two rabbits for the past two years or so. Big Mac indeed.
    On a bright note though, the skunk and raccoon population is almost non-existent. 🙂
    I think the hawk has found his smorgasboard.
    I have to say though, Mary Jo, I’m with you on the protein. Somehow, I just can’t stand the thought of looking my food in the eye…then again, in many ways, we’ve become such an ‘antiseptic’ society (not quite the word, but you know what I mean). Had I been born 100 years ago, or in another country, I’m sure I’d feel differently.

    Reply
  23. I’m fortunate enough to live a mile from a major shopping mall and yet, have deer, fox, coyote, a hawk and an owl that frequent my backyard.
    I back to a nature preserve and it’s always so nice to get up in the morning to see momma deer crossing my back yard and her three little babies wandering alongside. Or the fox that dares to come up, almost to the deck steps and peer in the back window. Funny thing though…we haven’t had but one or two rabbits for the past two years or so. Big Mac indeed.
    On a bright note though, the skunk and raccoon population is almost non-existent. 🙂
    I think the hawk has found his smorgasboard.
    I have to say though, Mary Jo, I’m with you on the protein. Somehow, I just can’t stand the thought of looking my food in the eye…then again, in many ways, we’ve become such an ‘antiseptic’ society (not quite the word, but you know what I mean). Had I been born 100 years ago, or in another country, I’m sure I’d feel differently.

    Reply
  24. I’m fortunate enough to live a mile from a major shopping mall and yet, have deer, fox, coyote, a hawk and an owl that frequent my backyard.
    I back to a nature preserve and it’s always so nice to get up in the morning to see momma deer crossing my back yard and her three little babies wandering alongside. Or the fox that dares to come up, almost to the deck steps and peer in the back window. Funny thing though…we haven’t had but one or two rabbits for the past two years or so. Big Mac indeed.
    On a bright note though, the skunk and raccoon population is almost non-existent. 🙂
    I think the hawk has found his smorgasboard.
    I have to say though, Mary Jo, I’m with you on the protein. Somehow, I just can’t stand the thought of looking my food in the eye…then again, in many ways, we’ve become such an ‘antiseptic’ society (not quite the word, but you know what I mean). Had I been born 100 years ago, or in another country, I’m sure I’d feel differently.

    Reply
  25. I’m fortunate enough to live a mile from a major shopping mall and yet, have deer, fox, coyote, a hawk and an owl that frequent my backyard.
    I back to a nature preserve and it’s always so nice to get up in the morning to see momma deer crossing my back yard and her three little babies wandering alongside. Or the fox that dares to come up, almost to the deck steps and peer in the back window. Funny thing though…we haven’t had but one or two rabbits for the past two years or so. Big Mac indeed.
    On a bright note though, the skunk and raccoon population is almost non-existent. 🙂
    I think the hawk has found his smorgasboard.
    I have to say though, Mary Jo, I’m with you on the protein. Somehow, I just can’t stand the thought of looking my food in the eye…then again, in many ways, we’ve become such an ‘antiseptic’ society (not quite the word, but you know what I mean). Had I been born 100 years ago, or in another country, I’m sure I’d feel differently.

    Reply
  26. Back in my grad student days, I lived in an apartment complex where raccoons and opossums came by regularly to raid the dumpsters. Very aggressive about it they were too, especially the opossums, who hissed at anyone they saw as competition.
    Another time, I attended a conference at UC Santa Cruz and glimpsed on successive days, a doe and her fawn, then a fox crouching behind one of the dining commons.
    But probably the most disconcerting encounter I had with wildlife involved a beach on Carmel and a pair of male elephant seals. Beautiful surroundings, peaceful atmosphere, and these two snarling aquatic mammals fighting and tussling their way across the beach and passing within inches of where I was standing. Neither took any notice of me, for which I’m profoundly thankful, given their size and aggression.

    Reply
  27. Back in my grad student days, I lived in an apartment complex where raccoons and opossums came by regularly to raid the dumpsters. Very aggressive about it they were too, especially the opossums, who hissed at anyone they saw as competition.
    Another time, I attended a conference at UC Santa Cruz and glimpsed on successive days, a doe and her fawn, then a fox crouching behind one of the dining commons.
    But probably the most disconcerting encounter I had with wildlife involved a beach on Carmel and a pair of male elephant seals. Beautiful surroundings, peaceful atmosphere, and these two snarling aquatic mammals fighting and tussling their way across the beach and passing within inches of where I was standing. Neither took any notice of me, for which I’m profoundly thankful, given their size and aggression.

    Reply
  28. Back in my grad student days, I lived in an apartment complex where raccoons and opossums came by regularly to raid the dumpsters. Very aggressive about it they were too, especially the opossums, who hissed at anyone they saw as competition.
    Another time, I attended a conference at UC Santa Cruz and glimpsed on successive days, a doe and her fawn, then a fox crouching behind one of the dining commons.
    But probably the most disconcerting encounter I had with wildlife involved a beach on Carmel and a pair of male elephant seals. Beautiful surroundings, peaceful atmosphere, and these two snarling aquatic mammals fighting and tussling their way across the beach and passing within inches of where I was standing. Neither took any notice of me, for which I’m profoundly thankful, given their size and aggression.

    Reply
  29. Back in my grad student days, I lived in an apartment complex where raccoons and opossums came by regularly to raid the dumpsters. Very aggressive about it they were too, especially the opossums, who hissed at anyone they saw as competition.
    Another time, I attended a conference at UC Santa Cruz and glimpsed on successive days, a doe and her fawn, then a fox crouching behind one of the dining commons.
    But probably the most disconcerting encounter I had with wildlife involved a beach on Carmel and a pair of male elephant seals. Beautiful surroundings, peaceful atmosphere, and these two snarling aquatic mammals fighting and tussling their way across the beach and passing within inches of where I was standing. Neither took any notice of me, for which I’m profoundly thankful, given their size and aggression.

    Reply
  30. Back in my grad student days, I lived in an apartment complex where raccoons and opossums came by regularly to raid the dumpsters. Very aggressive about it they were too, especially the opossums, who hissed at anyone they saw as competition.
    Another time, I attended a conference at UC Santa Cruz and glimpsed on successive days, a doe and her fawn, then a fox crouching behind one of the dining commons.
    But probably the most disconcerting encounter I had with wildlife involved a beach on Carmel and a pair of male elephant seals. Beautiful surroundings, peaceful atmosphere, and these two snarling aquatic mammals fighting and tussling their way across the beach and passing within inches of where I was standing. Neither took any notice of me, for which I’m profoundly thankful, given their size and aggression.

    Reply
  31. I don’t know if it’s “magical” but I have a raccoon volunteer who’s doing his best to insinuate himself into my household. He uses the dog door. He eats the dog food. He no longer runs from me or the dog, just stares up at us while we attempt to give him the heave-ho . . . one of these days I’m going to find him lounging on the couch with a beer. I just know it. And the truth of it is, I have a soft spot for raccoons . . . I had one as a pet when I was a kid, and my interloper brings back fond memories of my childhood.

    Reply
  32. I don’t know if it’s “magical” but I have a raccoon volunteer who’s doing his best to insinuate himself into my household. He uses the dog door. He eats the dog food. He no longer runs from me or the dog, just stares up at us while we attempt to give him the heave-ho . . . one of these days I’m going to find him lounging on the couch with a beer. I just know it. And the truth of it is, I have a soft spot for raccoons . . . I had one as a pet when I was a kid, and my interloper brings back fond memories of my childhood.

    Reply
  33. I don’t know if it’s “magical” but I have a raccoon volunteer who’s doing his best to insinuate himself into my household. He uses the dog door. He eats the dog food. He no longer runs from me or the dog, just stares up at us while we attempt to give him the heave-ho . . . one of these days I’m going to find him lounging on the couch with a beer. I just know it. And the truth of it is, I have a soft spot for raccoons . . . I had one as a pet when I was a kid, and my interloper brings back fond memories of my childhood.

    Reply
  34. I don’t know if it’s “magical” but I have a raccoon volunteer who’s doing his best to insinuate himself into my household. He uses the dog door. He eats the dog food. He no longer runs from me or the dog, just stares up at us while we attempt to give him the heave-ho . . . one of these days I’m going to find him lounging on the couch with a beer. I just know it. And the truth of it is, I have a soft spot for raccoons . . . I had one as a pet when I was a kid, and my interloper brings back fond memories of my childhood.

    Reply
  35. I don’t know if it’s “magical” but I have a raccoon volunteer who’s doing his best to insinuate himself into my household. He uses the dog door. He eats the dog food. He no longer runs from me or the dog, just stares up at us while we attempt to give him the heave-ho . . . one of these days I’m going to find him lounging on the couch with a beer. I just know it. And the truth of it is, I have a soft spot for raccoons . . . I had one as a pet when I was a kid, and my interloper brings back fond memories of my childhood.

    Reply
  36. Hey Mary Jo! Great Post. We have tons fat whistle pigs that think it’s really cool to watch for traffic from the center of the road before crossing into my yard. But they’re nearsighted, you see. So I am often on cleanup duty. DH can’t stomach road kill and I can’t stand snakes. So we have a deal. I tend the road and he defends the castle against all manner of snakes. (We have copper heads around here)
    We also have loads of horses. My house is sandwiched between two horse large farms that breed and board hundreds of thoroughbred racehorses. More than once those high-spirited creatures have trampled through my yard looking for a way back into the pasture they fought so hard to escape from. In spring, after the mares have foaled, cars invariably bank the road, creating Five Forks’s once-a-year traffic jam as little kids hang out rolled down windows oohing and awing at the gangly foals. Those horses are not exactly wild life I suppose, but they will avail themselves of hats, fingers and pigtails if carelessly presented.
    We also have lots of dear, too. When the alfalfa bordering my property is green, it’s quite common to see 10 plus peeking through my stand of white pine, eying up my green lawn as well. And while I feel no need to protect my shrubs and trees from their hungry bellies, I can’t stand the thought of staring my dinner in the eye before it hits my plate. Neutral protein, very neutral, is important on my plate. I can’t even stand chicken bones.
    Nina, who’d suddenly feel very different about wild life if a bear wandered into her yard.

    Reply
  37. Hey Mary Jo! Great Post. We have tons fat whistle pigs that think it’s really cool to watch for traffic from the center of the road before crossing into my yard. But they’re nearsighted, you see. So I am often on cleanup duty. DH can’t stomach road kill and I can’t stand snakes. So we have a deal. I tend the road and he defends the castle against all manner of snakes. (We have copper heads around here)
    We also have loads of horses. My house is sandwiched between two horse large farms that breed and board hundreds of thoroughbred racehorses. More than once those high-spirited creatures have trampled through my yard looking for a way back into the pasture they fought so hard to escape from. In spring, after the mares have foaled, cars invariably bank the road, creating Five Forks’s once-a-year traffic jam as little kids hang out rolled down windows oohing and awing at the gangly foals. Those horses are not exactly wild life I suppose, but they will avail themselves of hats, fingers and pigtails if carelessly presented.
    We also have lots of dear, too. When the alfalfa bordering my property is green, it’s quite common to see 10 plus peeking through my stand of white pine, eying up my green lawn as well. And while I feel no need to protect my shrubs and trees from their hungry bellies, I can’t stand the thought of staring my dinner in the eye before it hits my plate. Neutral protein, very neutral, is important on my plate. I can’t even stand chicken bones.
    Nina, who’d suddenly feel very different about wild life if a bear wandered into her yard.

    Reply
  38. Hey Mary Jo! Great Post. We have tons fat whistle pigs that think it’s really cool to watch for traffic from the center of the road before crossing into my yard. But they’re nearsighted, you see. So I am often on cleanup duty. DH can’t stomach road kill and I can’t stand snakes. So we have a deal. I tend the road and he defends the castle against all manner of snakes. (We have copper heads around here)
    We also have loads of horses. My house is sandwiched between two horse large farms that breed and board hundreds of thoroughbred racehorses. More than once those high-spirited creatures have trampled through my yard looking for a way back into the pasture they fought so hard to escape from. In spring, after the mares have foaled, cars invariably bank the road, creating Five Forks’s once-a-year traffic jam as little kids hang out rolled down windows oohing and awing at the gangly foals. Those horses are not exactly wild life I suppose, but they will avail themselves of hats, fingers and pigtails if carelessly presented.
    We also have lots of dear, too. When the alfalfa bordering my property is green, it’s quite common to see 10 plus peeking through my stand of white pine, eying up my green lawn as well. And while I feel no need to protect my shrubs and trees from their hungry bellies, I can’t stand the thought of staring my dinner in the eye before it hits my plate. Neutral protein, very neutral, is important on my plate. I can’t even stand chicken bones.
    Nina, who’d suddenly feel very different about wild life if a bear wandered into her yard.

    Reply
  39. Hey Mary Jo! Great Post. We have tons fat whistle pigs that think it’s really cool to watch for traffic from the center of the road before crossing into my yard. But they’re nearsighted, you see. So I am often on cleanup duty. DH can’t stomach road kill and I can’t stand snakes. So we have a deal. I tend the road and he defends the castle against all manner of snakes. (We have copper heads around here)
    We also have loads of horses. My house is sandwiched between two horse large farms that breed and board hundreds of thoroughbred racehorses. More than once those high-spirited creatures have trampled through my yard looking for a way back into the pasture they fought so hard to escape from. In spring, after the mares have foaled, cars invariably bank the road, creating Five Forks’s once-a-year traffic jam as little kids hang out rolled down windows oohing and awing at the gangly foals. Those horses are not exactly wild life I suppose, but they will avail themselves of hats, fingers and pigtails if carelessly presented.
    We also have lots of dear, too. When the alfalfa bordering my property is green, it’s quite common to see 10 plus peeking through my stand of white pine, eying up my green lawn as well. And while I feel no need to protect my shrubs and trees from their hungry bellies, I can’t stand the thought of staring my dinner in the eye before it hits my plate. Neutral protein, very neutral, is important on my plate. I can’t even stand chicken bones.
    Nina, who’d suddenly feel very different about wild life if a bear wandered into her yard.

    Reply
  40. Hey Mary Jo! Great Post. We have tons fat whistle pigs that think it’s really cool to watch for traffic from the center of the road before crossing into my yard. But they’re nearsighted, you see. So I am often on cleanup duty. DH can’t stomach road kill and I can’t stand snakes. So we have a deal. I tend the road and he defends the castle against all manner of snakes. (We have copper heads around here)
    We also have loads of horses. My house is sandwiched between two horse large farms that breed and board hundreds of thoroughbred racehorses. More than once those high-spirited creatures have trampled through my yard looking for a way back into the pasture they fought so hard to escape from. In spring, after the mares have foaled, cars invariably bank the road, creating Five Forks’s once-a-year traffic jam as little kids hang out rolled down windows oohing and awing at the gangly foals. Those horses are not exactly wild life I suppose, but they will avail themselves of hats, fingers and pigtails if carelessly presented.
    We also have lots of dear, too. When the alfalfa bordering my property is green, it’s quite common to see 10 plus peeking through my stand of white pine, eying up my green lawn as well. And while I feel no need to protect my shrubs and trees from their hungry bellies, I can’t stand the thought of staring my dinner in the eye before it hits my plate. Neutral protein, very neutral, is important on my plate. I can’t even stand chicken bones.
    Nina, who’d suddenly feel very different about wild life if a bear wandered into her yard.

    Reply
  41. Ah wildlife! So much better, I have found, when it stays wild.
    Squirrels nibble on my roof and then create squirrel hotels in my attic.
    A raccoon has lately taken to reclining on my roof, half on the skylight, to watch the sun come up. I don’t care to watch sunrise. But Miss Daisy has hysterics when she sees the raccoon, so I have little choice.
    The raccoon seems amused by her morning song. I would be too, if it weren’t for the sad fact that raccoons here on Long Island often have rabies.
    I’m not vegetarian, I suppose my basic animal predator nature prevents me. But lately I’ve found myself shuddering at the meat department of my local supermarket.
    When will we have vat grown food, as they do in all my fav futuristic novels?

    Reply
  42. Ah wildlife! So much better, I have found, when it stays wild.
    Squirrels nibble on my roof and then create squirrel hotels in my attic.
    A raccoon has lately taken to reclining on my roof, half on the skylight, to watch the sun come up. I don’t care to watch sunrise. But Miss Daisy has hysterics when she sees the raccoon, so I have little choice.
    The raccoon seems amused by her morning song. I would be too, if it weren’t for the sad fact that raccoons here on Long Island often have rabies.
    I’m not vegetarian, I suppose my basic animal predator nature prevents me. But lately I’ve found myself shuddering at the meat department of my local supermarket.
    When will we have vat grown food, as they do in all my fav futuristic novels?

    Reply
  43. Ah wildlife! So much better, I have found, when it stays wild.
    Squirrels nibble on my roof and then create squirrel hotels in my attic.
    A raccoon has lately taken to reclining on my roof, half on the skylight, to watch the sun come up. I don’t care to watch sunrise. But Miss Daisy has hysterics when she sees the raccoon, so I have little choice.
    The raccoon seems amused by her morning song. I would be too, if it weren’t for the sad fact that raccoons here on Long Island often have rabies.
    I’m not vegetarian, I suppose my basic animal predator nature prevents me. But lately I’ve found myself shuddering at the meat department of my local supermarket.
    When will we have vat grown food, as they do in all my fav futuristic novels?

    Reply
  44. Ah wildlife! So much better, I have found, when it stays wild.
    Squirrels nibble on my roof and then create squirrel hotels in my attic.
    A raccoon has lately taken to reclining on my roof, half on the skylight, to watch the sun come up. I don’t care to watch sunrise. But Miss Daisy has hysterics when she sees the raccoon, so I have little choice.
    The raccoon seems amused by her morning song. I would be too, if it weren’t for the sad fact that raccoons here on Long Island often have rabies.
    I’m not vegetarian, I suppose my basic animal predator nature prevents me. But lately I’ve found myself shuddering at the meat department of my local supermarket.
    When will we have vat grown food, as they do in all my fav futuristic novels?

    Reply
  45. Ah wildlife! So much better, I have found, when it stays wild.
    Squirrels nibble on my roof and then create squirrel hotels in my attic.
    A raccoon has lately taken to reclining on my roof, half on the skylight, to watch the sun come up. I don’t care to watch sunrise. But Miss Daisy has hysterics when she sees the raccoon, so I have little choice.
    The raccoon seems amused by her morning song. I would be too, if it weren’t for the sad fact that raccoons here on Long Island often have rabies.
    I’m not vegetarian, I suppose my basic animal predator nature prevents me. But lately I’ve found myself shuddering at the meat department of my local supermarket.
    When will we have vat grown food, as they do in all my fav futuristic novels?

    Reply
  46. For the past three years does have raised fawns in my back yard. I live in solid suburbia, but there are many creeks, and expansion has driven deer down here. (Mountain lions, too, although I’ve yet to see one close.)
    I love squirrels. We have red ones. And possums and a BIG skunk I’m not so fond of.
    A friend of mine lives in a posh gated community where the lawns are being destroyed by a band of feral pigs. I find this hilarious.

    Reply
  47. For the past three years does have raised fawns in my back yard. I live in solid suburbia, but there are many creeks, and expansion has driven deer down here. (Mountain lions, too, although I’ve yet to see one close.)
    I love squirrels. We have red ones. And possums and a BIG skunk I’m not so fond of.
    A friend of mine lives in a posh gated community where the lawns are being destroyed by a band of feral pigs. I find this hilarious.

    Reply
  48. For the past three years does have raised fawns in my back yard. I live in solid suburbia, but there are many creeks, and expansion has driven deer down here. (Mountain lions, too, although I’ve yet to see one close.)
    I love squirrels. We have red ones. And possums and a BIG skunk I’m not so fond of.
    A friend of mine lives in a posh gated community where the lawns are being destroyed by a band of feral pigs. I find this hilarious.

    Reply
  49. For the past three years does have raised fawns in my back yard. I live in solid suburbia, but there are many creeks, and expansion has driven deer down here. (Mountain lions, too, although I’ve yet to see one close.)
    I love squirrels. We have red ones. And possums and a BIG skunk I’m not so fond of.
    A friend of mine lives in a posh gated community where the lawns are being destroyed by a band of feral pigs. I find this hilarious.

    Reply
  50. For the past three years does have raised fawns in my back yard. I live in solid suburbia, but there are many creeks, and expansion has driven deer down here. (Mountain lions, too, although I’ve yet to see one close.)
    I love squirrels. We have red ones. And possums and a BIG skunk I’m not so fond of.
    A friend of mine lives in a posh gated community where the lawns are being destroyed by a band of feral pigs. I find this hilarious.

    Reply
  51. Hi Mary Jo,
    We live in the suburbs and lately I have seen been seeing hawks, which are just the most beautiful creatures. Last year my husband found one that must have slammed into a car or window because he couldn’t use his legs. He had to work so he locates a wild animal rescue center, puts the hawk in the box and puts the hawk in the back of my SUV and sends me off with directions to get this hawk some help. Luckily they were able to help him and he didn’t get out of the box while I was driving.

    Reply
  52. Hi Mary Jo,
    We live in the suburbs and lately I have seen been seeing hawks, which are just the most beautiful creatures. Last year my husband found one that must have slammed into a car or window because he couldn’t use his legs. He had to work so he locates a wild animal rescue center, puts the hawk in the box and puts the hawk in the back of my SUV and sends me off with directions to get this hawk some help. Luckily they were able to help him and he didn’t get out of the box while I was driving.

    Reply
  53. Hi Mary Jo,
    We live in the suburbs and lately I have seen been seeing hawks, which are just the most beautiful creatures. Last year my husband found one that must have slammed into a car or window because he couldn’t use his legs. He had to work so he locates a wild animal rescue center, puts the hawk in the box and puts the hawk in the back of my SUV and sends me off with directions to get this hawk some help. Luckily they were able to help him and he didn’t get out of the box while I was driving.

    Reply
  54. Hi Mary Jo,
    We live in the suburbs and lately I have seen been seeing hawks, which are just the most beautiful creatures. Last year my husband found one that must have slammed into a car or window because he couldn’t use his legs. He had to work so he locates a wild animal rescue center, puts the hawk in the box and puts the hawk in the back of my SUV and sends me off with directions to get this hawk some help. Luckily they were able to help him and he didn’t get out of the box while I was driving.

    Reply
  55. Hi Mary Jo,
    We live in the suburbs and lately I have seen been seeing hawks, which are just the most beautiful creatures. Last year my husband found one that must have slammed into a car or window because he couldn’t use his legs. He had to work so he locates a wild animal rescue center, puts the hawk in the box and puts the hawk in the back of my SUV and sends me off with directions to get this hawk some help. Luckily they were able to help him and he didn’t get out of the box while I was driving.

    Reply
  56. I have a new roof and electric meter thanks to a mommy raccoon and her three adorable babies. They were adorable too, they couldn’t climb very well and they were hanging off of drain pipes and siding and squeaking for their mother. And there mother could become very tall and walk on her back feet when a human being (me) placed themselves between her and her babies.

    Reply
  57. I have a new roof and electric meter thanks to a mommy raccoon and her three adorable babies. They were adorable too, they couldn’t climb very well and they were hanging off of drain pipes and siding and squeaking for their mother. And there mother could become very tall and walk on her back feet when a human being (me) placed themselves between her and her babies.

    Reply
  58. I have a new roof and electric meter thanks to a mommy raccoon and her three adorable babies. They were adorable too, they couldn’t climb very well and they were hanging off of drain pipes and siding and squeaking for their mother. And there mother could become very tall and walk on her back feet when a human being (me) placed themselves between her and her babies.

    Reply
  59. I have a new roof and electric meter thanks to a mommy raccoon and her three adorable babies. They were adorable too, they couldn’t climb very well and they were hanging off of drain pipes and siding and squeaking for their mother. And there mother could become very tall and walk on her back feet when a human being (me) placed themselves between her and her babies.

    Reply
  60. I have a new roof and electric meter thanks to a mommy raccoon and her three adorable babies. They were adorable too, they couldn’t climb very well and they were hanging off of drain pipes and siding and squeaking for their mother. And there mother could become very tall and walk on her back feet when a human being (me) placed themselves between her and her babies.

    Reply
  61. We have a pair of resident road runners that hatched two little ones this year….first time for that. Before the Cedar Fire there was one that came by occassionly. After the fire it took about 3 years before one showed up.Then this year the pair arrived. Also have numerous squirrels and rabbits. The rabbits do their share in keeping the lawn “mowed”. Can hear coyotes almost every night. Red-tailed Hawks have nested here and crows by the dozen. They get to the chicken eggs befor we do.

    Reply
  62. We have a pair of resident road runners that hatched two little ones this year….first time for that. Before the Cedar Fire there was one that came by occassionly. After the fire it took about 3 years before one showed up.Then this year the pair arrived. Also have numerous squirrels and rabbits. The rabbits do their share in keeping the lawn “mowed”. Can hear coyotes almost every night. Red-tailed Hawks have nested here and crows by the dozen. They get to the chicken eggs befor we do.

    Reply
  63. We have a pair of resident road runners that hatched two little ones this year….first time for that. Before the Cedar Fire there was one that came by occassionly. After the fire it took about 3 years before one showed up.Then this year the pair arrived. Also have numerous squirrels and rabbits. The rabbits do their share in keeping the lawn “mowed”. Can hear coyotes almost every night. Red-tailed Hawks have nested here and crows by the dozen. They get to the chicken eggs befor we do.

    Reply
  64. We have a pair of resident road runners that hatched two little ones this year….first time for that. Before the Cedar Fire there was one that came by occassionly. After the fire it took about 3 years before one showed up.Then this year the pair arrived. Also have numerous squirrels and rabbits. The rabbits do their share in keeping the lawn “mowed”. Can hear coyotes almost every night. Red-tailed Hawks have nested here and crows by the dozen. They get to the chicken eggs befor we do.

    Reply
  65. We have a pair of resident road runners that hatched two little ones this year….first time for that. Before the Cedar Fire there was one that came by occassionly. After the fire it took about 3 years before one showed up.Then this year the pair arrived. Also have numerous squirrels and rabbits. The rabbits do their share in keeping the lawn “mowed”. Can hear coyotes almost every night. Red-tailed Hawks have nested here and crows by the dozen. They get to the chicken eggs befor we do.

    Reply
  66. From MJP:
    Yikes about the coyote going after the toddler, Tal! But the mole was cute. 🙂
    Sherrie, thanks for the lesson on how to evict skunks. I sincerely hope I never have to use it. 🙂
    Kalen, LOL about the raccoon who’s moving in! They are amazingly cute–and wicked clever.
    Edith, I’m with you–give me vat protein cultivate to look like salmon or filet. I’m semi-vegetarian and all squeamish.
    Jane, if I had a friend who lived in a ritzy gated community who was dealing with feral pigs, I’d be pretty amused, too. 🙂
    Maureen, I’m glad you and your husband were able to save the hawk. I have some around here, and they’re stunning. And I’m VERY glad that one didn’t get out of his box when you were taking him to the bird rescue center!
    Mary Jo, thinking how critters brighten our lives–and chew our wiring. 🙂

    Reply
  67. From MJP:
    Yikes about the coyote going after the toddler, Tal! But the mole was cute. 🙂
    Sherrie, thanks for the lesson on how to evict skunks. I sincerely hope I never have to use it. 🙂
    Kalen, LOL about the raccoon who’s moving in! They are amazingly cute–and wicked clever.
    Edith, I’m with you–give me vat protein cultivate to look like salmon or filet. I’m semi-vegetarian and all squeamish.
    Jane, if I had a friend who lived in a ritzy gated community who was dealing with feral pigs, I’d be pretty amused, too. 🙂
    Maureen, I’m glad you and your husband were able to save the hawk. I have some around here, and they’re stunning. And I’m VERY glad that one didn’t get out of his box when you were taking him to the bird rescue center!
    Mary Jo, thinking how critters brighten our lives–and chew our wiring. 🙂

    Reply
  68. From MJP:
    Yikes about the coyote going after the toddler, Tal! But the mole was cute. 🙂
    Sherrie, thanks for the lesson on how to evict skunks. I sincerely hope I never have to use it. 🙂
    Kalen, LOL about the raccoon who’s moving in! They are amazingly cute–and wicked clever.
    Edith, I’m with you–give me vat protein cultivate to look like salmon or filet. I’m semi-vegetarian and all squeamish.
    Jane, if I had a friend who lived in a ritzy gated community who was dealing with feral pigs, I’d be pretty amused, too. 🙂
    Maureen, I’m glad you and your husband were able to save the hawk. I have some around here, and they’re stunning. And I’m VERY glad that one didn’t get out of his box when you were taking him to the bird rescue center!
    Mary Jo, thinking how critters brighten our lives–and chew our wiring. 🙂

    Reply
  69. From MJP:
    Yikes about the coyote going after the toddler, Tal! But the mole was cute. 🙂
    Sherrie, thanks for the lesson on how to evict skunks. I sincerely hope I never have to use it. 🙂
    Kalen, LOL about the raccoon who’s moving in! They are amazingly cute–and wicked clever.
    Edith, I’m with you–give me vat protein cultivate to look like salmon or filet. I’m semi-vegetarian and all squeamish.
    Jane, if I had a friend who lived in a ritzy gated community who was dealing with feral pigs, I’d be pretty amused, too. 🙂
    Maureen, I’m glad you and your husband were able to save the hawk. I have some around here, and they’re stunning. And I’m VERY glad that one didn’t get out of his box when you were taking him to the bird rescue center!
    Mary Jo, thinking how critters brighten our lives–and chew our wiring. 🙂

    Reply
  70. From MJP:
    Yikes about the coyote going after the toddler, Tal! But the mole was cute. 🙂
    Sherrie, thanks for the lesson on how to evict skunks. I sincerely hope I never have to use it. 🙂
    Kalen, LOL about the raccoon who’s moving in! They are amazingly cute–and wicked clever.
    Edith, I’m with you–give me vat protein cultivate to look like salmon or filet. I’m semi-vegetarian and all squeamish.
    Jane, if I had a friend who lived in a ritzy gated community who was dealing with feral pigs, I’d be pretty amused, too. 🙂
    Maureen, I’m glad you and your husband were able to save the hawk. I have some around here, and they’re stunning. And I’m VERY glad that one didn’t get out of his box when you were taking him to the bird rescue center!
    Mary Jo, thinking how critters brighten our lives–and chew our wiring. 🙂

    Reply
  71. Sherrie, do those methods work on teenagers?
    MJP (from whom I still await a report on Jenny C.’s new hair!), houses on the outskirts of developed land here in the Phoenix area, fronting (or backing) onto the desert) often have problems with coyotes. There’s some open land (a campus) at the end of my block, which is yet another reason my cats are strictly indoor critters. Coyotes are known to go after cats and small dogs, but as far as I know the incident I referred to is the only time one actually went after a kid.
    Mercedes Lackey and her husband are involved in raptor rescue, so they have dealt with lots of hawks–and a heron, I think it was, that was so aggressive that one had to wear a welder’s mask to feed it!
    Giving your dislike for recently-live protein, I’m sending you and Edith gift packs of a lovely substitute I’ve recently found. It’s called Soylent Green.

    Reply
  72. Sherrie, do those methods work on teenagers?
    MJP (from whom I still await a report on Jenny C.’s new hair!), houses on the outskirts of developed land here in the Phoenix area, fronting (or backing) onto the desert) often have problems with coyotes. There’s some open land (a campus) at the end of my block, which is yet another reason my cats are strictly indoor critters. Coyotes are known to go after cats and small dogs, but as far as I know the incident I referred to is the only time one actually went after a kid.
    Mercedes Lackey and her husband are involved in raptor rescue, so they have dealt with lots of hawks–and a heron, I think it was, that was so aggressive that one had to wear a welder’s mask to feed it!
    Giving your dislike for recently-live protein, I’m sending you and Edith gift packs of a lovely substitute I’ve recently found. It’s called Soylent Green.

    Reply
  73. Sherrie, do those methods work on teenagers?
    MJP (from whom I still await a report on Jenny C.’s new hair!), houses on the outskirts of developed land here in the Phoenix area, fronting (or backing) onto the desert) often have problems with coyotes. There’s some open land (a campus) at the end of my block, which is yet another reason my cats are strictly indoor critters. Coyotes are known to go after cats and small dogs, but as far as I know the incident I referred to is the only time one actually went after a kid.
    Mercedes Lackey and her husband are involved in raptor rescue, so they have dealt with lots of hawks–and a heron, I think it was, that was so aggressive that one had to wear a welder’s mask to feed it!
    Giving your dislike for recently-live protein, I’m sending you and Edith gift packs of a lovely substitute I’ve recently found. It’s called Soylent Green.

    Reply
  74. Sherrie, do those methods work on teenagers?
    MJP (from whom I still await a report on Jenny C.’s new hair!), houses on the outskirts of developed land here in the Phoenix area, fronting (or backing) onto the desert) often have problems with coyotes. There’s some open land (a campus) at the end of my block, which is yet another reason my cats are strictly indoor critters. Coyotes are known to go after cats and small dogs, but as far as I know the incident I referred to is the only time one actually went after a kid.
    Mercedes Lackey and her husband are involved in raptor rescue, so they have dealt with lots of hawks–and a heron, I think it was, that was so aggressive that one had to wear a welder’s mask to feed it!
    Giving your dislike for recently-live protein, I’m sending you and Edith gift packs of a lovely substitute I’ve recently found. It’s called Soylent Green.

    Reply
  75. Sherrie, do those methods work on teenagers?
    MJP (from whom I still await a report on Jenny C.’s new hair!), houses on the outskirts of developed land here in the Phoenix area, fronting (or backing) onto the desert) often have problems with coyotes. There’s some open land (a campus) at the end of my block, which is yet another reason my cats are strictly indoor critters. Coyotes are known to go after cats and small dogs, but as far as I know the incident I referred to is the only time one actually went after a kid.
    Mercedes Lackey and her husband are involved in raptor rescue, so they have dealt with lots of hawks–and a heron, I think it was, that was so aggressive that one had to wear a welder’s mask to feed it!
    Giving your dislike for recently-live protein, I’m sending you and Edith gift packs of a lovely substitute I’ve recently found. It’s called Soylent Green.

    Reply

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