Why Do Regency Heroines Swoon?

Fainting-1Andrea here, musing on “the Swoon,” one of the traditional minor but memorable secondary tropes of Regency romances. Fainting is far less prevalent in today’s historical novels—or it's used for tongue-in-cheek effect—as women aren’t as apt to be portrayed weak, flighty creatures. (What self-respecting modern heroine would fall into a faint at the first sign of trouble or bad news? These days, if accosted by a villain, she would likely punch him in the nose rather than swoon and hope to be rescued by her hero!)

But all jesting aside . . . the phenomenon of fainting from an emotional trigger (shocking news, fear, anxiety, etc) is actually a real medical condition called Vasovagal syncope. It happens when the part of the nervous system that controls heart rate and blood pressure reacts to stress. The heart slows, blood pressure suddenly drops, the blood vessels widen in your legs, causing the blood to drop to the lower extremities, thus oxygen has a hard time getting to the brain. So you, um, swoon. (It’s often called the Vagal Response because the vagus nerve is involved in controlling the blood vessels, and when it’s overstimulated by stress, unpleasant things can happen!)

How do I know this? Well . . .

 


Fainting-2When I first started reading romance novels I used to snicker at the idea of fainting from shock, thinking it a silly, overblown invention by authors to accentuate the delicate feminine sensibilities of their heroines. And then, to my utter surprise, it actually happened to me. I happen to dislike needles. As in, really dislike needles. The idea of getting a shot has always given me the heebie-jeebies. But I simply ask to sit down when getting one, and it’s okay. One time, though, I must have been stressed about other things, because I rolled up my sleeve, and then remember starting to breath a little weirdly. The next thing I knew, the nurse was patting my cheek gently, and looking horribly distraught. “I-I  hadn’t even touched you yet!” she stammered. “And you just keeled over!”

Fainting-3How embarrassing to find out I’m a flighty peagoose straight out of an Ann Radcliffe gothic novel! However, I’ve learned that’s much more common than you think. I now usually warn doctors or dentists of the potential problem. Just recently, I had to have a broken tooth extracted, and knowing that having a hammer and pliers in my mouth wasn’t a happy thought, I warned him that I was prone to the Vagal Response. He laughed and said not to worry—he had it happen a lot, and was perfectly prepared with oxygen, etc. to deal with it. (I’m delighted to report that no heroics were required. I’ve learned to control it with yoga breathing.)

Smelling-salts-rembrandtNow, in Regency novels, the heroines are usually revived with smelling salts or concentrated vinegar concoctions, and in doing a little research on that, I’ve discovered that the concept of shocking the system back into normal function with a sharp scent has been around since ancient times, when vinegar was used. The 13th century saw the advent of ammonium carbonate-based “smelling salts” (no doubt discovered by alchemists dabbling in their chemical laboratories.) However, by the 18th century, distillation methods allowed for the creation of a vinegar with a more concentrated amount of acetic acid, which made for a stronger scent. Thus vinegar became the preferred 'smelling salt" of the Regency

Fainting couchTo “sweeten” the punch of vinegar, one could have aromatic oils blended into the vinegar. It became fashionable to have an apothecary make up such scented potions. Some ladies even went so far as to have a personal blend made up. Favorite scents included rose, lavender, mint, lemon, rosemary, juniper, mace, cinnamon and cloves.

Vinaigrette 2So, how did a lady carry her vinegar? Most likely in a vinaigrette! (Though small glass bottles were also used.) These small, stylish containers came into vogue during the Regency. The high acetic acid content of Regency vinegar held the scent of the aromatic oils for months, so a viniagrette was designed to hold a small sponge soaked with perfumed vinegar. (The best quality natural sponges came from Turkey, which added to the exotic allure. They were of a very fine texture, thus a small piece could be used.)

Vinaigrette 1The container itself would have a hinged, tight-fitting lid, and a delicate grille inside would hold the sponge in place. Like snuffboxes, vinaigrettes became  works of art in themselves. The most expensive ones often had a lining of glass or vitrious enamel, which is basically a layer of powdered glass, to protect the metal. (Vinaigrette makers had to be knowledgeable about which materials were susceptible to the corrosive effect of acetic acid.)

The decorative designs of vinaigrettes often celebrated a grand event, like Nelson’s victory at Trafalgar or Wellington’s triumph at Waterloo. Travel scenes were also stylish, as were floral and pastoral motifs. The containers remained very popular well into Victorian times. (It’s no wonder, as the tightly laced corsets of the era were often responsible for the breathing difficulties that cause swoons.)

So, that’s a very short short history of The Swoon, and how to be revived from one. Now I have a couple of questions for everyone: What’s your opinion of swoons in romance novels? Have they ever struck you as silly? And lastly, have you ever fainted from the Vagal Response? (I promise you won’t be featured in my next novel!)

330 thoughts on “Why Do Regency Heroines Swoon?”

  1. I have “full out” fainted twice in my life. First time as a child. I was at a clinic to get a TB test. It involved putting a simple patch on my back, but I didn’t know that and my older brother had me so scared I just passed out. Side note: I too was scared to death of needles as a kid, but I didn’t hold my fear in. The nurse once had to call a security guard in to help hold me down while I got the shot (smile).
    The second time I fainted was as an adult in a dentist chair. I was scared to death but too old to cry. Now that was embarrassing. I didn’t see it coming at all.
    As for fainting in stories, the only one I can recall was one where the heroine was wearing a corset that was way too tight. I find it hard to believe that women were not fainting all the time wearing those things.

    Reply
  2. I have “full out” fainted twice in my life. First time as a child. I was at a clinic to get a TB test. It involved putting a simple patch on my back, but I didn’t know that and my older brother had me so scared I just passed out. Side note: I too was scared to death of needles as a kid, but I didn’t hold my fear in. The nurse once had to call a security guard in to help hold me down while I got the shot (smile).
    The second time I fainted was as an adult in a dentist chair. I was scared to death but too old to cry. Now that was embarrassing. I didn’t see it coming at all.
    As for fainting in stories, the only one I can recall was one where the heroine was wearing a corset that was way too tight. I find it hard to believe that women were not fainting all the time wearing those things.

    Reply
  3. I have “full out” fainted twice in my life. First time as a child. I was at a clinic to get a TB test. It involved putting a simple patch on my back, but I didn’t know that and my older brother had me so scared I just passed out. Side note: I too was scared to death of needles as a kid, but I didn’t hold my fear in. The nurse once had to call a security guard in to help hold me down while I got the shot (smile).
    The second time I fainted was as an adult in a dentist chair. I was scared to death but too old to cry. Now that was embarrassing. I didn’t see it coming at all.
    As for fainting in stories, the only one I can recall was one where the heroine was wearing a corset that was way too tight. I find it hard to believe that women were not fainting all the time wearing those things.

    Reply
  4. I have “full out” fainted twice in my life. First time as a child. I was at a clinic to get a TB test. It involved putting a simple patch on my back, but I didn’t know that and my older brother had me so scared I just passed out. Side note: I too was scared to death of needles as a kid, but I didn’t hold my fear in. The nurse once had to call a security guard in to help hold me down while I got the shot (smile).
    The second time I fainted was as an adult in a dentist chair. I was scared to death but too old to cry. Now that was embarrassing. I didn’t see it coming at all.
    As for fainting in stories, the only one I can recall was one where the heroine was wearing a corset that was way too tight. I find it hard to believe that women were not fainting all the time wearing those things.

    Reply
  5. I have “full out” fainted twice in my life. First time as a child. I was at a clinic to get a TB test. It involved putting a simple patch on my back, but I didn’t know that and my older brother had me so scared I just passed out. Side note: I too was scared to death of needles as a kid, but I didn’t hold my fear in. The nurse once had to call a security guard in to help hold me down while I got the shot (smile).
    The second time I fainted was as an adult in a dentist chair. I was scared to death but too old to cry. Now that was embarrassing. I didn’t see it coming at all.
    As for fainting in stories, the only one I can recall was one where the heroine was wearing a corset that was way too tight. I find it hard to believe that women were not fainting all the time wearing those things.

    Reply
  6. I never really had a problem with swoons in romance novels, in fact I rather empathised, given that I went through a phase of fainting “like a Victorian maiden”, as my friends dubbed it, at university. I managed to do it gracefully, knees together and just melting gently to the floor, but oh my goodness, the embarrassment when I fainted at the feet of the guy I liked!
    Fascinating to see what a vinaigrette looked like, thank you so much Andrea. I’d always assumed they were more along the lines of the glass bottle you mention but never troubled to look it up.

    Reply
  7. I never really had a problem with swoons in romance novels, in fact I rather empathised, given that I went through a phase of fainting “like a Victorian maiden”, as my friends dubbed it, at university. I managed to do it gracefully, knees together and just melting gently to the floor, but oh my goodness, the embarrassment when I fainted at the feet of the guy I liked!
    Fascinating to see what a vinaigrette looked like, thank you so much Andrea. I’d always assumed they were more along the lines of the glass bottle you mention but never troubled to look it up.

    Reply
  8. I never really had a problem with swoons in romance novels, in fact I rather empathised, given that I went through a phase of fainting “like a Victorian maiden”, as my friends dubbed it, at university. I managed to do it gracefully, knees together and just melting gently to the floor, but oh my goodness, the embarrassment when I fainted at the feet of the guy I liked!
    Fascinating to see what a vinaigrette looked like, thank you so much Andrea. I’d always assumed they were more along the lines of the glass bottle you mention but never troubled to look it up.

    Reply
  9. I never really had a problem with swoons in romance novels, in fact I rather empathised, given that I went through a phase of fainting “like a Victorian maiden”, as my friends dubbed it, at university. I managed to do it gracefully, knees together and just melting gently to the floor, but oh my goodness, the embarrassment when I fainted at the feet of the guy I liked!
    Fascinating to see what a vinaigrette looked like, thank you so much Andrea. I’d always assumed they were more along the lines of the glass bottle you mention but never troubled to look it up.

    Reply
  10. I never really had a problem with swoons in romance novels, in fact I rather empathised, given that I went through a phase of fainting “like a Victorian maiden”, as my friends dubbed it, at university. I managed to do it gracefully, knees together and just melting gently to the floor, but oh my goodness, the embarrassment when I fainted at the feet of the guy I liked!
    Fascinating to see what a vinaigrette looked like, thank you so much Andrea. I’d always assumed they were more along the lines of the glass bottle you mention but never troubled to look it up.

    Reply
  11. Jenny, it really is embarrassing, isn’t it? You must have had an interlude of blood pressure incidents. I couldn’t it the first time it happened, thinking how can I be such a wimp as to faint at needles?
    But I suddenly stopped snickering at scenes in a book about heroines fainting at very bad news.

    Reply
  12. Jenny, it really is embarrassing, isn’t it? You must have had an interlude of blood pressure incidents. I couldn’t it the first time it happened, thinking how can I be such a wimp as to faint at needles?
    But I suddenly stopped snickering at scenes in a book about heroines fainting at very bad news.

    Reply
  13. Jenny, it really is embarrassing, isn’t it? You must have had an interlude of blood pressure incidents. I couldn’t it the first time it happened, thinking how can I be such a wimp as to faint at needles?
    But I suddenly stopped snickering at scenes in a book about heroines fainting at very bad news.

    Reply
  14. Jenny, it really is embarrassing, isn’t it? You must have had an interlude of blood pressure incidents. I couldn’t it the first time it happened, thinking how can I be such a wimp as to faint at needles?
    But I suddenly stopped snickering at scenes in a book about heroines fainting at very bad news.

    Reply
  15. Jenny, it really is embarrassing, isn’t it? You must have had an interlude of blood pressure incidents. I couldn’t it the first time it happened, thinking how can I be such a wimp as to faint at needles?
    But I suddenly stopped snickering at scenes in a book about heroines fainting at very bad news.

    Reply
  16. Fascinating blog, Andrea! I’m another fainter – have keeled over many times since grade school. It’s definitely embarrassing, and I’ve had injuries from falling. Ugh! Full medical workups have come up with nothing – just a hyper vagus nerve and just be careful … I have sympathy for Regency and Victorian heroines! But I’m not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse. 😉

    Reply
  17. Fascinating blog, Andrea! I’m another fainter – have keeled over many times since grade school. It’s definitely embarrassing, and I’ve had injuries from falling. Ugh! Full medical workups have come up with nothing – just a hyper vagus nerve and just be careful … I have sympathy for Regency and Victorian heroines! But I’m not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse. 😉

    Reply
  18. Fascinating blog, Andrea! I’m another fainter – have keeled over many times since grade school. It’s definitely embarrassing, and I’ve had injuries from falling. Ugh! Full medical workups have come up with nothing – just a hyper vagus nerve and just be careful … I have sympathy for Regency and Victorian heroines! But I’m not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse. 😉

    Reply
  19. Fascinating blog, Andrea! I’m another fainter – have keeled over many times since grade school. It’s definitely embarrassing, and I’ve had injuries from falling. Ugh! Full medical workups have come up with nothing – just a hyper vagus nerve and just be careful … I have sympathy for Regency and Victorian heroines! But I’m not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse. 😉

    Reply
  20. Fascinating blog, Andrea! I’m another fainter – have keeled over many times since grade school. It’s definitely embarrassing, and I’ve had injuries from falling. Ugh! Full medical workups have come up with nothing – just a hyper vagus nerve and just be careful … I have sympathy for Regency and Victorian heroines! But I’m not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse. 😉

    Reply
  21. It’s amazing how many people are prone to it, Susan. I really thought I was a total weirdo fainting from needles, but as I said, my doc has assured me it’s WAY more common than one might think.
    Not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse either . . .but the vinaigrettes are awfully pretty!

    Reply
  22. It’s amazing how many people are prone to it, Susan. I really thought I was a total weirdo fainting from needles, but as I said, my doc has assured me it’s WAY more common than one might think.
    Not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse either . . .but the vinaigrettes are awfully pretty!

    Reply
  23. It’s amazing how many people are prone to it, Susan. I really thought I was a total weirdo fainting from needles, but as I said, my doc has assured me it’s WAY more common than one might think.
    Not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse either . . .but the vinaigrettes are awfully pretty!

    Reply
  24. It’s amazing how many people are prone to it, Susan. I really thought I was a total weirdo fainting from needles, but as I said, my doc has assured me it’s WAY more common than one might think.
    Not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse either . . .but the vinaigrettes are awfully pretty!

    Reply
  25. It’s amazing how many people are prone to it, Susan. I really thought I was a total weirdo fainting from needles, but as I said, my doc has assured me it’s WAY more common than one might think.
    Not sure I want to walk around with vinegar in my purse either . . .but the vinaigrettes are awfully pretty!

    Reply
  26. Another fainter here! Sometimes it is brought on by anxiety, since some nurses found it hard to locate a vein in my arm, and the longer they poke around, the worse I feel. I have learned to tolerate needles somewhat, and it’s been quite a while since I fainted due to a vagal response. However I also have low blood pressure, and the last time I fainted I was up on a ladder trying with all my strength to pull a very stubborn wisteria off of a building, on a freezing cold day. I felt myself getting dizzy and did manage to get off the ladder before I passed out, but I still gave a scare to the people I was with!

    Reply
  27. Another fainter here! Sometimes it is brought on by anxiety, since some nurses found it hard to locate a vein in my arm, and the longer they poke around, the worse I feel. I have learned to tolerate needles somewhat, and it’s been quite a while since I fainted due to a vagal response. However I also have low blood pressure, and the last time I fainted I was up on a ladder trying with all my strength to pull a very stubborn wisteria off of a building, on a freezing cold day. I felt myself getting dizzy and did manage to get off the ladder before I passed out, but I still gave a scare to the people I was with!

    Reply
  28. Another fainter here! Sometimes it is brought on by anxiety, since some nurses found it hard to locate a vein in my arm, and the longer they poke around, the worse I feel. I have learned to tolerate needles somewhat, and it’s been quite a while since I fainted due to a vagal response. However I also have low blood pressure, and the last time I fainted I was up on a ladder trying with all my strength to pull a very stubborn wisteria off of a building, on a freezing cold day. I felt myself getting dizzy and did manage to get off the ladder before I passed out, but I still gave a scare to the people I was with!

    Reply
  29. Another fainter here! Sometimes it is brought on by anxiety, since some nurses found it hard to locate a vein in my arm, and the longer they poke around, the worse I feel. I have learned to tolerate needles somewhat, and it’s been quite a while since I fainted due to a vagal response. However I also have low blood pressure, and the last time I fainted I was up on a ladder trying with all my strength to pull a very stubborn wisteria off of a building, on a freezing cold day. I felt myself getting dizzy and did manage to get off the ladder before I passed out, but I still gave a scare to the people I was with!

    Reply
  30. Another fainter here! Sometimes it is brought on by anxiety, since some nurses found it hard to locate a vein in my arm, and the longer they poke around, the worse I feel. I have learned to tolerate needles somewhat, and it’s been quite a while since I fainted due to a vagal response. However I also have low blood pressure, and the last time I fainted I was up on a ladder trying with all my strength to pull a very stubborn wisteria off of a building, on a freezing cold day. I felt myself getting dizzy and did manage to get off the ladder before I passed out, but I still gave a scare to the people I was with!

    Reply
  31. I’ve always kind of envied those heroines who can faint gracefully in moments of distress. It seems like a great way to get out of an awkward situation and make everyone feel sorry for you at the same time.
    My sister faints from the vagus nerve thing. It’s happened so often over the years that when she feels it about to happen she promptly gets down on the floor so she doesn’t hurt herself. I have something similar which the doctor called neurocardiogenic syncope (I think that sounds more impressive than vasovagal). It was happening frequently one day, so I went to the doctor and it happened while I was on the examining table. The doctor freaked out and sent me to the emergency room. I ended up spending three days in the hospital, at the end of which I was told to avoid sitting or standing in the same position too long and drink more water.

    Reply
  32. I’ve always kind of envied those heroines who can faint gracefully in moments of distress. It seems like a great way to get out of an awkward situation and make everyone feel sorry for you at the same time.
    My sister faints from the vagus nerve thing. It’s happened so often over the years that when she feels it about to happen she promptly gets down on the floor so she doesn’t hurt herself. I have something similar which the doctor called neurocardiogenic syncope (I think that sounds more impressive than vasovagal). It was happening frequently one day, so I went to the doctor and it happened while I was on the examining table. The doctor freaked out and sent me to the emergency room. I ended up spending three days in the hospital, at the end of which I was told to avoid sitting or standing in the same position too long and drink more water.

    Reply
  33. I’ve always kind of envied those heroines who can faint gracefully in moments of distress. It seems like a great way to get out of an awkward situation and make everyone feel sorry for you at the same time.
    My sister faints from the vagus nerve thing. It’s happened so often over the years that when she feels it about to happen she promptly gets down on the floor so she doesn’t hurt herself. I have something similar which the doctor called neurocardiogenic syncope (I think that sounds more impressive than vasovagal). It was happening frequently one day, so I went to the doctor and it happened while I was on the examining table. The doctor freaked out and sent me to the emergency room. I ended up spending three days in the hospital, at the end of which I was told to avoid sitting or standing in the same position too long and drink more water.

    Reply
  34. I’ve always kind of envied those heroines who can faint gracefully in moments of distress. It seems like a great way to get out of an awkward situation and make everyone feel sorry for you at the same time.
    My sister faints from the vagus nerve thing. It’s happened so often over the years that when she feels it about to happen she promptly gets down on the floor so she doesn’t hurt herself. I have something similar which the doctor called neurocardiogenic syncope (I think that sounds more impressive than vasovagal). It was happening frequently one day, so I went to the doctor and it happened while I was on the examining table. The doctor freaked out and sent me to the emergency room. I ended up spending three days in the hospital, at the end of which I was told to avoid sitting or standing in the same position too long and drink more water.

    Reply
  35. I’ve always kind of envied those heroines who can faint gracefully in moments of distress. It seems like a great way to get out of an awkward situation and make everyone feel sorry for you at the same time.
    My sister faints from the vagus nerve thing. It’s happened so often over the years that when she feels it about to happen she promptly gets down on the floor so she doesn’t hurt herself. I have something similar which the doctor called neurocardiogenic syncope (I think that sounds more impressive than vasovagal). It was happening frequently one day, so I went to the doctor and it happened while I was on the examining table. The doctor freaked out and sent me to the emergency room. I ended up spending three days in the hospital, at the end of which I was told to avoid sitting or standing in the same position too long and drink more water.

    Reply
  36. The closest I’ve ever come to fainting was in the dentist chair when he had me tipped too far back. I could feel something happening so I made some noise and he stopped and sat me up for a bit. It was not a pleasant feeling.
    I prefer my heroines to not swoon but I’m ok if side characters do it. I’m not sure I’ve ever read a book where the hero swooned. I’d be ok with that. 🙂

    Reply
  37. The closest I’ve ever come to fainting was in the dentist chair when he had me tipped too far back. I could feel something happening so I made some noise and he stopped and sat me up for a bit. It was not a pleasant feeling.
    I prefer my heroines to not swoon but I’m ok if side characters do it. I’m not sure I’ve ever read a book where the hero swooned. I’d be ok with that. 🙂

    Reply
  38. The closest I’ve ever come to fainting was in the dentist chair when he had me tipped too far back. I could feel something happening so I made some noise and he stopped and sat me up for a bit. It was not a pleasant feeling.
    I prefer my heroines to not swoon but I’m ok if side characters do it. I’m not sure I’ve ever read a book where the hero swooned. I’d be ok with that. 🙂

    Reply
  39. The closest I’ve ever come to fainting was in the dentist chair when he had me tipped too far back. I could feel something happening so I made some noise and he stopped and sat me up for a bit. It was not a pleasant feeling.
    I prefer my heroines to not swoon but I’m ok if side characters do it. I’m not sure I’ve ever read a book where the hero swooned. I’d be ok with that. 🙂

    Reply
  40. The closest I’ve ever come to fainting was in the dentist chair when he had me tipped too far back. I could feel something happening so I made some noise and he stopped and sat me up for a bit. It was not a pleasant feeling.
    I prefer my heroines to not swoon but I’m ok if side characters do it. I’m not sure I’ve ever read a book where the hero swooned. I’d be ok with that. 🙂

    Reply
  41. I was diagnosed with with a hyper Vagal nerve Response after fainting in the shower twice. Fortunately I wasn’t hurt but it was quite frightening. And embarrassing, since I took out a shower curtain both times. The doctor said I shouldn’t take hot showers anymore. Turns out I am extremely sensitive to heat and humidity. I had fainted in the middle of a basketball game played outdoors during junior high in Florida, taking out another girl as I went down. So humiliating. That was the first time. (If you don’t count the time I passed out during my bath as an infant. According to my mom I was just holding my breath!) It has happened since, when I have fainted off the backs of horses during lessons. I now live in Colorado, and would avoid Florida like the plague, except that my mom lives there. I don’t go out in the sun to sunbathe or do vigorous exercise in the heat of the day if I can avoid it. Such a little thing to affect my whole life.

    Reply
  42. I was diagnosed with with a hyper Vagal nerve Response after fainting in the shower twice. Fortunately I wasn’t hurt but it was quite frightening. And embarrassing, since I took out a shower curtain both times. The doctor said I shouldn’t take hot showers anymore. Turns out I am extremely sensitive to heat and humidity. I had fainted in the middle of a basketball game played outdoors during junior high in Florida, taking out another girl as I went down. So humiliating. That was the first time. (If you don’t count the time I passed out during my bath as an infant. According to my mom I was just holding my breath!) It has happened since, when I have fainted off the backs of horses during lessons. I now live in Colorado, and would avoid Florida like the plague, except that my mom lives there. I don’t go out in the sun to sunbathe or do vigorous exercise in the heat of the day if I can avoid it. Such a little thing to affect my whole life.

    Reply
  43. I was diagnosed with with a hyper Vagal nerve Response after fainting in the shower twice. Fortunately I wasn’t hurt but it was quite frightening. And embarrassing, since I took out a shower curtain both times. The doctor said I shouldn’t take hot showers anymore. Turns out I am extremely sensitive to heat and humidity. I had fainted in the middle of a basketball game played outdoors during junior high in Florida, taking out another girl as I went down. So humiliating. That was the first time. (If you don’t count the time I passed out during my bath as an infant. According to my mom I was just holding my breath!) It has happened since, when I have fainted off the backs of horses during lessons. I now live in Colorado, and would avoid Florida like the plague, except that my mom lives there. I don’t go out in the sun to sunbathe or do vigorous exercise in the heat of the day if I can avoid it. Such a little thing to affect my whole life.

    Reply
  44. I was diagnosed with with a hyper Vagal nerve Response after fainting in the shower twice. Fortunately I wasn’t hurt but it was quite frightening. And embarrassing, since I took out a shower curtain both times. The doctor said I shouldn’t take hot showers anymore. Turns out I am extremely sensitive to heat and humidity. I had fainted in the middle of a basketball game played outdoors during junior high in Florida, taking out another girl as I went down. So humiliating. That was the first time. (If you don’t count the time I passed out during my bath as an infant. According to my mom I was just holding my breath!) It has happened since, when I have fainted off the backs of horses during lessons. I now live in Colorado, and would avoid Florida like the plague, except that my mom lives there. I don’t go out in the sun to sunbathe or do vigorous exercise in the heat of the day if I can avoid it. Such a little thing to affect my whole life.

    Reply
  45. I was diagnosed with with a hyper Vagal nerve Response after fainting in the shower twice. Fortunately I wasn’t hurt but it was quite frightening. And embarrassing, since I took out a shower curtain both times. The doctor said I shouldn’t take hot showers anymore. Turns out I am extremely sensitive to heat and humidity. I had fainted in the middle of a basketball game played outdoors during junior high in Florida, taking out another girl as I went down. So humiliating. That was the first time. (If you don’t count the time I passed out during my bath as an infant. According to my mom I was just holding my breath!) It has happened since, when I have fainted off the backs of horses during lessons. I now live in Colorado, and would avoid Florida like the plague, except that my mom lives there. I don’t go out in the sun to sunbathe or do vigorous exercise in the heat of the day if I can avoid it. Such a little thing to affect my whole life.

    Reply
  46. I don’t think this blog is aimed at me but I found it interesting. I had always assumed that ladies in novels swooned to escape embarrassing situations … now I know it was low blood pressure or a vagus nerve! I have high blood pressure and am more likely to experience fight or flight symptoms. Is there an alcoholic alternative to vinegar? As a boy scout I tried to ‘Be Prepared’ … you never know when you might encounter a lady in distress! 😉

    Reply
  47. I don’t think this blog is aimed at me but I found it interesting. I had always assumed that ladies in novels swooned to escape embarrassing situations … now I know it was low blood pressure or a vagus nerve! I have high blood pressure and am more likely to experience fight or flight symptoms. Is there an alcoholic alternative to vinegar? As a boy scout I tried to ‘Be Prepared’ … you never know when you might encounter a lady in distress! 😉

    Reply
  48. I don’t think this blog is aimed at me but I found it interesting. I had always assumed that ladies in novels swooned to escape embarrassing situations … now I know it was low blood pressure or a vagus nerve! I have high blood pressure and am more likely to experience fight or flight symptoms. Is there an alcoholic alternative to vinegar? As a boy scout I tried to ‘Be Prepared’ … you never know when you might encounter a lady in distress! 😉

    Reply
  49. I don’t think this blog is aimed at me but I found it interesting. I had always assumed that ladies in novels swooned to escape embarrassing situations … now I know it was low blood pressure or a vagus nerve! I have high blood pressure and am more likely to experience fight or flight symptoms. Is there an alcoholic alternative to vinegar? As a boy scout I tried to ‘Be Prepared’ … you never know when you might encounter a lady in distress! 😉

    Reply
  50. I don’t think this blog is aimed at me but I found it interesting. I had always assumed that ladies in novels swooned to escape embarrassing situations … now I know it was low blood pressure or a vagus nerve! I have high blood pressure and am more likely to experience fight or flight symptoms. Is there an alcoholic alternative to vinegar? As a boy scout I tried to ‘Be Prepared’ … you never know when you might encounter a lady in distress! 😉

    Reply
  51. I have fainted fairly often in my life. (I told a young intern that once and he grew quite alarmed until I told him it was about once every 6 to 10 years; he hadn’t realized quite how old I truly was!).
    I am in the class of blood pressure victims. Sorry Quantum, my blood pressure has moved from over low to over high as I have grown older, but the number of faints has not fallen off OR gotten worse. I think perhaps I respond to complete pain. I do know that the last time I fainted (somewhere between Thanksgiving and Christmas this winter) I was undergoing an extreme amount of pain. I could feel the faint coming, but couldn’t hold it off. Luckily, I was already on the floor.

    Reply
  52. I have fainted fairly often in my life. (I told a young intern that once and he grew quite alarmed until I told him it was about once every 6 to 10 years; he hadn’t realized quite how old I truly was!).
    I am in the class of blood pressure victims. Sorry Quantum, my blood pressure has moved from over low to over high as I have grown older, but the number of faints has not fallen off OR gotten worse. I think perhaps I respond to complete pain. I do know that the last time I fainted (somewhere between Thanksgiving and Christmas this winter) I was undergoing an extreme amount of pain. I could feel the faint coming, but couldn’t hold it off. Luckily, I was already on the floor.

    Reply
  53. I have fainted fairly often in my life. (I told a young intern that once and he grew quite alarmed until I told him it was about once every 6 to 10 years; he hadn’t realized quite how old I truly was!).
    I am in the class of blood pressure victims. Sorry Quantum, my blood pressure has moved from over low to over high as I have grown older, but the number of faints has not fallen off OR gotten worse. I think perhaps I respond to complete pain. I do know that the last time I fainted (somewhere between Thanksgiving and Christmas this winter) I was undergoing an extreme amount of pain. I could feel the faint coming, but couldn’t hold it off. Luckily, I was already on the floor.

    Reply
  54. I have fainted fairly often in my life. (I told a young intern that once and he grew quite alarmed until I told him it was about once every 6 to 10 years; he hadn’t realized quite how old I truly was!).
    I am in the class of blood pressure victims. Sorry Quantum, my blood pressure has moved from over low to over high as I have grown older, but the number of faints has not fallen off OR gotten worse. I think perhaps I respond to complete pain. I do know that the last time I fainted (somewhere between Thanksgiving and Christmas this winter) I was undergoing an extreme amount of pain. I could feel the faint coming, but couldn’t hold it off. Luckily, I was already on the floor.

    Reply
  55. I have fainted fairly often in my life. (I told a young intern that once and he grew quite alarmed until I told him it was about once every 6 to 10 years; he hadn’t realized quite how old I truly was!).
    I am in the class of blood pressure victims. Sorry Quantum, my blood pressure has moved from over low to over high as I have grown older, but the number of faints has not fallen off OR gotten worse. I think perhaps I respond to complete pain. I do know that the last time I fainted (somewhere between Thanksgiving and Christmas this winter) I was undergoing an extreme amount of pain. I could feel the faint coming, but couldn’t hold it off. Luckily, I was already on the floor.

    Reply
  56. Fainting is not just a girl thing. My brother fainted in front of the whole congregation during his confirmation service. All the old ladies were very impressed with how seriously a fourteen year old took this important occasion and he got many cards and presents afterwards. I only fainted once from a mixture of bloodloss and pain, but I do get dizzy spells when I have a migraine, so I can sort of understand

    Reply
  57. Fainting is not just a girl thing. My brother fainted in front of the whole congregation during his confirmation service. All the old ladies were very impressed with how seriously a fourteen year old took this important occasion and he got many cards and presents afterwards. I only fainted once from a mixture of bloodloss and pain, but I do get dizzy spells when I have a migraine, so I can sort of understand

    Reply
  58. Fainting is not just a girl thing. My brother fainted in front of the whole congregation during his confirmation service. All the old ladies were very impressed with how seriously a fourteen year old took this important occasion and he got many cards and presents afterwards. I only fainted once from a mixture of bloodloss and pain, but I do get dizzy spells when I have a migraine, so I can sort of understand

    Reply
  59. Fainting is not just a girl thing. My brother fainted in front of the whole congregation during his confirmation service. All the old ladies were very impressed with how seriously a fourteen year old took this important occasion and he got many cards and presents afterwards. I only fainted once from a mixture of bloodloss and pain, but I do get dizzy spells when I have a migraine, so I can sort of understand

    Reply
  60. Fainting is not just a girl thing. My brother fainted in front of the whole congregation during his confirmation service. All the old ladies were very impressed with how seriously a fourteen year old took this important occasion and he got many cards and presents afterwards. I only fainted once from a mixture of bloodloss and pain, but I do get dizzy spells when I have a migraine, so I can sort of understand

    Reply
  61. It can actually run in families – both my brother and I have problems with fainting (or “blacking out”), though with different triggers (he was infamous for fainting at the sight of blood, among other things). I was finally diagnosed a few years ago when it started to happen in a doctor’s office after a cortisone shot in my wrist – luckily, I mentioned I was starting to feel woozy, and they immediately had me lie down, then drink something sweet, and kept me around for a while until I felt better. Since then, I warn doctors/dentists if there’s a chance I will feel major pain.

    Reply
  62. It can actually run in families – both my brother and I have problems with fainting (or “blacking out”), though with different triggers (he was infamous for fainting at the sight of blood, among other things). I was finally diagnosed a few years ago when it started to happen in a doctor’s office after a cortisone shot in my wrist – luckily, I mentioned I was starting to feel woozy, and they immediately had me lie down, then drink something sweet, and kept me around for a while until I felt better. Since then, I warn doctors/dentists if there’s a chance I will feel major pain.

    Reply
  63. It can actually run in families – both my brother and I have problems with fainting (or “blacking out”), though with different triggers (he was infamous for fainting at the sight of blood, among other things). I was finally diagnosed a few years ago when it started to happen in a doctor’s office after a cortisone shot in my wrist – luckily, I mentioned I was starting to feel woozy, and they immediately had me lie down, then drink something sweet, and kept me around for a while until I felt better. Since then, I warn doctors/dentists if there’s a chance I will feel major pain.

    Reply
  64. It can actually run in families – both my brother and I have problems with fainting (or “blacking out”), though with different triggers (he was infamous for fainting at the sight of blood, among other things). I was finally diagnosed a few years ago when it started to happen in a doctor’s office after a cortisone shot in my wrist – luckily, I mentioned I was starting to feel woozy, and they immediately had me lie down, then drink something sweet, and kept me around for a while until I felt better. Since then, I warn doctors/dentists if there’s a chance I will feel major pain.

    Reply
  65. It can actually run in families – both my brother and I have problems with fainting (or “blacking out”), though with different triggers (he was infamous for fainting at the sight of blood, among other things). I was finally diagnosed a few years ago when it started to happen in a doctor’s office after a cortisone shot in my wrist – luckily, I mentioned I was starting to feel woozy, and they immediately had me lie down, then drink something sweet, and kept me around for a while until I felt better. Since then, I warn doctors/dentists if there’s a chance I will feel major pain.

    Reply
  66. Oh, and it once happened to me as a teenager after getting some teeth pulled, and yes, the dentist used “smelling salts” to revive me.

    Reply
  67. Oh, and it once happened to me as a teenager after getting some teeth pulled, and yes, the dentist used “smelling salts” to revive me.

    Reply
  68. Oh, and it once happened to me as a teenager after getting some teeth pulled, and yes, the dentist used “smelling salts” to revive me.

    Reply
  69. Oh, and it once happened to me as a teenager after getting some teeth pulled, and yes, the dentist used “smelling salts” to revive me.

    Reply
  70. Oh, and it once happened to me as a teenager after getting some teeth pulled, and yes, the dentist used “smelling salts” to revive me.

    Reply
  71. I’ll take a whisk(e)y, Quantum 😉
    Mint imperials (a kind of hard mint sweet) used to stave of fainting fits for me, but whisky’s better!

    Reply
  72. I’ll take a whisk(e)y, Quantum 😉
    Mint imperials (a kind of hard mint sweet) used to stave of fainting fits for me, but whisky’s better!

    Reply
  73. I’ll take a whisk(e)y, Quantum 😉
    Mint imperials (a kind of hard mint sweet) used to stave of fainting fits for me, but whisky’s better!

    Reply
  74. I’ll take a whisk(e)y, Quantum 😉
    Mint imperials (a kind of hard mint sweet) used to stave of fainting fits for me, but whisky’s better!

    Reply
  75. I’ll take a whisk(e)y, Quantum 😉
    Mint imperials (a kind of hard mint sweet) used to stave of fainting fits for me, but whisky’s better!

    Reply
  76. I’ve fainted a few times, usually from sinus infections. It’s definitely a strange sensation.
    As far as needles and the dentist…
    For shots or blood draws, I have to watch them do it, otherwise I will have an anticipatory panic attack. Getting a shot where I can’t see what they are doing is awful. My doctor knows that, when I don’t object to getting a shot, I am really, really sick.
    For the dentist, anything other than x-rays and an exam requires sedation. The only time I made an exception was when I had an abscessed molar, and the pain was beyond excruciating.

    Reply
  77. I’ve fainted a few times, usually from sinus infections. It’s definitely a strange sensation.
    As far as needles and the dentist…
    For shots or blood draws, I have to watch them do it, otherwise I will have an anticipatory panic attack. Getting a shot where I can’t see what they are doing is awful. My doctor knows that, when I don’t object to getting a shot, I am really, really sick.
    For the dentist, anything other than x-rays and an exam requires sedation. The only time I made an exception was when I had an abscessed molar, and the pain was beyond excruciating.

    Reply
  78. I’ve fainted a few times, usually from sinus infections. It’s definitely a strange sensation.
    As far as needles and the dentist…
    For shots or blood draws, I have to watch them do it, otherwise I will have an anticipatory panic attack. Getting a shot where I can’t see what they are doing is awful. My doctor knows that, when I don’t object to getting a shot, I am really, really sick.
    For the dentist, anything other than x-rays and an exam requires sedation. The only time I made an exception was when I had an abscessed molar, and the pain was beyond excruciating.

    Reply
  79. I’ve fainted a few times, usually from sinus infections. It’s definitely a strange sensation.
    As far as needles and the dentist…
    For shots or blood draws, I have to watch them do it, otherwise I will have an anticipatory panic attack. Getting a shot where I can’t see what they are doing is awful. My doctor knows that, when I don’t object to getting a shot, I am really, really sick.
    For the dentist, anything other than x-rays and an exam requires sedation. The only time I made an exception was when I had an abscessed molar, and the pain was beyond excruciating.

    Reply
  80. I’ve fainted a few times, usually from sinus infections. It’s definitely a strange sensation.
    As far as needles and the dentist…
    For shots or blood draws, I have to watch them do it, otherwise I will have an anticipatory panic attack. Getting a shot where I can’t see what they are doing is awful. My doctor knows that, when I don’t object to getting a shot, I am really, really sick.
    For the dentist, anything other than x-rays and an exam requires sedation. The only time I made an exception was when I had an abscessed molar, and the pain was beyond excruciating.

    Reply
  81. I am a nurse and this is a very common problem, especially around blood draws. I once was getting blood for routine tests from a pregnant woman and we were chatting while it was going on, no problems, when there was this loud thud behind me. It was her big, strong husband falling off his chair in a dead faint! Poor guy was so embarrassed, but he had a real issue with blood. (I never did hear how he handled the birth) At our OB office, we kept ammonia capsules taped to the cupboards for quick access for just such an emergency!😀

    Reply
  82. I am a nurse and this is a very common problem, especially around blood draws. I once was getting blood for routine tests from a pregnant woman and we were chatting while it was going on, no problems, when there was this loud thud behind me. It was her big, strong husband falling off his chair in a dead faint! Poor guy was so embarrassed, but he had a real issue with blood. (I never did hear how he handled the birth) At our OB office, we kept ammonia capsules taped to the cupboards for quick access for just such an emergency!😀

    Reply
  83. I am a nurse and this is a very common problem, especially around blood draws. I once was getting blood for routine tests from a pregnant woman and we were chatting while it was going on, no problems, when there was this loud thud behind me. It was her big, strong husband falling off his chair in a dead faint! Poor guy was so embarrassed, but he had a real issue with blood. (I never did hear how he handled the birth) At our OB office, we kept ammonia capsules taped to the cupboards for quick access for just such an emergency!😀

    Reply
  84. I am a nurse and this is a very common problem, especially around blood draws. I once was getting blood for routine tests from a pregnant woman and we were chatting while it was going on, no problems, when there was this loud thud behind me. It was her big, strong husband falling off his chair in a dead faint! Poor guy was so embarrassed, but he had a real issue with blood. (I never did hear how he handled the birth) At our OB office, we kept ammonia capsules taped to the cupboards for quick access for just such an emergency!😀

    Reply
  85. I am a nurse and this is a very common problem, especially around blood draws. I once was getting blood for routine tests from a pregnant woman and we were chatting while it was going on, no problems, when there was this loud thud behind me. It was her big, strong husband falling off his chair in a dead faint! Poor guy was so embarrassed, but he had a real issue with blood. (I never did hear how he handled the birth) At our OB office, we kept ammonia capsules taped to the cupboards for quick access for just such an emergency!😀

    Reply
  86. What a fascinating post, Andrea. I’d always assumed the swooning of regency era women was due to lacing. I recall classmates dropping like flies when we sang carols at old age homes in Australia before the summer holidays; I suspect it was a combination of heat and odors.

    Reply
  87. What a fascinating post, Andrea. I’d always assumed the swooning of regency era women was due to lacing. I recall classmates dropping like flies when we sang carols at old age homes in Australia before the summer holidays; I suspect it was a combination of heat and odors.

    Reply
  88. What a fascinating post, Andrea. I’d always assumed the swooning of regency era women was due to lacing. I recall classmates dropping like flies when we sang carols at old age homes in Australia before the summer holidays; I suspect it was a combination of heat and odors.

    Reply
  89. What a fascinating post, Andrea. I’d always assumed the swooning of regency era women was due to lacing. I recall classmates dropping like flies when we sang carols at old age homes in Australia before the summer holidays; I suspect it was a combination of heat and odors.

    Reply
  90. What a fascinating post, Andrea. I’d always assumed the swooning of regency era women was due to lacing. I recall classmates dropping like flies when we sang carols at old age homes in Australia before the summer holidays; I suspect it was a combination of heat and odors.

    Reply
  91. LOL on the graceful swoon! I am not that artful!
    They say dehydration is a big of feeling fain, too. So I think it’s good to drink water before getting into a stressful situation, like the dentist chair or a shot, or blood being taken. (That one’s a rough one for me. The feel of the needle in my arm, sucking blood . . . !

    Reply
  92. LOL on the graceful swoon! I am not that artful!
    They say dehydration is a big of feeling fain, too. So I think it’s good to drink water before getting into a stressful situation, like the dentist chair or a shot, or blood being taken. (That one’s a rough one for me. The feel of the needle in my arm, sucking blood . . . !

    Reply
  93. LOL on the graceful swoon! I am not that artful!
    They say dehydration is a big of feeling fain, too. So I think it’s good to drink water before getting into a stressful situation, like the dentist chair or a shot, or blood being taken. (That one’s a rough one for me. The feel of the needle in my arm, sucking blood . . . !

    Reply
  94. LOL on the graceful swoon! I am not that artful!
    They say dehydration is a big of feeling fain, too. So I think it’s good to drink water before getting into a stressful situation, like the dentist chair or a shot, or blood being taken. (That one’s a rough one for me. The feel of the needle in my arm, sucking blood . . . !

    Reply
  95. LOL on the graceful swoon! I am not that artful!
    They say dehydration is a big of feeling fain, too. So I think it’s good to drink water before getting into a stressful situation, like the dentist chair or a shot, or blood being taken. (That one’s a rough one for me. The feel of the needle in my arm, sucking blood . . . !

    Reply
  96. We fainting types are in excellent company here! It really is more common than we imagine, right in our own Wenchly reader community! Reading the blog and the comments, I wonder if historical ladies swooned more often because they just didn’t drink much water, certainly not enough by modern common sense guidelines. We guzzle bottles of spring water today – but that wasn’t so available to them (unless they skipped on down to the local spring with a bucket and ladle every day). Simple dehydration might have been a real factor…

    Reply
  97. We fainting types are in excellent company here! It really is more common than we imagine, right in our own Wenchly reader community! Reading the blog and the comments, I wonder if historical ladies swooned more often because they just didn’t drink much water, certainly not enough by modern common sense guidelines. We guzzle bottles of spring water today – but that wasn’t so available to them (unless they skipped on down to the local spring with a bucket and ladle every day). Simple dehydration might have been a real factor…

    Reply
  98. We fainting types are in excellent company here! It really is more common than we imagine, right in our own Wenchly reader community! Reading the blog and the comments, I wonder if historical ladies swooned more often because they just didn’t drink much water, certainly not enough by modern common sense guidelines. We guzzle bottles of spring water today – but that wasn’t so available to them (unless they skipped on down to the local spring with a bucket and ladle every day). Simple dehydration might have been a real factor…

    Reply
  99. We fainting types are in excellent company here! It really is more common than we imagine, right in our own Wenchly reader community! Reading the blog and the comments, I wonder if historical ladies swooned more often because they just didn’t drink much water, certainly not enough by modern common sense guidelines. We guzzle bottles of spring water today – but that wasn’t so available to them (unless they skipped on down to the local spring with a bucket and ladle every day). Simple dehydration might have been a real factor…

    Reply
  100. We fainting types are in excellent company here! It really is more common than we imagine, right in our own Wenchly reader community! Reading the blog and the comments, I wonder if historical ladies swooned more often because they just didn’t drink much water, certainly not enough by modern common sense guidelines. We guzzle bottles of spring water today – but that wasn’t so available to them (unless they skipped on down to the local spring with a bucket and ladle every day). Simple dehydration might have been a real factor…

    Reply
  101. Jenny and Andrea, I can vouch for the Scotch variety (whisky). It definitely has magical restorative powers but I’m told that it might put hairs on your chest …. best not to swoon too often!

    Reply
  102. Jenny and Andrea, I can vouch for the Scotch variety (whisky). It definitely has magical restorative powers but I’m told that it might put hairs on your chest …. best not to swoon too often!

    Reply
  103. Jenny and Andrea, I can vouch for the Scotch variety (whisky). It definitely has magical restorative powers but I’m told that it might put hairs on your chest …. best not to swoon too often!

    Reply
  104. Jenny and Andrea, I can vouch for the Scotch variety (whisky). It definitely has magical restorative powers but I’m told that it might put hairs on your chest …. best not to swoon too often!

    Reply
  105. Jenny and Andrea, I can vouch for the Scotch variety (whisky). It definitely has magical restorative powers but I’m told that it might put hairs on your chest …. best not to swoon too often!

    Reply
  106. I used to get breathless and dizzy and then faint whenever a needle came too near me. It happened a LOT. Then a friend from church, who was a nurse for some 40+ years, told me when I started to get dizzy to sing Amazing Grace to the tune of the Gilligan’s Island theme song. It worked! I’m not sure why, but I haven’t fainted once in over 20 years.

    Reply
  107. I used to get breathless and dizzy and then faint whenever a needle came too near me. It happened a LOT. Then a friend from church, who was a nurse for some 40+ years, told me when I started to get dizzy to sing Amazing Grace to the tune of the Gilligan’s Island theme song. It worked! I’m not sure why, but I haven’t fainted once in over 20 years.

    Reply
  108. I used to get breathless and dizzy and then faint whenever a needle came too near me. It happened a LOT. Then a friend from church, who was a nurse for some 40+ years, told me when I started to get dizzy to sing Amazing Grace to the tune of the Gilligan’s Island theme song. It worked! I’m not sure why, but I haven’t fainted once in over 20 years.

    Reply
  109. I used to get breathless and dizzy and then faint whenever a needle came too near me. It happened a LOT. Then a friend from church, who was a nurse for some 40+ years, told me when I started to get dizzy to sing Amazing Grace to the tune of the Gilligan’s Island theme song. It worked! I’m not sure why, but I haven’t fainted once in over 20 years.

    Reply
  110. I used to get breathless and dizzy and then faint whenever a needle came too near me. It happened a LOT. Then a friend from church, who was a nurse for some 40+ years, told me when I started to get dizzy to sing Amazing Grace to the tune of the Gilligan’s Island theme song. It worked! I’m not sure why, but I haven’t fainted once in over 20 years.

    Reply
  111. Wow, who would have thought so many of us had fainting experiences!
    I was once in a music competition with a French horn player who was very talented but had little experience playing solo. He was comfortable playing in an orchestra, but how often do you see a French horn recital? He played his selection perfectly, then as the audience clapped he slowly fell forward off his chair, crushing his horn. The bell was totally flattened! As I recall, he still won. But, oh, that poor horn.

    Reply
  112. Wow, who would have thought so many of us had fainting experiences!
    I was once in a music competition with a French horn player who was very talented but had little experience playing solo. He was comfortable playing in an orchestra, but how often do you see a French horn recital? He played his selection perfectly, then as the audience clapped he slowly fell forward off his chair, crushing his horn. The bell was totally flattened! As I recall, he still won. But, oh, that poor horn.

    Reply
  113. Wow, who would have thought so many of us had fainting experiences!
    I was once in a music competition with a French horn player who was very talented but had little experience playing solo. He was comfortable playing in an orchestra, but how often do you see a French horn recital? He played his selection perfectly, then as the audience clapped he slowly fell forward off his chair, crushing his horn. The bell was totally flattened! As I recall, he still won. But, oh, that poor horn.

    Reply
  114. Wow, who would have thought so many of us had fainting experiences!
    I was once in a music competition with a French horn player who was very talented but had little experience playing solo. He was comfortable playing in an orchestra, but how often do you see a French horn recital? He played his selection perfectly, then as the audience clapped he slowly fell forward off his chair, crushing his horn. The bell was totally flattened! As I recall, he still won. But, oh, that poor horn.

    Reply
  115. Wow, who would have thought so many of us had fainting experiences!
    I was once in a music competition with a French horn player who was very talented but had little experience playing solo. He was comfortable playing in an orchestra, but how often do you see a French horn recital? He played his selection perfectly, then as the audience clapped he slowly fell forward off his chair, crushing his horn. The bell was totally flattened! As I recall, he still won. But, oh, that poor horn.

    Reply
  116. I spent most of my middle school years blacking out. In church and famously during a choir rehearsal when I took a cowbell out with me as I moved blindly towards fresh air! In college, I got off the examining table and fainted right in front of the doctor, which led to the discovery that I have orthostatic hypotension. I got so good at coping that I could rise from a crouching position to a standing one and the customer I was talking to never noticed that I couldn’t see anything for a second! The other way I cope is that I never spend a day in bed, no matter how sick I am. Dealing with dizziness on top of the other symptoms is contraindicated.

    Reply
  117. I spent most of my middle school years blacking out. In church and famously during a choir rehearsal when I took a cowbell out with me as I moved blindly towards fresh air! In college, I got off the examining table and fainted right in front of the doctor, which led to the discovery that I have orthostatic hypotension. I got so good at coping that I could rise from a crouching position to a standing one and the customer I was talking to never noticed that I couldn’t see anything for a second! The other way I cope is that I never spend a day in bed, no matter how sick I am. Dealing with dizziness on top of the other symptoms is contraindicated.

    Reply
  118. I spent most of my middle school years blacking out. In church and famously during a choir rehearsal when I took a cowbell out with me as I moved blindly towards fresh air! In college, I got off the examining table and fainted right in front of the doctor, which led to the discovery that I have orthostatic hypotension. I got so good at coping that I could rise from a crouching position to a standing one and the customer I was talking to never noticed that I couldn’t see anything for a second! The other way I cope is that I never spend a day in bed, no matter how sick I am. Dealing with dizziness on top of the other symptoms is contraindicated.

    Reply
  119. I spent most of my middle school years blacking out. In church and famously during a choir rehearsal when I took a cowbell out with me as I moved blindly towards fresh air! In college, I got off the examining table and fainted right in front of the doctor, which led to the discovery that I have orthostatic hypotension. I got so good at coping that I could rise from a crouching position to a standing one and the customer I was talking to never noticed that I couldn’t see anything for a second! The other way I cope is that I never spend a day in bed, no matter how sick I am. Dealing with dizziness on top of the other symptoms is contraindicated.

    Reply
  120. I spent most of my middle school years blacking out. In church and famously during a choir rehearsal when I took a cowbell out with me as I moved blindly towards fresh air! In college, I got off the examining table and fainted right in front of the doctor, which led to the discovery that I have orthostatic hypotension. I got so good at coping that I could rise from a crouching position to a standing one and the customer I was talking to never noticed that I couldn’t see anything for a second! The other way I cope is that I never spend a day in bed, no matter how sick I am. Dealing with dizziness on top of the other symptoms is contraindicated.

    Reply
  121. I had a patient come in with an injury that necessitated he receive a tetanus injection.
    He was huge…hairy and scary! As I was getting his shot ready I glanced over just in time to keep him from hitting his head on his way to the floor. His wife laughed and said it happened every time and I should give the shot while he was downn!

    Reply
  122. I had a patient come in with an injury that necessitated he receive a tetanus injection.
    He was huge…hairy and scary! As I was getting his shot ready I glanced over just in time to keep him from hitting his head on his way to the floor. His wife laughed and said it happened every time and I should give the shot while he was downn!

    Reply
  123. I had a patient come in with an injury that necessitated he receive a tetanus injection.
    He was huge…hairy and scary! As I was getting his shot ready I glanced over just in time to keep him from hitting his head on his way to the floor. His wife laughed and said it happened every time and I should give the shot while he was downn!

    Reply
  124. I had a patient come in with an injury that necessitated he receive a tetanus injection.
    He was huge…hairy and scary! As I was getting his shot ready I glanced over just in time to keep him from hitting his head on his way to the floor. His wife laughed and said it happened every time and I should give the shot while he was downn!

    Reply
  125. I had a patient come in with an injury that necessitated he receive a tetanus injection.
    He was huge…hairy and scary! As I was getting his shot ready I glanced over just in time to keep him from hitting his head on his way to the floor. His wife laughed and said it happened every time and I should give the shot while he was downn!

    Reply
  126. Corsets weren’t necessarily tightly laced. The corset was made for the particular woman, and was no more uncomfortable than a bra nowadays. There were also lots of different styles. Of course, there were always those who overdid the lacing, and they were extra susceptible to fainting.

    Reply
  127. Corsets weren’t necessarily tightly laced. The corset was made for the particular woman, and was no more uncomfortable than a bra nowadays. There were also lots of different styles. Of course, there were always those who overdid the lacing, and they were extra susceptible to fainting.

    Reply
  128. Corsets weren’t necessarily tightly laced. The corset was made for the particular woman, and was no more uncomfortable than a bra nowadays. There were also lots of different styles. Of course, there were always those who overdid the lacing, and they were extra susceptible to fainting.

    Reply
  129. Corsets weren’t necessarily tightly laced. The corset was made for the particular woman, and was no more uncomfortable than a bra nowadays. There were also lots of different styles. Of course, there were always those who overdid the lacing, and they were extra susceptible to fainting.

    Reply
  130. Corsets weren’t necessarily tightly laced. The corset was made for the particular woman, and was no more uncomfortable than a bra nowadays. There were also lots of different styles. Of course, there were always those who overdid the lacing, and they were extra susceptible to fainting.

    Reply
  131. According to my mother, my grandmother used faint at the sight of blood. Mom was fine, and I don’t faint, but I do get a super tingling feeling in my lower legs and ankles at the initial sight of blood.
    Loved the post!

    Reply
  132. According to my mother, my grandmother used faint at the sight of blood. Mom was fine, and I don’t faint, but I do get a super tingling feeling in my lower legs and ankles at the initial sight of blood.
    Loved the post!

    Reply
  133. According to my mother, my grandmother used faint at the sight of blood. Mom was fine, and I don’t faint, but I do get a super tingling feeling in my lower legs and ankles at the initial sight of blood.
    Loved the post!

    Reply
  134. According to my mother, my grandmother used faint at the sight of blood. Mom was fine, and I don’t faint, but I do get a super tingling feeling in my lower legs and ankles at the initial sight of blood.
    Loved the post!

    Reply
  135. According to my mother, my grandmother used faint at the sight of blood. Mom was fine, and I don’t faint, but I do get a super tingling feeling in my lower legs and ankles at the initial sight of blood.
    Loved the post!

    Reply
  136. What a really fascinating post. Y’all inform me on some of the most wonderful freaky facts.
    I have fainted once while watching a film about terrible auto accidents. It was to train teen drivers. It was very graphic. That is truly the only time I actually fainted – becoming unconscious.
    For years, in my early life, my blood pressure was very low, so I would get very dizzy and feel as though I were going to faint. But, I refused to do that.
    It was because I was unable to do anything gracefully. That is not in my repertoire. It was more like someone calling “timber” and I would go down like an inanimate object.
    I also had those spells at the sight of blood. Not good when you have kids who are big on adventure.
    I never considered that fainting, I was simply checking whether the floors were clean enough to use as a resting place. I did not lose awareness of anything.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  137. What a really fascinating post. Y’all inform me on some of the most wonderful freaky facts.
    I have fainted once while watching a film about terrible auto accidents. It was to train teen drivers. It was very graphic. That is truly the only time I actually fainted – becoming unconscious.
    For years, in my early life, my blood pressure was very low, so I would get very dizzy and feel as though I were going to faint. But, I refused to do that.
    It was because I was unable to do anything gracefully. That is not in my repertoire. It was more like someone calling “timber” and I would go down like an inanimate object.
    I also had those spells at the sight of blood. Not good when you have kids who are big on adventure.
    I never considered that fainting, I was simply checking whether the floors were clean enough to use as a resting place. I did not lose awareness of anything.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  138. What a really fascinating post. Y’all inform me on some of the most wonderful freaky facts.
    I have fainted once while watching a film about terrible auto accidents. It was to train teen drivers. It was very graphic. That is truly the only time I actually fainted – becoming unconscious.
    For years, in my early life, my blood pressure was very low, so I would get very dizzy and feel as though I were going to faint. But, I refused to do that.
    It was because I was unable to do anything gracefully. That is not in my repertoire. It was more like someone calling “timber” and I would go down like an inanimate object.
    I also had those spells at the sight of blood. Not good when you have kids who are big on adventure.
    I never considered that fainting, I was simply checking whether the floors were clean enough to use as a resting place. I did not lose awareness of anything.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  139. What a really fascinating post. Y’all inform me on some of the most wonderful freaky facts.
    I have fainted once while watching a film about terrible auto accidents. It was to train teen drivers. It was very graphic. That is truly the only time I actually fainted – becoming unconscious.
    For years, in my early life, my blood pressure was very low, so I would get very dizzy and feel as though I were going to faint. But, I refused to do that.
    It was because I was unable to do anything gracefully. That is not in my repertoire. It was more like someone calling “timber” and I would go down like an inanimate object.
    I also had those spells at the sight of blood. Not good when you have kids who are big on adventure.
    I never considered that fainting, I was simply checking whether the floors were clean enough to use as a resting place. I did not lose awareness of anything.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  140. What a really fascinating post. Y’all inform me on some of the most wonderful freaky facts.
    I have fainted once while watching a film about terrible auto accidents. It was to train teen drivers. It was very graphic. That is truly the only time I actually fainted – becoming unconscious.
    For years, in my early life, my blood pressure was very low, so I would get very dizzy and feel as though I were going to faint. But, I refused to do that.
    It was because I was unable to do anything gracefully. That is not in my repertoire. It was more like someone calling “timber” and I would go down like an inanimate object.
    I also had those spells at the sight of blood. Not good when you have kids who are big on adventure.
    I never considered that fainting, I was simply checking whether the floors were clean enough to use as a resting place. I did not lose awareness of anything.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  141. Andrea, like you I have fainted when getting shots, once as a child, and once when I was sixteen. Not since, though I still hate getting shots — the very thought of them makes my left arm hurt! And with all the news about the vaccine lately, it’s been hurting a lot these days.
    I’m not necessarily against heroines fainting, if it fits the story and the character of that heroine. Although my father once told me that when he was in the army, sometimes it was the biggest, strongest men who fainted when they got their shots! So maybe, once in a while, the hero should faint!

    Reply
  142. Andrea, like you I have fainted when getting shots, once as a child, and once when I was sixteen. Not since, though I still hate getting shots — the very thought of them makes my left arm hurt! And with all the news about the vaccine lately, it’s been hurting a lot these days.
    I’m not necessarily against heroines fainting, if it fits the story and the character of that heroine. Although my father once told me that when he was in the army, sometimes it was the biggest, strongest men who fainted when they got their shots! So maybe, once in a while, the hero should faint!

    Reply
  143. Andrea, like you I have fainted when getting shots, once as a child, and once when I was sixteen. Not since, though I still hate getting shots — the very thought of them makes my left arm hurt! And with all the news about the vaccine lately, it’s been hurting a lot these days.
    I’m not necessarily against heroines fainting, if it fits the story and the character of that heroine. Although my father once told me that when he was in the army, sometimes it was the biggest, strongest men who fainted when they got their shots! So maybe, once in a while, the hero should faint!

    Reply
  144. Andrea, like you I have fainted when getting shots, once as a child, and once when I was sixteen. Not since, though I still hate getting shots — the very thought of them makes my left arm hurt! And with all the news about the vaccine lately, it’s been hurting a lot these days.
    I’m not necessarily against heroines fainting, if it fits the story and the character of that heroine. Although my father once told me that when he was in the army, sometimes it was the biggest, strongest men who fainted when they got their shots! So maybe, once in a while, the hero should faint!

    Reply
  145. Andrea, like you I have fainted when getting shots, once as a child, and once when I was sixteen. Not since, though I still hate getting shots — the very thought of them makes my left arm hurt! And with all the news about the vaccine lately, it’s been hurting a lot these days.
    I’m not necessarily against heroines fainting, if it fits the story and the character of that heroine. Although my father once told me that when he was in the army, sometimes it was the biggest, strongest men who fainted when they got their shots! So maybe, once in a while, the hero should faint!

    Reply
  146. Great article, and like a few others I had no idea that vinegrettes were not little glass vials. But those beautiful boxes!!
    I don’t have the vagus nerve thing, thankfully. I read with utter awed sympathy of the rest of the comments here how so many people suffer with fainting. I’ve only come ‘close’ twice in my life and both were due to pain. I’m just not wary of needles…I’ve always been kind of fascinated by medical stuff. I don’t remember how my mom handled our getting shots, maybe it was honesty (I was the oldest) but from the get-go I found it fascinating to watch the nurse do the shot…sure it hurt for a bit.
    I once injured my collar bone area, inflamed tendons, and went to the doctor. He touched that area, I saw stars, and started to black out. My husband was with me thank goodness, they both rushed forward to hold me back from falling off the exam table. I didn’t full out faint though but that was a helpless feeling, thus my sympathy. And that danged tendonitis was horrible and took forever to heal.
    Keep safe everyone.

    Reply
  147. Great article, and like a few others I had no idea that vinegrettes were not little glass vials. But those beautiful boxes!!
    I don’t have the vagus nerve thing, thankfully. I read with utter awed sympathy of the rest of the comments here how so many people suffer with fainting. I’ve only come ‘close’ twice in my life and both were due to pain. I’m just not wary of needles…I’ve always been kind of fascinated by medical stuff. I don’t remember how my mom handled our getting shots, maybe it was honesty (I was the oldest) but from the get-go I found it fascinating to watch the nurse do the shot…sure it hurt for a bit.
    I once injured my collar bone area, inflamed tendons, and went to the doctor. He touched that area, I saw stars, and started to black out. My husband was with me thank goodness, they both rushed forward to hold me back from falling off the exam table. I didn’t full out faint though but that was a helpless feeling, thus my sympathy. And that danged tendonitis was horrible and took forever to heal.
    Keep safe everyone.

    Reply
  148. Great article, and like a few others I had no idea that vinegrettes were not little glass vials. But those beautiful boxes!!
    I don’t have the vagus nerve thing, thankfully. I read with utter awed sympathy of the rest of the comments here how so many people suffer with fainting. I’ve only come ‘close’ twice in my life and both were due to pain. I’m just not wary of needles…I’ve always been kind of fascinated by medical stuff. I don’t remember how my mom handled our getting shots, maybe it was honesty (I was the oldest) but from the get-go I found it fascinating to watch the nurse do the shot…sure it hurt for a bit.
    I once injured my collar bone area, inflamed tendons, and went to the doctor. He touched that area, I saw stars, and started to black out. My husband was with me thank goodness, they both rushed forward to hold me back from falling off the exam table. I didn’t full out faint though but that was a helpless feeling, thus my sympathy. And that danged tendonitis was horrible and took forever to heal.
    Keep safe everyone.

    Reply
  149. Great article, and like a few others I had no idea that vinegrettes were not little glass vials. But those beautiful boxes!!
    I don’t have the vagus nerve thing, thankfully. I read with utter awed sympathy of the rest of the comments here how so many people suffer with fainting. I’ve only come ‘close’ twice in my life and both were due to pain. I’m just not wary of needles…I’ve always been kind of fascinated by medical stuff. I don’t remember how my mom handled our getting shots, maybe it was honesty (I was the oldest) but from the get-go I found it fascinating to watch the nurse do the shot…sure it hurt for a bit.
    I once injured my collar bone area, inflamed tendons, and went to the doctor. He touched that area, I saw stars, and started to black out. My husband was with me thank goodness, they both rushed forward to hold me back from falling off the exam table. I didn’t full out faint though but that was a helpless feeling, thus my sympathy. And that danged tendonitis was horrible and took forever to heal.
    Keep safe everyone.

    Reply
  150. Great article, and like a few others I had no idea that vinegrettes were not little glass vials. But those beautiful boxes!!
    I don’t have the vagus nerve thing, thankfully. I read with utter awed sympathy of the rest of the comments here how so many people suffer with fainting. I’ve only come ‘close’ twice in my life and both were due to pain. I’m just not wary of needles…I’ve always been kind of fascinated by medical stuff. I don’t remember how my mom handled our getting shots, maybe it was honesty (I was the oldest) but from the get-go I found it fascinating to watch the nurse do the shot…sure it hurt for a bit.
    I once injured my collar bone area, inflamed tendons, and went to the doctor. He touched that area, I saw stars, and started to black out. My husband was with me thank goodness, they both rushed forward to hold me back from falling off the exam table. I didn’t full out faint though but that was a helpless feeling, thus my sympathy. And that danged tendonitis was horrible and took forever to heal.
    Keep safe everyone.

    Reply
  151. Jane, I’m like you in that I still hate shots, but I’ve gotten better about controlling my reaction to them. Haven’t fainted in years . . .but probably because I insist on lying down and closing my eyes.
    LOL on the big men fainting. We’ve had several accounts of that here. I think it would be very endearing to have a hero faint. (Will keep that in mind for a future book!)

    Reply
  152. Jane, I’m like you in that I still hate shots, but I’ve gotten better about controlling my reaction to them. Haven’t fainted in years . . .but probably because I insist on lying down and closing my eyes.
    LOL on the big men fainting. We’ve had several accounts of that here. I think it would be very endearing to have a hero faint. (Will keep that in mind for a future book!)

    Reply
  153. Jane, I’m like you in that I still hate shots, but I’ve gotten better about controlling my reaction to them. Haven’t fainted in years . . .but probably because I insist on lying down and closing my eyes.
    LOL on the big men fainting. We’ve had several accounts of that here. I think it would be very endearing to have a hero faint. (Will keep that in mind for a future book!)

    Reply
  154. Jane, I’m like you in that I still hate shots, but I’ve gotten better about controlling my reaction to them. Haven’t fainted in years . . .but probably because I insist on lying down and closing my eyes.
    LOL on the big men fainting. We’ve had several accounts of that here. I think it would be very endearing to have a hero faint. (Will keep that in mind for a future book!)

    Reply
  155. Jane, I’m like you in that I still hate shots, but I’ve gotten better about controlling my reaction to them. Haven’t fainted in years . . .but probably because I insist on lying down and closing my eyes.
    LOL on the big men fainting. We’ve had several accounts of that here. I think it would be very endearing to have a hero faint. (Will keep that in mind for a future book!)

    Reply
  156. Thanks, Michelle. I, too, was amazed when I did research and discovered how beautiful the vinaigrette are. I pictured most glass bottles, too.
    I think fainting from pain is a slightly different physical reaction than fainting from stress or shock. But both are frightening. Ouch on the injured collarbone. And it’s hard to keep still, so I can imagine how long it took to heal.

    Reply
  157. Thanks, Michelle. I, too, was amazed when I did research and discovered how beautiful the vinaigrette are. I pictured most glass bottles, too.
    I think fainting from pain is a slightly different physical reaction than fainting from stress or shock. But both are frightening. Ouch on the injured collarbone. And it’s hard to keep still, so I can imagine how long it took to heal.

    Reply
  158. Thanks, Michelle. I, too, was amazed when I did research and discovered how beautiful the vinaigrette are. I pictured most glass bottles, too.
    I think fainting from pain is a slightly different physical reaction than fainting from stress or shock. But both are frightening. Ouch on the injured collarbone. And it’s hard to keep still, so I can imagine how long it took to heal.

    Reply
  159. Thanks, Michelle. I, too, was amazed when I did research and discovered how beautiful the vinaigrette are. I pictured most glass bottles, too.
    I think fainting from pain is a slightly different physical reaction than fainting from stress or shock. But both are frightening. Ouch on the injured collarbone. And it’s hard to keep still, so I can imagine how long it took to heal.

    Reply
  160. Thanks, Michelle. I, too, was amazed when I did research and discovered how beautiful the vinaigrette are. I pictured most glass bottles, too.
    I think fainting from pain is a slightly different physical reaction than fainting from stress or shock. But both are frightening. Ouch on the injured collarbone. And it’s hard to keep still, so I can imagine how long it took to heal.

    Reply
  161. Loved the pictures of the vinaigrettes. I never knew what they looked like but assumed they were bottles as well. Funny side note on smelling salts. I got some in my stocking in a little green bottle when I was in High School or College – at least 40 years ago. I still have them and oh MY are they strong. Still strong to this day.
    As for fainting…holds up hand. Yes I’ve fainted. Weirdest sensation… Biggest faint was when I jumped up out of bed, ran downstairs and opened the front door answering the door bell. Oopps…down I went. Poor guy on the other side of the door was scared out of his wits.
    Having blood drawn can bring it on. So no looking. I’ve almost passed out before and freaked out a young blood vampire..
    Almost passed out when I got my ears pierced too when I was 14.
    The older I get the more frequently I get woozy if I go from a squat to a standing position. So at stores I ALWAYS have a shopping cart. Even if I only need one item. I don’t want them to have to do a page saying “Clean up on Aisle 1” meaning get me up off the floor.
    Happens when I’m gardening also. So at a certain point I just say. Okay. I’m done for the day.
    Fascinating how MANY people have fainting/woozy issues. Thanks for writing the post and all the responses.
    As for the heroine fainting…sometimes it is a good plot device used to extricate her/them from situation. Don’t necessarily want to read about someone fainting all the time.
    As for lacing corsets – sensible lacing allowed you to move, function, etc. At least everything I’ve seen written. It was those young girls or women who dressed for success that had problems. There are tons of videos on Youtube of what women wore (all the layers) from different eras. Those put out by Prior Attire are very good.

    Reply
  162. Loved the pictures of the vinaigrettes. I never knew what they looked like but assumed they were bottles as well. Funny side note on smelling salts. I got some in my stocking in a little green bottle when I was in High School or College – at least 40 years ago. I still have them and oh MY are they strong. Still strong to this day.
    As for fainting…holds up hand. Yes I’ve fainted. Weirdest sensation… Biggest faint was when I jumped up out of bed, ran downstairs and opened the front door answering the door bell. Oopps…down I went. Poor guy on the other side of the door was scared out of his wits.
    Having blood drawn can bring it on. So no looking. I’ve almost passed out before and freaked out a young blood vampire..
    Almost passed out when I got my ears pierced too when I was 14.
    The older I get the more frequently I get woozy if I go from a squat to a standing position. So at stores I ALWAYS have a shopping cart. Even if I only need one item. I don’t want them to have to do a page saying “Clean up on Aisle 1” meaning get me up off the floor.
    Happens when I’m gardening also. So at a certain point I just say. Okay. I’m done for the day.
    Fascinating how MANY people have fainting/woozy issues. Thanks for writing the post and all the responses.
    As for the heroine fainting…sometimes it is a good plot device used to extricate her/them from situation. Don’t necessarily want to read about someone fainting all the time.
    As for lacing corsets – sensible lacing allowed you to move, function, etc. At least everything I’ve seen written. It was those young girls or women who dressed for success that had problems. There are tons of videos on Youtube of what women wore (all the layers) from different eras. Those put out by Prior Attire are very good.

    Reply
  163. Loved the pictures of the vinaigrettes. I never knew what they looked like but assumed they were bottles as well. Funny side note on smelling salts. I got some in my stocking in a little green bottle when I was in High School or College – at least 40 years ago. I still have them and oh MY are they strong. Still strong to this day.
    As for fainting…holds up hand. Yes I’ve fainted. Weirdest sensation… Biggest faint was when I jumped up out of bed, ran downstairs and opened the front door answering the door bell. Oopps…down I went. Poor guy on the other side of the door was scared out of his wits.
    Having blood drawn can bring it on. So no looking. I’ve almost passed out before and freaked out a young blood vampire..
    Almost passed out when I got my ears pierced too when I was 14.
    The older I get the more frequently I get woozy if I go from a squat to a standing position. So at stores I ALWAYS have a shopping cart. Even if I only need one item. I don’t want them to have to do a page saying “Clean up on Aisle 1” meaning get me up off the floor.
    Happens when I’m gardening also. So at a certain point I just say. Okay. I’m done for the day.
    Fascinating how MANY people have fainting/woozy issues. Thanks for writing the post and all the responses.
    As for the heroine fainting…sometimes it is a good plot device used to extricate her/them from situation. Don’t necessarily want to read about someone fainting all the time.
    As for lacing corsets – sensible lacing allowed you to move, function, etc. At least everything I’ve seen written. It was those young girls or women who dressed for success that had problems. There are tons of videos on Youtube of what women wore (all the layers) from different eras. Those put out by Prior Attire are very good.

    Reply
  164. Loved the pictures of the vinaigrettes. I never knew what they looked like but assumed they were bottles as well. Funny side note on smelling salts. I got some in my stocking in a little green bottle when I was in High School or College – at least 40 years ago. I still have them and oh MY are they strong. Still strong to this day.
    As for fainting…holds up hand. Yes I’ve fainted. Weirdest sensation… Biggest faint was when I jumped up out of bed, ran downstairs and opened the front door answering the door bell. Oopps…down I went. Poor guy on the other side of the door was scared out of his wits.
    Having blood drawn can bring it on. So no looking. I’ve almost passed out before and freaked out a young blood vampire..
    Almost passed out when I got my ears pierced too when I was 14.
    The older I get the more frequently I get woozy if I go from a squat to a standing position. So at stores I ALWAYS have a shopping cart. Even if I only need one item. I don’t want them to have to do a page saying “Clean up on Aisle 1” meaning get me up off the floor.
    Happens when I’m gardening also. So at a certain point I just say. Okay. I’m done for the day.
    Fascinating how MANY people have fainting/woozy issues. Thanks for writing the post and all the responses.
    As for the heroine fainting…sometimes it is a good plot device used to extricate her/them from situation. Don’t necessarily want to read about someone fainting all the time.
    As for lacing corsets – sensible lacing allowed you to move, function, etc. At least everything I’ve seen written. It was those young girls or women who dressed for success that had problems. There are tons of videos on Youtube of what women wore (all the layers) from different eras. Those put out by Prior Attire are very good.

    Reply
  165. Loved the pictures of the vinaigrettes. I never knew what they looked like but assumed they were bottles as well. Funny side note on smelling salts. I got some in my stocking in a little green bottle when I was in High School or College – at least 40 years ago. I still have them and oh MY are they strong. Still strong to this day.
    As for fainting…holds up hand. Yes I’ve fainted. Weirdest sensation… Biggest faint was when I jumped up out of bed, ran downstairs and opened the front door answering the door bell. Oopps…down I went. Poor guy on the other side of the door was scared out of his wits.
    Having blood drawn can bring it on. So no looking. I’ve almost passed out before and freaked out a young blood vampire..
    Almost passed out when I got my ears pierced too when I was 14.
    The older I get the more frequently I get woozy if I go from a squat to a standing position. So at stores I ALWAYS have a shopping cart. Even if I only need one item. I don’t want them to have to do a page saying “Clean up on Aisle 1” meaning get me up off the floor.
    Happens when I’m gardening also. So at a certain point I just say. Okay. I’m done for the day.
    Fascinating how MANY people have fainting/woozy issues. Thanks for writing the post and all the responses.
    As for the heroine fainting…sometimes it is a good plot device used to extricate her/them from situation. Don’t necessarily want to read about someone fainting all the time.
    As for lacing corsets – sensible lacing allowed you to move, function, etc. At least everything I’ve seen written. It was those young girls or women who dressed for success that had problems. There are tons of videos on Youtube of what women wore (all the layers) from different eras. Those put out by Prior Attire are very good.

    Reply
  166. One of my Mother’s favorite stories was about “Granny Jane” who would wander into the front room where she and her sisters were sitting with their beaux (in the Forties). In the middle of the room Granny would suddenly and gracefully “swoon” to the floor. Now, the family was used to this and had found that the best thing to do was ignore her. But it was embarrassing, especially if a new beau was shocked by their lack of concern. After a few minutes Granny would pop one eye open, look around to see she was not getting any attention and calmly get up and leave the room.

    Reply
  167. One of my Mother’s favorite stories was about “Granny Jane” who would wander into the front room where she and her sisters were sitting with their beaux (in the Forties). In the middle of the room Granny would suddenly and gracefully “swoon” to the floor. Now, the family was used to this and had found that the best thing to do was ignore her. But it was embarrassing, especially if a new beau was shocked by their lack of concern. After a few minutes Granny would pop one eye open, look around to see she was not getting any attention and calmly get up and leave the room.

    Reply
  168. One of my Mother’s favorite stories was about “Granny Jane” who would wander into the front room where she and her sisters were sitting with their beaux (in the Forties). In the middle of the room Granny would suddenly and gracefully “swoon” to the floor. Now, the family was used to this and had found that the best thing to do was ignore her. But it was embarrassing, especially if a new beau was shocked by their lack of concern. After a few minutes Granny would pop one eye open, look around to see she was not getting any attention and calmly get up and leave the room.

    Reply
  169. One of my Mother’s favorite stories was about “Granny Jane” who would wander into the front room where she and her sisters were sitting with their beaux (in the Forties). In the middle of the room Granny would suddenly and gracefully “swoon” to the floor. Now, the family was used to this and had found that the best thing to do was ignore her. But it was embarrassing, especially if a new beau was shocked by their lack of concern. After a few minutes Granny would pop one eye open, look around to see she was not getting any attention and calmly get up and leave the room.

    Reply
  170. One of my Mother’s favorite stories was about “Granny Jane” who would wander into the front room where she and her sisters were sitting with their beaux (in the Forties). In the middle of the room Granny would suddenly and gracefully “swoon” to the floor. Now, the family was used to this and had found that the best thing to do was ignore her. But it was embarrassing, especially if a new beau was shocked by their lack of concern. After a few minutes Granny would pop one eye open, look around to see she was not getting any attention and calmly get up and leave the room.

    Reply
  171. Oh, Vicki, how fun that you actually have smelling salts! That’s very cool.
    I’ve really enjoyed all the stories, too. I confess, I hadn’t realized I was in such good company! But I guess it’s not as weird as I had first thought.
    Ear piercing could definitely bring on a swoon. Needles AND a hole into your flesh! Accck!
    The up and down fainting is definitely blood pressure stuff. I occasionally get light-headed if I jump up from a chair, haven’t fainted. Yet!

    Reply
  172. Oh, Vicki, how fun that you actually have smelling salts! That’s very cool.
    I’ve really enjoyed all the stories, too. I confess, I hadn’t realized I was in such good company! But I guess it’s not as weird as I had first thought.
    Ear piercing could definitely bring on a swoon. Needles AND a hole into your flesh! Accck!
    The up and down fainting is definitely blood pressure stuff. I occasionally get light-headed if I jump up from a chair, haven’t fainted. Yet!

    Reply
  173. Oh, Vicki, how fun that you actually have smelling salts! That’s very cool.
    I’ve really enjoyed all the stories, too. I confess, I hadn’t realized I was in such good company! But I guess it’s not as weird as I had first thought.
    Ear piercing could definitely bring on a swoon. Needles AND a hole into your flesh! Accck!
    The up and down fainting is definitely blood pressure stuff. I occasionally get light-headed if I jump up from a chair, haven’t fainted. Yet!

    Reply
  174. Oh, Vicki, how fun that you actually have smelling salts! That’s very cool.
    I’ve really enjoyed all the stories, too. I confess, I hadn’t realized I was in such good company! But I guess it’s not as weird as I had first thought.
    Ear piercing could definitely bring on a swoon. Needles AND a hole into your flesh! Accck!
    The up and down fainting is definitely blood pressure stuff. I occasionally get light-headed if I jump up from a chair, haven’t fainted. Yet!

    Reply
  175. Oh, Vicki, how fun that you actually have smelling salts! That’s very cool.
    I’ve really enjoyed all the stories, too. I confess, I hadn’t realized I was in such good company! But I guess it’s not as weird as I had first thought.
    Ear piercing could definitely bring on a swoon. Needles AND a hole into your flesh! Accck!
    The up and down fainting is definitely blood pressure stuff. I occasionally get light-headed if I jump up from a chair, haven’t fainted. Yet!

    Reply
  176. I just remembered…Mary Jo has a gentleman character in the Lost Lord series who faints when he sees blood – Damian (Mac) Mackenzie. His book is Nowhere Near Respectable.

    Reply
  177. I just remembered…Mary Jo has a gentleman character in the Lost Lord series who faints when he sees blood – Damian (Mac) Mackenzie. His book is Nowhere Near Respectable.

    Reply
  178. I just remembered…Mary Jo has a gentleman character in the Lost Lord series who faints when he sees blood – Damian (Mac) Mackenzie. His book is Nowhere Near Respectable.

    Reply
  179. I just remembered…Mary Jo has a gentleman character in the Lost Lord series who faints when he sees blood – Damian (Mac) Mackenzie. His book is Nowhere Near Respectable.

    Reply
  180. I just remembered…Mary Jo has a gentleman character in the Lost Lord series who faints when he sees blood – Damian (Mac) Mackenzie. His book is Nowhere Near Respectable.

    Reply
  181. I’ve never fainted from stress but I have known people who did, so I always took it seriously. It is a worrisome thing to see because when it happens you can’t know whether it will pass or not. Should I call 911 or what? I would think. But people (and they weren’t all women) seemed to come out of it before a call could even be made and claimed they were okay.
    So my sympathy is for the non-fake fainting ladies in regencies, but also for whoever had to deal with the faint and decide what to do.

    Reply
  182. I’ve never fainted from stress but I have known people who did, so I always took it seriously. It is a worrisome thing to see because when it happens you can’t know whether it will pass or not. Should I call 911 or what? I would think. But people (and they weren’t all women) seemed to come out of it before a call could even be made and claimed they were okay.
    So my sympathy is for the non-fake fainting ladies in regencies, but also for whoever had to deal with the faint and decide what to do.

    Reply
  183. I’ve never fainted from stress but I have known people who did, so I always took it seriously. It is a worrisome thing to see because when it happens you can’t know whether it will pass or not. Should I call 911 or what? I would think. But people (and they weren’t all women) seemed to come out of it before a call could even be made and claimed they were okay.
    So my sympathy is for the non-fake fainting ladies in regencies, but also for whoever had to deal with the faint and decide what to do.

    Reply
  184. I’ve never fainted from stress but I have known people who did, so I always took it seriously. It is a worrisome thing to see because when it happens you can’t know whether it will pass or not. Should I call 911 or what? I would think. But people (and they weren’t all women) seemed to come out of it before a call could even be made and claimed they were okay.
    So my sympathy is for the non-fake fainting ladies in regencies, but also for whoever had to deal with the faint and decide what to do.

    Reply
  185. I’ve never fainted from stress but I have known people who did, so I always took it seriously. It is a worrisome thing to see because when it happens you can’t know whether it will pass or not. Should I call 911 or what? I would think. But people (and they weren’t all women) seemed to come out of it before a call could even be made and claimed they were okay.
    So my sympathy is for the non-fake fainting ladies in regencies, but also for whoever had to deal with the faint and decide what to do.

    Reply
  186. I’ll admit that I’ve always thought that swooning ladies in Regency novels were for effect rather than a physical reaction. And this in spite of having many people of both genders, all ages and sizes, get faint during injections I have given. I definitely think the idea that people were probably dehydrated in that era has merit. When I was at school in Australia, we all had to line up before classes at Assembly and kids would regularly pass out (Ouch! onto the cement). Often the same ones over and over. Military parades in summer caused the same problem when they came to rest. Plus the audience would keel over. And people would regularly pass out at the cricket. It doesn’t seem to happen so much now. There are many more warnings about managing heat and people are so much more aware of drinking plenty of water. … Thanks for all the info on the vinaigrette. That was new information and really fascinating. Of course women needed something to compete with snuff boxes but how surprising there were no collections. Or do you think maybe there were secret, shame faced collections that Manly men didn’t talk about? Lol. Because they must have been just as beautiful and expensive.

    Reply
  187. I’ll admit that I’ve always thought that swooning ladies in Regency novels were for effect rather than a physical reaction. And this in spite of having many people of both genders, all ages and sizes, get faint during injections I have given. I definitely think the idea that people were probably dehydrated in that era has merit. When I was at school in Australia, we all had to line up before classes at Assembly and kids would regularly pass out (Ouch! onto the cement). Often the same ones over and over. Military parades in summer caused the same problem when they came to rest. Plus the audience would keel over. And people would regularly pass out at the cricket. It doesn’t seem to happen so much now. There are many more warnings about managing heat and people are so much more aware of drinking plenty of water. … Thanks for all the info on the vinaigrette. That was new information and really fascinating. Of course women needed something to compete with snuff boxes but how surprising there were no collections. Or do you think maybe there were secret, shame faced collections that Manly men didn’t talk about? Lol. Because they must have been just as beautiful and expensive.

    Reply
  188. I’ll admit that I’ve always thought that swooning ladies in Regency novels were for effect rather than a physical reaction. And this in spite of having many people of both genders, all ages and sizes, get faint during injections I have given. I definitely think the idea that people were probably dehydrated in that era has merit. When I was at school in Australia, we all had to line up before classes at Assembly and kids would regularly pass out (Ouch! onto the cement). Often the same ones over and over. Military parades in summer caused the same problem when they came to rest. Plus the audience would keel over. And people would regularly pass out at the cricket. It doesn’t seem to happen so much now. There are many more warnings about managing heat and people are so much more aware of drinking plenty of water. … Thanks for all the info on the vinaigrette. That was new information and really fascinating. Of course women needed something to compete with snuff boxes but how surprising there were no collections. Or do you think maybe there were secret, shame faced collections that Manly men didn’t talk about? Lol. Because they must have been just as beautiful and expensive.

    Reply
  189. I’ll admit that I’ve always thought that swooning ladies in Regency novels were for effect rather than a physical reaction. And this in spite of having many people of both genders, all ages and sizes, get faint during injections I have given. I definitely think the idea that people were probably dehydrated in that era has merit. When I was at school in Australia, we all had to line up before classes at Assembly and kids would regularly pass out (Ouch! onto the cement). Often the same ones over and over. Military parades in summer caused the same problem when they came to rest. Plus the audience would keel over. And people would regularly pass out at the cricket. It doesn’t seem to happen so much now. There are many more warnings about managing heat and people are so much more aware of drinking plenty of water. … Thanks for all the info on the vinaigrette. That was new information and really fascinating. Of course women needed something to compete with snuff boxes but how surprising there were no collections. Or do you think maybe there were secret, shame faced collections that Manly men didn’t talk about? Lol. Because they must have been just as beautiful and expensive.

    Reply
  190. I’ll admit that I’ve always thought that swooning ladies in Regency novels were for effect rather than a physical reaction. And this in spite of having many people of both genders, all ages and sizes, get faint during injections I have given. I definitely think the idea that people were probably dehydrated in that era has merit. When I was at school in Australia, we all had to line up before classes at Assembly and kids would regularly pass out (Ouch! onto the cement). Often the same ones over and over. Military parades in summer caused the same problem when they came to rest. Plus the audience would keel over. And people would regularly pass out at the cricket. It doesn’t seem to happen so much now. There are many more warnings about managing heat and people are so much more aware of drinking plenty of water. … Thanks for all the info on the vinaigrette. That was new information and really fascinating. Of course women needed something to compete with snuff boxes but how surprising there were no collections. Or do you think maybe there were secret, shame faced collections that Manly men didn’t talk about? Lol. Because they must have been just as beautiful and expensive.

    Reply

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