Who Reads American History?

Rice_LordRogue_200x300Pat here!

Since Mary Jo is writing about the War of 1812, and my early Americans are being re-released this month, I thought it might be fun to take a little jog back to our elementary school history classes.

Before you turn up your noses, consider this: The American Revolution took place during the Georgian era we so fondly write about in our historical romances, and the War of 1812 was smack dab in the midst of our favorite Regency era. The Americans participating in these confrontations were on the whole, Europeans and mostly English, or descendants thereof. We are essentially talking about the same characters we’re reading about in English Regencies, except they’re on a different continent. My westerns go further and deeper than those early years, delving into the Victorian era—at that point, the cultural dividing line between the US and England is a little more marked, but quite often, the attitudes are the same.

If you’re into astrology, I think 1812 had to be under the planet of change and upheaval. Aside from impoverished Russia stemming Napoleon’s disastrous invasion, the infant US also challenged the world-powerhouse British army to war. We had earthquakes that sent the Mississippi River running backward. American Robert Fulton spent most of his adult life in Europe learning how to build steam engines, and that year, he happened to sail the first steamboat from Pittsburgh to New Orleans—during the Nypl.digitalcollections.clermontearthquake. (the image is of the Clermont, his first successful endeavor in 1807) The U.S. acquired the enormous Louisiana Purchase—impacting large numbers of French and Spanish citizens as well as British and American. All these changed history and affected people on both sides of the Atlantic. Political history may be divided by country, but social history is too connected to specify American or English.

I often hear the arguments that readers prefer the luxury of wealthy English nobility for their romantic fantasies, but in LORD ROGUE, my hero is a wealthy English viscount, as well as a bad boy rebelling against his heritage. My heroine is a Philadelphia heiress who wears the same lovely gowns as her English counterparts. They have wealth. They have luxury. The fun is when you throw these people out of their elements. Survival is a much more interesting conflict than marrying the wrong duke, in my humble opinion. (OK, the American fashion plate is from 1849, but I couldn't resist it.)

I freely admit that I often find the Regency world as we write it just a little claustrophobic—certainly that is one of the reasons I write the MAGIC series. I love humor and I’m not as much into conflict as I was in those Robt Peel nypl.digitalcollections.1849 fashionplateearly days, so I understand the relaxation of a good comedy among dukes and heiresses. But now that BIRTH OF A NATION is about to hit the movie scene, wouldn’t you like to see just a little more about the history of the US and how we became what we are today?

If the answer is a big yawn, I’ll cease and desist with the fun (to me!) facts I’ve been rummaging through in an effort to brush up my memory of our founding fathers. Having only recently learned that my paternal ancestors were French Huguenots as well as minor British nobility, and that the Dutch Reformed Church my father belonged to was actually Calvinist, I’m off down my next rabbit hole. Stop me if you don’t want to hear the results!

 

225 thoughts on “Who Reads American History?”

  1. I blame the way American history has often been taught in high school for the lack of interest. I recall my American history textbook presenting the subject as a series of treaties and tariffs. (Remember the Smoot-Hawley tariff? All I remember is the name.) If that’s how you learn American history, and you learn English history of the Georgian period by reading Georgette Heyer, which are you likely to prefer?
    Of course, both of them are extremely narrow pictures of the past, but I can’t help thinking children would be far more interested in history if they were given novels to read instead of textbooks.

    Reply
  2. I blame the way American history has often been taught in high school for the lack of interest. I recall my American history textbook presenting the subject as a series of treaties and tariffs. (Remember the Smoot-Hawley tariff? All I remember is the name.) If that’s how you learn American history, and you learn English history of the Georgian period by reading Georgette Heyer, which are you likely to prefer?
    Of course, both of them are extremely narrow pictures of the past, but I can’t help thinking children would be far more interested in history if they were given novels to read instead of textbooks.

    Reply
  3. I blame the way American history has often been taught in high school for the lack of interest. I recall my American history textbook presenting the subject as a series of treaties and tariffs. (Remember the Smoot-Hawley tariff? All I remember is the name.) If that’s how you learn American history, and you learn English history of the Georgian period by reading Georgette Heyer, which are you likely to prefer?
    Of course, both of them are extremely narrow pictures of the past, but I can’t help thinking children would be far more interested in history if they were given novels to read instead of textbooks.

    Reply
  4. I blame the way American history has often been taught in high school for the lack of interest. I recall my American history textbook presenting the subject as a series of treaties and tariffs. (Remember the Smoot-Hawley tariff? All I remember is the name.) If that’s how you learn American history, and you learn English history of the Georgian period by reading Georgette Heyer, which are you likely to prefer?
    Of course, both of them are extremely narrow pictures of the past, but I can’t help thinking children would be far more interested in history if they were given novels to read instead of textbooks.

    Reply
  5. I blame the way American history has often been taught in high school for the lack of interest. I recall my American history textbook presenting the subject as a series of treaties and tariffs. (Remember the Smoot-Hawley tariff? All I remember is the name.) If that’s how you learn American history, and you learn English history of the Georgian period by reading Georgette Heyer, which are you likely to prefer?
    Of course, both of them are extremely narrow pictures of the past, but I can’t help thinking children would be far more interested in history if they were given novels to read instead of textbooks.

    Reply
  6. I want to hear the results. :p
    Nice post. 🙂 In fact, it made me remember Griffith’s Birth of A Nation. (By the way, I applaud this pioneer film-maker’s efforts and innovations and I profoundly admire Lillian Gish’s strength and dedication. )

    Reply
  7. I want to hear the results. :p
    Nice post. 🙂 In fact, it made me remember Griffith’s Birth of A Nation. (By the way, I applaud this pioneer film-maker’s efforts and innovations and I profoundly admire Lillian Gish’s strength and dedication. )

    Reply
  8. I want to hear the results. :p
    Nice post. 🙂 In fact, it made me remember Griffith’s Birth of A Nation. (By the way, I applaud this pioneer film-maker’s efforts and innovations and I profoundly admire Lillian Gish’s strength and dedication. )

    Reply
  9. I want to hear the results. :p
    Nice post. 🙂 In fact, it made me remember Griffith’s Birth of A Nation. (By the way, I applaud this pioneer film-maker’s efforts and innovations and I profoundly admire Lillian Gish’s strength and dedication. )

    Reply
  10. I want to hear the results. :p
    Nice post. 🙂 In fact, it made me remember Griffith’s Birth of A Nation. (By the way, I applaud this pioneer film-maker’s efforts and innovations and I profoundly admire Lillian Gish’s strength and dedication. )

    Reply
  11. I had a history teacher in college that told the events of the early 19th centrury like gossip in a thick-as-molasses accent. I liked hisotry before that, but adored it afterwards.

    Reply
  12. I had a history teacher in college that told the events of the early 19th centrury like gossip in a thick-as-molasses accent. I liked hisotry before that, but adored it afterwards.

    Reply
  13. I had a history teacher in college that told the events of the early 19th centrury like gossip in a thick-as-molasses accent. I liked hisotry before that, but adored it afterwards.

    Reply
  14. I had a history teacher in college that told the events of the early 19th centrury like gossip in a thick-as-molasses accent. I liked hisotry before that, but adored it afterwards.

    Reply
  15. I had a history teacher in college that told the events of the early 19th centrury like gossip in a thick-as-molasses accent. I liked hisotry before that, but adored it afterwards.

    Reply
  16. I love American history, and some of my favourite historical romances are set there. Unfortunately publishers seem to pick one location and theme and that’s it for the foreseeable future.
    The same in contemporary romances – how many navy SEALs can there possibly be, and why are all modern romance heroes located in only one or two US states?!

    Reply
  17. I love American history, and some of my favourite historical romances are set there. Unfortunately publishers seem to pick one location and theme and that’s it for the foreseeable future.
    The same in contemporary romances – how many navy SEALs can there possibly be, and why are all modern romance heroes located in only one or two US states?!

    Reply
  18. I love American history, and some of my favourite historical romances are set there. Unfortunately publishers seem to pick one location and theme and that’s it for the foreseeable future.
    The same in contemporary romances – how many navy SEALs can there possibly be, and why are all modern romance heroes located in only one or two US states?!

    Reply
  19. I love American history, and some of my favourite historical romances are set there. Unfortunately publishers seem to pick one location and theme and that’s it for the foreseeable future.
    The same in contemporary romances – how many navy SEALs can there possibly be, and why are all modern romance heroes located in only one or two US states?!

    Reply
  20. I love American history, and some of my favourite historical romances are set there. Unfortunately publishers seem to pick one location and theme and that’s it for the foreseeable future.
    The same in contemporary romances – how many navy SEALs can there possibly be, and why are all modern romance heroes located in only one or two US states?!

    Reply
  21. I LOVE history! Wasn’t always so. I remember Ancient History as my first history lessons in grade school. Wasn’t interested in it at all. But when we hit the middle ages and the characters in the pictures in my history book looked like contemporaries of Robin Hood (a TV series at the time) my imagination snapped on and hasn’t turned off since.
    I love American history and would be interested in all the fun facts you are rummaging through.

    Reply
  22. I LOVE history! Wasn’t always so. I remember Ancient History as my first history lessons in grade school. Wasn’t interested in it at all. But when we hit the middle ages and the characters in the pictures in my history book looked like contemporaries of Robin Hood (a TV series at the time) my imagination snapped on and hasn’t turned off since.
    I love American history and would be interested in all the fun facts you are rummaging through.

    Reply
  23. I LOVE history! Wasn’t always so. I remember Ancient History as my first history lessons in grade school. Wasn’t interested in it at all. But when we hit the middle ages and the characters in the pictures in my history book looked like contemporaries of Robin Hood (a TV series at the time) my imagination snapped on and hasn’t turned off since.
    I love American history and would be interested in all the fun facts you are rummaging through.

    Reply
  24. I LOVE history! Wasn’t always so. I remember Ancient History as my first history lessons in grade school. Wasn’t interested in it at all. But when we hit the middle ages and the characters in the pictures in my history book looked like contemporaries of Robin Hood (a TV series at the time) my imagination snapped on and hasn’t turned off since.
    I love American history and would be interested in all the fun facts you are rummaging through.

    Reply
  25. I LOVE history! Wasn’t always so. I remember Ancient History as my first history lessons in grade school. Wasn’t interested in it at all. But when we hit the middle ages and the characters in the pictures in my history book looked like contemporaries of Robin Hood (a TV series at the time) my imagination snapped on and hasn’t turned off since.
    I love American history and would be interested in all the fun facts you are rummaging through.

    Reply
  26. I believe what we feel about any history is what we first learned and how we first learned it. I agree with Lillian’s comment. History books seem to have been written to discourage anyone from wanting to know any more. Unfortunately for the people who write those books, they could not discourage me. I have a family which is large and various parts arrived here at different times from different places. So, I started asking questions, and getting library books and learning. I truly do not understand why American history is not taught by introducing people who were there, living the history. I think any student would love to get to know about Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. Or who would not want to learn about Dolly Madison saving things from the White House? History is all about people, and if those people were introduced to history students, I think those students would jump in with both feet.

    Reply
  27. I believe what we feel about any history is what we first learned and how we first learned it. I agree with Lillian’s comment. History books seem to have been written to discourage anyone from wanting to know any more. Unfortunately for the people who write those books, they could not discourage me. I have a family which is large and various parts arrived here at different times from different places. So, I started asking questions, and getting library books and learning. I truly do not understand why American history is not taught by introducing people who were there, living the history. I think any student would love to get to know about Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. Or who would not want to learn about Dolly Madison saving things from the White House? History is all about people, and if those people were introduced to history students, I think those students would jump in with both feet.

    Reply
  28. I believe what we feel about any history is what we first learned and how we first learned it. I agree with Lillian’s comment. History books seem to have been written to discourage anyone from wanting to know any more. Unfortunately for the people who write those books, they could not discourage me. I have a family which is large and various parts arrived here at different times from different places. So, I started asking questions, and getting library books and learning. I truly do not understand why American history is not taught by introducing people who were there, living the history. I think any student would love to get to know about Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. Or who would not want to learn about Dolly Madison saving things from the White House? History is all about people, and if those people were introduced to history students, I think those students would jump in with both feet.

    Reply
  29. I believe what we feel about any history is what we first learned and how we first learned it. I agree with Lillian’s comment. History books seem to have been written to discourage anyone from wanting to know any more. Unfortunately for the people who write those books, they could not discourage me. I have a family which is large and various parts arrived here at different times from different places. So, I started asking questions, and getting library books and learning. I truly do not understand why American history is not taught by introducing people who were there, living the history. I think any student would love to get to know about Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. Or who would not want to learn about Dolly Madison saving things from the White House? History is all about people, and if those people were introduced to history students, I think those students would jump in with both feet.

    Reply
  30. I believe what we feel about any history is what we first learned and how we first learned it. I agree with Lillian’s comment. History books seem to have been written to discourage anyone from wanting to know any more. Unfortunately for the people who write those books, they could not discourage me. I have a family which is large and various parts arrived here at different times from different places. So, I started asking questions, and getting library books and learning. I truly do not understand why American history is not taught by introducing people who were there, living the history. I think any student would love to get to know about Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. Or who would not want to learn about Dolly Madison saving things from the White House? History is all about people, and if those people were introduced to history students, I think those students would jump in with both feet.

    Reply
  31. Wow! You’ve hit my sweet spot. I love history. All history. Always have, always will and I’ll take it any way I can get it. Have fun in your new rabbit hole. Oh, and “Lord Rogue,” is one of my all time favorite books. The story, even after all these years, is still so vivid in my mind. You hit another one of my sweet spots with that book. True home, for me, is a stone’s throw away from the Mississippi River.

    Reply
  32. Wow! You’ve hit my sweet spot. I love history. All history. Always have, always will and I’ll take it any way I can get it. Have fun in your new rabbit hole. Oh, and “Lord Rogue,” is one of my all time favorite books. The story, even after all these years, is still so vivid in my mind. You hit another one of my sweet spots with that book. True home, for me, is a stone’s throw away from the Mississippi River.

    Reply
  33. Wow! You’ve hit my sweet spot. I love history. All history. Always have, always will and I’ll take it any way I can get it. Have fun in your new rabbit hole. Oh, and “Lord Rogue,” is one of my all time favorite books. The story, even after all these years, is still so vivid in my mind. You hit another one of my sweet spots with that book. True home, for me, is a stone’s throw away from the Mississippi River.

    Reply
  34. Wow! You’ve hit my sweet spot. I love history. All history. Always have, always will and I’ll take it any way I can get it. Have fun in your new rabbit hole. Oh, and “Lord Rogue,” is one of my all time favorite books. The story, even after all these years, is still so vivid in my mind. You hit another one of my sweet spots with that book. True home, for me, is a stone’s throw away from the Mississippi River.

    Reply
  35. Wow! You’ve hit my sweet spot. I love history. All history. Always have, always will and I’ll take it any way I can get it. Have fun in your new rabbit hole. Oh, and “Lord Rogue,” is one of my all time favorite books. The story, even after all these years, is still so vivid in my mind. You hit another one of my sweet spots with that book. True home, for me, is a stone’s throw away from the Mississippi River.

    Reply
  36. I’m guessing it’s easier to test dates and tariffs than understanding of the elements that caused the history to happen. A good history book would teach people and events, but people who write history books are more tied up in politics, I fear.

    Reply
  37. I’m guessing it’s easier to test dates and tariffs than understanding of the elements that caused the history to happen. A good history book would teach people and events, but people who write history books are more tied up in politics, I fear.

    Reply
  38. I’m guessing it’s easier to test dates and tariffs than understanding of the elements that caused the history to happen. A good history book would teach people and events, but people who write history books are more tied up in politics, I fear.

    Reply
  39. I’m guessing it’s easier to test dates and tariffs than understanding of the elements that caused the history to happen. A good history book would teach people and events, but people who write history books are more tied up in politics, I fear.

    Reply
  40. I’m guessing it’s easier to test dates and tariffs than understanding of the elements that caused the history to happen. A good history book would teach people and events, but people who write history books are more tied up in politics, I fear.

    Reply
  41. Or if those old TV shows had truly been accurate, we could teach using them! The people are absolutely fascinating. Maybe newspapers written as they are now, but using the people of the past? We have to get our heads of textbooks!

    Reply
  42. Or if those old TV shows had truly been accurate, we could teach using them! The people are absolutely fascinating. Maybe newspapers written as they are now, but using the people of the past? We have to get our heads of textbooks!

    Reply
  43. Or if those old TV shows had truly been accurate, we could teach using them! The people are absolutely fascinating. Maybe newspapers written as they are now, but using the people of the past? We have to get our heads of textbooks!

    Reply
  44. Or if those old TV shows had truly been accurate, we could teach using them! The people are absolutely fascinating. Maybe newspapers written as they are now, but using the people of the past? We have to get our heads of textbooks!

    Reply
  45. Or if those old TV shows had truly been accurate, we could teach using them! The people are absolutely fascinating. Maybe newspapers written as they are now, but using the people of the past? We have to get our heads of textbooks!

    Reply
  46. Oh, be still my beating heart, someone remembers Lord Rogue! You have just made my day, thank you! The history of the Mississippi River is beyond fascinating–and the people that traveled it! How can we dismiss an entire era?

    Reply
  47. Oh, be still my beating heart, someone remembers Lord Rogue! You have just made my day, thank you! The history of the Mississippi River is beyond fascinating–and the people that traveled it! How can we dismiss an entire era?

    Reply
  48. Oh, be still my beating heart, someone remembers Lord Rogue! You have just made my day, thank you! The history of the Mississippi River is beyond fascinating–and the people that traveled it! How can we dismiss an entire era?

    Reply
  49. Oh, be still my beating heart, someone remembers Lord Rogue! You have just made my day, thank you! The history of the Mississippi River is beyond fascinating–and the people that traveled it! How can we dismiss an entire era?

    Reply
  50. Oh, be still my beating heart, someone remembers Lord Rogue! You have just made my day, thank you! The history of the Mississippi River is beyond fascinating–and the people that traveled it! How can we dismiss an entire era?

    Reply
  51. I want to read anything and everything you’d like to share with us. I love American history, by itself and as it relates to England and Europe.

    Reply
  52. I want to read anything and everything you’d like to share with us. I love American history, by itself and as it relates to England and Europe.

    Reply
  53. I want to read anything and everything you’d like to share with us. I love American history, by itself and as it relates to England and Europe.

    Reply
  54. I want to read anything and everything you’d like to share with us. I love American history, by itself and as it relates to England and Europe.

    Reply
  55. I want to read anything and everything you’d like to share with us. I love American history, by itself and as it relates to England and Europe.

    Reply
  56. I’ve always been a history fan – but it wasn’t until I had Dr. James Bloomfield at Thiel College that I found someone who acknowledged the importance of the social and economic side of history as well as the political. I took his classes for all four years (and independent study). If American history were taught this way, we would not be so ignorant of our own past.

    Reply
  57. I’ve always been a history fan – but it wasn’t until I had Dr. James Bloomfield at Thiel College that I found someone who acknowledged the importance of the social and economic side of history as well as the political. I took his classes for all four years (and independent study). If American history were taught this way, we would not be so ignorant of our own past.

    Reply
  58. I’ve always been a history fan – but it wasn’t until I had Dr. James Bloomfield at Thiel College that I found someone who acknowledged the importance of the social and economic side of history as well as the political. I took his classes for all four years (and independent study). If American history were taught this way, we would not be so ignorant of our own past.

    Reply
  59. I’ve always been a history fan – but it wasn’t until I had Dr. James Bloomfield at Thiel College that I found someone who acknowledged the importance of the social and economic side of history as well as the political. I took his classes for all four years (and independent study). If American history were taught this way, we would not be so ignorant of our own past.

    Reply
  60. I’ve always been a history fan – but it wasn’t until I had Dr. James Bloomfield at Thiel College that I found someone who acknowledged the importance of the social and economic side of history as well as the political. I took his classes for all four years (and independent study). If American history were taught this way, we would not be so ignorant of our own past.

    Reply
  61. I wanted to like history in school, but found the textbooks we were given (a framework of bare facts, 95% of which concerned only the actions of men) barren and frustrating. There were almost no bits about how people actually lived and how the events affected their lives.
    My high school only took history up to about 1900 — after that it was radioactive stuff because it was all still controversial. One of my 12th grade instructors took a chance and taught a college style course about the development of Communism and the Russian Revolution (using Life Magazine, for God’s sake) and he had at least one monitor at every class meeting; he only lasted a year. As a result I’ve been reading ever since about early 20th century history, trying to reconstruct the times my parents lived through, about which they would barely speak because they wanted to put all that behind them.
    In college I discovered there was another kind of history – social history – and that made me happy because at last some of my questions about how men *and women* lived could be answered.

    Reply
  62. I wanted to like history in school, but found the textbooks we were given (a framework of bare facts, 95% of which concerned only the actions of men) barren and frustrating. There were almost no bits about how people actually lived and how the events affected their lives.
    My high school only took history up to about 1900 — after that it was radioactive stuff because it was all still controversial. One of my 12th grade instructors took a chance and taught a college style course about the development of Communism and the Russian Revolution (using Life Magazine, for God’s sake) and he had at least one monitor at every class meeting; he only lasted a year. As a result I’ve been reading ever since about early 20th century history, trying to reconstruct the times my parents lived through, about which they would barely speak because they wanted to put all that behind them.
    In college I discovered there was another kind of history – social history – and that made me happy because at last some of my questions about how men *and women* lived could be answered.

    Reply
  63. I wanted to like history in school, but found the textbooks we were given (a framework of bare facts, 95% of which concerned only the actions of men) barren and frustrating. There were almost no bits about how people actually lived and how the events affected their lives.
    My high school only took history up to about 1900 — after that it was radioactive stuff because it was all still controversial. One of my 12th grade instructors took a chance and taught a college style course about the development of Communism and the Russian Revolution (using Life Magazine, for God’s sake) and he had at least one monitor at every class meeting; he only lasted a year. As a result I’ve been reading ever since about early 20th century history, trying to reconstruct the times my parents lived through, about which they would barely speak because they wanted to put all that behind them.
    In college I discovered there was another kind of history – social history – and that made me happy because at last some of my questions about how men *and women* lived could be answered.

    Reply
  64. I wanted to like history in school, but found the textbooks we were given (a framework of bare facts, 95% of which concerned only the actions of men) barren and frustrating. There were almost no bits about how people actually lived and how the events affected their lives.
    My high school only took history up to about 1900 — after that it was radioactive stuff because it was all still controversial. One of my 12th grade instructors took a chance and taught a college style course about the development of Communism and the Russian Revolution (using Life Magazine, for God’s sake) and he had at least one monitor at every class meeting; he only lasted a year. As a result I’ve been reading ever since about early 20th century history, trying to reconstruct the times my parents lived through, about which they would barely speak because they wanted to put all that behind them.
    In college I discovered there was another kind of history – social history – and that made me happy because at last some of my questions about how men *and women* lived could be answered.

    Reply
  65. I wanted to like history in school, but found the textbooks we were given (a framework of bare facts, 95% of which concerned only the actions of men) barren and frustrating. There were almost no bits about how people actually lived and how the events affected their lives.
    My high school only took history up to about 1900 — after that it was radioactive stuff because it was all still controversial. One of my 12th grade instructors took a chance and taught a college style course about the development of Communism and the Russian Revolution (using Life Magazine, for God’s sake) and he had at least one monitor at every class meeting; he only lasted a year. As a result I’ve been reading ever since about early 20th century history, trying to reconstruct the times my parents lived through, about which they would barely speak because they wanted to put all that behind them.
    In college I discovered there was another kind of history – social history – and that made me happy because at last some of my questions about how men *and women* lived could be answered.

    Reply
  66. I was lucky enough to discover Jane Aiken Hodge’s books at about the same time as I found Georgette Heyer, which was around age 11, then within a few years I found Sergeant Golon, and my interest in history was growing wildly. I don’t remember any really good history teachers before college but I enjoyed the heck out of reading Wuthering Heights and Pride and Prejudice in 10th grade (especially since it was at least my 3rd or 4th time to read each) and so my big research paper as a high school senior compared The Mysteries of Udolpho with The Castle of Otranto and with current Gothic novels. Sort of independent studies. No surprise that I was a history major in college (minor in British literature). My interest in history becomes narrower during and after the Industrial Revolution and dwindles to nothing upon the advent of World War I. But I do love contemporaries and romantic suspense (whenever they are set), as well as straight mysteries. So there you are, it’s all because I love to read! And I’m an amateur genealogist to boot.

    Reply
  67. I was lucky enough to discover Jane Aiken Hodge’s books at about the same time as I found Georgette Heyer, which was around age 11, then within a few years I found Sergeant Golon, and my interest in history was growing wildly. I don’t remember any really good history teachers before college but I enjoyed the heck out of reading Wuthering Heights and Pride and Prejudice in 10th grade (especially since it was at least my 3rd or 4th time to read each) and so my big research paper as a high school senior compared The Mysteries of Udolpho with The Castle of Otranto and with current Gothic novels. Sort of independent studies. No surprise that I was a history major in college (minor in British literature). My interest in history becomes narrower during and after the Industrial Revolution and dwindles to nothing upon the advent of World War I. But I do love contemporaries and romantic suspense (whenever they are set), as well as straight mysteries. So there you are, it’s all because I love to read! And I’m an amateur genealogist to boot.

    Reply
  68. I was lucky enough to discover Jane Aiken Hodge’s books at about the same time as I found Georgette Heyer, which was around age 11, then within a few years I found Sergeant Golon, and my interest in history was growing wildly. I don’t remember any really good history teachers before college but I enjoyed the heck out of reading Wuthering Heights and Pride and Prejudice in 10th grade (especially since it was at least my 3rd or 4th time to read each) and so my big research paper as a high school senior compared The Mysteries of Udolpho with The Castle of Otranto and with current Gothic novels. Sort of independent studies. No surprise that I was a history major in college (minor in British literature). My interest in history becomes narrower during and after the Industrial Revolution and dwindles to nothing upon the advent of World War I. But I do love contemporaries and romantic suspense (whenever they are set), as well as straight mysteries. So there you are, it’s all because I love to read! And I’m an amateur genealogist to boot.

    Reply
  69. I was lucky enough to discover Jane Aiken Hodge’s books at about the same time as I found Georgette Heyer, which was around age 11, then within a few years I found Sergeant Golon, and my interest in history was growing wildly. I don’t remember any really good history teachers before college but I enjoyed the heck out of reading Wuthering Heights and Pride and Prejudice in 10th grade (especially since it was at least my 3rd or 4th time to read each) and so my big research paper as a high school senior compared The Mysteries of Udolpho with The Castle of Otranto and with current Gothic novels. Sort of independent studies. No surprise that I was a history major in college (minor in British literature). My interest in history becomes narrower during and after the Industrial Revolution and dwindles to nothing upon the advent of World War I. But I do love contemporaries and romantic suspense (whenever they are set), as well as straight mysteries. So there you are, it’s all because I love to read! And I’m an amateur genealogist to boot.

    Reply
  70. I was lucky enough to discover Jane Aiken Hodge’s books at about the same time as I found Georgette Heyer, which was around age 11, then within a few years I found Sergeant Golon, and my interest in history was growing wildly. I don’t remember any really good history teachers before college but I enjoyed the heck out of reading Wuthering Heights and Pride and Prejudice in 10th grade (especially since it was at least my 3rd or 4th time to read each) and so my big research paper as a high school senior compared The Mysteries of Udolpho with The Castle of Otranto and with current Gothic novels. Sort of independent studies. No surprise that I was a history major in college (minor in British literature). My interest in history becomes narrower during and after the Industrial Revolution and dwindles to nothing upon the advent of World War I. But I do love contemporaries and romantic suspense (whenever they are set), as well as straight mysteries. So there you are, it’s all because I love to read! And I’m an amateur genealogist to boot.

    Reply
  71. oh wow, you speak to me clearly! I suffered from similar ignorance in school. I know my granddaughter has been doing some crash courses in history that took them into WWII but I doubt if they’re teaching more than who shot whom and when.

    Reply
  72. oh wow, you speak to me clearly! I suffered from similar ignorance in school. I know my granddaughter has been doing some crash courses in history that took them into WWII but I doubt if they’re teaching more than who shot whom and when.

    Reply
  73. oh wow, you speak to me clearly! I suffered from similar ignorance in school. I know my granddaughter has been doing some crash courses in history that took them into WWII but I doubt if they’re teaching more than who shot whom and when.

    Reply
  74. oh wow, you speak to me clearly! I suffered from similar ignorance in school. I know my granddaughter has been doing some crash courses in history that took them into WWII but I doubt if they’re teaching more than who shot whom and when.

    Reply
  75. oh wow, you speak to me clearly! I suffered from similar ignorance in school. I know my granddaughter has been doing some crash courses in history that took them into WWII but I doubt if they’re teaching more than who shot whom and when.

    Reply
  76. I blame reading on a lot of things. And yes, I’m sure it’s the British and Russian literature that I read as a teen that spiked my quest for historical knowledge. How do other people learn anything without books?

    Reply
  77. I blame reading on a lot of things. And yes, I’m sure it’s the British and Russian literature that I read as a teen that spiked my quest for historical knowledge. How do other people learn anything without books?

    Reply
  78. I blame reading on a lot of things. And yes, I’m sure it’s the British and Russian literature that I read as a teen that spiked my quest for historical knowledge. How do other people learn anything without books?

    Reply
  79. I blame reading on a lot of things. And yes, I’m sure it’s the British and Russian literature that I read as a teen that spiked my quest for historical knowledge. How do other people learn anything without books?

    Reply
  80. I blame reading on a lot of things. And yes, I’m sure it’s the British and Russian literature that I read as a teen that spiked my quest for historical knowledge. How do other people learn anything without books?

    Reply
  81. I was luckier than the rest of you. I had a truly GOOD history book in 7th and 8th grade. Alas the schools today don’t use anything as interesting and complete as that text was.
    With a good text like mine plus childrens’ books — especially the Altshuler books I’ve mentioned before— my interest in history was aroused early. When I was first reading Jane Aiken Hodge, Georgette Heyer, and others I would check the Encyclopaedia Britannica we owned and then go to the library to verify the background. As I found good researchers, I would then begin to take their other books on faith. Now, I’m fairly well versed on some eras and locations, but I still check out new periods.
    And yes, Patricia, I would LOVE to hear of your researches.

    Reply
  82. I was luckier than the rest of you. I had a truly GOOD history book in 7th and 8th grade. Alas the schools today don’t use anything as interesting and complete as that text was.
    With a good text like mine plus childrens’ books — especially the Altshuler books I’ve mentioned before— my interest in history was aroused early. When I was first reading Jane Aiken Hodge, Georgette Heyer, and others I would check the Encyclopaedia Britannica we owned and then go to the library to verify the background. As I found good researchers, I would then begin to take their other books on faith. Now, I’m fairly well versed on some eras and locations, but I still check out new periods.
    And yes, Patricia, I would LOVE to hear of your researches.

    Reply
  83. I was luckier than the rest of you. I had a truly GOOD history book in 7th and 8th grade. Alas the schools today don’t use anything as interesting and complete as that text was.
    With a good text like mine plus childrens’ books — especially the Altshuler books I’ve mentioned before— my interest in history was aroused early. When I was first reading Jane Aiken Hodge, Georgette Heyer, and others I would check the Encyclopaedia Britannica we owned and then go to the library to verify the background. As I found good researchers, I would then begin to take their other books on faith. Now, I’m fairly well versed on some eras and locations, but I still check out new periods.
    And yes, Patricia, I would LOVE to hear of your researches.

    Reply
  84. I was luckier than the rest of you. I had a truly GOOD history book in 7th and 8th grade. Alas the schools today don’t use anything as interesting and complete as that text was.
    With a good text like mine plus childrens’ books — especially the Altshuler books I’ve mentioned before— my interest in history was aroused early. When I was first reading Jane Aiken Hodge, Georgette Heyer, and others I would check the Encyclopaedia Britannica we owned and then go to the library to verify the background. As I found good researchers, I would then begin to take their other books on faith. Now, I’m fairly well versed on some eras and locations, but I still check out new periods.
    And yes, Patricia, I would LOVE to hear of your researches.

    Reply
  85. I was luckier than the rest of you. I had a truly GOOD history book in 7th and 8th grade. Alas the schools today don’t use anything as interesting and complete as that text was.
    With a good text like mine plus childrens’ books — especially the Altshuler books I’ve mentioned before— my interest in history was aroused early. When I was first reading Jane Aiken Hodge, Georgette Heyer, and others I would check the Encyclopaedia Britannica we owned and then go to the library to verify the background. As I found good researchers, I would then begin to take their other books on faith. Now, I’m fairly well versed on some eras and locations, but I still check out new periods.
    And yes, Patricia, I would LOVE to hear of your researches.

    Reply
  86. When I was in 5th grade, (,long,long ago), we studied the Middle Ages. The class was divided into 4 groups. We pushed our desks together so we had 4 islands, each representing a castle. We had to give a name to the castle, design a flag, draw it on fabric and then it was attached to a pole and stood by our desks.
    We each had to write a story, of the time, illuminating the script, illustrating it and binding it.
    In addition, the “castles” competed against each other in math drills and we set up a government, similar to the period.
    I have loved history since that time.

    Reply
  87. When I was in 5th grade, (,long,long ago), we studied the Middle Ages. The class was divided into 4 groups. We pushed our desks together so we had 4 islands, each representing a castle. We had to give a name to the castle, design a flag, draw it on fabric and then it was attached to a pole and stood by our desks.
    We each had to write a story, of the time, illuminating the script, illustrating it and binding it.
    In addition, the “castles” competed against each other in math drills and we set up a government, similar to the period.
    I have loved history since that time.

    Reply
  88. When I was in 5th grade, (,long,long ago), we studied the Middle Ages. The class was divided into 4 groups. We pushed our desks together so we had 4 islands, each representing a castle. We had to give a name to the castle, design a flag, draw it on fabric and then it was attached to a pole and stood by our desks.
    We each had to write a story, of the time, illuminating the script, illustrating it and binding it.
    In addition, the “castles” competed against each other in math drills and we set up a government, similar to the period.
    I have loved history since that time.

    Reply
  89. When I was in 5th grade, (,long,long ago), we studied the Middle Ages. The class was divided into 4 groups. We pushed our desks together so we had 4 islands, each representing a castle. We had to give a name to the castle, design a flag, draw it on fabric and then it was attached to a pole and stood by our desks.
    We each had to write a story, of the time, illuminating the script, illustrating it and binding it.
    In addition, the “castles” competed against each other in math drills and we set up a government, similar to the period.
    I have loved history since that time.

    Reply
  90. When I was in 5th grade, (,long,long ago), we studied the Middle Ages. The class was divided into 4 groups. We pushed our desks together so we had 4 islands, each representing a castle. We had to give a name to the castle, design a flag, draw it on fabric and then it was attached to a pole and stood by our desks.
    We each had to write a story, of the time, illuminating the script, illustrating it and binding it.
    In addition, the “castles” competed against each other in math drills and we set up a government, similar to the period.
    I have loved history since that time.

    Reply
  91. So whatever happened to textbooks that they’ve declined to their current state? And the Alsthuler books were never in our school library. Did people lose interest in history?
    and thank you. I am now evilly contemplating what American historical facts I can use to stir controversy.

    Reply
  92. So whatever happened to textbooks that they’ve declined to their current state? And the Alsthuler books were never in our school library. Did people lose interest in history?
    and thank you. I am now evilly contemplating what American historical facts I can use to stir controversy.

    Reply
  93. So whatever happened to textbooks that they’ve declined to their current state? And the Alsthuler books were never in our school library. Did people lose interest in history?
    and thank you. I am now evilly contemplating what American historical facts I can use to stir controversy.

    Reply
  94. So whatever happened to textbooks that they’ve declined to their current state? And the Alsthuler books were never in our school library. Did people lose interest in history?
    and thank you. I am now evilly contemplating what American historical facts I can use to stir controversy.

    Reply
  95. So whatever happened to textbooks that they’ve declined to their current state? And the Alsthuler books were never in our school library. Did people lose interest in history?
    and thank you. I am now evilly contemplating what American historical facts I can use to stir controversy.

    Reply
  96. My memory is sufficiently sketchy that I don’t recall what I studied history-wise up to age 10 in Australia. After that I lived primarily in the US where it seemed that all we did was study American history (well, pre-20th century American history to be precise). I spent one year in Jamaica where I studied the history of the West Indies and, back in the US, I spent a year studying European History. I’d call my history education lopsided!
    I enjoyed your post, Ms. Rice, and await your rabbit hole results with interest.

    Reply
  97. My memory is sufficiently sketchy that I don’t recall what I studied history-wise up to age 10 in Australia. After that I lived primarily in the US where it seemed that all we did was study American history (well, pre-20th century American history to be precise). I spent one year in Jamaica where I studied the history of the West Indies and, back in the US, I spent a year studying European History. I’d call my history education lopsided!
    I enjoyed your post, Ms. Rice, and await your rabbit hole results with interest.

    Reply
  98. My memory is sufficiently sketchy that I don’t recall what I studied history-wise up to age 10 in Australia. After that I lived primarily in the US where it seemed that all we did was study American history (well, pre-20th century American history to be precise). I spent one year in Jamaica where I studied the history of the West Indies and, back in the US, I spent a year studying European History. I’d call my history education lopsided!
    I enjoyed your post, Ms. Rice, and await your rabbit hole results with interest.

    Reply
  99. My memory is sufficiently sketchy that I don’t recall what I studied history-wise up to age 10 in Australia. After that I lived primarily in the US where it seemed that all we did was study American history (well, pre-20th century American history to be precise). I spent one year in Jamaica where I studied the history of the West Indies and, back in the US, I spent a year studying European History. I’d call my history education lopsided!
    I enjoyed your post, Ms. Rice, and await your rabbit hole results with interest.

    Reply
  100. My memory is sufficiently sketchy that I don’t recall what I studied history-wise up to age 10 in Australia. After that I lived primarily in the US where it seemed that all we did was study American history (well, pre-20th century American history to be precise). I spent one year in Jamaica where I studied the history of the West Indies and, back in the US, I spent a year studying European History. I’d call my history education lopsided!
    I enjoyed your post, Ms. Rice, and await your rabbit hole results with interest.

    Reply
  101. Hi Patricia, I love history but I do think the classroom did (and does) destroy people’s interest and connection to it. It is primarily told in terms of results and the redistribution of power rather than as stories of people. I think that’s why people love shows like Who Do You Think You Are. There’s lots of history, but it is told through the eyes of specific individuals and that’s what makes it real and interesting.

    Reply
  102. Hi Patricia, I love history but I do think the classroom did (and does) destroy people’s interest and connection to it. It is primarily told in terms of results and the redistribution of power rather than as stories of people. I think that’s why people love shows like Who Do You Think You Are. There’s lots of history, but it is told through the eyes of specific individuals and that’s what makes it real and interesting.

    Reply
  103. Hi Patricia, I love history but I do think the classroom did (and does) destroy people’s interest and connection to it. It is primarily told in terms of results and the redistribution of power rather than as stories of people. I think that’s why people love shows like Who Do You Think You Are. There’s lots of history, but it is told through the eyes of specific individuals and that’s what makes it real and interesting.

    Reply
  104. Hi Patricia, I love history but I do think the classroom did (and does) destroy people’s interest and connection to it. It is primarily told in terms of results and the redistribution of power rather than as stories of people. I think that’s why people love shows like Who Do You Think You Are. There’s lots of history, but it is told through the eyes of specific individuals and that’s what makes it real and interesting.

    Reply
  105. Hi Patricia, I love history but I do think the classroom did (and does) destroy people’s interest and connection to it. It is primarily told in terms of results and the redistribution of power rather than as stories of people. I think that’s why people love shows like Who Do You Think You Are. There’s lots of history, but it is told through the eyes of specific individuals and that’s what makes it real and interesting.

    Reply
  106. Pat said: “If you’re into astrology, I think 1812 had to be under the planet of change and upheaval.” I do not know the astrological chart for 1812. However many events of 1812 had their origin in the Great Comet of 1811. Napoleon believed that great comets foretold great things for great men and that influenced his decision to enter Russia. Momentous things were supposed to follow in the wake of such great comets, This comet was large and visible for a long period of time.
    Yes, the Regency period seems a bit claustrophobic for some. It certainly was insular — in all senses of the word. The people had been more or less confined to their island for a decade before the regency even began . They were”cabin’d , cribb’d. confin’d” This changed some what after 1815,.
    I do not know why the regency period of history has particularly intrigued me. American history doesn’t have the same pull. I have read books set in all periods but much prefer history in history books for most.
    History wasn’t made interesting in school. The text books were drier than a desert. My high school teacher of American history did her best and finally resorted to pop quizzes to make us read our lessons. All those politicians and wars just weren’t as interesting as kings riding around needing a horse.
    My children’s teachers had them do projects such as building model buildings or making videos of a slice of history. My daughter got dinged on her grade because she made a booklet illustrating the clothes of ancient Egypt. The teacher said it would have been more interesting as a video with live models– meaning some one had to make the costumes. We wondered about her IQ because my daughter’s research had shown that the Egyptian clothing didn’t leave much to the imagination. That was long ago. Things might have changed.

    Reply
  107. Pat said: “If you’re into astrology, I think 1812 had to be under the planet of change and upheaval.” I do not know the astrological chart for 1812. However many events of 1812 had their origin in the Great Comet of 1811. Napoleon believed that great comets foretold great things for great men and that influenced his decision to enter Russia. Momentous things were supposed to follow in the wake of such great comets, This comet was large and visible for a long period of time.
    Yes, the Regency period seems a bit claustrophobic for some. It certainly was insular — in all senses of the word. The people had been more or less confined to their island for a decade before the regency even began . They were”cabin’d , cribb’d. confin’d” This changed some what after 1815,.
    I do not know why the regency period of history has particularly intrigued me. American history doesn’t have the same pull. I have read books set in all periods but much prefer history in history books for most.
    History wasn’t made interesting in school. The text books were drier than a desert. My high school teacher of American history did her best and finally resorted to pop quizzes to make us read our lessons. All those politicians and wars just weren’t as interesting as kings riding around needing a horse.
    My children’s teachers had them do projects such as building model buildings or making videos of a slice of history. My daughter got dinged on her grade because she made a booklet illustrating the clothes of ancient Egypt. The teacher said it would have been more interesting as a video with live models– meaning some one had to make the costumes. We wondered about her IQ because my daughter’s research had shown that the Egyptian clothing didn’t leave much to the imagination. That was long ago. Things might have changed.

    Reply
  108. Pat said: “If you’re into astrology, I think 1812 had to be under the planet of change and upheaval.” I do not know the astrological chart for 1812. However many events of 1812 had their origin in the Great Comet of 1811. Napoleon believed that great comets foretold great things for great men and that influenced his decision to enter Russia. Momentous things were supposed to follow in the wake of such great comets, This comet was large and visible for a long period of time.
    Yes, the Regency period seems a bit claustrophobic for some. It certainly was insular — in all senses of the word. The people had been more or less confined to their island for a decade before the regency even began . They were”cabin’d , cribb’d. confin’d” This changed some what after 1815,.
    I do not know why the regency period of history has particularly intrigued me. American history doesn’t have the same pull. I have read books set in all periods but much prefer history in history books for most.
    History wasn’t made interesting in school. The text books were drier than a desert. My high school teacher of American history did her best and finally resorted to pop quizzes to make us read our lessons. All those politicians and wars just weren’t as interesting as kings riding around needing a horse.
    My children’s teachers had them do projects such as building model buildings or making videos of a slice of history. My daughter got dinged on her grade because she made a booklet illustrating the clothes of ancient Egypt. The teacher said it would have been more interesting as a video with live models– meaning some one had to make the costumes. We wondered about her IQ because my daughter’s research had shown that the Egyptian clothing didn’t leave much to the imagination. That was long ago. Things might have changed.

    Reply
  109. Pat said: “If you’re into astrology, I think 1812 had to be under the planet of change and upheaval.” I do not know the astrological chart for 1812. However many events of 1812 had their origin in the Great Comet of 1811. Napoleon believed that great comets foretold great things for great men and that influenced his decision to enter Russia. Momentous things were supposed to follow in the wake of such great comets, This comet was large and visible for a long period of time.
    Yes, the Regency period seems a bit claustrophobic for some. It certainly was insular — in all senses of the word. The people had been more or less confined to their island for a decade before the regency even began . They were”cabin’d , cribb’d. confin’d” This changed some what after 1815,.
    I do not know why the regency period of history has particularly intrigued me. American history doesn’t have the same pull. I have read books set in all periods but much prefer history in history books for most.
    History wasn’t made interesting in school. The text books were drier than a desert. My high school teacher of American history did her best and finally resorted to pop quizzes to make us read our lessons. All those politicians and wars just weren’t as interesting as kings riding around needing a horse.
    My children’s teachers had them do projects such as building model buildings or making videos of a slice of history. My daughter got dinged on her grade because she made a booklet illustrating the clothes of ancient Egypt. The teacher said it would have been more interesting as a video with live models– meaning some one had to make the costumes. We wondered about her IQ because my daughter’s research had shown that the Egyptian clothing didn’t leave much to the imagination. That was long ago. Things might have changed.

    Reply
  110. Pat said: “If you’re into astrology, I think 1812 had to be under the planet of change and upheaval.” I do not know the astrological chart for 1812. However many events of 1812 had their origin in the Great Comet of 1811. Napoleon believed that great comets foretold great things for great men and that influenced his decision to enter Russia. Momentous things were supposed to follow in the wake of such great comets, This comet was large and visible for a long period of time.
    Yes, the Regency period seems a bit claustrophobic for some. It certainly was insular — in all senses of the word. The people had been more or less confined to their island for a decade before the regency even began . They were”cabin’d , cribb’d. confin’d” This changed some what after 1815,.
    I do not know why the regency period of history has particularly intrigued me. American history doesn’t have the same pull. I have read books set in all periods but much prefer history in history books for most.
    History wasn’t made interesting in school. The text books were drier than a desert. My high school teacher of American history did her best and finally resorted to pop quizzes to make us read our lessons. All those politicians and wars just weren’t as interesting as kings riding around needing a horse.
    My children’s teachers had them do projects such as building model buildings or making videos of a slice of history. My daughter got dinged on her grade because she made a booklet illustrating the clothes of ancient Egypt. The teacher said it would have been more interesting as a video with live models– meaning some one had to make the costumes. We wondered about her IQ because my daughter’s research had shown that the Egyptian clothing didn’t leave much to the imagination. That was long ago. Things might have changed.

    Reply
  111. Y’know, I kinda like the idea of a well-rounded education through travel! You might not have appreciated it as a child, but you probably learned more than most that way.
    And thank you! I’m eagerly looking for more rabbit holes.

    Reply
  112. Y’know, I kinda like the idea of a well-rounded education through travel! You might not have appreciated it as a child, but you probably learned more than most that way.
    And thank you! I’m eagerly looking for more rabbit holes.

    Reply
  113. Y’know, I kinda like the idea of a well-rounded education through travel! You might not have appreciated it as a child, but you probably learned more than most that way.
    And thank you! I’m eagerly looking for more rabbit holes.

    Reply
  114. Y’know, I kinda like the idea of a well-rounded education through travel! You might not have appreciated it as a child, but you probably learned more than most that way.
    And thank you! I’m eagerly looking for more rabbit holes.

    Reply
  115. Y’know, I kinda like the idea of a well-rounded education through travel! You might not have appreciated it as a child, but you probably learned more than most that way.
    And thank you! I’m eagerly looking for more rabbit holes.

    Reply
  116. I’d forgotten the Great Comet, thank you! (My mind is packed full of irrelevant knowledge and sieves it like sand) It certainly was a time of great upheaval, although Napoleon really should have taken into consideration that it might be the other side that was made great by the comet.
    When I was a kid, I MADE the costumes–several outfits for Barbie and Ken dolls representing Puritan/Early American clothing. And got dinged by the male teacher who thought it was too easy. The rest of the class took exception, however, and he had to mark up my grade. Researching Egyptians wasn’t easy!

    Reply
  117. I’d forgotten the Great Comet, thank you! (My mind is packed full of irrelevant knowledge and sieves it like sand) It certainly was a time of great upheaval, although Napoleon really should have taken into consideration that it might be the other side that was made great by the comet.
    When I was a kid, I MADE the costumes–several outfits for Barbie and Ken dolls representing Puritan/Early American clothing. And got dinged by the male teacher who thought it was too easy. The rest of the class took exception, however, and he had to mark up my grade. Researching Egyptians wasn’t easy!

    Reply
  118. I’d forgotten the Great Comet, thank you! (My mind is packed full of irrelevant knowledge and sieves it like sand) It certainly was a time of great upheaval, although Napoleon really should have taken into consideration that it might be the other side that was made great by the comet.
    When I was a kid, I MADE the costumes–several outfits for Barbie and Ken dolls representing Puritan/Early American clothing. And got dinged by the male teacher who thought it was too easy. The rest of the class took exception, however, and he had to mark up my grade. Researching Egyptians wasn’t easy!

    Reply
  119. I’d forgotten the Great Comet, thank you! (My mind is packed full of irrelevant knowledge and sieves it like sand) It certainly was a time of great upheaval, although Napoleon really should have taken into consideration that it might be the other side that was made great by the comet.
    When I was a kid, I MADE the costumes–several outfits for Barbie and Ken dolls representing Puritan/Early American clothing. And got dinged by the male teacher who thought it was too easy. The rest of the class took exception, however, and he had to mark up my grade. Researching Egyptians wasn’t easy!

    Reply
  120. I’d forgotten the Great Comet, thank you! (My mind is packed full of irrelevant knowledge and sieves it like sand) It certainly was a time of great upheaval, although Napoleon really should have taken into consideration that it might be the other side that was made great by the comet.
    When I was a kid, I MADE the costumes–several outfits for Barbie and Ken dolls representing Puritan/Early American clothing. And got dinged by the male teacher who thought it was too easy. The rest of the class took exception, however, and he had to mark up my grade. Researching Egyptians wasn’t easy!

    Reply
  121. Love rabbit hole topics. Go for the American History, English History, any history trivia.
    I have no memory of any good text books but I do remember 2 outstanding history teachers. Miss Bradley in HS. I can’t remember if I was in 10th or 11th grade but she was a fascinating teacher and didn’t put up with anything. She taught English History in two parts. Up to 1600 and 1600 to the current time (1977).
    In College it was Dr. Hoskins. My parents say I majored in Dr. Hoskins because anything he taught I took because he was such a wonderful professor. Therefore I studied Mesopotamia, China, WWII in film, Japan, etc.
    He served in the Navy and went on many Jap ships when they surrendered at the end of WWII. He also was some kind of intelligence officer after the WWII before he became a teacher.
    I personally didn’t have much interest in China or Japan when I took the classes but I’ve always been very glad I took them because the conflicts and attitudes towards the west are still relevant to the present time. And the actions and attitudes of westerners when they met the Japanese and Chinese for the first time. VERY relevant to later events.
    When I was in Jr. High I became very interested in Native Americans, Anthropology and Archaeology so read everything I could lay my hands on in the school library, city library and very dry, dusty books from the college library. (My Dad was a college professor so would check out the books I chose and I could keep them for an entire semester….) Mayans, Incans, North American Native Americans/First People tribes.
    Again…that background has made a difference in my understanding of current conflicts/issues and attitudes.
    Favorite time period? It depends…grin. Growing up I read Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge, Little House on the Prairie, Little Women, etc., etc. If it is a good story, I will generally like the time period. Though I don’t care too much for the Medieval or Puritan/Roundhead/Cavalier time periods. Not sure but they just don’t do it for me.
    Love The American Frontier/West time period more than Pilgrim times.
    If we had textbooks written like Stephen Ambrose writes, people would love history. He was able to take any time period/subject and make it fascinating. He made each era come alive and understandable.

    Reply
  122. Love rabbit hole topics. Go for the American History, English History, any history trivia.
    I have no memory of any good text books but I do remember 2 outstanding history teachers. Miss Bradley in HS. I can’t remember if I was in 10th or 11th grade but she was a fascinating teacher and didn’t put up with anything. She taught English History in two parts. Up to 1600 and 1600 to the current time (1977).
    In College it was Dr. Hoskins. My parents say I majored in Dr. Hoskins because anything he taught I took because he was such a wonderful professor. Therefore I studied Mesopotamia, China, WWII in film, Japan, etc.
    He served in the Navy and went on many Jap ships when they surrendered at the end of WWII. He also was some kind of intelligence officer after the WWII before he became a teacher.
    I personally didn’t have much interest in China or Japan when I took the classes but I’ve always been very glad I took them because the conflicts and attitudes towards the west are still relevant to the present time. And the actions and attitudes of westerners when they met the Japanese and Chinese for the first time. VERY relevant to later events.
    When I was in Jr. High I became very interested in Native Americans, Anthropology and Archaeology so read everything I could lay my hands on in the school library, city library and very dry, dusty books from the college library. (My Dad was a college professor so would check out the books I chose and I could keep them for an entire semester….) Mayans, Incans, North American Native Americans/First People tribes.
    Again…that background has made a difference in my understanding of current conflicts/issues and attitudes.
    Favorite time period? It depends…grin. Growing up I read Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge, Little House on the Prairie, Little Women, etc., etc. If it is a good story, I will generally like the time period. Though I don’t care too much for the Medieval or Puritan/Roundhead/Cavalier time periods. Not sure but they just don’t do it for me.
    Love The American Frontier/West time period more than Pilgrim times.
    If we had textbooks written like Stephen Ambrose writes, people would love history. He was able to take any time period/subject and make it fascinating. He made each era come alive and understandable.

    Reply
  123. Love rabbit hole topics. Go for the American History, English History, any history trivia.
    I have no memory of any good text books but I do remember 2 outstanding history teachers. Miss Bradley in HS. I can’t remember if I was in 10th or 11th grade but she was a fascinating teacher and didn’t put up with anything. She taught English History in two parts. Up to 1600 and 1600 to the current time (1977).
    In College it was Dr. Hoskins. My parents say I majored in Dr. Hoskins because anything he taught I took because he was such a wonderful professor. Therefore I studied Mesopotamia, China, WWII in film, Japan, etc.
    He served in the Navy and went on many Jap ships when they surrendered at the end of WWII. He also was some kind of intelligence officer after the WWII before he became a teacher.
    I personally didn’t have much interest in China or Japan when I took the classes but I’ve always been very glad I took them because the conflicts and attitudes towards the west are still relevant to the present time. And the actions and attitudes of westerners when they met the Japanese and Chinese for the first time. VERY relevant to later events.
    When I was in Jr. High I became very interested in Native Americans, Anthropology and Archaeology so read everything I could lay my hands on in the school library, city library and very dry, dusty books from the college library. (My Dad was a college professor so would check out the books I chose and I could keep them for an entire semester….) Mayans, Incans, North American Native Americans/First People tribes.
    Again…that background has made a difference in my understanding of current conflicts/issues and attitudes.
    Favorite time period? It depends…grin. Growing up I read Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge, Little House on the Prairie, Little Women, etc., etc. If it is a good story, I will generally like the time period. Though I don’t care too much for the Medieval or Puritan/Roundhead/Cavalier time periods. Not sure but they just don’t do it for me.
    Love The American Frontier/West time period more than Pilgrim times.
    If we had textbooks written like Stephen Ambrose writes, people would love history. He was able to take any time period/subject and make it fascinating. He made each era come alive and understandable.

    Reply
  124. Love rabbit hole topics. Go for the American History, English History, any history trivia.
    I have no memory of any good text books but I do remember 2 outstanding history teachers. Miss Bradley in HS. I can’t remember if I was in 10th or 11th grade but she was a fascinating teacher and didn’t put up with anything. She taught English History in two parts. Up to 1600 and 1600 to the current time (1977).
    In College it was Dr. Hoskins. My parents say I majored in Dr. Hoskins because anything he taught I took because he was such a wonderful professor. Therefore I studied Mesopotamia, China, WWII in film, Japan, etc.
    He served in the Navy and went on many Jap ships when they surrendered at the end of WWII. He also was some kind of intelligence officer after the WWII before he became a teacher.
    I personally didn’t have much interest in China or Japan when I took the classes but I’ve always been very glad I took them because the conflicts and attitudes towards the west are still relevant to the present time. And the actions and attitudes of westerners when they met the Japanese and Chinese for the first time. VERY relevant to later events.
    When I was in Jr. High I became very interested in Native Americans, Anthropology and Archaeology so read everything I could lay my hands on in the school library, city library and very dry, dusty books from the college library. (My Dad was a college professor so would check out the books I chose and I could keep them for an entire semester….) Mayans, Incans, North American Native Americans/First People tribes.
    Again…that background has made a difference in my understanding of current conflicts/issues and attitudes.
    Favorite time period? It depends…grin. Growing up I read Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge, Little House on the Prairie, Little Women, etc., etc. If it is a good story, I will generally like the time period. Though I don’t care too much for the Medieval or Puritan/Roundhead/Cavalier time periods. Not sure but they just don’t do it for me.
    Love The American Frontier/West time period more than Pilgrim times.
    If we had textbooks written like Stephen Ambrose writes, people would love history. He was able to take any time period/subject and make it fascinating. He made each era come alive and understandable.

    Reply
  125. Love rabbit hole topics. Go for the American History, English History, any history trivia.
    I have no memory of any good text books but I do remember 2 outstanding history teachers. Miss Bradley in HS. I can’t remember if I was in 10th or 11th grade but she was a fascinating teacher and didn’t put up with anything. She taught English History in two parts. Up to 1600 and 1600 to the current time (1977).
    In College it was Dr. Hoskins. My parents say I majored in Dr. Hoskins because anything he taught I took because he was such a wonderful professor. Therefore I studied Mesopotamia, China, WWII in film, Japan, etc.
    He served in the Navy and went on many Jap ships when they surrendered at the end of WWII. He also was some kind of intelligence officer after the WWII before he became a teacher.
    I personally didn’t have much interest in China or Japan when I took the classes but I’ve always been very glad I took them because the conflicts and attitudes towards the west are still relevant to the present time. And the actions and attitudes of westerners when they met the Japanese and Chinese for the first time. VERY relevant to later events.
    When I was in Jr. High I became very interested in Native Americans, Anthropology and Archaeology so read everything I could lay my hands on in the school library, city library and very dry, dusty books from the college library. (My Dad was a college professor so would check out the books I chose and I could keep them for an entire semester….) Mayans, Incans, North American Native Americans/First People tribes.
    Again…that background has made a difference in my understanding of current conflicts/issues and attitudes.
    Favorite time period? It depends…grin. Growing up I read Georgette Heyer and Jane Aiken Hodge, Little House on the Prairie, Little Women, etc., etc. If it is a good story, I will generally like the time period. Though I don’t care too much for the Medieval or Puritan/Roundhead/Cavalier time periods. Not sure but they just don’t do it for me.
    Love The American Frontier/West time period more than Pilgrim times.
    If we had textbooks written like Stephen Ambrose writes, people would love history. He was able to take any time period/subject and make it fascinating. He made each era come alive and understandable.

    Reply
  126. A fascination with archaeology and anthropology seem to go hand in hand with our love of history. I have a huge stack of books and DVDs sitting here on Mayan and Inca history that I’m determined to work my way through as soon as I get that story organized in my head.
    But you’re entirely right–history is always relevant. I wish more people understood that.

    Reply
  127. A fascination with archaeology and anthropology seem to go hand in hand with our love of history. I have a huge stack of books and DVDs sitting here on Mayan and Inca history that I’m determined to work my way through as soon as I get that story organized in my head.
    But you’re entirely right–history is always relevant. I wish more people understood that.

    Reply
  128. A fascination with archaeology and anthropology seem to go hand in hand with our love of history. I have a huge stack of books and DVDs sitting here on Mayan and Inca history that I’m determined to work my way through as soon as I get that story organized in my head.
    But you’re entirely right–history is always relevant. I wish more people understood that.

    Reply
  129. A fascination with archaeology and anthropology seem to go hand in hand with our love of history. I have a huge stack of books and DVDs sitting here on Mayan and Inca history that I’m determined to work my way through as soon as I get that story organized in my head.
    But you’re entirely right–history is always relevant. I wish more people understood that.

    Reply
  130. A fascination with archaeology and anthropology seem to go hand in hand with our love of history. I have a huge stack of books and DVDs sitting here on Mayan and Inca history that I’m determined to work my way through as soon as I get that story organized in my head.
    But you’re entirely right–history is always relevant. I wish more people understood that.

    Reply
  131. I love history–a huge part of why I write historical fiction. I used to be far more interested in European history than in American history because, well, I’m American and we learned all that in school and it was pretty dreadful. But I’ve been getting back into learning and reading about American history lately from things like the TV show Turn (why did we never learn about Washington’s spies in school?) to Hamilton (I’m completely obsessed) to The Warmth of Other Suns and the great migration.

    Reply
  132. I love history–a huge part of why I write historical fiction. I used to be far more interested in European history than in American history because, well, I’m American and we learned all that in school and it was pretty dreadful. But I’ve been getting back into learning and reading about American history lately from things like the TV show Turn (why did we never learn about Washington’s spies in school?) to Hamilton (I’m completely obsessed) to The Warmth of Other Suns and the great migration.

    Reply
  133. I love history–a huge part of why I write historical fiction. I used to be far more interested in European history than in American history because, well, I’m American and we learned all that in school and it was pretty dreadful. But I’ve been getting back into learning and reading about American history lately from things like the TV show Turn (why did we never learn about Washington’s spies in school?) to Hamilton (I’m completely obsessed) to The Warmth of Other Suns and the great migration.

    Reply
  134. I love history–a huge part of why I write historical fiction. I used to be far more interested in European history than in American history because, well, I’m American and we learned all that in school and it was pretty dreadful. But I’ve been getting back into learning and reading about American history lately from things like the TV show Turn (why did we never learn about Washington’s spies in school?) to Hamilton (I’m completely obsessed) to The Warmth of Other Suns and the great migration.

    Reply
  135. I love history–a huge part of why I write historical fiction. I used to be far more interested in European history than in American history because, well, I’m American and we learned all that in school and it was pretty dreadful. But I’ve been getting back into learning and reading about American history lately from things like the TV show Turn (why did we never learn about Washington’s spies in school?) to Hamilton (I’m completely obsessed) to The Warmth of Other Suns and the great migration.

    Reply
  136. I always loved history at school, perhaps influenced by some of the first books I ever read from the public library – the Little Maid series. This series is so old that my mother read the books as a girl. Each story is set in a different location (Little Maid of Vermont, Littke Maid of Ticonderoga,etc) and features a brave little American patriot who helps in the Revolutionary War effort. They were o p for a long time, but I believe they have been reprinted in the last 10 or 20 years.

    Reply
  137. I always loved history at school, perhaps influenced by some of the first books I ever read from the public library – the Little Maid series. This series is so old that my mother read the books as a girl. Each story is set in a different location (Little Maid of Vermont, Littke Maid of Ticonderoga,etc) and features a brave little American patriot who helps in the Revolutionary War effort. They were o p for a long time, but I believe they have been reprinted in the last 10 or 20 years.

    Reply
  138. I always loved history at school, perhaps influenced by some of the first books I ever read from the public library – the Little Maid series. This series is so old that my mother read the books as a girl. Each story is set in a different location (Little Maid of Vermont, Littke Maid of Ticonderoga,etc) and features a brave little American patriot who helps in the Revolutionary War effort. They were o p for a long time, but I believe they have been reprinted in the last 10 or 20 years.

    Reply
  139. I always loved history at school, perhaps influenced by some of the first books I ever read from the public library – the Little Maid series. This series is so old that my mother read the books as a girl. Each story is set in a different location (Little Maid of Vermont, Littke Maid of Ticonderoga,etc) and features a brave little American patriot who helps in the Revolutionary War effort. They were o p for a long time, but I believe they have been reprinted in the last 10 or 20 years.

    Reply
  140. I always loved history at school, perhaps influenced by some of the first books I ever read from the public library – the Little Maid series. This series is so old that my mother read the books as a girl. Each story is set in a different location (Little Maid of Vermont, Littke Maid of Ticonderoga,etc) and features a brave little American patriot who helps in the Revolutionary War effort. They were o p for a long time, but I believe they have been reprinted in the last 10 or 20 years.

    Reply
  141. What happened to our history Books? What Steve Allen called the “dumbing donw” of America. And the movement to involve “home folks” in education. The second movement os basically a good one, but too often if fell into the hands of “who needs specialties” which cut off true involvement.
    As to the Altshuller books, I found my in the St. Louis public libraries. Last I looked (more than 30 years ago) St. Louis County system still had them. As the two libraries now exchange books, you could probably still get them, BUT neither of us live there any more.

    Reply
  142. What happened to our history Books? What Steve Allen called the “dumbing donw” of America. And the movement to involve “home folks” in education. The second movement os basically a good one, but too often if fell into the hands of “who needs specialties” which cut off true involvement.
    As to the Altshuller books, I found my in the St. Louis public libraries. Last I looked (more than 30 years ago) St. Louis County system still had them. As the two libraries now exchange books, you could probably still get them, BUT neither of us live there any more.

    Reply
  143. What happened to our history Books? What Steve Allen called the “dumbing donw” of America. And the movement to involve “home folks” in education. The second movement os basically a good one, but too often if fell into the hands of “who needs specialties” which cut off true involvement.
    As to the Altshuller books, I found my in the St. Louis public libraries. Last I looked (more than 30 years ago) St. Louis County system still had them. As the two libraries now exchange books, you could probably still get them, BUT neither of us live there any more.

    Reply
  144. What happened to our history Books? What Steve Allen called the “dumbing donw” of America. And the movement to involve “home folks” in education. The second movement os basically a good one, but too often if fell into the hands of “who needs specialties” which cut off true involvement.
    As to the Altshuller books, I found my in the St. Louis public libraries. Last I looked (more than 30 years ago) St. Louis County system still had them. As the two libraries now exchange books, you could probably still get them, BUT neither of us live there any more.

    Reply
  145. What happened to our history Books? What Steve Allen called the “dumbing donw” of America. And the movement to involve “home folks” in education. The second movement os basically a good one, but too often if fell into the hands of “who needs specialties” which cut off true involvement.
    As to the Altshuller books, I found my in the St. Louis public libraries. Last I looked (more than 30 years ago) St. Louis County system still had them. As the two libraries now exchange books, you could probably still get them, BUT neither of us live there any more.

    Reply
  146. I think the attraction of the Regency is that it’s not here (the US). It’s far enough away in time and distance for some fantasy, but not too far to be way too different.
    While Americans in 1812 were still very similar in attitudes to the English, they weren’t English any more. There is a difference in tone between America and England, and that may be what readers want.
    As for the readers wanting Cinderella meets “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous”, I’ve read way too many stories like that. Time for a change. How about a poor gentleman?

    Reply
  147. I think the attraction of the Regency is that it’s not here (the US). It’s far enough away in time and distance for some fantasy, but not too far to be way too different.
    While Americans in 1812 were still very similar in attitudes to the English, they weren’t English any more. There is a difference in tone between America and England, and that may be what readers want.
    As for the readers wanting Cinderella meets “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous”, I’ve read way too many stories like that. Time for a change. How about a poor gentleman?

    Reply
  148. I think the attraction of the Regency is that it’s not here (the US). It’s far enough away in time and distance for some fantasy, but not too far to be way too different.
    While Americans in 1812 were still very similar in attitudes to the English, they weren’t English any more. There is a difference in tone between America and England, and that may be what readers want.
    As for the readers wanting Cinderella meets “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous”, I’ve read way too many stories like that. Time for a change. How about a poor gentleman?

    Reply
  149. I think the attraction of the Regency is that it’s not here (the US). It’s far enough away in time and distance for some fantasy, but not too far to be way too different.
    While Americans in 1812 were still very similar in attitudes to the English, they weren’t English any more. There is a difference in tone between America and England, and that may be what readers want.
    As for the readers wanting Cinderella meets “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous”, I’ve read way too many stories like that. Time for a change. How about a poor gentleman?

    Reply
  150. I think the attraction of the Regency is that it’s not here (the US). It’s far enough away in time and distance for some fantasy, but not too far to be way too different.
    While Americans in 1812 were still very similar in attitudes to the English, they weren’t English any more. There is a difference in tone between America and England, and that may be what readers want.
    As for the readers wanting Cinderella meets “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous”, I’ve read way too many stories like that. Time for a change. How about a poor gentleman?

    Reply

Leave a Comment