Whitby

J2817a

Whitby, North Yorkshire.

Having been here as an interviewee so recently, I'd thought I'd do a short blog about Whitby. I recently bought a local book called Life In Regency Whitby by Prudence Bebb. It's more bits and pieces than a coherent whole, but still full of interesting material. I see she's written a number of Life in Regency xxxxxx books which could be useful for using any of those places in a Regency novel. (check out Amazon UK for a listing.)

The View From On High

There are lots of aerial views of Whitby here.  You'll see, for example on this one that the town sits on both sides of the River Esk, and it's the safe harbour of the Esk that made Whitby a good port back to early times.
Stormysea

The North Sea Coast is a rough place for shipping, even though so many people have made their living up here from the sea. This picture of a rough sea was taken on a day pleasant enough for a walk into town! Bebb has interesting detail about the way captains caught in a storm would see if Whitby could offer refuge. I high flag on the harbour tower meant deep water in the river harbour. Middle meant a shallow draft, and low meant impossible.

Famous Connections.

One Whitby wreck was a Russian ship, the Demeter, which carried Count Dracula to England — fictionally speaking. Hence the famous Goth weekends here. The next one is on the 24th and 25th of this month.

Cook The other important connection is Captain Cook, who trained here as an apprentice and then began his seafaring career, which is why there's a statue overlooking the harbour.

The Past Is Not Always Comfortable.

In the Regency, Whitby was a whaling port, which brought in a lot of wealth as whale oil was used in oil lamps.I just looked whale oil up on Wikipedia and was interested to learn that it's a liquid wax not an oil.

I also came across an interesting article about old oil lamps.

I assume most of us aren't too happy about killing whales for their oil. Will this affect our reading of a novel in which the characters are using oil lamps? The oil was also used to make candles, so unless beeswax is specified….

Is this yet another way in which the past can be uncomfortable for the modern conscience. Would it bother you?

Scoresby

Let's Hear It For Young Heroes!

 Whaling, good or evil, demanded heroics, and I liked one story because William Scoresby, the captain of a whaler, was only 26. I write young heroes but sometimes people seem to think that young means callow.

Briefly, the ship the Esk was holed by ice in Greenland. Other ships came to help, but everyone thought the ship lost. William, however, came up with a plan. Everything was taken off the ship onto the ice so it floated high, then it was rolled on its side and the huge hole mended. Then, with the help of his brother-in-law, the captain of another ship and no older, the Esk limped home to Whitby.

William was also a scientist and made important discoveries about the Arctic. You can read more about him here.

My sort of guy!

Sht4

Some Regency Houses.

A few years later he rented a house in what is now called Saint Hilda's terrage. I'm not sure this is the one, but it would be like this. The annual rent was 34 pounds.

Here's another candidate.

Sht1 

And to balance the picture — how the lower orders lived. Some 17th century cottages, which now sit below street level.

Oldcottages  

I hope you've enjoyed this little bit about Whitby.

Cheers!

Jo

75 thoughts on “Whitby”

  1. Thanks, Jo, for the spotlight on Whitby! I was pleasantly surprised to learn its connection to Captain Cook, the legendary explorer who introduced Hawaii to the Western World.
    Captain Cook and his ships, the Resolution and Discovery, entered Kealakekua Bay (Pathway of the God) on January 17, 1779. Thinking Cook was a returning God, the Hawaiians welcomed and honored him. Ultimately, the Hawaiians realized the white men were not immortal and Captain Cook was killed in a dispute over a stolen object.
    Cook’s sailors erected a cross near the spot where he was killed. 100 years later, Princess Likelike (Lee-kay-lee-kay) erected an obelisk in honor of Captain Cook and deeded it to the United Kingdom. For beautiful pictures, log onto:
    http://www.hawaiiweb.com/hawaii/html/sites/captain_cooks_monument.html

    Reply
  2. Thanks, Jo, for the spotlight on Whitby! I was pleasantly surprised to learn its connection to Captain Cook, the legendary explorer who introduced Hawaii to the Western World.
    Captain Cook and his ships, the Resolution and Discovery, entered Kealakekua Bay (Pathway of the God) on January 17, 1779. Thinking Cook was a returning God, the Hawaiians welcomed and honored him. Ultimately, the Hawaiians realized the white men were not immortal and Captain Cook was killed in a dispute over a stolen object.
    Cook’s sailors erected a cross near the spot where he was killed. 100 years later, Princess Likelike (Lee-kay-lee-kay) erected an obelisk in honor of Captain Cook and deeded it to the United Kingdom. For beautiful pictures, log onto:
    http://www.hawaiiweb.com/hawaii/html/sites/captain_cooks_monument.html

    Reply
  3. Thanks, Jo, for the spotlight on Whitby! I was pleasantly surprised to learn its connection to Captain Cook, the legendary explorer who introduced Hawaii to the Western World.
    Captain Cook and his ships, the Resolution and Discovery, entered Kealakekua Bay (Pathway of the God) on January 17, 1779. Thinking Cook was a returning God, the Hawaiians welcomed and honored him. Ultimately, the Hawaiians realized the white men were not immortal and Captain Cook was killed in a dispute over a stolen object.
    Cook’s sailors erected a cross near the spot where he was killed. 100 years later, Princess Likelike (Lee-kay-lee-kay) erected an obelisk in honor of Captain Cook and deeded it to the United Kingdom. For beautiful pictures, log onto:
    http://www.hawaiiweb.com/hawaii/html/sites/captain_cooks_monument.html

    Reply
  4. Thanks, Jo, for the spotlight on Whitby! I was pleasantly surprised to learn its connection to Captain Cook, the legendary explorer who introduced Hawaii to the Western World.
    Captain Cook and his ships, the Resolution and Discovery, entered Kealakekua Bay (Pathway of the God) on January 17, 1779. Thinking Cook was a returning God, the Hawaiians welcomed and honored him. Ultimately, the Hawaiians realized the white men were not immortal and Captain Cook was killed in a dispute over a stolen object.
    Cook’s sailors erected a cross near the spot where he was killed. 100 years later, Princess Likelike (Lee-kay-lee-kay) erected an obelisk in honor of Captain Cook and deeded it to the United Kingdom. For beautiful pictures, log onto:
    http://www.hawaiiweb.com/hawaii/html/sites/captain_cooks_monument.html

    Reply
  5. Thanks, Jo, for the spotlight on Whitby! I was pleasantly surprised to learn its connection to Captain Cook, the legendary explorer who introduced Hawaii to the Western World.
    Captain Cook and his ships, the Resolution and Discovery, entered Kealakekua Bay (Pathway of the God) on January 17, 1779. Thinking Cook was a returning God, the Hawaiians welcomed and honored him. Ultimately, the Hawaiians realized the white men were not immortal and Captain Cook was killed in a dispute over a stolen object.
    Cook’s sailors erected a cross near the spot where he was killed. 100 years later, Princess Likelike (Lee-kay-lee-kay) erected an obelisk in honor of Captain Cook and deeded it to the United Kingdom. For beautiful pictures, log onto:
    http://www.hawaiiweb.com/hawaii/html/sites/captain_cooks_monument.html

    Reply
  6. What an interesting history Whitby has, Jo. Thank you for sharing it with us.
    I have most of Pridence Bebb’s Regency books and have found them full of useful little snippets of information. I drew on Life in Regency Harrogate for my book The Chaperon Bride, which was set in the town.
    On the subject of whaling, I touch on it in my next book, Whisper of Scandal, which is set partly in the Arctic. When researching it I discovered that there were many uses for the whale! For someone like me, who is inspired by natural history and went on a whale-watching holiday last year, this was a very difficult subject to handle. I feel much the same about fox hunting. Many of the characters in the Regency era would have been devoted to their country sports, of course. It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!

    Reply
  7. What an interesting history Whitby has, Jo. Thank you for sharing it with us.
    I have most of Pridence Bebb’s Regency books and have found them full of useful little snippets of information. I drew on Life in Regency Harrogate for my book The Chaperon Bride, which was set in the town.
    On the subject of whaling, I touch on it in my next book, Whisper of Scandal, which is set partly in the Arctic. When researching it I discovered that there were many uses for the whale! For someone like me, who is inspired by natural history and went on a whale-watching holiday last year, this was a very difficult subject to handle. I feel much the same about fox hunting. Many of the characters in the Regency era would have been devoted to their country sports, of course. It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!

    Reply
  8. What an interesting history Whitby has, Jo. Thank you for sharing it with us.
    I have most of Pridence Bebb’s Regency books and have found them full of useful little snippets of information. I drew on Life in Regency Harrogate for my book The Chaperon Bride, which was set in the town.
    On the subject of whaling, I touch on it in my next book, Whisper of Scandal, which is set partly in the Arctic. When researching it I discovered that there were many uses for the whale! For someone like me, who is inspired by natural history and went on a whale-watching holiday last year, this was a very difficult subject to handle. I feel much the same about fox hunting. Many of the characters in the Regency era would have been devoted to their country sports, of course. It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!

    Reply
  9. What an interesting history Whitby has, Jo. Thank you for sharing it with us.
    I have most of Pridence Bebb’s Regency books and have found them full of useful little snippets of information. I drew on Life in Regency Harrogate for my book The Chaperon Bride, which was set in the town.
    On the subject of whaling, I touch on it in my next book, Whisper of Scandal, which is set partly in the Arctic. When researching it I discovered that there were many uses for the whale! For someone like me, who is inspired by natural history and went on a whale-watching holiday last year, this was a very difficult subject to handle. I feel much the same about fox hunting. Many of the characters in the Regency era would have been devoted to their country sports, of course. It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!

    Reply
  10. What an interesting history Whitby has, Jo. Thank you for sharing it with us.
    I have most of Pridence Bebb’s Regency books and have found them full of useful little snippets of information. I drew on Life in Regency Harrogate for my book The Chaperon Bride, which was set in the town.
    On the subject of whaling, I touch on it in my next book, Whisper of Scandal, which is set partly in the Arctic. When researching it I discovered that there were many uses for the whale! For someone like me, who is inspired by natural history and went on a whale-watching holiday last year, this was a very difficult subject to handle. I feel much the same about fox hunting. Many of the characters in the Regency era would have been devoted to their country sports, of course. It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!

    Reply
  11. How fascinating to be able to live in a little town so rich in history. I might never get anything done, I’d be too interested in learning all the little tidbits.
    Thanks for the view into a past you get to walk through whenever you want! :o)

    Reply
  12. How fascinating to be able to live in a little town so rich in history. I might never get anything done, I’d be too interested in learning all the little tidbits.
    Thanks for the view into a past you get to walk through whenever you want! :o)

    Reply
  13. How fascinating to be able to live in a little town so rich in history. I might never get anything done, I’d be too interested in learning all the little tidbits.
    Thanks for the view into a past you get to walk through whenever you want! :o)

    Reply
  14. How fascinating to be able to live in a little town so rich in history. I might never get anything done, I’d be too interested in learning all the little tidbits.
    Thanks for the view into a past you get to walk through whenever you want! :o)

    Reply
  15. How fascinating to be able to live in a little town so rich in history. I might never get anything done, I’d be too interested in learning all the little tidbits.
    Thanks for the view into a past you get to walk through whenever you want! :o)

    Reply
  16. Nicola said, “It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!”
    Which is a huge subject. It partly depends on our sensibilities. Hunting doesn’t bother me that much. Slavery more so.
    I’m opposed to whaling now, but don’t have big problems with it in the past. I’m not a vegetarian and I wear leather. If I’m willing to use a range of animal products that require the animal’s death, I don’t think it’s logical to pick and choose between species. But that’s just me. 🙂
    Perhaps we should do a blog one day about individual sticking points in past realities.Frankly, I’m more likely to be annoyed when an author overrides all reality of her period by insisting on some modern sensibility. Better to write in a more comfortable era, IMO.
    Jo

    Reply
  17. Nicola said, “It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!”
    Which is a huge subject. It partly depends on our sensibilities. Hunting doesn’t bother me that much. Slavery more so.
    I’m opposed to whaling now, but don’t have big problems with it in the past. I’m not a vegetarian and I wear leather. If I’m willing to use a range of animal products that require the animal’s death, I don’t think it’s logical to pick and choose between species. But that’s just me. 🙂
    Perhaps we should do a blog one day about individual sticking points in past realities.Frankly, I’m more likely to be annoyed when an author overrides all reality of her period by insisting on some modern sensibility. Better to write in a more comfortable era, IMO.
    Jo

    Reply
  18. Nicola said, “It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!”
    Which is a huge subject. It partly depends on our sensibilities. Hunting doesn’t bother me that much. Slavery more so.
    I’m opposed to whaling now, but don’t have big problems with it in the past. I’m not a vegetarian and I wear leather. If I’m willing to use a range of animal products that require the animal’s death, I don’t think it’s logical to pick and choose between species. But that’s just me. 🙂
    Perhaps we should do a blog one day about individual sticking points in past realities.Frankly, I’m more likely to be annoyed when an author overrides all reality of her period by insisting on some modern sensibility. Better to write in a more comfortable era, IMO.
    Jo

    Reply
  19. Nicola said, “It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!”
    Which is a huge subject. It partly depends on our sensibilities. Hunting doesn’t bother me that much. Slavery more so.
    I’m opposed to whaling now, but don’t have big problems with it in the past. I’m not a vegetarian and I wear leather. If I’m willing to use a range of animal products that require the animal’s death, I don’t think it’s logical to pick and choose between species. But that’s just me. 🙂
    Perhaps we should do a blog one day about individual sticking points in past realities.Frankly, I’m more likely to be annoyed when an author overrides all reality of her period by insisting on some modern sensibility. Better to write in a more comfortable era, IMO.
    Jo

    Reply
  20. Nicola said, “It raises that interesting question of how authentic we make our books and how far we go to address the sensibilities of our own time!”
    Which is a huge subject. It partly depends on our sensibilities. Hunting doesn’t bother me that much. Slavery more so.
    I’m opposed to whaling now, but don’t have big problems with it in the past. I’m not a vegetarian and I wear leather. If I’m willing to use a range of animal products that require the animal’s death, I don’t think it’s logical to pick and choose between species. But that’s just me. 🙂
    Perhaps we should do a blog one day about individual sticking points in past realities.Frankly, I’m more likely to be annoyed when an author overrides all reality of her period by insisting on some modern sensibility. Better to write in a more comfortable era, IMO.
    Jo

    Reply
  21. I couldn’t even imagine putting a politically correct distaste for whale oil or any other whale-derived product into the mind or mouth of an historical character. It annoys me enough to put up with other such PC attitudes in historical romances towards things we have now banned or frown upon due to modern sensibilities without committing the same sin myself. If it’s a matter of conscience – say, a woman watching a slave being beaten – that is a different matter. I’m sure many would have been uncomfortable with the absolute tyranny of slave-owning. But to have that woman suddenly leap up and give a public speech, for instance, about the evils of slavery – well, that kind of modern-day response would be vastly unrealistic, and quite rightly deserve the book being flung across the room. Unless, of course, it’s about a real historical character who is documented as being involved in the abolition of slavery …

    Reply
  22. I couldn’t even imagine putting a politically correct distaste for whale oil or any other whale-derived product into the mind or mouth of an historical character. It annoys me enough to put up with other such PC attitudes in historical romances towards things we have now banned or frown upon due to modern sensibilities without committing the same sin myself. If it’s a matter of conscience – say, a woman watching a slave being beaten – that is a different matter. I’m sure many would have been uncomfortable with the absolute tyranny of slave-owning. But to have that woman suddenly leap up and give a public speech, for instance, about the evils of slavery – well, that kind of modern-day response would be vastly unrealistic, and quite rightly deserve the book being flung across the room. Unless, of course, it’s about a real historical character who is documented as being involved in the abolition of slavery …

    Reply
  23. I couldn’t even imagine putting a politically correct distaste for whale oil or any other whale-derived product into the mind or mouth of an historical character. It annoys me enough to put up with other such PC attitudes in historical romances towards things we have now banned or frown upon due to modern sensibilities without committing the same sin myself. If it’s a matter of conscience – say, a woman watching a slave being beaten – that is a different matter. I’m sure many would have been uncomfortable with the absolute tyranny of slave-owning. But to have that woman suddenly leap up and give a public speech, for instance, about the evils of slavery – well, that kind of modern-day response would be vastly unrealistic, and quite rightly deserve the book being flung across the room. Unless, of course, it’s about a real historical character who is documented as being involved in the abolition of slavery …

    Reply
  24. I couldn’t even imagine putting a politically correct distaste for whale oil or any other whale-derived product into the mind or mouth of an historical character. It annoys me enough to put up with other such PC attitudes in historical romances towards things we have now banned or frown upon due to modern sensibilities without committing the same sin myself. If it’s a matter of conscience – say, a woman watching a slave being beaten – that is a different matter. I’m sure many would have been uncomfortable with the absolute tyranny of slave-owning. But to have that woman suddenly leap up and give a public speech, for instance, about the evils of slavery – well, that kind of modern-day response would be vastly unrealistic, and quite rightly deserve the book being flung across the room. Unless, of course, it’s about a real historical character who is documented as being involved in the abolition of slavery …

    Reply
  25. I couldn’t even imagine putting a politically correct distaste for whale oil or any other whale-derived product into the mind or mouth of an historical character. It annoys me enough to put up with other such PC attitudes in historical romances towards things we have now banned or frown upon due to modern sensibilities without committing the same sin myself. If it’s a matter of conscience – say, a woman watching a slave being beaten – that is a different matter. I’m sure many would have been uncomfortable with the absolute tyranny of slave-owning. But to have that woman suddenly leap up and give a public speech, for instance, about the evils of slavery – well, that kind of modern-day response would be vastly unrealistic, and quite rightly deserve the book being flung across the room. Unless, of course, it’s about a real historical character who is documented as being involved in the abolition of slavery …

    Reply
  26. Interesting to think about the individual sticking points. In fact, from the mid-Georgian period on, a LOT of English folk, especially women, were actively against slavery. (I wrote a novel about that, actually. *g*)
    The whales had few if any advocates then. Now is a different matter, of course.

    Reply
  27. Interesting to think about the individual sticking points. In fact, from the mid-Georgian period on, a LOT of English folk, especially women, were actively against slavery. (I wrote a novel about that, actually. *g*)
    The whales had few if any advocates then. Now is a different matter, of course.

    Reply
  28. Interesting to think about the individual sticking points. In fact, from the mid-Georgian period on, a LOT of English folk, especially women, were actively against slavery. (I wrote a novel about that, actually. *g*)
    The whales had few if any advocates then. Now is a different matter, of course.

    Reply
  29. Interesting to think about the individual sticking points. In fact, from the mid-Georgian period on, a LOT of English folk, especially women, were actively against slavery. (I wrote a novel about that, actually. *g*)
    The whales had few if any advocates then. Now is a different matter, of course.

    Reply
  30. Interesting to think about the individual sticking points. In fact, from the mid-Georgian period on, a LOT of English folk, especially women, were actively against slavery. (I wrote a novel about that, actually. *g*)
    The whales had few if any advocates then. Now is a different matter, of course.

    Reply
  31. In the days you ladies write about, the whales had a fighting chance and it was man against whale.
    In today’s world with factory ships (we watched them with binoculars off the U.S. and on PBS TV) the whales and many thousands of other fish have NO chance at all and many are caught that aren’t wanted, die and thrown back into the sea–useless killing.
    And when you read historical books we readers have to realize that attitudes were very different and England was way ahead of USA in the slavery area!

    Reply
  32. In the days you ladies write about, the whales had a fighting chance and it was man against whale.
    In today’s world with factory ships (we watched them with binoculars off the U.S. and on PBS TV) the whales and many thousands of other fish have NO chance at all and many are caught that aren’t wanted, die and thrown back into the sea–useless killing.
    And when you read historical books we readers have to realize that attitudes were very different and England was way ahead of USA in the slavery area!

    Reply
  33. In the days you ladies write about, the whales had a fighting chance and it was man against whale.
    In today’s world with factory ships (we watched them with binoculars off the U.S. and on PBS TV) the whales and many thousands of other fish have NO chance at all and many are caught that aren’t wanted, die and thrown back into the sea–useless killing.
    And when you read historical books we readers have to realize that attitudes were very different and England was way ahead of USA in the slavery area!

    Reply
  34. In the days you ladies write about, the whales had a fighting chance and it was man against whale.
    In today’s world with factory ships (we watched them with binoculars off the U.S. and on PBS TV) the whales and many thousands of other fish have NO chance at all and many are caught that aren’t wanted, die and thrown back into the sea–useless killing.
    And when you read historical books we readers have to realize that attitudes were very different and England was way ahead of USA in the slavery area!

    Reply
  35. In the days you ladies write about, the whales had a fighting chance and it was man against whale.
    In today’s world with factory ships (we watched them with binoculars off the U.S. and on PBS TV) the whales and many thousands of other fish have NO chance at all and many are caught that aren’t wanted, die and thrown back into the sea–useless killing.
    And when you read historical books we readers have to realize that attitudes were very different and England was way ahead of USA in the slavery area!

    Reply
  36. I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.
    You live a lovely are with much local history to keep you busy. There should be some characters or ideas for your books floating around there somewhere.

    Reply
  37. I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.
    You live a lovely are with much local history to keep you busy. There should be some characters or ideas for your books floating around there somewhere.

    Reply
  38. I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.
    You live a lovely are with much local history to keep you busy. There should be some characters or ideas for your books floating around there somewhere.

    Reply
  39. I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.
    You live a lovely are with much local history to keep you busy. There should be some characters or ideas for your books floating around there somewhere.

    Reply
  40. I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.
    You live a lovely are with much local history to keep you busy. There should be some characters or ideas for your books floating around there somewhere.

    Reply
  41. When I was a child, every summer, I and my three brothers plus Nanny and a Nursery maid, had a fortnight’s holiday in Whitby.
    What I remember vividly was watching the fishing fleet going out of an evening (that dates me!)and visiting the wonderful place where kippers where smoked. They hung in rows over wires stretched across the room and looked like large flat autumn beech leaves, coppery coloured and smelling of both fish and the oak shavings which were used for smoking.
    And, of course, there’s Whitby jet.
    I recommend the Whitby Museum which has a number of interesting booklets on jet, whaling and so on.
    Thank you for posting this, Jo. It’s brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  42. When I was a child, every summer, I and my three brothers plus Nanny and a Nursery maid, had a fortnight’s holiday in Whitby.
    What I remember vividly was watching the fishing fleet going out of an evening (that dates me!)and visiting the wonderful place where kippers where smoked. They hung in rows over wires stretched across the room and looked like large flat autumn beech leaves, coppery coloured and smelling of both fish and the oak shavings which were used for smoking.
    And, of course, there’s Whitby jet.
    I recommend the Whitby Museum which has a number of interesting booklets on jet, whaling and so on.
    Thank you for posting this, Jo. It’s brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  43. When I was a child, every summer, I and my three brothers plus Nanny and a Nursery maid, had a fortnight’s holiday in Whitby.
    What I remember vividly was watching the fishing fleet going out of an evening (that dates me!)and visiting the wonderful place where kippers where smoked. They hung in rows over wires stretched across the room and looked like large flat autumn beech leaves, coppery coloured and smelling of both fish and the oak shavings which were used for smoking.
    And, of course, there’s Whitby jet.
    I recommend the Whitby Museum which has a number of interesting booklets on jet, whaling and so on.
    Thank you for posting this, Jo. It’s brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  44. When I was a child, every summer, I and my three brothers plus Nanny and a Nursery maid, had a fortnight’s holiday in Whitby.
    What I remember vividly was watching the fishing fleet going out of an evening (that dates me!)and visiting the wonderful place where kippers where smoked. They hung in rows over wires stretched across the room and looked like large flat autumn beech leaves, coppery coloured and smelling of both fish and the oak shavings which were used for smoking.
    And, of course, there’s Whitby jet.
    I recommend the Whitby Museum which has a number of interesting booklets on jet, whaling and so on.
    Thank you for posting this, Jo. It’s brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  45. When I was a child, every summer, I and my three brothers plus Nanny and a Nursery maid, had a fortnight’s holiday in Whitby.
    What I remember vividly was watching the fishing fleet going out of an evening (that dates me!)and visiting the wonderful place where kippers where smoked. They hung in rows over wires stretched across the room and looked like large flat autumn beech leaves, coppery coloured and smelling of both fish and the oak shavings which were used for smoking.
    And, of course, there’s Whitby jet.
    I recommend the Whitby Museum which has a number of interesting booklets on jet, whaling and so on.
    Thank you for posting this, Jo. It’s brought back a lot of memories.

    Reply
  46. I’m sure many women were against slavery. But would they have spoken out in public against it in the mid-nineteeth century? That seems unlikely. They are more likely to have attempted to gain influence through their husbands etc. Though since we weren’t there …

    Reply
  47. I’m sure many women were against slavery. But would they have spoken out in public against it in the mid-nineteeth century? That seems unlikely. They are more likely to have attempted to gain influence through their husbands etc. Though since we weren’t there …

    Reply
  48. I’m sure many women were against slavery. But would they have spoken out in public against it in the mid-nineteeth century? That seems unlikely. They are more likely to have attempted to gain influence through their husbands etc. Though since we weren’t there …

    Reply
  49. I’m sure many women were against slavery. But would they have spoken out in public against it in the mid-nineteeth century? That seems unlikely. They are more likely to have attempted to gain influence through their husbands etc. Though since we weren’t there …

    Reply
  50. I’m sure many women were against slavery. But would they have spoken out in public against it in the mid-nineteeth century? That seems unlikely. They are more likely to have attempted to gain influence through their husbands etc. Though since we weren’t there …

    Reply
  51. Personally speaking, I have nothing against use of whale oil in a historical. That’s a fact. Also, the Georgians were judicious in their whaling and used the entire whale. It’s our industrial careless overfishing that’s caused the reverse, equally extreme, backlash banning.
    Patricia Barraclough wrote: “I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.”
    This is a good way of looking at it. We rarely comment or notice the mundane in our daily lives even if there are plenty of people protesting against it. We use it and move on.

    Reply
  52. Personally speaking, I have nothing against use of whale oil in a historical. That’s a fact. Also, the Georgians were judicious in their whaling and used the entire whale. It’s our industrial careless overfishing that’s caused the reverse, equally extreme, backlash banning.
    Patricia Barraclough wrote: “I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.”
    This is a good way of looking at it. We rarely comment or notice the mundane in our daily lives even if there are plenty of people protesting against it. We use it and move on.

    Reply
  53. Personally speaking, I have nothing against use of whale oil in a historical. That’s a fact. Also, the Georgians were judicious in their whaling and used the entire whale. It’s our industrial careless overfishing that’s caused the reverse, equally extreme, backlash banning.
    Patricia Barraclough wrote: “I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.”
    This is a good way of looking at it. We rarely comment or notice the mundane in our daily lives even if there are plenty of people protesting against it. We use it and move on.

    Reply
  54. Personally speaking, I have nothing against use of whale oil in a historical. That’s a fact. Also, the Georgians were judicious in their whaling and used the entire whale. It’s our industrial careless overfishing that’s caused the reverse, equally extreme, backlash banning.
    Patricia Barraclough wrote: “I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.”
    This is a good way of looking at it. We rarely comment or notice the mundane in our daily lives even if there are plenty of people protesting against it. We use it and move on.

    Reply
  55. Personally speaking, I have nothing against use of whale oil in a historical. That’s a fact. Also, the Georgians were judicious in their whaling and used the entire whale. It’s our industrial careless overfishing that’s caused the reverse, equally extreme, backlash banning.
    Patricia Barraclough wrote: “I don’t see any reason to mention that the lamps and candles are of whale oil, unless it is important to the plot of the story. It was what they used. We think nothing of the fossil fuels polluting the air when flip the switch for electric lights.”
    This is a good way of looking at it. We rarely comment or notice the mundane in our daily lives even if there are plenty of people protesting against it. We use it and move on.

    Reply

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