Where have all the Westerns gone?

Cat 243 Dover by Mary Jo

Westerns are sometimes considered THE American story.  Often they’re set in the semi-mythic frontier lands of the Old West.  The iconic hero is a lone wanderer such as a gunfighter or cowboy, a version of the knight errant who wanders wild and beautiful lands, stopping now and then to help people out.  Western mythologies permeate American culture, including Hollywood and politics, so it’s not surprising Westerns have played a very large part of the historical romance market.  The early historical writers (like Pat Rice) often jumped from setting to setting, including medievals, Westerns, Revolutionary or Civil War, etc. 

But in the last few years, as the Regency setting practically took over historical romance, Westerns largely disappeared.  Not entirely—a few long established writers have continued to spin Western tales, but the setting became a very small proportion of the total number of historical romances published.

Now Westerns are showing signs of being on the upswing.  I was going to pontificate, but the three Western writers I talked to for this blog have pretty much said all that needs saying:

First up is Shirl Henke.  (http://shirlhenke.com/)  Shirl’s very first published romance in 1986 was Golden Lady, and it won the Romantic Times Best New Author award and was a Rita finalist.  She grew up reading Luke Short, Max Brand and Zane Grey.  With a few detours to England, some contemporary suspense and two thrillers under a pseudonym, she’s overwhelmingly stuck to the West for her settings. 

Shirl HenkeShirl Henke: The West is a whole lot more than cowboys and Indians:

“…if either Freud or the Navajo speak true, westward we shall find the hole in the earth through which the soul may plunge to peace…”
            Bernard DeVoto
 
"Have you ever seen Bonanza dubbed in Japanese?  I have.  Sounded a little weird, but it illustrates the universal appeal of the West, an idea as limitless as human imagination.  “Space…the final frontier…” 

Exploring the unknown, taming the wilderness, starting over again are the stuff of primal myth.  Captain Kirk and Marshal Dillon had a lot more in common than Hollywood ever imagined…at least until Joss Whedon put it together in Firefly.  Because the West holds such a deeply rooted place, not only in America's imagination but the world's, Westerns will always return in cycles and so will western romances. 

DSCN0537 There is a panoply of raw materials from which to craft a story.  No other time or place in history drew together as many people from around the globe as did the ever-expanding American frontier:  Spanish conquistadors, czarist Russians, French fur trappers, Anglo riflemen, Scots merchants.  Cattle barons were often literally that—titled gents from England or Germany.  The dispossessed came searching for a better life:  Irish, Chinese, Hawaiians and Jews.  African-Americans from the post-Civil War South left their mark as cowboys, lawmen and legendary Buffalo Soldiers.  With this cast, how could any writer fail to find her muse?
 
I believe that Westerns and romances uniquely compliment each other.  Nothing holds more mythic allure than the concept of frontier.  Nothing is more powerful than the male-female relationship.  I can't imagine a better setting for the essential conflict between a hero and heroine than the West, a place beyond ordinary rules, filled with extraordinary promise.  I put my protagonists at risk.  They come from opposing cultures—Anglo vs. Hispanic, white vs. Indian, Mormon vs. Gentile.  In a violent land they discover who they are and what they really want—each other.
 
PaleMoonStalkerflat My newly released western romance, Pale Moon Stalker, has an English nobleman turned bounty hunter offering a marriage of convenience to a mixed-blood Sioux woman.  I introduce a paranormal element with an old Cheyenne medicine man who sees their future and helps them track down a truly nasty remittance man.  Where else could I have set Max and Sky's story but in the West?

I’ve committed to this Wild West Series that began with The River Nymph Feb 08.  Pale Moon Stalker is out now and Chosen Woman will be out July 09.  I intend to continue this project as long as readers want the books." 

Pat Potter  Patricia Potter is another long-term writer, possessor of a full tribe of RITA nominations.  Pat started out with Westerns, including some that used Civil War Western history.  More recently she’s been writing contemporary romantic suspense and Scottish historicals, but lots of people remember her Westerns with passionate enthusiasm.  http://patriciapotter.com/

I contacted Pat, and found out that not only has she just agreed to do three Westerns for Harlequin Blaze (the line is adding a historical a month). but another publisher has also expressed interest in having Pat write Westerns for them.

Patricia Potter: You can go home again 

“Yes, I do think there's a longing among readers for the Western.   I regularly receive queries about when I'll do another Western and laments about the lack of them.  There seemed to be a fluttering interest about their revival among publishers two years ago, then it slackened.  But I see it coming back again.    
 
I think the appeal of Westerns is still out there.   Publishing has a habit of picking up on a trend, then overloading the market and eventually destroying it by over-publication. We've seen it with Westerns, romantic suspense, chick lit, and now we're in the midst of a paranormal boon.   All eventually return in more measured publication.  
 
I believe the appeal of the Western is still strong.   It was a time of discovery, both in the land and in the strength of the people who settled it.   There were amazing real life heroines and men bigger than life.  There are so many wonderful stories to   be told.
 
DSCN0556 Westerns are doing very well with Harlequin Historicals and Kensington.    I've just agreed to do three in the Blaze line.   I hope this is one boom that is coming back."

Those three upcoming Patricia Potter Westerns are good news for lovers of the genre!  Pat is a member of http://petticoatsandpistols.com/, a blog of Western writers as well as http://storybroads.com/, a more general romance writer blog.

Besides classic Westerns, new forms of Western are appearing, including erotica and even vampire Westerns.  I talked to my Texas born friend Laurie Kingery, who wrote Westerns and medievals for Dorchester, Harlequin, and Warner under the pseudonym Laurie Grant. (http://lauriekingery.com/)

Laurie_Kingery Now Laurie is writing Westerns for the Steeple Hill Love Inspired Historicals line of inspirational romances.   Her first book for them, A Hill Country Christmas, is a November release and she has another one in production.  (The Outlaw's Lady, August 2009.) 

Laurie Kingery:  Western Inspirationals, a match made in heaven

“I'm not sure western romances have ever been totally eclipsed, but they were indeed overshadowed for a time by Regencies and medievals. But publishers like Harlequin Historicals and now, Love Inspired Historicals, have recognized that Westerns are the backbone of historical romance with their appeal to a simpler time when our country was still young and a vast expanse of western land needed to be settled by strong men who were able to protect their ladies, and ladies who were strong enough in their own way to be the equal partner to these men.

Many of us grew up watching Westerns on TV and in the movies, and while those weekly TV shows like “Gunsmoke” and “Rawhide” are gone, the continuing popularity of Westerns reveals itself in the movies that are still made for both the cinema and TV like Tombstone (my personal favorite), Appaloosa and Broken Trail.

DSCN0528However politically incorrect it is these days to make a hero of a man who's good with a gun, something in many of us harkens back to when this quality meant survival for a man and his family.  It's also a way to re-explore our ambivalent relationship with the Native Americans.

Steeple Hill Love Inspired Historicals, drawing on the core audience of Harlequin Historicals (they're both part of the same huge publisher) is currently publishing two historicals a month. One of these is always a Western, which speaks to the strength of that readership.

The difference between a secular historical and an inspirational one is the addition of the faith journey of the hero and heroine. In a secular romance, the main characters are the hero and heroine; in an inspirational one, God is a third main character, forming an unbreakable three-stranded cord.

Hill_Country_ChristmasThese stories do not always involve conversions and are not merely "religious tracts within a story," but the hero and heroine are usually at different points in their faith journey, which forms part of the conflict. Westerns are a natural fit for inspirational historicals, because it was a time in our nation when most average people were people of faith, for it's hard to imagine how people could come from the civilized east of America—and from countries all over the world—without strong faith in a God who watches over them and cares about them.

Laurie is currently working on Marrying Milly, the start of the "Spinsters of Simpson Creek" series.  So it looks like Westerns are alive and well at Love Inspired.

To round out the subject, I asked Kate Duffy, my wonderful editor, about Westerns at Kensington.  Her reply:

“Well, the God’s honest truth is that here they never went away.  We as readers love them.  Brava currently has two Western historical writers doing great business – Diane Whiteside and Beth Williamson.

In Zebra, Georgina Gentry, Janette Kenny, Elaine Levine (just off the top of my head) and we are lucky to have Jodi Thomas in some anthologies including, coming next February, Give Me A Cowboy, following the success of Give Me A Texan.  I am sure I am leaving some authors out but in my defense, I haven’t had enough coffee.

So we never experienced an eclipse.  We certainly saw fewer of them submitted to us.  And that seems, as I said in San Francisco (at the RWA conference) to be because of the impact of this notion which really wasn’t valid, at least at Kensington.”

So there are the thoughts of four experts on Westerns.  How about you—have you missed them?  Do you have favorite Westerns that you loved?  Tell us about them!

As a special treat, Shirl Henke and Laurie Kingery will give away signed copies of their current releases (Pale Moon Stalker and A Hill Country Christmas, respectively) to lucky commenters before midnight Friday.  So speak up!

DSCN0531 Mary Jo, who only ever wrote one Western novella, but is glad to see Westerns reviving.

 

160 thoughts on “Where have all the Westerns gone?”

  1. “However politically incorrect it is these days to make a hero of a man who’s good with a gun”
    That’s interesting, because I think even older Westerns (in the Western genre, that is) displayed a lot of ambivalence about heroes. Aren’t traditional Westerns’ heroes often slightly (or very) on the wrong side of the law? In many Western romances too, there’s a tension between the hero and the local sheriff/ranger/etc.
    I also have the impression that mysterious men often save the day–though I’m not sure whether they’d be the romance heroes or just conveniently good-natured outlaws. Patricia Gaffney riffed on that in her “Outlaw in Paradise”. Her hero was a faux-villain, his man-of-mystery pose *was* a pose, and his dangerousness was a front for his marshmallowness.

    Reply
  2. “However politically incorrect it is these days to make a hero of a man who’s good with a gun”
    That’s interesting, because I think even older Westerns (in the Western genre, that is) displayed a lot of ambivalence about heroes. Aren’t traditional Westerns’ heroes often slightly (or very) on the wrong side of the law? In many Western romances too, there’s a tension between the hero and the local sheriff/ranger/etc.
    I also have the impression that mysterious men often save the day–though I’m not sure whether they’d be the romance heroes or just conveniently good-natured outlaws. Patricia Gaffney riffed on that in her “Outlaw in Paradise”. Her hero was a faux-villain, his man-of-mystery pose *was* a pose, and his dangerousness was a front for his marshmallowness.

    Reply
  3. “However politically incorrect it is these days to make a hero of a man who’s good with a gun”
    That’s interesting, because I think even older Westerns (in the Western genre, that is) displayed a lot of ambivalence about heroes. Aren’t traditional Westerns’ heroes often slightly (or very) on the wrong side of the law? In many Western romances too, there’s a tension between the hero and the local sheriff/ranger/etc.
    I also have the impression that mysterious men often save the day–though I’m not sure whether they’d be the romance heroes or just conveniently good-natured outlaws. Patricia Gaffney riffed on that in her “Outlaw in Paradise”. Her hero was a faux-villain, his man-of-mystery pose *was* a pose, and his dangerousness was a front for his marshmallowness.

    Reply
  4. “However politically incorrect it is these days to make a hero of a man who’s good with a gun”
    That’s interesting, because I think even older Westerns (in the Western genre, that is) displayed a lot of ambivalence about heroes. Aren’t traditional Westerns’ heroes often slightly (or very) on the wrong side of the law? In many Western romances too, there’s a tension between the hero and the local sheriff/ranger/etc.
    I also have the impression that mysterious men often save the day–though I’m not sure whether they’d be the romance heroes or just conveniently good-natured outlaws. Patricia Gaffney riffed on that in her “Outlaw in Paradise”. Her hero was a faux-villain, his man-of-mystery pose *was* a pose, and his dangerousness was a front for his marshmallowness.

    Reply
  5. “However politically incorrect it is these days to make a hero of a man who’s good with a gun”
    That’s interesting, because I think even older Westerns (in the Western genre, that is) displayed a lot of ambivalence about heroes. Aren’t traditional Westerns’ heroes often slightly (or very) on the wrong side of the law? In many Western romances too, there’s a tension between the hero and the local sheriff/ranger/etc.
    I also have the impression that mysterious men often save the day–though I’m not sure whether they’d be the romance heroes or just conveniently good-natured outlaws. Patricia Gaffney riffed on that in her “Outlaw in Paradise”. Her hero was a faux-villain, his man-of-mystery pose *was* a pose, and his dangerousness was a front for his marshmallowness.

    Reply
  6. I love a good western and have read a lot of them over the years and always enjoyed them most of the books I read these days are Regency but I have read a few of Tracy Garrett’s and Anna Leighs that I have really enjoyed.
    I will be keeping an eye out in the shops for these new ones because I do love a cowboy.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  7. I love a good western and have read a lot of them over the years and always enjoyed them most of the books I read these days are Regency but I have read a few of Tracy Garrett’s and Anna Leighs that I have really enjoyed.
    I will be keeping an eye out in the shops for these new ones because I do love a cowboy.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  8. I love a good western and have read a lot of them over the years and always enjoyed them most of the books I read these days are Regency but I have read a few of Tracy Garrett’s and Anna Leighs that I have really enjoyed.
    I will be keeping an eye out in the shops for these new ones because I do love a cowboy.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  9. I love a good western and have read a lot of them over the years and always enjoyed them most of the books I read these days are Regency but I have read a few of Tracy Garrett’s and Anna Leighs that I have really enjoyed.
    I will be keeping an eye out in the shops for these new ones because I do love a cowboy.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  10. I love a good western and have read a lot of them over the years and always enjoyed them most of the books I read these days are Regency but I have read a few of Tracy Garrett’s and Anna Leighs that I have really enjoyed.
    I will be keeping an eye out in the shops for these new ones because I do love a cowboy.
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  11. Thanks for doing this blog, MJ, made all the more interesting for me because, not only do I love westerns — reading them as well as writing them — but because two favorite authors of Westerns are right here!I’ve read Pat Potter’s and Shirl Henke’s Westerns for years! I’d like to know what you all might consider a “new Western” concept. When Westerns seemed to be out of favor (and I’m glad to read Kate Duffy’s comments about how they never really went away at Kensington), I heard editors and agents say that *if* Westerns ever came back they’d have to have a *new concept* about them, something different about them. Do you all think that’s true? And what would you think could be really new about a tried and true genre? Thanks again. I took great heart in all the words! Garda

    Reply
  12. Thanks for doing this blog, MJ, made all the more interesting for me because, not only do I love westerns — reading them as well as writing them — but because two favorite authors of Westerns are right here!I’ve read Pat Potter’s and Shirl Henke’s Westerns for years! I’d like to know what you all might consider a “new Western” concept. When Westerns seemed to be out of favor (and I’m glad to read Kate Duffy’s comments about how they never really went away at Kensington), I heard editors and agents say that *if* Westerns ever came back they’d have to have a *new concept* about them, something different about them. Do you all think that’s true? And what would you think could be really new about a tried and true genre? Thanks again. I took great heart in all the words! Garda

    Reply
  13. Thanks for doing this blog, MJ, made all the more interesting for me because, not only do I love westerns — reading them as well as writing them — but because two favorite authors of Westerns are right here!I’ve read Pat Potter’s and Shirl Henke’s Westerns for years! I’d like to know what you all might consider a “new Western” concept. When Westerns seemed to be out of favor (and I’m glad to read Kate Duffy’s comments about how they never really went away at Kensington), I heard editors and agents say that *if* Westerns ever came back they’d have to have a *new concept* about them, something different about them. Do you all think that’s true? And what would you think could be really new about a tried and true genre? Thanks again. I took great heart in all the words! Garda

    Reply
  14. Thanks for doing this blog, MJ, made all the more interesting for me because, not only do I love westerns — reading them as well as writing them — but because two favorite authors of Westerns are right here!I’ve read Pat Potter’s and Shirl Henke’s Westerns for years! I’d like to know what you all might consider a “new Western” concept. When Westerns seemed to be out of favor (and I’m glad to read Kate Duffy’s comments about how they never really went away at Kensington), I heard editors and agents say that *if* Westerns ever came back they’d have to have a *new concept* about them, something different about them. Do you all think that’s true? And what would you think could be really new about a tried and true genre? Thanks again. I took great heart in all the words! Garda

    Reply
  15. Thanks for doing this blog, MJ, made all the more interesting for me because, not only do I love westerns — reading them as well as writing them — but because two favorite authors of Westerns are right here!I’ve read Pat Potter’s and Shirl Henke’s Westerns for years! I’d like to know what you all might consider a “new Western” concept. When Westerns seemed to be out of favor (and I’m glad to read Kate Duffy’s comments about how they never really went away at Kensington), I heard editors and agents say that *if* Westerns ever came back they’d have to have a *new concept* about them, something different about them. Do you all think that’s true? And what would you think could be really new about a tried and true genre? Thanks again. I took great heart in all the words! Garda

    Reply
  16. Great post, Mary Jo. As one who grew up in the west and loves the ambience as well as the loner hero who gets things done his way — not to mention the woman strong enough to be his heroine — I would love to see westerns historicals (and contemporaries) come back (personally, because I wrote them, but also because I love reading them). One of my favorite western historical authors is Linda Benjamin who also wrote as Jessica Douglass.

    Reply
  17. Great post, Mary Jo. As one who grew up in the west and loves the ambience as well as the loner hero who gets things done his way — not to mention the woman strong enough to be his heroine — I would love to see westerns historicals (and contemporaries) come back (personally, because I wrote them, but also because I love reading them). One of my favorite western historical authors is Linda Benjamin who also wrote as Jessica Douglass.

    Reply
  18. Great post, Mary Jo. As one who grew up in the west and loves the ambience as well as the loner hero who gets things done his way — not to mention the woman strong enough to be his heroine — I would love to see westerns historicals (and contemporaries) come back (personally, because I wrote them, but also because I love reading them). One of my favorite western historical authors is Linda Benjamin who also wrote as Jessica Douglass.

    Reply
  19. Great post, Mary Jo. As one who grew up in the west and loves the ambience as well as the loner hero who gets things done his way — not to mention the woman strong enough to be his heroine — I would love to see westerns historicals (and contemporaries) come back (personally, because I wrote them, but also because I love reading them). One of my favorite western historical authors is Linda Benjamin who also wrote as Jessica Douglass.

    Reply
  20. Great post, Mary Jo. As one who grew up in the west and loves the ambience as well as the loner hero who gets things done his way — not to mention the woman strong enough to be his heroine — I would love to see westerns historicals (and contemporaries) come back (personally, because I wrote them, but also because I love reading them). One of my favorite western historical authors is Linda Benjamin who also wrote as Jessica Douglass.

    Reply
  21. Maggie Osborne’s name is synonymous with the western romance for me. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read The Promise of Jenny Jones, The Brides of Praire Gold, The Best Man, The Wives of Bowie Stone. Lorraine Heath’s Texas trilogy and Pam Morsi’s Courting Miss Hattie are also long-time favorites. I have also enjoyed western romances by Susan Kay Law and Cheryl St. John, and more recently I really liked Kathryn Albright’s The Rebel and the Lady.
    And I don’t even consider myself a big western fan. 🙂

    Reply
  22. Maggie Osborne’s name is synonymous with the western romance for me. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read The Promise of Jenny Jones, The Brides of Praire Gold, The Best Man, The Wives of Bowie Stone. Lorraine Heath’s Texas trilogy and Pam Morsi’s Courting Miss Hattie are also long-time favorites. I have also enjoyed western romances by Susan Kay Law and Cheryl St. John, and more recently I really liked Kathryn Albright’s The Rebel and the Lady.
    And I don’t even consider myself a big western fan. 🙂

    Reply
  23. Maggie Osborne’s name is synonymous with the western romance for me. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read The Promise of Jenny Jones, The Brides of Praire Gold, The Best Man, The Wives of Bowie Stone. Lorraine Heath’s Texas trilogy and Pam Morsi’s Courting Miss Hattie are also long-time favorites. I have also enjoyed western romances by Susan Kay Law and Cheryl St. John, and more recently I really liked Kathryn Albright’s The Rebel and the Lady.
    And I don’t even consider myself a big western fan. 🙂

    Reply
  24. Maggie Osborne’s name is synonymous with the western romance for me. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read The Promise of Jenny Jones, The Brides of Praire Gold, The Best Man, The Wives of Bowie Stone. Lorraine Heath’s Texas trilogy and Pam Morsi’s Courting Miss Hattie are also long-time favorites. I have also enjoyed western romances by Susan Kay Law and Cheryl St. John, and more recently I really liked Kathryn Albright’s The Rebel and the Lady.
    And I don’t even consider myself a big western fan. 🙂

    Reply
  25. Maggie Osborne’s name is synonymous with the western romance for me. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve read The Promise of Jenny Jones, The Brides of Praire Gold, The Best Man, The Wives of Bowie Stone. Lorraine Heath’s Texas trilogy and Pam Morsi’s Courting Miss Hattie are also long-time favorites. I have also enjoyed western romances by Susan Kay Law and Cheryl St. John, and more recently I really liked Kathryn Albright’s The Rebel and the Lady.
    And I don’t even consider myself a big western fan. 🙂

    Reply
  26. I love a good western romance, both historical and contemporary. Some of my favorite western authors are Linda Lael Miller, Stacey Kayne, Cheryl St. John, and Diana Palmer. I recently discovered author Jodi Thomas when I read Tall, Dark, and Texan. That was a fantastic book.

    Reply
  27. I love a good western romance, both historical and contemporary. Some of my favorite western authors are Linda Lael Miller, Stacey Kayne, Cheryl St. John, and Diana Palmer. I recently discovered author Jodi Thomas when I read Tall, Dark, and Texan. That was a fantastic book.

    Reply
  28. I love a good western romance, both historical and contemporary. Some of my favorite western authors are Linda Lael Miller, Stacey Kayne, Cheryl St. John, and Diana Palmer. I recently discovered author Jodi Thomas when I read Tall, Dark, and Texan. That was a fantastic book.

    Reply
  29. I love a good western romance, both historical and contemporary. Some of my favorite western authors are Linda Lael Miller, Stacey Kayne, Cheryl St. John, and Diana Palmer. I recently discovered author Jodi Thomas when I read Tall, Dark, and Texan. That was a fantastic book.

    Reply
  30. I love a good western romance, both historical and contemporary. Some of my favorite western authors are Linda Lael Miller, Stacey Kayne, Cheryl St. John, and Diana Palmer. I recently discovered author Jodi Thomas when I read Tall, Dark, and Texan. That was a fantastic book.

    Reply
  31. I do enjoy Western historical romances and I am glad that there will be more of them out there. Cheryl St. John is one of the many great writers of western romance and one of my favorites.

    Reply
  32. I do enjoy Western historical romances and I am glad that there will be more of them out there. Cheryl St. John is one of the many great writers of western romance and one of my favorites.

    Reply
  33. I do enjoy Western historical romances and I am glad that there will be more of them out there. Cheryl St. John is one of the many great writers of western romance and one of my favorites.

    Reply
  34. I do enjoy Western historical romances and I am glad that there will be more of them out there. Cheryl St. John is one of the many great writers of western romance and one of my favorites.

    Reply
  35. I do enjoy Western historical romances and I am glad that there will be more of them out there. Cheryl St. John is one of the many great writers of western romance and one of my favorites.

    Reply
  36. I, too, am glad to hear that Western romance is on the rise. Besides enjoying Jodi Thomas and the ladies who commented in this blog I used to read an author named Kathleen Kane who I really enjoyed. Her stories were frequently set in the West and often had a paranormal side to them which were great fun. I’ve often wished she would publish something new. Anyone know who I mean or what happened to her?

    Reply
  37. I, too, am glad to hear that Western romance is on the rise. Besides enjoying Jodi Thomas and the ladies who commented in this blog I used to read an author named Kathleen Kane who I really enjoyed. Her stories were frequently set in the West and often had a paranormal side to them which were great fun. I’ve often wished she would publish something new. Anyone know who I mean or what happened to her?

    Reply
  38. I, too, am glad to hear that Western romance is on the rise. Besides enjoying Jodi Thomas and the ladies who commented in this blog I used to read an author named Kathleen Kane who I really enjoyed. Her stories were frequently set in the West and often had a paranormal side to them which were great fun. I’ve often wished she would publish something new. Anyone know who I mean or what happened to her?

    Reply
  39. I, too, am glad to hear that Western romance is on the rise. Besides enjoying Jodi Thomas and the ladies who commented in this blog I used to read an author named Kathleen Kane who I really enjoyed. Her stories were frequently set in the West and often had a paranormal side to them which were great fun. I’ve often wished she would publish something new. Anyone know who I mean or what happened to her?

    Reply
  40. I, too, am glad to hear that Western romance is on the rise. Besides enjoying Jodi Thomas and the ladies who commented in this blog I used to read an author named Kathleen Kane who I really enjoyed. Her stories were frequently set in the West and often had a paranormal side to them which were great fun. I’ve often wished she would publish something new. Anyone know who I mean or what happened to her?

    Reply
  41. I was interested in Laurie’s comment about Western heroes not always being “politically correct.” Any way you look at it, the West was not a politically correct place. That’s part of the mystique–no boundries, few social conventions. Women were scarce and men did marry prostitutes (who often became model wives and mothers, accepted in the community). Kenny Rogers has an old song (a la Jesse James) called “Tennessee Bottle” which says “500 miles to hide my life.” For many men who started off on the wrong side of the law, the frontier offered a chance to reinvent themselves. They make the most fascinating heroes.
    Garda, may I please say that I’m delighted that you have “read Pat Potter and Shirl Henke’s westerns for years”! It’s so good to hear from a loyal reader!
    So happy, too, to learn that Kate Duffy feels Westerns are a going thing. I’ve always felt they never went away. Pat and I strayed to other places for a bit, but we have come back. It’s a happy homecoming!
    Shirl

    Reply
  42. I was interested in Laurie’s comment about Western heroes not always being “politically correct.” Any way you look at it, the West was not a politically correct place. That’s part of the mystique–no boundries, few social conventions. Women were scarce and men did marry prostitutes (who often became model wives and mothers, accepted in the community). Kenny Rogers has an old song (a la Jesse James) called “Tennessee Bottle” which says “500 miles to hide my life.” For many men who started off on the wrong side of the law, the frontier offered a chance to reinvent themselves. They make the most fascinating heroes.
    Garda, may I please say that I’m delighted that you have “read Pat Potter and Shirl Henke’s westerns for years”! It’s so good to hear from a loyal reader!
    So happy, too, to learn that Kate Duffy feels Westerns are a going thing. I’ve always felt they never went away. Pat and I strayed to other places for a bit, but we have come back. It’s a happy homecoming!
    Shirl

    Reply
  43. I was interested in Laurie’s comment about Western heroes not always being “politically correct.” Any way you look at it, the West was not a politically correct place. That’s part of the mystique–no boundries, few social conventions. Women were scarce and men did marry prostitutes (who often became model wives and mothers, accepted in the community). Kenny Rogers has an old song (a la Jesse James) called “Tennessee Bottle” which says “500 miles to hide my life.” For many men who started off on the wrong side of the law, the frontier offered a chance to reinvent themselves. They make the most fascinating heroes.
    Garda, may I please say that I’m delighted that you have “read Pat Potter and Shirl Henke’s westerns for years”! It’s so good to hear from a loyal reader!
    So happy, too, to learn that Kate Duffy feels Westerns are a going thing. I’ve always felt they never went away. Pat and I strayed to other places for a bit, but we have come back. It’s a happy homecoming!
    Shirl

    Reply
  44. I was interested in Laurie’s comment about Western heroes not always being “politically correct.” Any way you look at it, the West was not a politically correct place. That’s part of the mystique–no boundries, few social conventions. Women were scarce and men did marry prostitutes (who often became model wives and mothers, accepted in the community). Kenny Rogers has an old song (a la Jesse James) called “Tennessee Bottle” which says “500 miles to hide my life.” For many men who started off on the wrong side of the law, the frontier offered a chance to reinvent themselves. They make the most fascinating heroes.
    Garda, may I please say that I’m delighted that you have “read Pat Potter and Shirl Henke’s westerns for years”! It’s so good to hear from a loyal reader!
    So happy, too, to learn that Kate Duffy feels Westerns are a going thing. I’ve always felt they never went away. Pat and I strayed to other places for a bit, but we have come back. It’s a happy homecoming!
    Shirl

    Reply
  45. I was interested in Laurie’s comment about Western heroes not always being “politically correct.” Any way you look at it, the West was not a politically correct place. That’s part of the mystique–no boundries, few social conventions. Women were scarce and men did marry prostitutes (who often became model wives and mothers, accepted in the community). Kenny Rogers has an old song (a la Jesse James) called “Tennessee Bottle” which says “500 miles to hide my life.” For many men who started off on the wrong side of the law, the frontier offered a chance to reinvent themselves. They make the most fascinating heroes.
    Garda, may I please say that I’m delighted that you have “read Pat Potter and Shirl Henke’s westerns for years”! It’s so good to hear from a loyal reader!
    So happy, too, to learn that Kate Duffy feels Westerns are a going thing. I’ve always felt they never went away. Pat and I strayed to other places for a bit, but we have come back. It’s a happy homecoming!
    Shirl

    Reply
  46. I come at Westerns from a somewhat different perspective. Because I grew up in Arizona and Washington state, I’m intimately familiar with the setting, but that’s my problem: As beautiful as I find the American west, it’s too familiar. It’s easier to romanticize places that are farther away in both distance and time. However, having said that, I love Maggie Osborne’s “The Promise of Jenny Jones”, Patricia Gaffney’s “Crooked Hearts”, Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsiders” and other western-set books — the author just has to do a bit more convincing to get me to pick up the book.

    Reply
  47. I come at Westerns from a somewhat different perspective. Because I grew up in Arizona and Washington state, I’m intimately familiar with the setting, but that’s my problem: As beautiful as I find the American west, it’s too familiar. It’s easier to romanticize places that are farther away in both distance and time. However, having said that, I love Maggie Osborne’s “The Promise of Jenny Jones”, Patricia Gaffney’s “Crooked Hearts”, Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsiders” and other western-set books — the author just has to do a bit more convincing to get me to pick up the book.

    Reply
  48. I come at Westerns from a somewhat different perspective. Because I grew up in Arizona and Washington state, I’m intimately familiar with the setting, but that’s my problem: As beautiful as I find the American west, it’s too familiar. It’s easier to romanticize places that are farther away in both distance and time. However, having said that, I love Maggie Osborne’s “The Promise of Jenny Jones”, Patricia Gaffney’s “Crooked Hearts”, Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsiders” and other western-set books — the author just has to do a bit more convincing to get me to pick up the book.

    Reply
  49. I come at Westerns from a somewhat different perspective. Because I grew up in Arizona and Washington state, I’m intimately familiar with the setting, but that’s my problem: As beautiful as I find the American west, it’s too familiar. It’s easier to romanticize places that are farther away in both distance and time. However, having said that, I love Maggie Osborne’s “The Promise of Jenny Jones”, Patricia Gaffney’s “Crooked Hearts”, Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsiders” and other western-set books — the author just has to do a bit more convincing to get me to pick up the book.

    Reply
  50. I come at Westerns from a somewhat different perspective. Because I grew up in Arizona and Washington state, I’m intimately familiar with the setting, but that’s my problem: As beautiful as I find the American west, it’s too familiar. It’s easier to romanticize places that are farther away in both distance and time. However, having said that, I love Maggie Osborne’s “The Promise of Jenny Jones”, Patricia Gaffney’s “Crooked Hearts”, Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsiders” and other western-set books — the author just has to do a bit more convincing to get me to pick up the book.

    Reply
  51. I, too, grew up reading westerns…Zane Grey, William McLeod Raine, B. M. Bower, (didn’t find out until years later that the writer was a lady), and others. Now that you reminded me, I’ll have to start looking for the newer Westerns.

    Reply
  52. I, too, grew up reading westerns…Zane Grey, William McLeod Raine, B. M. Bower, (didn’t find out until years later that the writer was a lady), and others. Now that you reminded me, I’ll have to start looking for the newer Westerns.

    Reply
  53. I, too, grew up reading westerns…Zane Grey, William McLeod Raine, B. M. Bower, (didn’t find out until years later that the writer was a lady), and others. Now that you reminded me, I’ll have to start looking for the newer Westerns.

    Reply
  54. I, too, grew up reading westerns…Zane Grey, William McLeod Raine, B. M. Bower, (didn’t find out until years later that the writer was a lady), and others. Now that you reminded me, I’ll have to start looking for the newer Westerns.

    Reply
  55. I, too, grew up reading westerns…Zane Grey, William McLeod Raine, B. M. Bower, (didn’t find out until years later that the writer was a lady), and others. Now that you reminded me, I’ll have to start looking for the newer Westerns.

    Reply
  56. From MJP:
    Nice to see the interest in Westerns is still there! Like Susan/DC, I’m not a huge fan of the setting. Though I didn’t grow up in the West, I did grow up in hardworking farm country, so the life is not one that rings my fantasies.
    But some stories simply won’t work anywhere else–which is why I set a novella there. (“Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know,” reissued a couple of years ago in the combo volume DANGEROUS TO KNOW with the Regency The Diabolical Baron.) The first line is “He was going to be hanged on Tuesday.” ANd that’s not something you can do in all settings!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  57. From MJP:
    Nice to see the interest in Westerns is still there! Like Susan/DC, I’m not a huge fan of the setting. Though I didn’t grow up in the West, I did grow up in hardworking farm country, so the life is not one that rings my fantasies.
    But some stories simply won’t work anywhere else–which is why I set a novella there. (“Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know,” reissued a couple of years ago in the combo volume DANGEROUS TO KNOW with the Regency The Diabolical Baron.) The first line is “He was going to be hanged on Tuesday.” ANd that’s not something you can do in all settings!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  58. From MJP:
    Nice to see the interest in Westerns is still there! Like Susan/DC, I’m not a huge fan of the setting. Though I didn’t grow up in the West, I did grow up in hardworking farm country, so the life is not one that rings my fantasies.
    But some stories simply won’t work anywhere else–which is why I set a novella there. (“Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know,” reissued a couple of years ago in the combo volume DANGEROUS TO KNOW with the Regency The Diabolical Baron.) The first line is “He was going to be hanged on Tuesday.” ANd that’s not something you can do in all settings!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  59. From MJP:
    Nice to see the interest in Westerns is still there! Like Susan/DC, I’m not a huge fan of the setting. Though I didn’t grow up in the West, I did grow up in hardworking farm country, so the life is not one that rings my fantasies.
    But some stories simply won’t work anywhere else–which is why I set a novella there. (“Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know,” reissued a couple of years ago in the combo volume DANGEROUS TO KNOW with the Regency The Diabolical Baron.) The first line is “He was going to be hanged on Tuesday.” ANd that’s not something you can do in all settings!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  60. From MJP:
    Nice to see the interest in Westerns is still there! Like Susan/DC, I’m not a huge fan of the setting. Though I didn’t grow up in the West, I did grow up in hardworking farm country, so the life is not one that rings my fantasies.
    But some stories simply won’t work anywhere else–which is why I set a novella there. (“Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know,” reissued a couple of years ago in the combo volume DANGEROUS TO KNOW with the Regency The Diabolical Baron.) The first line is “He was going to be hanged on Tuesday.” ANd that’s not something you can do in all settings!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  61. Hi all . . .It’s so good to see so much interest in westerns these days, and it’s great to see two old and very good friends, Mary Jo and Shirl. As for the appeal of westerns,and Scottish tales as well, I think it can be summed up in one word: untamed. Both the western and Scottish heroes functioned in worlds without much law and had to rely on their own wits and courage. As did, of course, the women who fought and loved them.
    I also have to put in a word for Celeste DeBlasis’s “The Proud Breed.” It’s my all-time favorite western.

    Reply
  62. Hi all . . .It’s so good to see so much interest in westerns these days, and it’s great to see two old and very good friends, Mary Jo and Shirl. As for the appeal of westerns,and Scottish tales as well, I think it can be summed up in one word: untamed. Both the western and Scottish heroes functioned in worlds without much law and had to rely on their own wits and courage. As did, of course, the women who fought and loved them.
    I also have to put in a word for Celeste DeBlasis’s “The Proud Breed.” It’s my all-time favorite western.

    Reply
  63. Hi all . . .It’s so good to see so much interest in westerns these days, and it’s great to see two old and very good friends, Mary Jo and Shirl. As for the appeal of westerns,and Scottish tales as well, I think it can be summed up in one word: untamed. Both the western and Scottish heroes functioned in worlds without much law and had to rely on their own wits and courage. As did, of course, the women who fought and loved them.
    I also have to put in a word for Celeste DeBlasis’s “The Proud Breed.” It’s my all-time favorite western.

    Reply
  64. Hi all . . .It’s so good to see so much interest in westerns these days, and it’s great to see two old and very good friends, Mary Jo and Shirl. As for the appeal of westerns,and Scottish tales as well, I think it can be summed up in one word: untamed. Both the western and Scottish heroes functioned in worlds without much law and had to rely on their own wits and courage. As did, of course, the women who fought and loved them.
    I also have to put in a word for Celeste DeBlasis’s “The Proud Breed.” It’s my all-time favorite western.

    Reply
  65. Hi all . . .It’s so good to see so much interest in westerns these days, and it’s great to see two old and very good friends, Mary Jo and Shirl. As for the appeal of westerns,and Scottish tales as well, I think it can be summed up in one word: untamed. Both the western and Scottish heroes functioned in worlds without much law and had to rely on their own wits and courage. As did, of course, the women who fought and loved them.
    I also have to put in a word for Celeste DeBlasis’s “The Proud Breed.” It’s my all-time favorite western.

    Reply
  66. Mary Jo, thanks for letting me guest blog on this favorite subject! What a great roundup )you did on the subject. I really enjoyed reading what other western writers had to say on the subject, and now my TBR pile is going to get even higher, because I’ve GOT to get their books! 🙂
    Blessings and Happy Thanksgiving to all, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  67. Mary Jo, thanks for letting me guest blog on this favorite subject! What a great roundup )you did on the subject. I really enjoyed reading what other western writers had to say on the subject, and now my TBR pile is going to get even higher, because I’ve GOT to get their books! 🙂
    Blessings and Happy Thanksgiving to all, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  68. Mary Jo, thanks for letting me guest blog on this favorite subject! What a great roundup )you did on the subject. I really enjoyed reading what other western writers had to say on the subject, and now my TBR pile is going to get even higher, because I’ve GOT to get their books! 🙂
    Blessings and Happy Thanksgiving to all, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  69. Mary Jo, thanks for letting me guest blog on this favorite subject! What a great roundup )you did on the subject. I really enjoyed reading what other western writers had to say on the subject, and now my TBR pile is going to get even higher, because I’ve GOT to get their books! 🙂
    Blessings and Happy Thanksgiving to all, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  70. Mary Jo, thanks for letting me guest blog on this favorite subject! What a great roundup )you did on the subject. I really enjoyed reading what other western writers had to say on the subject, and now my TBR pile is going to get even higher, because I’ve GOT to get their books! 🙂
    Blessings and Happy Thanksgiving to all, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  71. Growing up at the “Gateway to the West” (St. Louis), I was naturally predestined to love the setting, I guess. My family traveled extensively through the West when I was a kid and my sister moved to Oregon when I was a teen, but being in familiar territory never dulled the luster for me. I agree with Pat’s comment about the West and historical Scotland both being lawless lands where rules don’t apply. Perfect place for alpha males!
    BTW, for those of you interested in reading the West, stop by my website and check out the contest I’m running through Dec 31. Enter and you could win a neat prize.

    Reply
  72. Growing up at the “Gateway to the West” (St. Louis), I was naturally predestined to love the setting, I guess. My family traveled extensively through the West when I was a kid and my sister moved to Oregon when I was a teen, but being in familiar territory never dulled the luster for me. I agree with Pat’s comment about the West and historical Scotland both being lawless lands where rules don’t apply. Perfect place for alpha males!
    BTW, for those of you interested in reading the West, stop by my website and check out the contest I’m running through Dec 31. Enter and you could win a neat prize.

    Reply
  73. Growing up at the “Gateway to the West” (St. Louis), I was naturally predestined to love the setting, I guess. My family traveled extensively through the West when I was a kid and my sister moved to Oregon when I was a teen, but being in familiar territory never dulled the luster for me. I agree with Pat’s comment about the West and historical Scotland both being lawless lands where rules don’t apply. Perfect place for alpha males!
    BTW, for those of you interested in reading the West, stop by my website and check out the contest I’m running through Dec 31. Enter and you could win a neat prize.

    Reply
  74. Growing up at the “Gateway to the West” (St. Louis), I was naturally predestined to love the setting, I guess. My family traveled extensively through the West when I was a kid and my sister moved to Oregon when I was a teen, but being in familiar territory never dulled the luster for me. I agree with Pat’s comment about the West and historical Scotland both being lawless lands where rules don’t apply. Perfect place for alpha males!
    BTW, for those of you interested in reading the West, stop by my website and check out the contest I’m running through Dec 31. Enter and you could win a neat prize.

    Reply
  75. Growing up at the “Gateway to the West” (St. Louis), I was naturally predestined to love the setting, I guess. My family traveled extensively through the West when I was a kid and my sister moved to Oregon when I was a teen, but being in familiar territory never dulled the luster for me. I agree with Pat’s comment about the West and historical Scotland both being lawless lands where rules don’t apply. Perfect place for alpha males!
    BTW, for those of you interested in reading the West, stop by my website and check out the contest I’m running through Dec 31. Enter and you could win a neat prize.

    Reply
  76. Hi! Very cool to hear from Shirl, Pat, and Laurie! I’ve been fairly recently introduced to Westerns and have really been enjoying them–glad to hear there’s an upswing, but I doubt I’m going to run out of stuff to read given what all these talented authors have written already! A few I really enjoyed were by Stacey Kayne, Tamera Alexander, and Beth Ciotta.

    Reply
  77. Hi! Very cool to hear from Shirl, Pat, and Laurie! I’ve been fairly recently introduced to Westerns and have really been enjoying them–glad to hear there’s an upswing, but I doubt I’m going to run out of stuff to read given what all these talented authors have written already! A few I really enjoyed were by Stacey Kayne, Tamera Alexander, and Beth Ciotta.

    Reply
  78. Hi! Very cool to hear from Shirl, Pat, and Laurie! I’ve been fairly recently introduced to Westerns and have really been enjoying them–glad to hear there’s an upswing, but I doubt I’m going to run out of stuff to read given what all these talented authors have written already! A few I really enjoyed were by Stacey Kayne, Tamera Alexander, and Beth Ciotta.

    Reply
  79. Hi! Very cool to hear from Shirl, Pat, and Laurie! I’ve been fairly recently introduced to Westerns and have really been enjoying them–glad to hear there’s an upswing, but I doubt I’m going to run out of stuff to read given what all these talented authors have written already! A few I really enjoyed were by Stacey Kayne, Tamera Alexander, and Beth Ciotta.

    Reply
  80. Hi! Very cool to hear from Shirl, Pat, and Laurie! I’ve been fairly recently introduced to Westerns and have really been enjoying them–glad to hear there’s an upswing, but I doubt I’m going to run out of stuff to read given what all these talented authors have written already! A few I really enjoyed were by Stacey Kayne, Tamera Alexander, and Beth Ciotta.

    Reply
  81. Hi, everyone! Good to see old friends here discussing a favorite subject. I adore westerns, but I suspect Susan may be expressing the view that prevents many readers from returning to the dusty west–readers are looking for what they perceive as the elegance of the Regency, not the grittiness of the familiar. I have a funny feeling that a lush bordello is not what they consider elegant. “G”

    Reply
  82. Hi, everyone! Good to see old friends here discussing a favorite subject. I adore westerns, but I suspect Susan may be expressing the view that prevents many readers from returning to the dusty west–readers are looking for what they perceive as the elegance of the Regency, not the grittiness of the familiar. I have a funny feeling that a lush bordello is not what they consider elegant. “G”

    Reply
  83. Hi, everyone! Good to see old friends here discussing a favorite subject. I adore westerns, but I suspect Susan may be expressing the view that prevents many readers from returning to the dusty west–readers are looking for what they perceive as the elegance of the Regency, not the grittiness of the familiar. I have a funny feeling that a lush bordello is not what they consider elegant. “G”

    Reply
  84. Hi, everyone! Good to see old friends here discussing a favorite subject. I adore westerns, but I suspect Susan may be expressing the view that prevents many readers from returning to the dusty west–readers are looking for what they perceive as the elegance of the Regency, not the grittiness of the familiar. I have a funny feeling that a lush bordello is not what they consider elegant. “G”

    Reply
  85. Hi, everyone! Good to see old friends here discussing a favorite subject. I adore westerns, but I suspect Susan may be expressing the view that prevents many readers from returning to the dusty west–readers are looking for what they perceive as the elegance of the Regency, not the grittiness of the familiar. I have a funny feeling that a lush bordello is not what they consider elegant. “G”

    Reply
  86. I adore westerns (and any American-set historical romance) and really miss them. I do hunt out the Harlequin Historical westerns and the others still published. I do want them to come back, but on the whole, the western setting does not seem to appeal as much to folks who were too young to grow up watching them on tv. Even if the new western movies get good ratings, when you look at the demographic breakdown, it really trends to baby boomers and older.
    It would be really cool if some person could find a way to “re-conceptualize” the story so that they appeal to more folks across all generations. It’s my understanding that the Joss Whedon western was more of a cult hit than a smash hit.
    As it’s been mentioned a bunch on this blog, I really miss the variety of settings there used to be in historical romance. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I need more variety.

    Reply
  87. I adore westerns (and any American-set historical romance) and really miss them. I do hunt out the Harlequin Historical westerns and the others still published. I do want them to come back, but on the whole, the western setting does not seem to appeal as much to folks who were too young to grow up watching them on tv. Even if the new western movies get good ratings, when you look at the demographic breakdown, it really trends to baby boomers and older.
    It would be really cool if some person could find a way to “re-conceptualize” the story so that they appeal to more folks across all generations. It’s my understanding that the Joss Whedon western was more of a cult hit than a smash hit.
    As it’s been mentioned a bunch on this blog, I really miss the variety of settings there used to be in historical romance. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I need more variety.

    Reply
  88. I adore westerns (and any American-set historical romance) and really miss them. I do hunt out the Harlequin Historical westerns and the others still published. I do want them to come back, but on the whole, the western setting does not seem to appeal as much to folks who were too young to grow up watching them on tv. Even if the new western movies get good ratings, when you look at the demographic breakdown, it really trends to baby boomers and older.
    It would be really cool if some person could find a way to “re-conceptualize” the story so that they appeal to more folks across all generations. It’s my understanding that the Joss Whedon western was more of a cult hit than a smash hit.
    As it’s been mentioned a bunch on this blog, I really miss the variety of settings there used to be in historical romance. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I need more variety.

    Reply
  89. I adore westerns (and any American-set historical romance) and really miss them. I do hunt out the Harlequin Historical westerns and the others still published. I do want them to come back, but on the whole, the western setting does not seem to appeal as much to folks who were too young to grow up watching them on tv. Even if the new western movies get good ratings, when you look at the demographic breakdown, it really trends to baby boomers and older.
    It would be really cool if some person could find a way to “re-conceptualize” the story so that they appeal to more folks across all generations. It’s my understanding that the Joss Whedon western was more of a cult hit than a smash hit.
    As it’s been mentioned a bunch on this blog, I really miss the variety of settings there used to be in historical romance. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I need more variety.

    Reply
  90. I adore westerns (and any American-set historical romance) and really miss them. I do hunt out the Harlequin Historical westerns and the others still published. I do want them to come back, but on the whole, the western setting does not seem to appeal as much to folks who were too young to grow up watching them on tv. Even if the new western movies get good ratings, when you look at the demographic breakdown, it really trends to baby boomers and older.
    It would be really cool if some person could find a way to “re-conceptualize” the story so that they appeal to more folks across all generations. It’s my understanding that the Joss Whedon western was more of a cult hit than a smash hit.
    As it’s been mentioned a bunch on this blog, I really miss the variety of settings there used to be in historical romance. While I LOVE regency-set historicals, I need more variety.

    Reply
  91. Shirl and Laurie, I forgot to mention how much I love the featured book covers. The book cover “gods” were really smiling on you this time. 😉
    Also, Pat, I love the Petticoats and Pistols blog that you are a member of. Everyone, be sure to check it out if you are interested in western romances.

    Reply
  92. Shirl and Laurie, I forgot to mention how much I love the featured book covers. The book cover “gods” were really smiling on you this time. 😉
    Also, Pat, I love the Petticoats and Pistols blog that you are a member of. Everyone, be sure to check it out if you are interested in western romances.

    Reply
  93. Shirl and Laurie, I forgot to mention how much I love the featured book covers. The book cover “gods” were really smiling on you this time. 😉
    Also, Pat, I love the Petticoats and Pistols blog that you are a member of. Everyone, be sure to check it out if you are interested in western romances.

    Reply
  94. Shirl and Laurie, I forgot to mention how much I love the featured book covers. The book cover “gods” were really smiling on you this time. 😉
    Also, Pat, I love the Petticoats and Pistols blog that you are a member of. Everyone, be sure to check it out if you are interested in western romances.

    Reply
  95. Shirl and Laurie, I forgot to mention how much I love the featured book covers. The book cover “gods” were really smiling on you this time. 😉
    Also, Pat, I love the Petticoats and Pistols blog that you are a member of. Everyone, be sure to check it out if you are interested in western romances.

    Reply
  96. No one has mentioned Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns. They are among my favorites. Though they were written in the 80s she still gets requests for additional stories of secondary characters. Regardless of setting, the characters and plot are primary for me. There was an overabundance of westerns that were lacking in one or both of those critical elements and I stopped picking them up. But I’m ready to see if things have changed for the better. A good story is always welcome!

    Reply
  97. No one has mentioned Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns. They are among my favorites. Though they were written in the 80s she still gets requests for additional stories of secondary characters. Regardless of setting, the characters and plot are primary for me. There was an overabundance of westerns that were lacking in one or both of those critical elements and I stopped picking them up. But I’m ready to see if things have changed for the better. A good story is always welcome!

    Reply
  98. No one has mentioned Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns. They are among my favorites. Though they were written in the 80s she still gets requests for additional stories of secondary characters. Regardless of setting, the characters and plot are primary for me. There was an overabundance of westerns that were lacking in one or both of those critical elements and I stopped picking them up. But I’m ready to see if things have changed for the better. A good story is always welcome!

    Reply
  99. No one has mentioned Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns. They are among my favorites. Though they were written in the 80s she still gets requests for additional stories of secondary characters. Regardless of setting, the characters and plot are primary for me. There was an overabundance of westerns that were lacking in one or both of those critical elements and I stopped picking them up. But I’m ready to see if things have changed for the better. A good story is always welcome!

    Reply
  100. No one has mentioned Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns. They are among my favorites. Though they were written in the 80s she still gets requests for additional stories of secondary characters. Regardless of setting, the characters and plot are primary for me. There was an overabundance of westerns that were lacking in one or both of those critical elements and I stopped picking them up. But I’m ready to see if things have changed for the better. A good story is always welcome!

    Reply
  101. Add me to the list of readers who miss westerns. I have a stack of Pat Potter westerns, dog-eared and beloved. Lawless is one of my comfort reads— the lone outlaw coming in from the cold.
    I suspect what’s needed is a fresh new take, a bold, over-the-top, perhaps not all that politically correct new western to remind readers of what they loved about the genre.
    I think that’s happened in Regency recently — the dark hero coming back, when everyone thought that was in the past and dark heroes were only acceptable in paranormals.

    Reply
  102. Add me to the list of readers who miss westerns. I have a stack of Pat Potter westerns, dog-eared and beloved. Lawless is one of my comfort reads— the lone outlaw coming in from the cold.
    I suspect what’s needed is a fresh new take, a bold, over-the-top, perhaps not all that politically correct new western to remind readers of what they loved about the genre.
    I think that’s happened in Regency recently — the dark hero coming back, when everyone thought that was in the past and dark heroes were only acceptable in paranormals.

    Reply
  103. Add me to the list of readers who miss westerns. I have a stack of Pat Potter westerns, dog-eared and beloved. Lawless is one of my comfort reads— the lone outlaw coming in from the cold.
    I suspect what’s needed is a fresh new take, a bold, over-the-top, perhaps not all that politically correct new western to remind readers of what they loved about the genre.
    I think that’s happened in Regency recently — the dark hero coming back, when everyone thought that was in the past and dark heroes were only acceptable in paranormals.

    Reply
  104. Add me to the list of readers who miss westerns. I have a stack of Pat Potter westerns, dog-eared and beloved. Lawless is one of my comfort reads— the lone outlaw coming in from the cold.
    I suspect what’s needed is a fresh new take, a bold, over-the-top, perhaps not all that politically correct new western to remind readers of what they loved about the genre.
    I think that’s happened in Regency recently — the dark hero coming back, when everyone thought that was in the past and dark heroes were only acceptable in paranormals.

    Reply
  105. Add me to the list of readers who miss westerns. I have a stack of Pat Potter westerns, dog-eared and beloved. Lawless is one of my comfort reads— the lone outlaw coming in from the cold.
    I suspect what’s needed is a fresh new take, a bold, over-the-top, perhaps not all that politically correct new western to remind readers of what they loved about the genre.
    I think that’s happened in Regency recently — the dark hero coming back, when everyone thought that was in the past and dark heroes were only acceptable in paranormals.

    Reply
  106. Kathy I remember them. Only His, Only Mine etc — I loved them too and have a stack of them still to reread. Loved her medieval Scottish border historicals, too. Untamed, Forbidden, Untouched.
    And Cheryl, thanks for letting us know about the Pistols and Petticoats Blog — great name. I’ll be sure to pop in.

    Reply
  107. Kathy I remember them. Only His, Only Mine etc — I loved them too and have a stack of them still to reread. Loved her medieval Scottish border historicals, too. Untamed, Forbidden, Untouched.
    And Cheryl, thanks for letting us know about the Pistols and Petticoats Blog — great name. I’ll be sure to pop in.

    Reply
  108. Kathy I remember them. Only His, Only Mine etc — I loved them too and have a stack of them still to reread. Loved her medieval Scottish border historicals, too. Untamed, Forbidden, Untouched.
    And Cheryl, thanks for letting us know about the Pistols and Petticoats Blog — great name. I’ll be sure to pop in.

    Reply
  109. Kathy I remember them. Only His, Only Mine etc — I loved them too and have a stack of them still to reread. Loved her medieval Scottish border historicals, too. Untamed, Forbidden, Untouched.
    And Cheryl, thanks for letting us know about the Pistols and Petticoats Blog — great name. I’ll be sure to pop in.

    Reply
  110. Kathy I remember them. Only His, Only Mine etc — I loved them too and have a stack of them still to reread. Loved her medieval Scottish border historicals, too. Untamed, Forbidden, Untouched.
    And Cheryl, thanks for letting us know about the Pistols and Petticoats Blog — great name. I’ll be sure to pop in.

    Reply
  111. Westerns are my first love. Unlike some who feel it’s too familiar, I also grew up smack dab in cowboy country and still, westerns pull me in every time.
    As for the protests that westerns didn’t have a funeral, maybe not, but they were definitely red-headed step-children for a while. What do you do with a rejection like, “You’re a wonderful writer but we’re not accepting westerns at this time.” So this is good news to me, although I’ve gone on to fantasy now. I still love to read westerns.

    Reply
  112. Westerns are my first love. Unlike some who feel it’s too familiar, I also grew up smack dab in cowboy country and still, westerns pull me in every time.
    As for the protests that westerns didn’t have a funeral, maybe not, but they were definitely red-headed step-children for a while. What do you do with a rejection like, “You’re a wonderful writer but we’re not accepting westerns at this time.” So this is good news to me, although I’ve gone on to fantasy now. I still love to read westerns.

    Reply
  113. Westerns are my first love. Unlike some who feel it’s too familiar, I also grew up smack dab in cowboy country and still, westerns pull me in every time.
    As for the protests that westerns didn’t have a funeral, maybe not, but they were definitely red-headed step-children for a while. What do you do with a rejection like, “You’re a wonderful writer but we’re not accepting westerns at this time.” So this is good news to me, although I’ve gone on to fantasy now. I still love to read westerns.

    Reply
  114. Westerns are my first love. Unlike some who feel it’s too familiar, I also grew up smack dab in cowboy country and still, westerns pull me in every time.
    As for the protests that westerns didn’t have a funeral, maybe not, but they were definitely red-headed step-children for a while. What do you do with a rejection like, “You’re a wonderful writer but we’re not accepting westerns at this time.” So this is good news to me, although I’ve gone on to fantasy now. I still love to read westerns.

    Reply
  115. Westerns are my first love. Unlike some who feel it’s too familiar, I also grew up smack dab in cowboy country and still, westerns pull me in every time.
    As for the protests that westerns didn’t have a funeral, maybe not, but they were definitely red-headed step-children for a while. What do you do with a rejection like, “You’re a wonderful writer but we’re not accepting westerns at this time.” So this is good news to me, although I’ve gone on to fantasy now. I still love to read westerns.

    Reply
  116. Cheryl, appreciate the kudos about my cover, but Dorchester’s art department did the heavy lifting. You’re right, though, to get one this good is pure luck.
    Michelle, Joss Whedon’s FIREFLY was a “space western,” and yes, certainly a cult classic, but one I think bears more exploration by modern writers. Anyone remember Robert Heinlen’s TUNNELS IN THE SKY? Space Western novel back in the 1940’s!
    Louis, over the years around 20% of my reader mail has come from men who read my books as Western adventure that just happen to have romance. Give one a try. I promise you’ll like it.
    Anne, I love dark, tortured heroes, too. Do lots of them–no place better than the West for the half-breed caught between red and white worlds, or a man fleeing demons in a distant land and redeeming himself in a wild new land. But my favorite is the heroine who escapes from her past only to confront it when she meets the hero. I’ve done several books where the heroine was forced into prostitution and reinvented herself as a proud woman who would never back down to any alpha male hero.

    Reply
  117. Cheryl, appreciate the kudos about my cover, but Dorchester’s art department did the heavy lifting. You’re right, though, to get one this good is pure luck.
    Michelle, Joss Whedon’s FIREFLY was a “space western,” and yes, certainly a cult classic, but one I think bears more exploration by modern writers. Anyone remember Robert Heinlen’s TUNNELS IN THE SKY? Space Western novel back in the 1940’s!
    Louis, over the years around 20% of my reader mail has come from men who read my books as Western adventure that just happen to have romance. Give one a try. I promise you’ll like it.
    Anne, I love dark, tortured heroes, too. Do lots of them–no place better than the West for the half-breed caught between red and white worlds, or a man fleeing demons in a distant land and redeeming himself in a wild new land. But my favorite is the heroine who escapes from her past only to confront it when she meets the hero. I’ve done several books where the heroine was forced into prostitution and reinvented herself as a proud woman who would never back down to any alpha male hero.

    Reply
  118. Cheryl, appreciate the kudos about my cover, but Dorchester’s art department did the heavy lifting. You’re right, though, to get one this good is pure luck.
    Michelle, Joss Whedon’s FIREFLY was a “space western,” and yes, certainly a cult classic, but one I think bears more exploration by modern writers. Anyone remember Robert Heinlen’s TUNNELS IN THE SKY? Space Western novel back in the 1940’s!
    Louis, over the years around 20% of my reader mail has come from men who read my books as Western adventure that just happen to have romance. Give one a try. I promise you’ll like it.
    Anne, I love dark, tortured heroes, too. Do lots of them–no place better than the West for the half-breed caught between red and white worlds, or a man fleeing demons in a distant land and redeeming himself in a wild new land. But my favorite is the heroine who escapes from her past only to confront it when she meets the hero. I’ve done several books where the heroine was forced into prostitution and reinvented herself as a proud woman who would never back down to any alpha male hero.

    Reply
  119. Cheryl, appreciate the kudos about my cover, but Dorchester’s art department did the heavy lifting. You’re right, though, to get one this good is pure luck.
    Michelle, Joss Whedon’s FIREFLY was a “space western,” and yes, certainly a cult classic, but one I think bears more exploration by modern writers. Anyone remember Robert Heinlen’s TUNNELS IN THE SKY? Space Western novel back in the 1940’s!
    Louis, over the years around 20% of my reader mail has come from men who read my books as Western adventure that just happen to have romance. Give one a try. I promise you’ll like it.
    Anne, I love dark, tortured heroes, too. Do lots of them–no place better than the West for the half-breed caught between red and white worlds, or a man fleeing demons in a distant land and redeeming himself in a wild new land. But my favorite is the heroine who escapes from her past only to confront it when she meets the hero. I’ve done several books where the heroine was forced into prostitution and reinvented herself as a proud woman who would never back down to any alpha male hero.

    Reply
  120. Cheryl, appreciate the kudos about my cover, but Dorchester’s art department did the heavy lifting. You’re right, though, to get one this good is pure luck.
    Michelle, Joss Whedon’s FIREFLY was a “space western,” and yes, certainly a cult classic, but one I think bears more exploration by modern writers. Anyone remember Robert Heinlen’s TUNNELS IN THE SKY? Space Western novel back in the 1940’s!
    Louis, over the years around 20% of my reader mail has come from men who read my books as Western adventure that just happen to have romance. Give one a try. I promise you’ll like it.
    Anne, I love dark, tortured heroes, too. Do lots of them–no place better than the West for the half-breed caught between red and white worlds, or a man fleeing demons in a distant land and redeeming himself in a wild new land. But my favorite is the heroine who escapes from her past only to confront it when she meets the hero. I’ve done several books where the heroine was forced into prostitution and reinvented herself as a proud woman who would never back down to any alpha male hero.

    Reply
  121. This will date me and certainly be “politically incorrect” but the Western that got me reading historical romance was Rosemary Rogers’ SWEET SAVAGE LOVE. Not crazy about her later stuff, but the first Steve/Ginny book is a classic and helped define the genre. Would’ve been better if she’d stopped with the first one as the protagonists had settled everything that needed to be settled in their relationship when it ended.
    Which brings me to a related topic–when is enough enough? How long can a Western series go on? I know Louis L’Amore, William Johnstone and other strict Western authors have been very successful doing this. I’ve never gone beyond a trilogy (although almost all my books have indirect links to other ones via minor characters or family names). Now I’ve just turned in the third book in my Wild West series. Do I continue with it? The connections between stories link characters from each past book to new protagonists in the current book. I’d be interested in seeing if folks like this idea, especially as I’m leaning toward making the rest of the series paranormal in the sense of a mystical gift of seeing the future passed down from the old Cheyenne medicine man in PALE MOON STALKER to the CHOSEN WOMAN and then continuing with the theme in more stories dealing with Native Americans. Comments?

    Reply
  122. This will date me and certainly be “politically incorrect” but the Western that got me reading historical romance was Rosemary Rogers’ SWEET SAVAGE LOVE. Not crazy about her later stuff, but the first Steve/Ginny book is a classic and helped define the genre. Would’ve been better if she’d stopped with the first one as the protagonists had settled everything that needed to be settled in their relationship when it ended.
    Which brings me to a related topic–when is enough enough? How long can a Western series go on? I know Louis L’Amore, William Johnstone and other strict Western authors have been very successful doing this. I’ve never gone beyond a trilogy (although almost all my books have indirect links to other ones via minor characters or family names). Now I’ve just turned in the third book in my Wild West series. Do I continue with it? The connections between stories link characters from each past book to new protagonists in the current book. I’d be interested in seeing if folks like this idea, especially as I’m leaning toward making the rest of the series paranormal in the sense of a mystical gift of seeing the future passed down from the old Cheyenne medicine man in PALE MOON STALKER to the CHOSEN WOMAN and then continuing with the theme in more stories dealing with Native Americans. Comments?

    Reply
  123. This will date me and certainly be “politically incorrect” but the Western that got me reading historical romance was Rosemary Rogers’ SWEET SAVAGE LOVE. Not crazy about her later stuff, but the first Steve/Ginny book is a classic and helped define the genre. Would’ve been better if she’d stopped with the first one as the protagonists had settled everything that needed to be settled in their relationship when it ended.
    Which brings me to a related topic–when is enough enough? How long can a Western series go on? I know Louis L’Amore, William Johnstone and other strict Western authors have been very successful doing this. I’ve never gone beyond a trilogy (although almost all my books have indirect links to other ones via minor characters or family names). Now I’ve just turned in the third book in my Wild West series. Do I continue with it? The connections between stories link characters from each past book to new protagonists in the current book. I’d be interested in seeing if folks like this idea, especially as I’m leaning toward making the rest of the series paranormal in the sense of a mystical gift of seeing the future passed down from the old Cheyenne medicine man in PALE MOON STALKER to the CHOSEN WOMAN and then continuing with the theme in more stories dealing with Native Americans. Comments?

    Reply
  124. This will date me and certainly be “politically incorrect” but the Western that got me reading historical romance was Rosemary Rogers’ SWEET SAVAGE LOVE. Not crazy about her later stuff, but the first Steve/Ginny book is a classic and helped define the genre. Would’ve been better if she’d stopped with the first one as the protagonists had settled everything that needed to be settled in their relationship when it ended.
    Which brings me to a related topic–when is enough enough? How long can a Western series go on? I know Louis L’Amore, William Johnstone and other strict Western authors have been very successful doing this. I’ve never gone beyond a trilogy (although almost all my books have indirect links to other ones via minor characters or family names). Now I’ve just turned in the third book in my Wild West series. Do I continue with it? The connections between stories link characters from each past book to new protagonists in the current book. I’d be interested in seeing if folks like this idea, especially as I’m leaning toward making the rest of the series paranormal in the sense of a mystical gift of seeing the future passed down from the old Cheyenne medicine man in PALE MOON STALKER to the CHOSEN WOMAN and then continuing with the theme in more stories dealing with Native Americans. Comments?

    Reply
  125. This will date me and certainly be “politically incorrect” but the Western that got me reading historical romance was Rosemary Rogers’ SWEET SAVAGE LOVE. Not crazy about her later stuff, but the first Steve/Ginny book is a classic and helped define the genre. Would’ve been better if she’d stopped with the first one as the protagonists had settled everything that needed to be settled in their relationship when it ended.
    Which brings me to a related topic–when is enough enough? How long can a Western series go on? I know Louis L’Amore, William Johnstone and other strict Western authors have been very successful doing this. I’ve never gone beyond a trilogy (although almost all my books have indirect links to other ones via minor characters or family names). Now I’ve just turned in the third book in my Wild West series. Do I continue with it? The connections between stories link characters from each past book to new protagonists in the current book. I’d be interested in seeing if folks like this idea, especially as I’m leaning toward making the rest of the series paranormal in the sense of a mystical gift of seeing the future passed down from the old Cheyenne medicine man in PALE MOON STALKER to the CHOSEN WOMAN and then continuing with the theme in more stories dealing with Native Americans. Comments?

    Reply
  126. Cheryl C, I have to agree about my cover. This is probably the most visually pleasing one I’ve ever had, even if there’s rarely enough snow in central Texas to use a sleigh. I’m honored to have the very first Christmas story in the Love Inspired Historicals line.
    And I forget who mentioned them, but I loved Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns too!
    Blessings, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  127. Cheryl C, I have to agree about my cover. This is probably the most visually pleasing one I’ve ever had, even if there’s rarely enough snow in central Texas to use a sleigh. I’m honored to have the very first Christmas story in the Love Inspired Historicals line.
    And I forget who mentioned them, but I loved Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns too!
    Blessings, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  128. Cheryl C, I have to agree about my cover. This is probably the most visually pleasing one I’ve ever had, even if there’s rarely enough snow in central Texas to use a sleigh. I’m honored to have the very first Christmas story in the Love Inspired Historicals line.
    And I forget who mentioned them, but I loved Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns too!
    Blessings, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  129. Cheryl C, I have to agree about my cover. This is probably the most visually pleasing one I’ve ever had, even if there’s rarely enough snow in central Texas to use a sleigh. I’m honored to have the very first Christmas story in the Love Inspired Historicals line.
    And I forget who mentioned them, but I loved Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns too!
    Blessings, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  130. Cheryl C, I have to agree about my cover. This is probably the most visually pleasing one I’ve ever had, even if there’s rarely enough snow in central Texas to use a sleigh. I’m honored to have the very first Christmas story in the Love Inspired Historicals line.
    And I forget who mentioned them, but I loved Elizabeth Lowell’s westerns too!
    Blessings, Laurie Kingery

    Reply
  131. Well, I try not to think about things too deeply. I just haven’t the capacity for it. But this topic continues to puzzle me. Westerns have never gone away and will never go away and it came to me in a flash this morning as I was performing my beauty regimen, I know why.
    And the answer is the same one I offered when I was asked if starting a company (Silhouette) to take on Harlequin would work. I said yes and when asked how I could be so sure I answered, “Because I’m not English.”
    An American romance, contemp or historical, will have an appeal to me because there will be familiar resonance in settings, characters and sensibilities. Of course, it helps that some of the best writers around write western historicals and I do thank people who posted on here for alerting me to several authors I have missed.
    Kate

    Reply
  132. Well, I try not to think about things too deeply. I just haven’t the capacity for it. But this topic continues to puzzle me. Westerns have never gone away and will never go away and it came to me in a flash this morning as I was performing my beauty regimen, I know why.
    And the answer is the same one I offered when I was asked if starting a company (Silhouette) to take on Harlequin would work. I said yes and when asked how I could be so sure I answered, “Because I’m not English.”
    An American romance, contemp or historical, will have an appeal to me because there will be familiar resonance in settings, characters and sensibilities. Of course, it helps that some of the best writers around write western historicals and I do thank people who posted on here for alerting me to several authors I have missed.
    Kate

    Reply
  133. Well, I try not to think about things too deeply. I just haven’t the capacity for it. But this topic continues to puzzle me. Westerns have never gone away and will never go away and it came to me in a flash this morning as I was performing my beauty regimen, I know why.
    And the answer is the same one I offered when I was asked if starting a company (Silhouette) to take on Harlequin would work. I said yes and when asked how I could be so sure I answered, “Because I’m not English.”
    An American romance, contemp or historical, will have an appeal to me because there will be familiar resonance in settings, characters and sensibilities. Of course, it helps that some of the best writers around write western historicals and I do thank people who posted on here for alerting me to several authors I have missed.
    Kate

    Reply
  134. Well, I try not to think about things too deeply. I just haven’t the capacity for it. But this topic continues to puzzle me. Westerns have never gone away and will never go away and it came to me in a flash this morning as I was performing my beauty regimen, I know why.
    And the answer is the same one I offered when I was asked if starting a company (Silhouette) to take on Harlequin would work. I said yes and when asked how I could be so sure I answered, “Because I’m not English.”
    An American romance, contemp or historical, will have an appeal to me because there will be familiar resonance in settings, characters and sensibilities. Of course, it helps that some of the best writers around write western historicals and I do thank people who posted on here for alerting me to several authors I have missed.
    Kate

    Reply
  135. Well, I try not to think about things too deeply. I just haven’t the capacity for it. But this topic continues to puzzle me. Westerns have never gone away and will never go away and it came to me in a flash this morning as I was performing my beauty regimen, I know why.
    And the answer is the same one I offered when I was asked if starting a company (Silhouette) to take on Harlequin would work. I said yes and when asked how I could be so sure I answered, “Because I’m not English.”
    An American romance, contemp or historical, will have an appeal to me because there will be familiar resonance in settings, characters and sensibilities. Of course, it helps that some of the best writers around write western historicals and I do thank people who posted on here for alerting me to several authors I have missed.
    Kate

    Reply
  136. I did a happy chair dance at the mere sight of Shirl Henke’s name and had to immediately email a friend at work to let her know there really are forthcoming Patricia Potter westerns after all. The author we knew as Laurie Grant doing not only more historicals, but inspirational historicals? Is it Christmas? ::looks at calendar:: Umm, pretty close.
    I’m very excited to see new vistas opening (or reopening) for a wide variety of settings, including westerns. As a child, I always wanted to color with all the crayons in the box, a trait which carried over into my writing and reading life. Whichever side of the Atlantic (or Pacific) a hero and heroine find their happily ever after, it’s best when the author can infuse it with the “you are there” sense where the atmosphere seeps into the readers’ bones and we journey not only with characters but with *people.*
    Westerns are a wonderful fit for gritty, emotional stories, so bring them on.

    Reply
  137. I did a happy chair dance at the mere sight of Shirl Henke’s name and had to immediately email a friend at work to let her know there really are forthcoming Patricia Potter westerns after all. The author we knew as Laurie Grant doing not only more historicals, but inspirational historicals? Is it Christmas? ::looks at calendar:: Umm, pretty close.
    I’m very excited to see new vistas opening (or reopening) for a wide variety of settings, including westerns. As a child, I always wanted to color with all the crayons in the box, a trait which carried over into my writing and reading life. Whichever side of the Atlantic (or Pacific) a hero and heroine find their happily ever after, it’s best when the author can infuse it with the “you are there” sense where the atmosphere seeps into the readers’ bones and we journey not only with characters but with *people.*
    Westerns are a wonderful fit for gritty, emotional stories, so bring them on.

    Reply
  138. I did a happy chair dance at the mere sight of Shirl Henke’s name and had to immediately email a friend at work to let her know there really are forthcoming Patricia Potter westerns after all. The author we knew as Laurie Grant doing not only more historicals, but inspirational historicals? Is it Christmas? ::looks at calendar:: Umm, pretty close.
    I’m very excited to see new vistas opening (or reopening) for a wide variety of settings, including westerns. As a child, I always wanted to color with all the crayons in the box, a trait which carried over into my writing and reading life. Whichever side of the Atlantic (or Pacific) a hero and heroine find their happily ever after, it’s best when the author can infuse it with the “you are there” sense where the atmosphere seeps into the readers’ bones and we journey not only with characters but with *people.*
    Westerns are a wonderful fit for gritty, emotional stories, so bring them on.

    Reply
  139. I did a happy chair dance at the mere sight of Shirl Henke’s name and had to immediately email a friend at work to let her know there really are forthcoming Patricia Potter westerns after all. The author we knew as Laurie Grant doing not only more historicals, but inspirational historicals? Is it Christmas? ::looks at calendar:: Umm, pretty close.
    I’m very excited to see new vistas opening (or reopening) for a wide variety of settings, including westerns. As a child, I always wanted to color with all the crayons in the box, a trait which carried over into my writing and reading life. Whichever side of the Atlantic (or Pacific) a hero and heroine find their happily ever after, it’s best when the author can infuse it with the “you are there” sense where the atmosphere seeps into the readers’ bones and we journey not only with characters but with *people.*
    Westerns are a wonderful fit for gritty, emotional stories, so bring them on.

    Reply
  140. I did a happy chair dance at the mere sight of Shirl Henke’s name and had to immediately email a friend at work to let her know there really are forthcoming Patricia Potter westerns after all. The author we knew as Laurie Grant doing not only more historicals, but inspirational historicals? Is it Christmas? ::looks at calendar:: Umm, pretty close.
    I’m very excited to see new vistas opening (or reopening) for a wide variety of settings, including westerns. As a child, I always wanted to color with all the crayons in the box, a trait which carried over into my writing and reading life. Whichever side of the Atlantic (or Pacific) a hero and heroine find their happily ever after, it’s best when the author can infuse it with the “you are there” sense where the atmosphere seeps into the readers’ bones and we journey not only with characters but with *people.*
    Westerns are a wonderful fit for gritty, emotional stories, so bring them on.

    Reply
  141. Anna, so glad for your “happy chair dance” over seeing my name. Yep, I’m still around and back in the saddle again 🙂 Hope you enjoy PALE MOON STALKER and next July, CHOSEN WOMAN. I couldn’t agree with you more about the West being a great place for gritty, emotional stories and the chance to introduce such a wide cast of characters from around the world–talk about coloring with every crayon in the box, perfect way of describing what we do!

    Reply
  142. Anna, so glad for your “happy chair dance” over seeing my name. Yep, I’m still around and back in the saddle again 🙂 Hope you enjoy PALE MOON STALKER and next July, CHOSEN WOMAN. I couldn’t agree with you more about the West being a great place for gritty, emotional stories and the chance to introduce such a wide cast of characters from around the world–talk about coloring with every crayon in the box, perfect way of describing what we do!

    Reply
  143. Anna, so glad for your “happy chair dance” over seeing my name. Yep, I’m still around and back in the saddle again 🙂 Hope you enjoy PALE MOON STALKER and next July, CHOSEN WOMAN. I couldn’t agree with you more about the West being a great place for gritty, emotional stories and the chance to introduce such a wide cast of characters from around the world–talk about coloring with every crayon in the box, perfect way of describing what we do!

    Reply
  144. Anna, so glad for your “happy chair dance” over seeing my name. Yep, I’m still around and back in the saddle again 🙂 Hope you enjoy PALE MOON STALKER and next July, CHOSEN WOMAN. I couldn’t agree with you more about the West being a great place for gritty, emotional stories and the chance to introduce such a wide cast of characters from around the world–talk about coloring with every crayon in the box, perfect way of describing what we do!

    Reply
  145. Anna, so glad for your “happy chair dance” over seeing my name. Yep, I’m still around and back in the saddle again 🙂 Hope you enjoy PALE MOON STALKER and next July, CHOSEN WOMAN. I couldn’t agree with you more about the West being a great place for gritty, emotional stories and the chance to introduce such a wide cast of characters from around the world–talk about coloring with every crayon in the box, perfect way of describing what we do!

    Reply
  146. Great post, Mary Jo! And a special Thank You to all who contributed. It’s good to see American ageing enough to finally appreciate her own roots.
    For me, I’ve never read a Western save MJP’s “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know, which I loved. But as a child… The Lone Ranger… oh how I drooled over that man! And Zorro, oh my! Not especially western but I do remember the settings as being rather raw and frontier like. There’s just something about a man in a mask riding a horse. 🙂

    Reply
  147. Great post, Mary Jo! And a special Thank You to all who contributed. It’s good to see American ageing enough to finally appreciate her own roots.
    For me, I’ve never read a Western save MJP’s “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know, which I loved. But as a child… The Lone Ranger… oh how I drooled over that man! And Zorro, oh my! Not especially western but I do remember the settings as being rather raw and frontier like. There’s just something about a man in a mask riding a horse. 🙂

    Reply
  148. Great post, Mary Jo! And a special Thank You to all who contributed. It’s good to see American ageing enough to finally appreciate her own roots.
    For me, I’ve never read a Western save MJP’s “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know, which I loved. But as a child… The Lone Ranger… oh how I drooled over that man! And Zorro, oh my! Not especially western but I do remember the settings as being rather raw and frontier like. There’s just something about a man in a mask riding a horse. 🙂

    Reply
  149. Great post, Mary Jo! And a special Thank You to all who contributed. It’s good to see American ageing enough to finally appreciate her own roots.
    For me, I’ve never read a Western save MJP’s “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know, which I loved. But as a child… The Lone Ranger… oh how I drooled over that man! And Zorro, oh my! Not especially western but I do remember the settings as being rather raw and frontier like. There’s just something about a man in a mask riding a horse. 🙂

    Reply
  150. Great post, Mary Jo! And a special Thank You to all who contributed. It’s good to see American ageing enough to finally appreciate her own roots.
    For me, I’ve never read a Western save MJP’s “Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know, which I loved. But as a child… The Lone Ranger… oh how I drooled over that man! And Zorro, oh my! Not especially western but I do remember the settings as being rather raw and frontier like. There’s just something about a man in a mask riding a horse. 🙂

    Reply
  151. Dear Nina, “Heigh Ho Silver, away!” Yeah, I loved the masked man, too. And Zorro, wow, did Old California ever influence me. My first two books were set there, GOLDEN LADY and LOVE UNWILLING. There is something about mysterious heroes with dark pasts that draws readers, I think. I know that ever since Steve Morgan, I’ve been hooked! Here’s to many more stories set in the wondeful wild West!

    Reply
  152. Dear Nina, “Heigh Ho Silver, away!” Yeah, I loved the masked man, too. And Zorro, wow, did Old California ever influence me. My first two books were set there, GOLDEN LADY and LOVE UNWILLING. There is something about mysterious heroes with dark pasts that draws readers, I think. I know that ever since Steve Morgan, I’ve been hooked! Here’s to many more stories set in the wondeful wild West!

    Reply
  153. Dear Nina, “Heigh Ho Silver, away!” Yeah, I loved the masked man, too. And Zorro, wow, did Old California ever influence me. My first two books were set there, GOLDEN LADY and LOVE UNWILLING. There is something about mysterious heroes with dark pasts that draws readers, I think. I know that ever since Steve Morgan, I’ve been hooked! Here’s to many more stories set in the wondeful wild West!

    Reply
  154. Dear Nina, “Heigh Ho Silver, away!” Yeah, I loved the masked man, too. And Zorro, wow, did Old California ever influence me. My first two books were set there, GOLDEN LADY and LOVE UNWILLING. There is something about mysterious heroes with dark pasts that draws readers, I think. I know that ever since Steve Morgan, I’ve been hooked! Here’s to many more stories set in the wondeful wild West!

    Reply
  155. Dear Nina, “Heigh Ho Silver, away!” Yeah, I loved the masked man, too. And Zorro, wow, did Old California ever influence me. My first two books were set there, GOLDEN LADY and LOVE UNWILLING. There is something about mysterious heroes with dark pasts that draws readers, I think. I know that ever since Steve Morgan, I’ve been hooked! Here’s to many more stories set in the wondeful wild West!

    Reply

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