A Grand and Green Query

Edith_layton2_2

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! 

This is the day, as we in New York say, when everyone is Irish.
Wonderful!  What grand company to be in.

Think of all the great Irish poets and novelists:

James Joyce, Jonathan Swift, Oliver Goldsmith, Oscar Wilde, Thomas Moore, William Butler Yeats (my man!) Lawrence Sterne, Edna O’Brien, and so many others, including the inventor of the Gothik Romance beloved of Regency females, herself: Maria Edgeworth.

Do I hear music?  Irish Music?  Of course.

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Tenors!
Rockers par excellence.
Bagpipers.
And dancers, from Riverdance to step dancers everywhere.
Fantastic beers and ales, and whiskeys.
Men in Kilts. (Every man on earth would look better in a kilt, imho.)
And I’m not even Irish… except here in New York today.

Ireland’s history is full and tragic and beautiful
They have castles, and had (and have) aristocrats.

Irish_histroical
So riddle me this: Why are there not more Historical Romances set in Ireland?

Nora Roberts writes loverly romances with Irish backgrounds, but they are contemporary.
The only two historicals I know are: Sara Healy’s THE GREEN MAN.
(I read it long ago, but not since. Still I remember it fondly.)
And R. A. Macavoy’s whiz bang "THE WHITE HORSE" is a wonderfully heartwarming love story with paranormal elements too.  It’s a book that endures, I often re-read it.

Movies, we got:
THE QUIET MAN is one of the best screen romances ever.

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There are others, too numerous to list.

Actors? Be still my fantasies. Le pant pant: Peter O’Toole, Aidan Quinn, Liam Neeson, Colin Farrell, Pierce Brosnan, Jonathan Rhys Meyeres,, Cillian Murphy and many many others.
(We shall skip actors of the female persuasion, because although they are as numerous and gorgeous, I do not daydream or nightdream about them.)

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But Historical Novels about Ireland? A paucity.
Scarlet O’Hara was Irish, and she lived at Tara, but GONE WITH THE WIND was set in America.

There are tons of Scottish Historicals.  I love them too.
And many fine "straight" Historicals novels set in Ireland.

Why not more Historical Romances?

I haven’t written any romances set there either, true.  But remember I’m only Irish on St. Patricks’ day, and also, the lilting idiom of the language eludes my writing ear.

I wrote a book with some Welsh characters, partially set in Wales.  I’ve been there – up and down and across that lovely land, and found the idiom easier to reflect in English.  (Think Yoda: backwards she writes.) That book had a wonderful love story.  But there were also beheadings and various awful executions galore. 

It was a "straight" Historical called QUEEN OF SHADOWS: A Novel of Isabella, Wife of Edward ll by Edith Felber.  (And by the way – this very week, the Czechs bought QUEEN OF SHADOWS for translation!)

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And by the by, why not more Historical Romances set in Wales? 
But that’s for another day.

On this St. Patrick’s Day I must ask:no Historical Irish Romances?  Why is no one writing them?

Or have I missed them?  I know I must have done. I hate to be red-faced on this green day, so tell me if I forgot a good ‘un. And can you recommend some?  Or else, explain their paucity?

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HELP!  And even if you can’t — a Grand St. Pat’s Day to you!


115 thoughts on “A Grand and Green Query”

  1. Michelle Willingham is a newish Harlequin/Mills and Boon writer who writes about medieval Ireland and Irish warriors. Yum. I too wonder why there are not more Irish-set historicals. The political problems may throw people off, but the Scots had equally dire problems. Maybe you’ll start a new trend, Edith!

    Reply
  2. Michelle Willingham is a newish Harlequin/Mills and Boon writer who writes about medieval Ireland and Irish warriors. Yum. I too wonder why there are not more Irish-set historicals. The political problems may throw people off, but the Scots had equally dire problems. Maybe you’ll start a new trend, Edith!

    Reply
  3. Michelle Willingham is a newish Harlequin/Mills and Boon writer who writes about medieval Ireland and Irish warriors. Yum. I too wonder why there are not more Irish-set historicals. The political problems may throw people off, but the Scots had equally dire problems. Maybe you’ll start a new trend, Edith!

    Reply
  4. Michelle Willingham is a newish Harlequin/Mills and Boon writer who writes about medieval Ireland and Irish warriors. Yum. I too wonder why there are not more Irish-set historicals. The political problems may throw people off, but the Scots had equally dire problems. Maybe you’ll start a new trend, Edith!

    Reply
  5. Michelle Willingham is a newish Harlequin/Mills and Boon writer who writes about medieval Ireland and Irish warriors. Yum. I too wonder why there are not more Irish-set historicals. The political problems may throw people off, but the Scots had equally dire problems. Maybe you’ll start a new trend, Edith!

    Reply
  6. Happy St. Patricks Day, celebrate your Irish roots and remember April 6th is Tartan Day, so wear your tartan and celebrate your Scottish roots.
    Anyway, maybe Ireland is viewed more as a sad place. A place that people leave until things are better. Maybe happier endings are harder to come by in historical Ireland.
    I believe the late Nancy Richards-Akers had some historical novels that take place in Ireland. Doesn’t Jo’s “Dangerous Joy” take place partially in Ireland? The following authors have dabbled in historical Ireland Denée Cody, Claire Delacroix, Amy J. Fetzer, Donna Fletcher, Diana Groe, Ellen Fitzgerald, Emma Jensen, Shirley Kennedy, Emma Lange, Margaret Evans Porter, Joan Wolf, Mary Burkhardt, Eilis Dillon, Carole Nelson Douglas, Karen Robards and Kate Saunders.
    As far as movies…The Quiet Man is one of my all time favorites. There is also Waking Ned Devine, My Left Foot, Dancing at Lughnasa and who could forget Darby O’Gill and the Little People. The last movie scared the crap out of me when I was young and the Banshee was coming. Of course, none of those are historicals.

    Reply
  7. Happy St. Patricks Day, celebrate your Irish roots and remember April 6th is Tartan Day, so wear your tartan and celebrate your Scottish roots.
    Anyway, maybe Ireland is viewed more as a sad place. A place that people leave until things are better. Maybe happier endings are harder to come by in historical Ireland.
    I believe the late Nancy Richards-Akers had some historical novels that take place in Ireland. Doesn’t Jo’s “Dangerous Joy” take place partially in Ireland? The following authors have dabbled in historical Ireland Denée Cody, Claire Delacroix, Amy J. Fetzer, Donna Fletcher, Diana Groe, Ellen Fitzgerald, Emma Jensen, Shirley Kennedy, Emma Lange, Margaret Evans Porter, Joan Wolf, Mary Burkhardt, Eilis Dillon, Carole Nelson Douglas, Karen Robards and Kate Saunders.
    As far as movies…The Quiet Man is one of my all time favorites. There is also Waking Ned Devine, My Left Foot, Dancing at Lughnasa and who could forget Darby O’Gill and the Little People. The last movie scared the crap out of me when I was young and the Banshee was coming. Of course, none of those are historicals.

    Reply
  8. Happy St. Patricks Day, celebrate your Irish roots and remember April 6th is Tartan Day, so wear your tartan and celebrate your Scottish roots.
    Anyway, maybe Ireland is viewed more as a sad place. A place that people leave until things are better. Maybe happier endings are harder to come by in historical Ireland.
    I believe the late Nancy Richards-Akers had some historical novels that take place in Ireland. Doesn’t Jo’s “Dangerous Joy” take place partially in Ireland? The following authors have dabbled in historical Ireland Denée Cody, Claire Delacroix, Amy J. Fetzer, Donna Fletcher, Diana Groe, Ellen Fitzgerald, Emma Jensen, Shirley Kennedy, Emma Lange, Margaret Evans Porter, Joan Wolf, Mary Burkhardt, Eilis Dillon, Carole Nelson Douglas, Karen Robards and Kate Saunders.
    As far as movies…The Quiet Man is one of my all time favorites. There is also Waking Ned Devine, My Left Foot, Dancing at Lughnasa and who could forget Darby O’Gill and the Little People. The last movie scared the crap out of me when I was young and the Banshee was coming. Of course, none of those are historicals.

    Reply
  9. Happy St. Patricks Day, celebrate your Irish roots and remember April 6th is Tartan Day, so wear your tartan and celebrate your Scottish roots.
    Anyway, maybe Ireland is viewed more as a sad place. A place that people leave until things are better. Maybe happier endings are harder to come by in historical Ireland.
    I believe the late Nancy Richards-Akers had some historical novels that take place in Ireland. Doesn’t Jo’s “Dangerous Joy” take place partially in Ireland? The following authors have dabbled in historical Ireland Denée Cody, Claire Delacroix, Amy J. Fetzer, Donna Fletcher, Diana Groe, Ellen Fitzgerald, Emma Jensen, Shirley Kennedy, Emma Lange, Margaret Evans Porter, Joan Wolf, Mary Burkhardt, Eilis Dillon, Carole Nelson Douglas, Karen Robards and Kate Saunders.
    As far as movies…The Quiet Man is one of my all time favorites. There is also Waking Ned Devine, My Left Foot, Dancing at Lughnasa and who could forget Darby O’Gill and the Little People. The last movie scared the crap out of me when I was young and the Banshee was coming. Of course, none of those are historicals.

    Reply
  10. Happy St. Patricks Day, celebrate your Irish roots and remember April 6th is Tartan Day, so wear your tartan and celebrate your Scottish roots.
    Anyway, maybe Ireland is viewed more as a sad place. A place that people leave until things are better. Maybe happier endings are harder to come by in historical Ireland.
    I believe the late Nancy Richards-Akers had some historical novels that take place in Ireland. Doesn’t Jo’s “Dangerous Joy” take place partially in Ireland? The following authors have dabbled in historical Ireland Denée Cody, Claire Delacroix, Amy J. Fetzer, Donna Fletcher, Diana Groe, Ellen Fitzgerald, Emma Jensen, Shirley Kennedy, Emma Lange, Margaret Evans Porter, Joan Wolf, Mary Burkhardt, Eilis Dillon, Carole Nelson Douglas, Karen Robards and Kate Saunders.
    As far as movies…The Quiet Man is one of my all time favorites. There is also Waking Ned Devine, My Left Foot, Dancing at Lughnasa and who could forget Darby O’Gill and the Little People. The last movie scared the crap out of me when I was young and the Banshee was coming. Of course, none of those are historicals.

    Reply
  11. Well, Jo’s Dangerous Joy has Irish characters and is set partly in Ireland. Both Tracy Anne Warren (The Wife Trap) and Lauren Willig (The Deception of the Emerald Ring) are recent historicals with Irish connections. Teresa Medeiros’s Lady of Conquest uses early Irish history. Kathleen Korbel’s books in the Nocturne line (Dangerous Temptations and Dark Seduction) have contemporary heroes, but the heroines are from Irish myth. Kimberly Cates has used Ireland in several historicals as well as in the contemporary Fly Away Home.

    Reply
  12. Well, Jo’s Dangerous Joy has Irish characters and is set partly in Ireland. Both Tracy Anne Warren (The Wife Trap) and Lauren Willig (The Deception of the Emerald Ring) are recent historicals with Irish connections. Teresa Medeiros’s Lady of Conquest uses early Irish history. Kathleen Korbel’s books in the Nocturne line (Dangerous Temptations and Dark Seduction) have contemporary heroes, but the heroines are from Irish myth. Kimberly Cates has used Ireland in several historicals as well as in the contemporary Fly Away Home.

    Reply
  13. Well, Jo’s Dangerous Joy has Irish characters and is set partly in Ireland. Both Tracy Anne Warren (The Wife Trap) and Lauren Willig (The Deception of the Emerald Ring) are recent historicals with Irish connections. Teresa Medeiros’s Lady of Conquest uses early Irish history. Kathleen Korbel’s books in the Nocturne line (Dangerous Temptations and Dark Seduction) have contemporary heroes, but the heroines are from Irish myth. Kimberly Cates has used Ireland in several historicals as well as in the contemporary Fly Away Home.

    Reply
  14. Well, Jo’s Dangerous Joy has Irish characters and is set partly in Ireland. Both Tracy Anne Warren (The Wife Trap) and Lauren Willig (The Deception of the Emerald Ring) are recent historicals with Irish connections. Teresa Medeiros’s Lady of Conquest uses early Irish history. Kathleen Korbel’s books in the Nocturne line (Dangerous Temptations and Dark Seduction) have contemporary heroes, but the heroines are from Irish myth. Kimberly Cates has used Ireland in several historicals as well as in the contemporary Fly Away Home.

    Reply
  15. Well, Jo’s Dangerous Joy has Irish characters and is set partly in Ireland. Both Tracy Anne Warren (The Wife Trap) and Lauren Willig (The Deception of the Emerald Ring) are recent historicals with Irish connections. Teresa Medeiros’s Lady of Conquest uses early Irish history. Kathleen Korbel’s books in the Nocturne line (Dangerous Temptations and Dark Seduction) have contemporary heroes, but the heroines are from Irish myth. Kimberly Cates has used Ireland in several historicals as well as in the contemporary Fly Away Home.

    Reply
  16. Kay – I just spoke with Joan Wolf, an old friend, btw, and she says she doesn’t remember ever doing a Historical Romance with Irish elements. She had a contemporary somewhat like that, but asks that you please let her know which Historical you mean!

    Reply
  17. Kay – I just spoke with Joan Wolf, an old friend, btw, and she says she doesn’t remember ever doing a Historical Romance with Irish elements. She had a contemporary somewhat like that, but asks that you please let her know which Historical you mean!

    Reply
  18. Kay – I just spoke with Joan Wolf, an old friend, btw, and she says she doesn’t remember ever doing a Historical Romance with Irish elements. She had a contemporary somewhat like that, but asks that you please let her know which Historical you mean!

    Reply
  19. Kay – I just spoke with Joan Wolf, an old friend, btw, and she says she doesn’t remember ever doing a Historical Romance with Irish elements. She had a contemporary somewhat like that, but asks that you please let her know which Historical you mean!

    Reply
  20. Kay – I just spoke with Joan Wolf, an old friend, btw, and she says she doesn’t remember ever doing a Historical Romance with Irish elements. She had a contemporary somewhat like that, but asks that you please let her know which Historical you mean!

    Reply
  21. And Jo, I said that my face might be red on this green day – sorry I didn’t mention your DANGEROUS JOYS.
    But I still maintain that wholly Irish Historical romances are a rare breed.

    Reply
  22. And Jo, I said that my face might be red on this green day – sorry I didn’t mention your DANGEROUS JOYS.
    But I still maintain that wholly Irish Historical romances are a rare breed.

    Reply
  23. And Jo, I said that my face might be red on this green day – sorry I didn’t mention your DANGEROUS JOYS.
    But I still maintain that wholly Irish Historical romances are a rare breed.

    Reply
  24. And Jo, I said that my face might be red on this green day – sorry I didn’t mention your DANGEROUS JOYS.
    But I still maintain that wholly Irish Historical romances are a rare breed.

    Reply
  25. And Jo, I said that my face might be red on this green day – sorry I didn’t mention your DANGEROUS JOYS.
    But I still maintain that wholly Irish Historical romances are a rare breed.

    Reply
  26. Ok, how about an Irish heroine or partially Irish theme…A Difficult Truce by Joan Wolf, written sometime in the 90’s.
    And, yes I agree on the whole book being Irish, although I think some of Amy Fetzers are all Irish. You notice I’m saying words like “think” because it has been awhile since I read any Irish stories. There are always the novella’s with Irish themes.

    Reply
  27. Ok, how about an Irish heroine or partially Irish theme…A Difficult Truce by Joan Wolf, written sometime in the 90’s.
    And, yes I agree on the whole book being Irish, although I think some of Amy Fetzers are all Irish. You notice I’m saying words like “think” because it has been awhile since I read any Irish stories. There are always the novella’s with Irish themes.

    Reply
  28. Ok, how about an Irish heroine or partially Irish theme…A Difficult Truce by Joan Wolf, written sometime in the 90’s.
    And, yes I agree on the whole book being Irish, although I think some of Amy Fetzers are all Irish. You notice I’m saying words like “think” because it has been awhile since I read any Irish stories. There are always the novella’s with Irish themes.

    Reply
  29. Ok, how about an Irish heroine or partially Irish theme…A Difficult Truce by Joan Wolf, written sometime in the 90’s.
    And, yes I agree on the whole book being Irish, although I think some of Amy Fetzers are all Irish. You notice I’m saying words like “think” because it has been awhile since I read any Irish stories. There are always the novella’s with Irish themes.

    Reply
  30. Ok, how about an Irish heroine or partially Irish theme…A Difficult Truce by Joan Wolf, written sometime in the 90’s.
    And, yes I agree on the whole book being Irish, although I think some of Amy Fetzers are all Irish. You notice I’m saying words like “think” because it has been awhile since I read any Irish stories. There are always the novella’s with Irish themes.

    Reply
  31. “The Quiet Man”
    Love that movie…one of John Ford’s best. It is based on a short story of the same name by Maurice Walsh…a fine Irish writer.

    Reply
  32. “The Quiet Man”
    Love that movie…one of John Ford’s best. It is based on a short story of the same name by Maurice Walsh…a fine Irish writer.

    Reply
  33. “The Quiet Man”
    Love that movie…one of John Ford’s best. It is based on a short story of the same name by Maurice Walsh…a fine Irish writer.

    Reply
  34. “The Quiet Man”
    Love that movie…one of John Ford’s best. It is based on a short story of the same name by Maurice Walsh…a fine Irish writer.

    Reply
  35. “The Quiet Man”
    Love that movie…one of John Ford’s best. It is based on a short story of the same name by Maurice Walsh…a fine Irish writer.

    Reply
  36. Brenda Joyce’s Regency de Warrenne series follows an Irish family–one or two of the books are set completely in Ireland and the others are partially set there.
    Madeline Hunter set one of her medieval books in Wales.

    Reply
  37. Brenda Joyce’s Regency de Warrenne series follows an Irish family–one or two of the books are set completely in Ireland and the others are partially set there.
    Madeline Hunter set one of her medieval books in Wales.

    Reply
  38. Brenda Joyce’s Regency de Warrenne series follows an Irish family–one or two of the books are set completely in Ireland and the others are partially set there.
    Madeline Hunter set one of her medieval books in Wales.

    Reply
  39. Brenda Joyce’s Regency de Warrenne series follows an Irish family–one or two of the books are set completely in Ireland and the others are partially set there.
    Madeline Hunter set one of her medieval books in Wales.

    Reply
  40. Brenda Joyce’s Regency de Warrenne series follows an Irish family–one or two of the books are set completely in Ireland and the others are partially set there.
    Madeline Hunter set one of her medieval books in Wales.

    Reply
  41. i’m so confused. i thought kilts were scottish!
    racking my brains thinking of irish-set stories, all i’m coming up with is the excellent historical movie ‘tristan and isolde’ (set in ireland AND wales, IIRC, double points! or was it cornwall???)
    and the even more excellent movie ‘waking ned devine’, with one of the most indelible skinnydipping scenes ever to be caught on film.

    Reply
  42. i’m so confused. i thought kilts were scottish!
    racking my brains thinking of irish-set stories, all i’m coming up with is the excellent historical movie ‘tristan and isolde’ (set in ireland AND wales, IIRC, double points! or was it cornwall???)
    and the even more excellent movie ‘waking ned devine’, with one of the most indelible skinnydipping scenes ever to be caught on film.

    Reply
  43. i’m so confused. i thought kilts were scottish!
    racking my brains thinking of irish-set stories, all i’m coming up with is the excellent historical movie ‘tristan and isolde’ (set in ireland AND wales, IIRC, double points! or was it cornwall???)
    and the even more excellent movie ‘waking ned devine’, with one of the most indelible skinnydipping scenes ever to be caught on film.

    Reply
  44. i’m so confused. i thought kilts were scottish!
    racking my brains thinking of irish-set stories, all i’m coming up with is the excellent historical movie ‘tristan and isolde’ (set in ireland AND wales, IIRC, double points! or was it cornwall???)
    and the even more excellent movie ‘waking ned devine’, with one of the most indelible skinnydipping scenes ever to be caught on film.

    Reply
  45. i’m so confused. i thought kilts were scottish!
    racking my brains thinking of irish-set stories, all i’m coming up with is the excellent historical movie ‘tristan and isolde’ (set in ireland AND wales, IIRC, double points! or was it cornwall???)
    and the even more excellent movie ‘waking ned devine’, with one of the most indelible skinnydipping scenes ever to be caught on film.

    Reply
  46. I loved the Quiet Man, have watched it several times.
    Donna Fletcher’s The Irish Devil is one of my favorite books, with a sequel, The Irish Hope.

    Reply
  47. I loved the Quiet Man, have watched it several times.
    Donna Fletcher’s The Irish Devil is one of my favorite books, with a sequel, The Irish Hope.

    Reply
  48. I loved the Quiet Man, have watched it several times.
    Donna Fletcher’s The Irish Devil is one of my favorite books, with a sequel, The Irish Hope.

    Reply
  49. I loved the Quiet Man, have watched it several times.
    Donna Fletcher’s The Irish Devil is one of my favorite books, with a sequel, The Irish Hope.

    Reply
  50. I loved the Quiet Man, have watched it several times.
    Donna Fletcher’s The Irish Devil is one of my favorite books, with a sequel, The Irish Hope.

    Reply
  51. I have some Irish-set historicals in the pipeline! One is set in 1907 and the other in 1916. I’m particularly fascinated by the Fenian movement (as evidenced by the dates), and good grief–Ireland is oodles more romantic than Scotland!!

    Reply
  52. I have some Irish-set historicals in the pipeline! One is set in 1907 and the other in 1916. I’m particularly fascinated by the Fenian movement (as evidenced by the dates), and good grief–Ireland is oodles more romantic than Scotland!!

    Reply
  53. I have some Irish-set historicals in the pipeline! One is set in 1907 and the other in 1916. I’m particularly fascinated by the Fenian movement (as evidenced by the dates), and good grief–Ireland is oodles more romantic than Scotland!!

    Reply
  54. I have some Irish-set historicals in the pipeline! One is set in 1907 and the other in 1916. I’m particularly fascinated by the Fenian movement (as evidenced by the dates), and good grief–Ireland is oodles more romantic than Scotland!!

    Reply
  55. I have some Irish-set historicals in the pipeline! One is set in 1907 and the other in 1916. I’m particularly fascinated by the Fenian movement (as evidenced by the dates), and good grief–Ireland is oodles more romantic than Scotland!!

    Reply
  56. There’s The Anglophile by Egan O’Neill (one of the many pseudonyms of Elizabeth Linington/Dell Shannon.
    Morgan Llywelyn has written a slew of books about Ireland, despite her Welsh name.
    My old grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a series about Fionn mac Cumhal (with Adrienne Martine-Barnes)
    1. Master of Earth and Water (1992)
    2. The Shield Between the Worlds (1994)
    3. Sword of Fire and Shadow (1995)
    And The Irish Rogue by Emma Jensen is one of my favorite Signet traditional Regencies–the heroine first appears chasing a bat, and the hero is a Scarlet Pimpernel/Robin Hood type.
    And for those who like YA fantasy, one of Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series, A Wizard Abroad, is set in Ireland, both in the present day and in the mythical past.
    For the great Gaels of Ireland
    Are the men that God made mad,
    For all their wars are merry
    And all their songs are sad.
    May your glass be ever full.
    May the roof over your head be always strong.
    And may you be half an hour in heaven
    before the devil knows you’re dead.

    Reply
  57. There’s The Anglophile by Egan O’Neill (one of the many pseudonyms of Elizabeth Linington/Dell Shannon.
    Morgan Llywelyn has written a slew of books about Ireland, despite her Welsh name.
    My old grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a series about Fionn mac Cumhal (with Adrienne Martine-Barnes)
    1. Master of Earth and Water (1992)
    2. The Shield Between the Worlds (1994)
    3. Sword of Fire and Shadow (1995)
    And The Irish Rogue by Emma Jensen is one of my favorite Signet traditional Regencies–the heroine first appears chasing a bat, and the hero is a Scarlet Pimpernel/Robin Hood type.
    And for those who like YA fantasy, one of Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series, A Wizard Abroad, is set in Ireland, both in the present day and in the mythical past.
    For the great Gaels of Ireland
    Are the men that God made mad,
    For all their wars are merry
    And all their songs are sad.
    May your glass be ever full.
    May the roof over your head be always strong.
    And may you be half an hour in heaven
    before the devil knows you’re dead.

    Reply
  58. There’s The Anglophile by Egan O’Neill (one of the many pseudonyms of Elizabeth Linington/Dell Shannon.
    Morgan Llywelyn has written a slew of books about Ireland, despite her Welsh name.
    My old grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a series about Fionn mac Cumhal (with Adrienne Martine-Barnes)
    1. Master of Earth and Water (1992)
    2. The Shield Between the Worlds (1994)
    3. Sword of Fire and Shadow (1995)
    And The Irish Rogue by Emma Jensen is one of my favorite Signet traditional Regencies–the heroine first appears chasing a bat, and the hero is a Scarlet Pimpernel/Robin Hood type.
    And for those who like YA fantasy, one of Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series, A Wizard Abroad, is set in Ireland, both in the present day and in the mythical past.
    For the great Gaels of Ireland
    Are the men that God made mad,
    For all their wars are merry
    And all their songs are sad.
    May your glass be ever full.
    May the roof over your head be always strong.
    And may you be half an hour in heaven
    before the devil knows you’re dead.

    Reply
  59. There’s The Anglophile by Egan O’Neill (one of the many pseudonyms of Elizabeth Linington/Dell Shannon.
    Morgan Llywelyn has written a slew of books about Ireland, despite her Welsh name.
    My old grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a series about Fionn mac Cumhal (with Adrienne Martine-Barnes)
    1. Master of Earth and Water (1992)
    2. The Shield Between the Worlds (1994)
    3. Sword of Fire and Shadow (1995)
    And The Irish Rogue by Emma Jensen is one of my favorite Signet traditional Regencies–the heroine first appears chasing a bat, and the hero is a Scarlet Pimpernel/Robin Hood type.
    And for those who like YA fantasy, one of Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series, A Wizard Abroad, is set in Ireland, both in the present day and in the mythical past.
    For the great Gaels of Ireland
    Are the men that God made mad,
    For all their wars are merry
    And all their songs are sad.
    May your glass be ever full.
    May the roof over your head be always strong.
    And may you be half an hour in heaven
    before the devil knows you’re dead.

    Reply
  60. There’s The Anglophile by Egan O’Neill (one of the many pseudonyms of Elizabeth Linington/Dell Shannon.
    Morgan Llywelyn has written a slew of books about Ireland, despite her Welsh name.
    My old grad school roommate Diana L. Paxson has written a series about Fionn mac Cumhal (with Adrienne Martine-Barnes)
    1. Master of Earth and Water (1992)
    2. The Shield Between the Worlds (1994)
    3. Sword of Fire and Shadow (1995)
    And The Irish Rogue by Emma Jensen is one of my favorite Signet traditional Regencies–the heroine first appears chasing a bat, and the hero is a Scarlet Pimpernel/Robin Hood type.
    And for those who like YA fantasy, one of Diane Duane’s Young Wizards series, A Wizard Abroad, is set in Ireland, both in the present day and in the mythical past.
    For the great Gaels of Ireland
    Are the men that God made mad,
    For all their wars are merry
    And all their songs are sad.
    May your glass be ever full.
    May the roof over your head be always strong.
    And may you be half an hour in heaven
    before the devil knows you’re dead.

    Reply
  61. I’d love to see more historical romances set in Ireland. I think that its history of strife and oppression may be too strong to write a romance that isn’t overshadowed by it. Scotland did have its share of those elements but to most people’s minds they did see it continuing well into the 20th century.
    Things are much different now. For example, I’ve recently learned that a new song of Ireland has been penned. Two rugby teams, one from the Republic of Ireland and one from Northern Ireland were to play. They could play neither’s national anthem game and so a new one was composed that celebrated and called forth a united Ireland. It’s beautiful.
    Good news about more books based in Ireland. Amanda McCabe has a new series set in Ireland coming out in 2010.
    Juliene Osborne McKnight has written some wonderful books of the history and folklore of in a pre-Medieval Ireland with some very strong romantic elements in them. I think they’re stellar.

    Reply
  62. I’d love to see more historical romances set in Ireland. I think that its history of strife and oppression may be too strong to write a romance that isn’t overshadowed by it. Scotland did have its share of those elements but to most people’s minds they did see it continuing well into the 20th century.
    Things are much different now. For example, I’ve recently learned that a new song of Ireland has been penned. Two rugby teams, one from the Republic of Ireland and one from Northern Ireland were to play. They could play neither’s national anthem game and so a new one was composed that celebrated and called forth a united Ireland. It’s beautiful.
    Good news about more books based in Ireland. Amanda McCabe has a new series set in Ireland coming out in 2010.
    Juliene Osborne McKnight has written some wonderful books of the history and folklore of in a pre-Medieval Ireland with some very strong romantic elements in them. I think they’re stellar.

    Reply
  63. I’d love to see more historical romances set in Ireland. I think that its history of strife and oppression may be too strong to write a romance that isn’t overshadowed by it. Scotland did have its share of those elements but to most people’s minds they did see it continuing well into the 20th century.
    Things are much different now. For example, I’ve recently learned that a new song of Ireland has been penned. Two rugby teams, one from the Republic of Ireland and one from Northern Ireland were to play. They could play neither’s national anthem game and so a new one was composed that celebrated and called forth a united Ireland. It’s beautiful.
    Good news about more books based in Ireland. Amanda McCabe has a new series set in Ireland coming out in 2010.
    Juliene Osborne McKnight has written some wonderful books of the history and folklore of in a pre-Medieval Ireland with some very strong romantic elements in them. I think they’re stellar.

    Reply
  64. I’d love to see more historical romances set in Ireland. I think that its history of strife and oppression may be too strong to write a romance that isn’t overshadowed by it. Scotland did have its share of those elements but to most people’s minds they did see it continuing well into the 20th century.
    Things are much different now. For example, I’ve recently learned that a new song of Ireland has been penned. Two rugby teams, one from the Republic of Ireland and one from Northern Ireland were to play. They could play neither’s national anthem game and so a new one was composed that celebrated and called forth a united Ireland. It’s beautiful.
    Good news about more books based in Ireland. Amanda McCabe has a new series set in Ireland coming out in 2010.
    Juliene Osborne McKnight has written some wonderful books of the history and folklore of in a pre-Medieval Ireland with some very strong romantic elements in them. I think they’re stellar.

    Reply
  65. I’d love to see more historical romances set in Ireland. I think that its history of strife and oppression may be too strong to write a romance that isn’t overshadowed by it. Scotland did have its share of those elements but to most people’s minds they did see it continuing well into the 20th century.
    Things are much different now. For example, I’ve recently learned that a new song of Ireland has been penned. Two rugby teams, one from the Republic of Ireland and one from Northern Ireland were to play. They could play neither’s national anthem game and so a new one was composed that celebrated and called forth a united Ireland. It’s beautiful.
    Good news about more books based in Ireland. Amanda McCabe has a new series set in Ireland coming out in 2010.
    Juliene Osborne McKnight has written some wonderful books of the history and folklore of in a pre-Medieval Ireland with some very strong romantic elements in them. I think they’re stellar.

    Reply
  66. I’m not offering an opinion one way or the other on the content, but Bertrice Small’s Skye O’Malley is Irish, and some of those books are set in Ireland.

    Reply
  67. I’m not offering an opinion one way or the other on the content, but Bertrice Small’s Skye O’Malley is Irish, and some of those books are set in Ireland.

    Reply
  68. I’m not offering an opinion one way or the other on the content, but Bertrice Small’s Skye O’Malley is Irish, and some of those books are set in Ireland.

    Reply
  69. I’m not offering an opinion one way or the other on the content, but Bertrice Small’s Skye O’Malley is Irish, and some of those books are set in Ireland.

    Reply
  70. I’m not offering an opinion one way or the other on the content, but Bertrice Small’s Skye O’Malley is Irish, and some of those books are set in Ireland.

    Reply
  71. Gentle Readers, you are something else!
    You reminded me of books I’d so embarrassingly forgot – (Kay – Joan too! She didn’t recall her own Irish book until she saw your post!) – and told me about some that are new to me.
    You guys are incredible.
    (And yes, I’ve seen THE QUIET MAN so often I can recite the dialogue along with the actors… only their accents are better.)

    Reply
  72. Gentle Readers, you are something else!
    You reminded me of books I’d so embarrassingly forgot – (Kay – Joan too! She didn’t recall her own Irish book until she saw your post!) – and told me about some that are new to me.
    You guys are incredible.
    (And yes, I’ve seen THE QUIET MAN so often I can recite the dialogue along with the actors… only their accents are better.)

    Reply
  73. Gentle Readers, you are something else!
    You reminded me of books I’d so embarrassingly forgot – (Kay – Joan too! She didn’t recall her own Irish book until she saw your post!) – and told me about some that are new to me.
    You guys are incredible.
    (And yes, I’ve seen THE QUIET MAN so often I can recite the dialogue along with the actors… only their accents are better.)

    Reply
  74. Gentle Readers, you are something else!
    You reminded me of books I’d so embarrassingly forgot – (Kay – Joan too! She didn’t recall her own Irish book until she saw your post!) – and told me about some that are new to me.
    You guys are incredible.
    (And yes, I’ve seen THE QUIET MAN so often I can recite the dialogue along with the actors… only their accents are better.)

    Reply
  75. Gentle Readers, you are something else!
    You reminded me of books I’d so embarrassingly forgot – (Kay – Joan too! She didn’t recall her own Irish book until she saw your post!) – and told me about some that are new to me.
    You guys are incredible.
    (And yes, I’ve seen THE QUIET MAN so often I can recite the dialogue along with the actors… only their accents are better.)

    Reply
  76. Sorry I’m chiming in so late on the discussion! I wrote an Irish historical way back in the day, even got paid for it, too, and then the publisher quit publishing romances before it went to print. Poor O’Toole may never see the light of day.
    The main problem with Irish historicals is the cruelty of the laws the English imposed upon them. Even though Americans know from history that the English haven’t always been the good guys, it’s hard to accept that such rampant discrimination happened in countries who speak our language. It’s tough to make such misery into a romance, and it would almost always have to end in the rebels leaving home. Sad endings will kill a romance faster than anything!

    Reply
  77. Sorry I’m chiming in so late on the discussion! I wrote an Irish historical way back in the day, even got paid for it, too, and then the publisher quit publishing romances before it went to print. Poor O’Toole may never see the light of day.
    The main problem with Irish historicals is the cruelty of the laws the English imposed upon them. Even though Americans know from history that the English haven’t always been the good guys, it’s hard to accept that such rampant discrimination happened in countries who speak our language. It’s tough to make such misery into a romance, and it would almost always have to end in the rebels leaving home. Sad endings will kill a romance faster than anything!

    Reply
  78. Sorry I’m chiming in so late on the discussion! I wrote an Irish historical way back in the day, even got paid for it, too, and then the publisher quit publishing romances before it went to print. Poor O’Toole may never see the light of day.
    The main problem with Irish historicals is the cruelty of the laws the English imposed upon them. Even though Americans know from history that the English haven’t always been the good guys, it’s hard to accept that such rampant discrimination happened in countries who speak our language. It’s tough to make such misery into a romance, and it would almost always have to end in the rebels leaving home. Sad endings will kill a romance faster than anything!

    Reply
  79. Sorry I’m chiming in so late on the discussion! I wrote an Irish historical way back in the day, even got paid for it, too, and then the publisher quit publishing romances before it went to print. Poor O’Toole may never see the light of day.
    The main problem with Irish historicals is the cruelty of the laws the English imposed upon them. Even though Americans know from history that the English haven’t always been the good guys, it’s hard to accept that such rampant discrimination happened in countries who speak our language. It’s tough to make such misery into a romance, and it would almost always have to end in the rebels leaving home. Sad endings will kill a romance faster than anything!

    Reply
  80. Sorry I’m chiming in so late on the discussion! I wrote an Irish historical way back in the day, even got paid for it, too, and then the publisher quit publishing romances before it went to print. Poor O’Toole may never see the light of day.
    The main problem with Irish historicals is the cruelty of the laws the English imposed upon them. Even though Americans know from history that the English haven’t always been the good guys, it’s hard to accept that such rampant discrimination happened in countries who speak our language. It’s tough to make such misery into a romance, and it would almost always have to end in the rebels leaving home. Sad endings will kill a romance faster than anything!

    Reply
  81. +JMJ+
    Edith, this is my first visit to the Word Wenches blog in weeks. I’m sorry to be so late to thank you for autographing a copy of The Cad for me. You added a note to apologise for it being so late, so now let me tell you not to worry. With the speed I’ve learned to expect from the post office, it didn’t matter at all! Thank you so much again! =)

    Reply
  82. +JMJ+
    Edith, this is my first visit to the Word Wenches blog in weeks. I’m sorry to be so late to thank you for autographing a copy of The Cad for me. You added a note to apologise for it being so late, so now let me tell you not to worry. With the speed I’ve learned to expect from the post office, it didn’t matter at all! Thank you so much again! =)

    Reply
  83. +JMJ+
    Edith, this is my first visit to the Word Wenches blog in weeks. I’m sorry to be so late to thank you for autographing a copy of The Cad for me. You added a note to apologise for it being so late, so now let me tell you not to worry. With the speed I’ve learned to expect from the post office, it didn’t matter at all! Thank you so much again! =)

    Reply
  84. +JMJ+
    Edith, this is my first visit to the Word Wenches blog in weeks. I’m sorry to be so late to thank you for autographing a copy of The Cad for me. You added a note to apologise for it being so late, so now let me tell you not to worry. With the speed I’ve learned to expect from the post office, it didn’t matter at all! Thank you so much again! =)

    Reply
  85. +JMJ+
    Edith, this is my first visit to the Word Wenches blog in weeks. I’m sorry to be so late to thank you for autographing a copy of The Cad for me. You added a note to apologise for it being so late, so now let me tell you not to worry. With the speed I’ve learned to expect from the post office, it didn’t matter at all! Thank you so much again! =)

    Reply

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