When Natures Erupts . . .

Krakatoa_eruption_lithographAndrea here, writing this while hurricane warnings are flying fast and furious where I live in New England as Tropical Storm Henri bears down on us. I don’t take this stuff lightly as I was at Ground Zero when Hurricane Sandy and experienced first-hand how devastating Nature can be.

Climate threats seem to be intensifying all over the world, from the terrible fires in Australia and the Western United States to catastrophic flooding in Europe and Asia, as well as droughts and dangerous heat waves in areas that haven’t suffered such things before. It’s terrifying, but it got me to thinking about the history, and how natural disasters had a profound effect on past eras, too.


Volcano 1One just has to look at Regency era, when the 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora in the islands of the Dutch East Indies —modern-day Indonesia—wreaked havoc around the globe, including in Britain. The explosion is the most powerful volcanic eruption ever measured (100 times more powerful than Mount St. Helens.) The ash and various chemicals and gases thrown into the atmosphere—including carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride—affected the entire world. Temperatures dropped . . . with devastating effects that played out over the following few years.

Eruption-of-Tambora-696x408When the initial explosion took place, most of Europe was far more focused on the drama playing out closer to home on the battlefield of Waterloo. However, winter was unusually cold, and it was a harbinger of worse to come. 1816 was known as the Year Without a Summer. In Britain and Ireland, cold temperatures and heavy rains ruined the harvest, causing food shortages and outright famines in many areas. Wheat, oats and potatoes—all staples of daily life—were especially hard hit. Giant hailstones fell throughout the summer months in London. Hungry crowds rioted over the lack of bread.

Screen Shot 2021-08-21 at 2.11.31 PMThe rest of the world suffered similar plights. In the Northeast of America, a dry red-tinged fog hung over the region, blocking sunlight, and neither rain nor winds seemed to disperse it. Heavy snows fell in June and July, both in New England and eastern Canada. As a result, livestock died and crops failed. Exacerbated by the weather changes, typhus epidemics broke out in southern Europe and the eastern Mediterranean area. The German principalities suffered the worst famine of the 19th century. And in India, the monsoons were altered by the odd weather patterns, causing massive harvest failures. A cholera pandemic took hold there in 1817 and spread around the world, killing millions.

The effects of the changes in weather affected other areas of life. The New York Times ran a fascinating article on the Tambora volcanic eruption and its effects, and mentions a book, Tambora: The Eruption that Changed the World,” by Gillen D’Arcy Wood, which posits that the event also had an influence on the artistic world. Many of the famous artists of the day—especially J. M. W. Turner and John Constable—depicted particularly dramatic skies with fiery sunsets or strangely ominous clouds in their paintings.
Turner
Frankenstein_1Even more interesting, it suggested that the cold and rainy weather in Switzerland—where famine forced the government to declare a national emergency—compelled Lord Byron, along with his fellow travelers Percy and Mary Shelley and John Poldari, to hole up in their lakeside villa, where they entertained themselves writing ghost stories. Wood is of the opinion that Frankenstein, the resulting story by Mary Shelley, as well as Byron’s poem Darkness, were likely inspired by the grimness that gripped the world.

View-of-the-comparative-heights-of-volcanic-mountains-detail-from-Charles-DaubenyI also took a quick look at a list of other volcano eruptions around the same time, and saw that there was also a terrible eruption in 1783 in Iceland, where the massive amounts of sulfur dioxide killed nearly a quarter of its population. It’s also thought that 23,000 people in Britain died from the poisonous air. And then of course, there’s the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883 . . . It was certainly not a good century for the Earth.

So, although it’s of no comfort at all, our current angst over natural disasters is not new. Nature, when aroused to a fury, can be a force of terrifying destruction.

So what about you? Have you been affected by the recent weather events around the world? Or have you any memorable weather stories to recount from the past?

160 thoughts on “When Natures Erupts . . .”

  1. Andrea, if you hoped to make us feel better about global warming … I don’t think so, lol. Maybe this, too, shall pass, but it’s clearly gonna try to take a lot of us with it. It seems like wars, pestilence, and climate catastrophe may be nature’s way of balancing out population levels, but it’s hard to be prosaic about it when you’re at ground zero. Hope Henri moves out to sea and leaves you alone this time!

    Reply
  2. Andrea, if you hoped to make us feel better about global warming … I don’t think so, lol. Maybe this, too, shall pass, but it’s clearly gonna try to take a lot of us with it. It seems like wars, pestilence, and climate catastrophe may be nature’s way of balancing out population levels, but it’s hard to be prosaic about it when you’re at ground zero. Hope Henri moves out to sea and leaves you alone this time!

    Reply
  3. Andrea, if you hoped to make us feel better about global warming … I don’t think so, lol. Maybe this, too, shall pass, but it’s clearly gonna try to take a lot of us with it. It seems like wars, pestilence, and climate catastrophe may be nature’s way of balancing out population levels, but it’s hard to be prosaic about it when you’re at ground zero. Hope Henri moves out to sea and leaves you alone this time!

    Reply
  4. Andrea, if you hoped to make us feel better about global warming … I don’t think so, lol. Maybe this, too, shall pass, but it’s clearly gonna try to take a lot of us with it. It seems like wars, pestilence, and climate catastrophe may be nature’s way of balancing out population levels, but it’s hard to be prosaic about it when you’re at ground zero. Hope Henri moves out to sea and leaves you alone this time!

    Reply
  5. Andrea, if you hoped to make us feel better about global warming … I don’t think so, lol. Maybe this, too, shall pass, but it’s clearly gonna try to take a lot of us with it. It seems like wars, pestilence, and climate catastrophe may be nature’s way of balancing out population levels, but it’s hard to be prosaic about it when you’re at ground zero. Hope Henri moves out to sea and leaves you alone this time!

    Reply
  6. Very interesting post. It seems that Tambora is finally getting the attention it has always deserved, though it has some way to go before it displaces Krakatoa in the popular imagination. I guess that this is because the link between volcanic eruptions and cooling events is a comparatively recent scientific discovery.
    Meanwhile, you might want to add the current Siberian fires to your list of this year’s woes. They don’t get the publicity of those in the USA or Australia – or even Greece – but they are enormous (and of course adding huge amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, plus lots of soot to be blown north and deposited on the ice cap to help it to melt).

    Reply
  7. Very interesting post. It seems that Tambora is finally getting the attention it has always deserved, though it has some way to go before it displaces Krakatoa in the popular imagination. I guess that this is because the link between volcanic eruptions and cooling events is a comparatively recent scientific discovery.
    Meanwhile, you might want to add the current Siberian fires to your list of this year’s woes. They don’t get the publicity of those in the USA or Australia – or even Greece – but they are enormous (and of course adding huge amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, plus lots of soot to be blown north and deposited on the ice cap to help it to melt).

    Reply
  8. Very interesting post. It seems that Tambora is finally getting the attention it has always deserved, though it has some way to go before it displaces Krakatoa in the popular imagination. I guess that this is because the link between volcanic eruptions and cooling events is a comparatively recent scientific discovery.
    Meanwhile, you might want to add the current Siberian fires to your list of this year’s woes. They don’t get the publicity of those in the USA or Australia – or even Greece – but they are enormous (and of course adding huge amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, plus lots of soot to be blown north and deposited on the ice cap to help it to melt).

    Reply
  9. Very interesting post. It seems that Tambora is finally getting the attention it has always deserved, though it has some way to go before it displaces Krakatoa in the popular imagination. I guess that this is because the link between volcanic eruptions and cooling events is a comparatively recent scientific discovery.
    Meanwhile, you might want to add the current Siberian fires to your list of this year’s woes. They don’t get the publicity of those in the USA or Australia – or even Greece – but they are enormous (and of course adding huge amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, plus lots of soot to be blown north and deposited on the ice cap to help it to melt).

    Reply
  10. Very interesting post. It seems that Tambora is finally getting the attention it has always deserved, though it has some way to go before it displaces Krakatoa in the popular imagination. I guess that this is because the link between volcanic eruptions and cooling events is a comparatively recent scientific discovery.
    Meanwhile, you might want to add the current Siberian fires to your list of this year’s woes. They don’t get the publicity of those in the USA or Australia – or even Greece – but they are enormous (and of course adding huge amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, plus lots of soot to be blown north and deposited on the ice cap to help it to melt).

    Reply
  11. Many years ago, my grandfather had been paralyzed from the waste down. My little sister and I were sitting by his bedside on the sun porch of our summer cottage, during a hurricane. I think it was Hazel. We were watching the huge oak tree in front of us (it seemed huge to me—my arms couldn’t even reach halfway around it) as it swayed back and forth and finally went over. Parallel to the house, not on us.
    My sister and I weren’t in the least afraid, of course. More entranced by something we had never seen before. And while the experience taught me the power of nature, I still tend to view storms with more fascination than fear.

    Reply
  12. Many years ago, my grandfather had been paralyzed from the waste down. My little sister and I were sitting by his bedside on the sun porch of our summer cottage, during a hurricane. I think it was Hazel. We were watching the huge oak tree in front of us (it seemed huge to me—my arms couldn’t even reach halfway around it) as it swayed back and forth and finally went over. Parallel to the house, not on us.
    My sister and I weren’t in the least afraid, of course. More entranced by something we had never seen before. And while the experience taught me the power of nature, I still tend to view storms with more fascination than fear.

    Reply
  13. Many years ago, my grandfather had been paralyzed from the waste down. My little sister and I were sitting by his bedside on the sun porch of our summer cottage, during a hurricane. I think it was Hazel. We were watching the huge oak tree in front of us (it seemed huge to me—my arms couldn’t even reach halfway around it) as it swayed back and forth and finally went over. Parallel to the house, not on us.
    My sister and I weren’t in the least afraid, of course. More entranced by something we had never seen before. And while the experience taught me the power of nature, I still tend to view storms with more fascination than fear.

    Reply
  14. Many years ago, my grandfather had been paralyzed from the waste down. My little sister and I were sitting by his bedside on the sun porch of our summer cottage, during a hurricane. I think it was Hazel. We were watching the huge oak tree in front of us (it seemed huge to me—my arms couldn’t even reach halfway around it) as it swayed back and forth and finally went over. Parallel to the house, not on us.
    My sister and I weren’t in the least afraid, of course. More entranced by something we had never seen before. And while the experience taught me the power of nature, I still tend to view storms with more fascination than fear.

    Reply
  15. Many years ago, my grandfather had been paralyzed from the waste down. My little sister and I were sitting by his bedside on the sun porch of our summer cottage, during a hurricane. I think it was Hazel. We were watching the huge oak tree in front of us (it seemed huge to me—my arms couldn’t even reach halfway around it) as it swayed back and forth and finally went over. Parallel to the house, not on us.
    My sister and I weren’t in the least afraid, of course. More entranced by something we had never seen before. And while the experience taught me the power of nature, I still tend to view storms with more fascination than fear.

    Reply
  16. No, I wasn’t trying to make us all feel better about global warming! My point how vulnerable we all are when Nature goes awry. The volcanos seem out of our control, but much of today’s climate woes do seem man-made. I think more and more people are accepting that truth. And I devoutly hope we’ll start doing the things necessary—however hard—to combat it.

    Reply
  17. No, I wasn’t trying to make us all feel better about global warming! My point how vulnerable we all are when Nature goes awry. The volcanos seem out of our control, but much of today’s climate woes do seem man-made. I think more and more people are accepting that truth. And I devoutly hope we’ll start doing the things necessary—however hard—to combat it.

    Reply
  18. No, I wasn’t trying to make us all feel better about global warming! My point how vulnerable we all are when Nature goes awry. The volcanos seem out of our control, but much of today’s climate woes do seem man-made. I think more and more people are accepting that truth. And I devoutly hope we’ll start doing the things necessary—however hard—to combat it.

    Reply
  19. No, I wasn’t trying to make us all feel better about global warming! My point how vulnerable we all are when Nature goes awry. The volcanos seem out of our control, but much of today’s climate woes do seem man-made. I think more and more people are accepting that truth. And I devoutly hope we’ll start doing the things necessary—however hard—to combat it.

    Reply
  20. No, I wasn’t trying to make us all feel better about global warming! My point how vulnerable we all are when Nature goes awry. The volcanos seem out of our control, but much of today’s climate woes do seem man-made. I think more and more people are accepting that truth. And I devoutly hope we’ll start doing the things necessary—however hard—to combat it.

    Reply
  21. Glad you enjoyed the post, Mike. I’m surprised the Tambora eruption doesn’t get more recognition. It really wreaked global havoc.
    The Siberian fires are definitely a huge catastrophe, and show the terrible temperature changes that are happening in the North. (The permaforst is disappearing as part of those changes.)
    We better start addressing what we’re doing to the planet.

    Reply
  22. Glad you enjoyed the post, Mike. I’m surprised the Tambora eruption doesn’t get more recognition. It really wreaked global havoc.
    The Siberian fires are definitely a huge catastrophe, and show the terrible temperature changes that are happening in the North. (The permaforst is disappearing as part of those changes.)
    We better start addressing what we’re doing to the planet.

    Reply
  23. Glad you enjoyed the post, Mike. I’m surprised the Tambora eruption doesn’t get more recognition. It really wreaked global havoc.
    The Siberian fires are definitely a huge catastrophe, and show the terrible temperature changes that are happening in the North. (The permaforst is disappearing as part of those changes.)
    We better start addressing what we’re doing to the planet.

    Reply
  24. Glad you enjoyed the post, Mike. I’m surprised the Tambora eruption doesn’t get more recognition. It really wreaked global havoc.
    The Siberian fires are definitely a huge catastrophe, and show the terrible temperature changes that are happening in the North. (The permaforst is disappearing as part of those changes.)
    We better start addressing what we’re doing to the planet.

    Reply
  25. Glad you enjoyed the post, Mike. I’m surprised the Tambora eruption doesn’t get more recognition. It really wreaked global havoc.
    The Siberian fires are definitely a huge catastrophe, and show the terrible temperature changes that are happening in the North. (The permaforst is disappearing as part of those changes.)
    We better start addressing what we’re doing to the planet.

    Reply
  26. The worst weather we ever had in my lifetime on Vancouver Island was the Blizzard of ’96. We don’t normally get really bad weather of any kind – we get moderate amounts of rain, snow, winds, and sun! In ’96 we got more snow in a few days than we’d had in the previous 20 years combined – over 6 feet. May not seem like a lot for some people but when you have limited snow removal equipment it’s a big deal! The whole city of Victoria shut down. We couldn’t get out of our house – you should have seen the look on our dogs’ faces when we opened the door in the morning to take them out for a pee and it was a wall of snow to the top of the door! We spent the morning clearing a path out of the garage just so the dogs could get outside. The electricity went off and we were very lucky as we has a gas stove and fireplace so we put them on for heat and bundled my mother into every sweater and coat she owned and put her in front of the fireplace to keep warm!
    It lasted for 3 weeks and turned out pretty well with everyone helping everyone else clear the paths and roads. Had some collapses with flat roofed homes but no one hurt. It’s funny when we tell east coasters about it as it’s nothing compared to what they get!
    We’ve had the ash when Mt St Helens blew and we get the smoke from the forest fires from as far away as California so we are well aware of what can happen and send help as much as we can. All we can do about the predicted ‘Big One’ is keep our fingers crossed!

    Reply
  27. The worst weather we ever had in my lifetime on Vancouver Island was the Blizzard of ’96. We don’t normally get really bad weather of any kind – we get moderate amounts of rain, snow, winds, and sun! In ’96 we got more snow in a few days than we’d had in the previous 20 years combined – over 6 feet. May not seem like a lot for some people but when you have limited snow removal equipment it’s a big deal! The whole city of Victoria shut down. We couldn’t get out of our house – you should have seen the look on our dogs’ faces when we opened the door in the morning to take them out for a pee and it was a wall of snow to the top of the door! We spent the morning clearing a path out of the garage just so the dogs could get outside. The electricity went off and we were very lucky as we has a gas stove and fireplace so we put them on for heat and bundled my mother into every sweater and coat she owned and put her in front of the fireplace to keep warm!
    It lasted for 3 weeks and turned out pretty well with everyone helping everyone else clear the paths and roads. Had some collapses with flat roofed homes but no one hurt. It’s funny when we tell east coasters about it as it’s nothing compared to what they get!
    We’ve had the ash when Mt St Helens blew and we get the smoke from the forest fires from as far away as California so we are well aware of what can happen and send help as much as we can. All we can do about the predicted ‘Big One’ is keep our fingers crossed!

    Reply
  28. The worst weather we ever had in my lifetime on Vancouver Island was the Blizzard of ’96. We don’t normally get really bad weather of any kind – we get moderate amounts of rain, snow, winds, and sun! In ’96 we got more snow in a few days than we’d had in the previous 20 years combined – over 6 feet. May not seem like a lot for some people but when you have limited snow removal equipment it’s a big deal! The whole city of Victoria shut down. We couldn’t get out of our house – you should have seen the look on our dogs’ faces when we opened the door in the morning to take them out for a pee and it was a wall of snow to the top of the door! We spent the morning clearing a path out of the garage just so the dogs could get outside. The electricity went off and we were very lucky as we has a gas stove and fireplace so we put them on for heat and bundled my mother into every sweater and coat she owned and put her in front of the fireplace to keep warm!
    It lasted for 3 weeks and turned out pretty well with everyone helping everyone else clear the paths and roads. Had some collapses with flat roofed homes but no one hurt. It’s funny when we tell east coasters about it as it’s nothing compared to what they get!
    We’ve had the ash when Mt St Helens blew and we get the smoke from the forest fires from as far away as California so we are well aware of what can happen and send help as much as we can. All we can do about the predicted ‘Big One’ is keep our fingers crossed!

    Reply
  29. The worst weather we ever had in my lifetime on Vancouver Island was the Blizzard of ’96. We don’t normally get really bad weather of any kind – we get moderate amounts of rain, snow, winds, and sun! In ’96 we got more snow in a few days than we’d had in the previous 20 years combined – over 6 feet. May not seem like a lot for some people but when you have limited snow removal equipment it’s a big deal! The whole city of Victoria shut down. We couldn’t get out of our house – you should have seen the look on our dogs’ faces when we opened the door in the morning to take them out for a pee and it was a wall of snow to the top of the door! We spent the morning clearing a path out of the garage just so the dogs could get outside. The electricity went off and we were very lucky as we has a gas stove and fireplace so we put them on for heat and bundled my mother into every sweater and coat she owned and put her in front of the fireplace to keep warm!
    It lasted for 3 weeks and turned out pretty well with everyone helping everyone else clear the paths and roads. Had some collapses with flat roofed homes but no one hurt. It’s funny when we tell east coasters about it as it’s nothing compared to what they get!
    We’ve had the ash when Mt St Helens blew and we get the smoke from the forest fires from as far away as California so we are well aware of what can happen and send help as much as we can. All we can do about the predicted ‘Big One’ is keep our fingers crossed!

    Reply
  30. The worst weather we ever had in my lifetime on Vancouver Island was the Blizzard of ’96. We don’t normally get really bad weather of any kind – we get moderate amounts of rain, snow, winds, and sun! In ’96 we got more snow in a few days than we’d had in the previous 20 years combined – over 6 feet. May not seem like a lot for some people but when you have limited snow removal equipment it’s a big deal! The whole city of Victoria shut down. We couldn’t get out of our house – you should have seen the look on our dogs’ faces when we opened the door in the morning to take them out for a pee and it was a wall of snow to the top of the door! We spent the morning clearing a path out of the garage just so the dogs could get outside. The electricity went off and we were very lucky as we has a gas stove and fireplace so we put them on for heat and bundled my mother into every sweater and coat she owned and put her in front of the fireplace to keep warm!
    It lasted for 3 weeks and turned out pretty well with everyone helping everyone else clear the paths and roads. Had some collapses with flat roofed homes but no one hurt. It’s funny when we tell east coasters about it as it’s nothing compared to what they get!
    We’ve had the ash when Mt St Helens blew and we get the smoke from the forest fires from as far away as California so we are well aware of what can happen and send help as much as we can. All we can do about the predicted ‘Big One’ is keep our fingers crossed!

    Reply
  31. Nature truly is powerful, Andrea; thank you for a fascinating post.
    I’d heard of the Year Without a Summer as regards Britain, but (foolishly) I hadn’t realized the effects were also felt in North America.
    On the upside, that Turner painting is stunning.

    Reply
  32. Nature truly is powerful, Andrea; thank you for a fascinating post.
    I’d heard of the Year Without a Summer as regards Britain, but (foolishly) I hadn’t realized the effects were also felt in North America.
    On the upside, that Turner painting is stunning.

    Reply
  33. Nature truly is powerful, Andrea; thank you for a fascinating post.
    I’d heard of the Year Without a Summer as regards Britain, but (foolishly) I hadn’t realized the effects were also felt in North America.
    On the upside, that Turner painting is stunning.

    Reply
  34. Nature truly is powerful, Andrea; thank you for a fascinating post.
    I’d heard of the Year Without a Summer as regards Britain, but (foolishly) I hadn’t realized the effects were also felt in North America.
    On the upside, that Turner painting is stunning.

    Reply
  35. Nature truly is powerful, Andrea; thank you for a fascinating post.
    I’d heard of the Year Without a Summer as regards Britain, but (foolishly) I hadn’t realized the effects were also felt in North America.
    On the upside, that Turner painting is stunning.

    Reply
  36. I have had several “encounters of a close kind. The first was when I was one or two weeks old. A tornado hit an area in central St. Louis about 3 miles north of our house. (I of course do not remember this, but my mother frequently mentioned it. Many years later the same area of the city was hit by another tornado, thus creating Gaslight square. I felt that one pass over our house, but no damage was done in our area of the city.
    The children and I were in a VW bug, when the weather rain got so heavy, I parked on the verge to wait it out. I parked in the open, because the overpasses can draw lightning. You guessed it — another tornado! (I forgot what all went down in that one.)
    But I remember hearing of another volcano winter. A friend of the family who lived in Alton. Illinois on the upper Mississippi just before it flows into the Missouri (there is a dam there now — since the 1930s. But the volcano winter was so strong that the Upper Mississippi was frozen. He often talked of walking on the ice.

    Reply
  37. I have had several “encounters of a close kind. The first was when I was one or two weeks old. A tornado hit an area in central St. Louis about 3 miles north of our house. (I of course do not remember this, but my mother frequently mentioned it. Many years later the same area of the city was hit by another tornado, thus creating Gaslight square. I felt that one pass over our house, but no damage was done in our area of the city.
    The children and I were in a VW bug, when the weather rain got so heavy, I parked on the verge to wait it out. I parked in the open, because the overpasses can draw lightning. You guessed it — another tornado! (I forgot what all went down in that one.)
    But I remember hearing of another volcano winter. A friend of the family who lived in Alton. Illinois on the upper Mississippi just before it flows into the Missouri (there is a dam there now — since the 1930s. But the volcano winter was so strong that the Upper Mississippi was frozen. He often talked of walking on the ice.

    Reply
  38. I have had several “encounters of a close kind. The first was when I was one or two weeks old. A tornado hit an area in central St. Louis about 3 miles north of our house. (I of course do not remember this, but my mother frequently mentioned it. Many years later the same area of the city was hit by another tornado, thus creating Gaslight square. I felt that one pass over our house, but no damage was done in our area of the city.
    The children and I were in a VW bug, when the weather rain got so heavy, I parked on the verge to wait it out. I parked in the open, because the overpasses can draw lightning. You guessed it — another tornado! (I forgot what all went down in that one.)
    But I remember hearing of another volcano winter. A friend of the family who lived in Alton. Illinois on the upper Mississippi just before it flows into the Missouri (there is a dam there now — since the 1930s. But the volcano winter was so strong that the Upper Mississippi was frozen. He often talked of walking on the ice.

    Reply
  39. I have had several “encounters of a close kind. The first was when I was one or two weeks old. A tornado hit an area in central St. Louis about 3 miles north of our house. (I of course do not remember this, but my mother frequently mentioned it. Many years later the same area of the city was hit by another tornado, thus creating Gaslight square. I felt that one pass over our house, but no damage was done in our area of the city.
    The children and I were in a VW bug, when the weather rain got so heavy, I parked on the verge to wait it out. I parked in the open, because the overpasses can draw lightning. You guessed it — another tornado! (I forgot what all went down in that one.)
    But I remember hearing of another volcano winter. A friend of the family who lived in Alton. Illinois on the upper Mississippi just before it flows into the Missouri (there is a dam there now — since the 1930s. But the volcano winter was so strong that the Upper Mississippi was frozen. He often talked of walking on the ice.

    Reply
  40. I have had several “encounters of a close kind. The first was when I was one or two weeks old. A tornado hit an area in central St. Louis about 3 miles north of our house. (I of course do not remember this, but my mother frequently mentioned it. Many years later the same area of the city was hit by another tornado, thus creating Gaslight square. I felt that one pass over our house, but no damage was done in our area of the city.
    The children and I were in a VW bug, when the weather rain got so heavy, I parked on the verge to wait it out. I parked in the open, because the overpasses can draw lightning. You guessed it — another tornado! (I forgot what all went down in that one.)
    But I remember hearing of another volcano winter. A friend of the family who lived in Alton. Illinois on the upper Mississippi just before it flows into the Missouri (there is a dam there now — since the 1930s. But the volcano winter was so strong that the Upper Mississippi was frozen. He often talked of walking on the ice.

    Reply
  41. Oh, Janet, to be literally snowed in must have been frightening—and then to have no electricity! Yipes! Thank heavens you had a gas stove and fireplace. We take for granted so many things in our daily life–the roads getting cleared of snow, furnaces running smoothly, food being able to be trucked in to the locals stores. It makes one realize what Regency England was like . . .the heavy work it took just to do daily chores, the isolation . . .
    When a storm takes all those things out, it’s a real shock.
    We got the smoke from California all the way here on the East Coast–and had Turner-like yellow/orange skies.
    Yes, fingers crossed about the Big One.

    Reply
  42. Oh, Janet, to be literally snowed in must have been frightening—and then to have no electricity! Yipes! Thank heavens you had a gas stove and fireplace. We take for granted so many things in our daily life–the roads getting cleared of snow, furnaces running smoothly, food being able to be trucked in to the locals stores. It makes one realize what Regency England was like . . .the heavy work it took just to do daily chores, the isolation . . .
    When a storm takes all those things out, it’s a real shock.
    We got the smoke from California all the way here on the East Coast–and had Turner-like yellow/orange skies.
    Yes, fingers crossed about the Big One.

    Reply
  43. Oh, Janet, to be literally snowed in must have been frightening—and then to have no electricity! Yipes! Thank heavens you had a gas stove and fireplace. We take for granted so many things in our daily life–the roads getting cleared of snow, furnaces running smoothly, food being able to be trucked in to the locals stores. It makes one realize what Regency England was like . . .the heavy work it took just to do daily chores, the isolation . . .
    When a storm takes all those things out, it’s a real shock.
    We got the smoke from California all the way here on the East Coast–and had Turner-like yellow/orange skies.
    Yes, fingers crossed about the Big One.

    Reply
  44. Oh, Janet, to be literally snowed in must have been frightening—and then to have no electricity! Yipes! Thank heavens you had a gas stove and fireplace. We take for granted so many things in our daily life–the roads getting cleared of snow, furnaces running smoothly, food being able to be trucked in to the locals stores. It makes one realize what Regency England was like . . .the heavy work it took just to do daily chores, the isolation . . .
    When a storm takes all those things out, it’s a real shock.
    We got the smoke from California all the way here on the East Coast–and had Turner-like yellow/orange skies.
    Yes, fingers crossed about the Big One.

    Reply
  45. Oh, Janet, to be literally snowed in must have been frightening—and then to have no electricity! Yipes! Thank heavens you had a gas stove and fireplace. We take for granted so many things in our daily life–the roads getting cleared of snow, furnaces running smoothly, food being able to be trucked in to the locals stores. It makes one realize what Regency England was like . . .the heavy work it took just to do daily chores, the isolation . . .
    When a storm takes all those things out, it’s a real shock.
    We got the smoke from California all the way here on the East Coast–and had Turner-like yellow/orange skies.
    Yes, fingers crossed about the Big One.

    Reply
  46. OMG, Sue‚—three tornado experiences! You are a very intrepid soul. I would have totally freaked out in the VW Bug. I’ve never been near a tornado, but seeing films of them is absolutely terrifying!
    That’s really interesting to hear of the volcanic winter in Illinois. it’s hard to imagine the Mississippi River frozen!

    Reply
  47. OMG, Sue‚—three tornado experiences! You are a very intrepid soul. I would have totally freaked out in the VW Bug. I’ve never been near a tornado, but seeing films of them is absolutely terrifying!
    That’s really interesting to hear of the volcanic winter in Illinois. it’s hard to imagine the Mississippi River frozen!

    Reply
  48. OMG, Sue‚—three tornado experiences! You are a very intrepid soul. I would have totally freaked out in the VW Bug. I’ve never been near a tornado, but seeing films of them is absolutely terrifying!
    That’s really interesting to hear of the volcanic winter in Illinois. it’s hard to imagine the Mississippi River frozen!

    Reply
  49. OMG, Sue‚—three tornado experiences! You are a very intrepid soul. I would have totally freaked out in the VW Bug. I’ve never been near a tornado, but seeing films of them is absolutely terrifying!
    That’s really interesting to hear of the volcanic winter in Illinois. it’s hard to imagine the Mississippi River frozen!

    Reply
  50. OMG, Sue‚—three tornado experiences! You are a very intrepid soul. I would have totally freaked out in the VW Bug. I’ve never been near a tornado, but seeing films of them is absolutely terrifying!
    That’s really interesting to hear of the volcanic winter in Illinois. it’s hard to imagine the Mississippi River frozen!

    Reply
  51. Years ago, in the 1940’s my grandmother lived in a 1800’s built house with a tin roof in Alabama. Thunder storms were a regular daily occurrence in the summer months. Night storms less frequent, but often. One night my grandmother got up to use the bathroom and while she was up lightning struck her bed and set her mattress on fire. My mother and she managed to drag the smouldering mattress down stairs and draped it over the railing around the veranda. It stayed there all day smouldering. My cousins and I poured water on the burning hole from time to time. You never forget the smell of burning mattress. Years later I alerted a man who had dropped a cigarette on to his mattress when I smelled his mattress burning as I walked by his basement apartment.

    Reply
  52. Years ago, in the 1940’s my grandmother lived in a 1800’s built house with a tin roof in Alabama. Thunder storms were a regular daily occurrence in the summer months. Night storms less frequent, but often. One night my grandmother got up to use the bathroom and while she was up lightning struck her bed and set her mattress on fire. My mother and she managed to drag the smouldering mattress down stairs and draped it over the railing around the veranda. It stayed there all day smouldering. My cousins and I poured water on the burning hole from time to time. You never forget the smell of burning mattress. Years later I alerted a man who had dropped a cigarette on to his mattress when I smelled his mattress burning as I walked by his basement apartment.

    Reply
  53. Years ago, in the 1940’s my grandmother lived in a 1800’s built house with a tin roof in Alabama. Thunder storms were a regular daily occurrence in the summer months. Night storms less frequent, but often. One night my grandmother got up to use the bathroom and while she was up lightning struck her bed and set her mattress on fire. My mother and she managed to drag the smouldering mattress down stairs and draped it over the railing around the veranda. It stayed there all day smouldering. My cousins and I poured water on the burning hole from time to time. You never forget the smell of burning mattress. Years later I alerted a man who had dropped a cigarette on to his mattress when I smelled his mattress burning as I walked by his basement apartment.

    Reply
  54. Years ago, in the 1940’s my grandmother lived in a 1800’s built house with a tin roof in Alabama. Thunder storms were a regular daily occurrence in the summer months. Night storms less frequent, but often. One night my grandmother got up to use the bathroom and while she was up lightning struck her bed and set her mattress on fire. My mother and she managed to drag the smouldering mattress down stairs and draped it over the railing around the veranda. It stayed there all day smouldering. My cousins and I poured water on the burning hole from time to time. You never forget the smell of burning mattress. Years later I alerted a man who had dropped a cigarette on to his mattress when I smelled his mattress burning as I walked by his basement apartment.

    Reply
  55. Years ago, in the 1940’s my grandmother lived in a 1800’s built house with a tin roof in Alabama. Thunder storms were a regular daily occurrence in the summer months. Night storms less frequent, but often. One night my grandmother got up to use the bathroom and while she was up lightning struck her bed and set her mattress on fire. My mother and she managed to drag the smouldering mattress down stairs and draped it over the railing around the veranda. It stayed there all day smouldering. My cousins and I poured water on the burning hole from time to time. You never forget the smell of burning mattress. Years later I alerted a man who had dropped a cigarette on to his mattress when I smelled his mattress burning as I walked by his basement apartment.

    Reply
  56. Andrea, note the “lol” up there–maybe I should have used one of Mary Jo’s ‘s instead. I agree with you all the way.

    Reply
  57. Andrea, note the “lol” up there–maybe I should have used one of Mary Jo’s ‘s instead. I agree with you all the way.

    Reply
  58. Andrea, note the “lol” up there–maybe I should have used one of Mary Jo’s ‘s instead. I agree with you all the way.

    Reply
  59. Andrea, note the “lol” up there–maybe I should have used one of Mary Jo’s ‘s instead. I agree with you all the way.

    Reply
  60. Andrea, note the “lol” up there–maybe I should have used one of Mary Jo’s ‘s instead. I agree with you all the way.

    Reply
  61. The forces of nature are certainly terrifying! When I lived in Japan I was constantly scared by the threat of earthquakes and whenever one occurred, I felt extremely small and helpless. Luckily for me, the “big one” which had been predicted for that time, never came while I was there.
    The events you describe in 1815/16 are horrifying – it’s a wonder any of our ancestors survived at all!

    Reply
  62. The forces of nature are certainly terrifying! When I lived in Japan I was constantly scared by the threat of earthquakes and whenever one occurred, I felt extremely small and helpless. Luckily for me, the “big one” which had been predicted for that time, never came while I was there.
    The events you describe in 1815/16 are horrifying – it’s a wonder any of our ancestors survived at all!

    Reply
  63. The forces of nature are certainly terrifying! When I lived in Japan I was constantly scared by the threat of earthquakes and whenever one occurred, I felt extremely small and helpless. Luckily for me, the “big one” which had been predicted for that time, never came while I was there.
    The events you describe in 1815/16 are horrifying – it’s a wonder any of our ancestors survived at all!

    Reply
  64. The forces of nature are certainly terrifying! When I lived in Japan I was constantly scared by the threat of earthquakes and whenever one occurred, I felt extremely small and helpless. Luckily for me, the “big one” which had been predicted for that time, never came while I was there.
    The events you describe in 1815/16 are horrifying – it’s a wonder any of our ancestors survived at all!

    Reply
  65. The forces of nature are certainly terrifying! When I lived in Japan I was constantly scared by the threat of earthquakes and whenever one occurred, I felt extremely small and helpless. Luckily for me, the “big one” which had been predicted for that time, never came while I was there.
    The events you describe in 1815/16 are horrifying – it’s a wonder any of our ancestors survived at all!

    Reply
  66. Well, bu now I’ve been through Gloria, Bob, and Sandy, plus an ice storm that left us without heat or electricity in January. I’ve watched a horse chestnut tree split and tumble and a black walnut go over. Being without power taught me why dinner used to be in the middle of the day—dining by candlelight may be romantic, but cooking by candlelight is a major pain.
    Despite it all, I still think storms are exciting.

    Reply
  67. Well, bu now I’ve been through Gloria, Bob, and Sandy, plus an ice storm that left us without heat or electricity in January. I’ve watched a horse chestnut tree split and tumble and a black walnut go over. Being without power taught me why dinner used to be in the middle of the day—dining by candlelight may be romantic, but cooking by candlelight is a major pain.
    Despite it all, I still think storms are exciting.

    Reply
  68. Well, bu now I’ve been through Gloria, Bob, and Sandy, plus an ice storm that left us without heat or electricity in January. I’ve watched a horse chestnut tree split and tumble and a black walnut go over. Being without power taught me why dinner used to be in the middle of the day—dining by candlelight may be romantic, but cooking by candlelight is a major pain.
    Despite it all, I still think storms are exciting.

    Reply
  69. Well, bu now I’ve been through Gloria, Bob, and Sandy, plus an ice storm that left us without heat or electricity in January. I’ve watched a horse chestnut tree split and tumble and a black walnut go over. Being without power taught me why dinner used to be in the middle of the day—dining by candlelight may be romantic, but cooking by candlelight is a major pain.
    Despite it all, I still think storms are exciting.

    Reply
  70. Well, bu now I’ve been through Gloria, Bob, and Sandy, plus an ice storm that left us without heat or electricity in January. I’ve watched a horse chestnut tree split and tumble and a black walnut go over. Being without power taught me why dinner used to be in the middle of the day—dining by candlelight may be romantic, but cooking by candlelight is a major pain.
    Despite it all, I still think storms are exciting.

    Reply
  71. Fascinating post Andrea!
    Here in Ireland we don’t seem to get the extremes of weather that other countries get. However, the rain we’ve been getting this year is unbelievable!! It’s torrential. I was driving up the country last week to collect my daughter. It’s a four and a half hour drive. Midway the rain started. I couldn’t stop because I was on the motorway, even though I wanted too. I could hardly see and it was as dark as night.
    Thankfully it cleared and when I was about an hour from my destination the sun was baking hot. Strangest weather ever for us and it’s happened a lot this year.
    We’ve know for some time about climate change but it’s definitely accelerated the past year or so.

    Reply
  72. Fascinating post Andrea!
    Here in Ireland we don’t seem to get the extremes of weather that other countries get. However, the rain we’ve been getting this year is unbelievable!! It’s torrential. I was driving up the country last week to collect my daughter. It’s a four and a half hour drive. Midway the rain started. I couldn’t stop because I was on the motorway, even though I wanted too. I could hardly see and it was as dark as night.
    Thankfully it cleared and when I was about an hour from my destination the sun was baking hot. Strangest weather ever for us and it’s happened a lot this year.
    We’ve know for some time about climate change but it’s definitely accelerated the past year or so.

    Reply
  73. Fascinating post Andrea!
    Here in Ireland we don’t seem to get the extremes of weather that other countries get. However, the rain we’ve been getting this year is unbelievable!! It’s torrential. I was driving up the country last week to collect my daughter. It’s a four and a half hour drive. Midway the rain started. I couldn’t stop because I was on the motorway, even though I wanted too. I could hardly see and it was as dark as night.
    Thankfully it cleared and when I was about an hour from my destination the sun was baking hot. Strangest weather ever for us and it’s happened a lot this year.
    We’ve know for some time about climate change but it’s definitely accelerated the past year or so.

    Reply
  74. Fascinating post Andrea!
    Here in Ireland we don’t seem to get the extremes of weather that other countries get. However, the rain we’ve been getting this year is unbelievable!! It’s torrential. I was driving up the country last week to collect my daughter. It’s a four and a half hour drive. Midway the rain started. I couldn’t stop because I was on the motorway, even though I wanted too. I could hardly see and it was as dark as night.
    Thankfully it cleared and when I was about an hour from my destination the sun was baking hot. Strangest weather ever for us and it’s happened a lot this year.
    We’ve know for some time about climate change but it’s definitely accelerated the past year or so.

    Reply
  75. Fascinating post Andrea!
    Here in Ireland we don’t seem to get the extremes of weather that other countries get. However, the rain we’ve been getting this year is unbelievable!! It’s torrential. I was driving up the country last week to collect my daughter. It’s a four and a half hour drive. Midway the rain started. I couldn’t stop because I was on the motorway, even though I wanted too. I could hardly see and it was as dark as night.
    Thankfully it cleared and when I was about an hour from my destination the sun was baking hot. Strangest weather ever for us and it’s happened a lot this year.
    We’ve know for some time about climate change but it’s definitely accelerated the past year or so.

    Reply
  76. Thank you for the terrific post. I had heard of the weather changes in 1815/16 but did not know the name of the volcano.
    There are things that each of us can do to help deal with climate change. I hope that people begin to face the future by actually acting.
    Sorry, did not mean to lecture.
    I worked for FEMA here in the States. I have seen the results of floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and fires.
    I sat across from people who lost everything they owned after seeing one of these weather events. It is not easy to do, but most of those same people were more resilient than they ever realized.
    Human beings are powerful. The devastation can be overwhelming. The changes made to the land is amazing. the changes to people is even more amazing.
    At the same time, I know about the loss of life, the crops which are no more, the change to the geography and the emotional cost.
    I guess if another volcanic eruption like Tambora happened, at least we would know about it as it happened. Can’t you just see some TV reporter standing at the edge of the volcano as the lava comes oozing out? Or asking some home owner “Sir, how did you feel when your entire world was covered with melting rock?” And they would do it without a hair out of place.
    I hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  77. Thank you for the terrific post. I had heard of the weather changes in 1815/16 but did not know the name of the volcano.
    There are things that each of us can do to help deal with climate change. I hope that people begin to face the future by actually acting.
    Sorry, did not mean to lecture.
    I worked for FEMA here in the States. I have seen the results of floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and fires.
    I sat across from people who lost everything they owned after seeing one of these weather events. It is not easy to do, but most of those same people were more resilient than they ever realized.
    Human beings are powerful. The devastation can be overwhelming. The changes made to the land is amazing. the changes to people is even more amazing.
    At the same time, I know about the loss of life, the crops which are no more, the change to the geography and the emotional cost.
    I guess if another volcanic eruption like Tambora happened, at least we would know about it as it happened. Can’t you just see some TV reporter standing at the edge of the volcano as the lava comes oozing out? Or asking some home owner “Sir, how did you feel when your entire world was covered with melting rock?” And they would do it without a hair out of place.
    I hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  78. Thank you for the terrific post. I had heard of the weather changes in 1815/16 but did not know the name of the volcano.
    There are things that each of us can do to help deal with climate change. I hope that people begin to face the future by actually acting.
    Sorry, did not mean to lecture.
    I worked for FEMA here in the States. I have seen the results of floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and fires.
    I sat across from people who lost everything they owned after seeing one of these weather events. It is not easy to do, but most of those same people were more resilient than they ever realized.
    Human beings are powerful. The devastation can be overwhelming. The changes made to the land is amazing. the changes to people is even more amazing.
    At the same time, I know about the loss of life, the crops which are no more, the change to the geography and the emotional cost.
    I guess if another volcanic eruption like Tambora happened, at least we would know about it as it happened. Can’t you just see some TV reporter standing at the edge of the volcano as the lava comes oozing out? Or asking some home owner “Sir, how did you feel when your entire world was covered with melting rock?” And they would do it without a hair out of place.
    I hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  79. Thank you for the terrific post. I had heard of the weather changes in 1815/16 but did not know the name of the volcano.
    There are things that each of us can do to help deal with climate change. I hope that people begin to face the future by actually acting.
    Sorry, did not mean to lecture.
    I worked for FEMA here in the States. I have seen the results of floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and fires.
    I sat across from people who lost everything they owned after seeing one of these weather events. It is not easy to do, but most of those same people were more resilient than they ever realized.
    Human beings are powerful. The devastation can be overwhelming. The changes made to the land is amazing. the changes to people is even more amazing.
    At the same time, I know about the loss of life, the crops which are no more, the change to the geography and the emotional cost.
    I guess if another volcanic eruption like Tambora happened, at least we would know about it as it happened. Can’t you just see some TV reporter standing at the edge of the volcano as the lava comes oozing out? Or asking some home owner “Sir, how did you feel when your entire world was covered with melting rock?” And they would do it without a hair out of place.
    I hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  80. Thank you for the terrific post. I had heard of the weather changes in 1815/16 but did not know the name of the volcano.
    There are things that each of us can do to help deal with climate change. I hope that people begin to face the future by actually acting.
    Sorry, did not mean to lecture.
    I worked for FEMA here in the States. I have seen the results of floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and fires.
    I sat across from people who lost everything they owned after seeing one of these weather events. It is not easy to do, but most of those same people were more resilient than they ever realized.
    Human beings are powerful. The devastation can be overwhelming. The changes made to the land is amazing. the changes to people is even more amazing.
    At the same time, I know about the loss of life, the crops which are no more, the change to the geography and the emotional cost.
    I guess if another volcanic eruption like Tambora happened, at least we would know about it as it happened. Can’t you just see some TV reporter standing at the edge of the volcano as the lava comes oozing out? Or asking some home owner “Sir, how did you feel when your entire world was covered with melting rock?” And they would do it without a hair out of place.
    I hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  81. That must have been really frightening, Christina. I have to admit, while San Francisco is really beautiful, I would always be a little nervous if I lived there. Living with the threat of earthquakes must be very stressful.
    And yes, when you read about the horrors of 1816, it is amazing that anyone survived!

    Reply
  82. That must have been really frightening, Christina. I have to admit, while San Francisco is really beautiful, I would always be a little nervous if I lived there. Living with the threat of earthquakes must be very stressful.
    And yes, when you read about the horrors of 1816, it is amazing that anyone survived!

    Reply
  83. That must have been really frightening, Christina. I have to admit, while San Francisco is really beautiful, I would always be a little nervous if I lived there. Living with the threat of earthquakes must be very stressful.
    And yes, when you read about the horrors of 1816, it is amazing that anyone survived!

    Reply
  84. That must have been really frightening, Christina. I have to admit, while San Francisco is really beautiful, I would always be a little nervous if I lived there. Living with the threat of earthquakes must be very stressful.
    And yes, when you read about the horrors of 1816, it is amazing that anyone survived!

    Reply
  85. That must have been really frightening, Christina. I have to admit, while San Francisco is really beautiful, I would always be a little nervous if I lived there. Living with the threat of earthquakes must be very stressful.
    And yes, when you read about the horrors of 1816, it is amazing that anyone survived!

    Reply
  86. Climate here in England is very benign, so nothing really bad has happened to me. Though I have encountered a whirl wind ripping through a hedge and snow drifts up to around 10 Ft high. With ice caps melting and sea levels rising the worst may be yet to come …living on an island maybe I should build an arc and buy a house on a hill top …. in readiness!
    Fascinating post Andrea.

    Reply
  87. Climate here in England is very benign, so nothing really bad has happened to me. Though I have encountered a whirl wind ripping through a hedge and snow drifts up to around 10 Ft high. With ice caps melting and sea levels rising the worst may be yet to come …living on an island maybe I should build an arc and buy a house on a hill top …. in readiness!
    Fascinating post Andrea.

    Reply
  88. Climate here in England is very benign, so nothing really bad has happened to me. Though I have encountered a whirl wind ripping through a hedge and snow drifts up to around 10 Ft high. With ice caps melting and sea levels rising the worst may be yet to come …living on an island maybe I should build an arc and buy a house on a hill top …. in readiness!
    Fascinating post Andrea.

    Reply
  89. Climate here in England is very benign, so nothing really bad has happened to me. Though I have encountered a whirl wind ripping through a hedge and snow drifts up to around 10 Ft high. With ice caps melting and sea levels rising the worst may be yet to come …living on an island maybe I should build an arc and buy a house on a hill top …. in readiness!
    Fascinating post Andrea.

    Reply
  90. Climate here in England is very benign, so nothing really bad has happened to me. Though I have encountered a whirl wind ripping through a hedge and snow drifts up to around 10 Ft high. With ice caps melting and sea levels rising the worst may be yet to come …living on an island maybe I should build an arc and buy a house on a hill top …. in readiness!
    Fascinating post Andrea.

    Reply
  91. Andrea, great post! I’ve not specifically studied volcanoes but when the subject comes up I pay attention, and I’m familiar with it’s effects in Regency England. I’ve read a few really good Regencies that addressed that situation and surprised that more writers don’t use it as atmosphere if not focus in their stories. To find out that eruption was 100 times the eruption power and destruction of Mount St.Helen’s is staggering. I remember of course watching the news in shock when it happened. My gosh 40 years ago.
    Since we grew up in the Midwest, we’re quite familiar with tornadoes. And they were plentiful in Texas when we lived there. But surprisingly enough the closest experience we had was living in New York State. A tornado tore through our neighborhood going right between our house and our next door neighbor and very thankfully it was just barely gearing up steam before it built up and became much more destructive further along in its path. We lost a giant old tree in front of our house and miraculously it fell over parallel to our house. The piece of ground and sidewalk it took up with it was shocking. I was on the phone and starting hearing a curious noise and told my husband I needed to go. Just like that it sounded like a jet landing right over our house, I yelled (!) at my son to run to the middle of the house (near the chimney and no time to get to the basement) and then saw the windows in the kitchen covered by the bent trees in between our two houses…nothing but leaves, and it was over. I never saw the actual tornado but our neighbors across the street did, to their shock. The tree cleanup fascinated the neighborhood kids for a couple days. And zero damage to our house!
    Knowing of a handful of authors, and our son and daughter-in-law, and their friends, who live in Oregon we’re constantly aware of the fires and bad air quality. When we visited in June we saw St.Helen’s very clearly and Mt. Hood very closely. Of the so far dormant volcanoes in that mountain range, Mt. Hood is the most likely to erupt in the future. We can’t think about these things all the time or it would drive us nuts. The immediacy of the fires is bad enough. It’s been a horrible year for fires. I’ve got a friend in Australia I was quite worried about during those devastating fires.
    I’m so glad Hurricane Henri has moved off the coast and I hope he stays that way.
    We all have someone near and dear in locations plagued by hurricanes, tornadoes, fires and floods, life threatening ice storms, etc. But oh yes, we not only have to do our own part to help slow climate change, but urge our governing bodies to step up across the board.

    Reply
  92. Andrea, great post! I’ve not specifically studied volcanoes but when the subject comes up I pay attention, and I’m familiar with it’s effects in Regency England. I’ve read a few really good Regencies that addressed that situation and surprised that more writers don’t use it as atmosphere if not focus in their stories. To find out that eruption was 100 times the eruption power and destruction of Mount St.Helen’s is staggering. I remember of course watching the news in shock when it happened. My gosh 40 years ago.
    Since we grew up in the Midwest, we’re quite familiar with tornadoes. And they were plentiful in Texas when we lived there. But surprisingly enough the closest experience we had was living in New York State. A tornado tore through our neighborhood going right between our house and our next door neighbor and very thankfully it was just barely gearing up steam before it built up and became much more destructive further along in its path. We lost a giant old tree in front of our house and miraculously it fell over parallel to our house. The piece of ground and sidewalk it took up with it was shocking. I was on the phone and starting hearing a curious noise and told my husband I needed to go. Just like that it sounded like a jet landing right over our house, I yelled (!) at my son to run to the middle of the house (near the chimney and no time to get to the basement) and then saw the windows in the kitchen covered by the bent trees in between our two houses…nothing but leaves, and it was over. I never saw the actual tornado but our neighbors across the street did, to their shock. The tree cleanup fascinated the neighborhood kids for a couple days. And zero damage to our house!
    Knowing of a handful of authors, and our son and daughter-in-law, and their friends, who live in Oregon we’re constantly aware of the fires and bad air quality. When we visited in June we saw St.Helen’s very clearly and Mt. Hood very closely. Of the so far dormant volcanoes in that mountain range, Mt. Hood is the most likely to erupt in the future. We can’t think about these things all the time or it would drive us nuts. The immediacy of the fires is bad enough. It’s been a horrible year for fires. I’ve got a friend in Australia I was quite worried about during those devastating fires.
    I’m so glad Hurricane Henri has moved off the coast and I hope he stays that way.
    We all have someone near and dear in locations plagued by hurricanes, tornadoes, fires and floods, life threatening ice storms, etc. But oh yes, we not only have to do our own part to help slow climate change, but urge our governing bodies to step up across the board.

    Reply
  93. Andrea, great post! I’ve not specifically studied volcanoes but when the subject comes up I pay attention, and I’m familiar with it’s effects in Regency England. I’ve read a few really good Regencies that addressed that situation and surprised that more writers don’t use it as atmosphere if not focus in their stories. To find out that eruption was 100 times the eruption power and destruction of Mount St.Helen’s is staggering. I remember of course watching the news in shock when it happened. My gosh 40 years ago.
    Since we grew up in the Midwest, we’re quite familiar with tornadoes. And they were plentiful in Texas when we lived there. But surprisingly enough the closest experience we had was living in New York State. A tornado tore through our neighborhood going right between our house and our next door neighbor and very thankfully it was just barely gearing up steam before it built up and became much more destructive further along in its path. We lost a giant old tree in front of our house and miraculously it fell over parallel to our house. The piece of ground and sidewalk it took up with it was shocking. I was on the phone and starting hearing a curious noise and told my husband I needed to go. Just like that it sounded like a jet landing right over our house, I yelled (!) at my son to run to the middle of the house (near the chimney and no time to get to the basement) and then saw the windows in the kitchen covered by the bent trees in between our two houses…nothing but leaves, and it was over. I never saw the actual tornado but our neighbors across the street did, to their shock. The tree cleanup fascinated the neighborhood kids for a couple days. And zero damage to our house!
    Knowing of a handful of authors, and our son and daughter-in-law, and their friends, who live in Oregon we’re constantly aware of the fires and bad air quality. When we visited in June we saw St.Helen’s very clearly and Mt. Hood very closely. Of the so far dormant volcanoes in that mountain range, Mt. Hood is the most likely to erupt in the future. We can’t think about these things all the time or it would drive us nuts. The immediacy of the fires is bad enough. It’s been a horrible year for fires. I’ve got a friend in Australia I was quite worried about during those devastating fires.
    I’m so glad Hurricane Henri has moved off the coast and I hope he stays that way.
    We all have someone near and dear in locations plagued by hurricanes, tornadoes, fires and floods, life threatening ice storms, etc. But oh yes, we not only have to do our own part to help slow climate change, but urge our governing bodies to step up across the board.

    Reply
  94. Andrea, great post! I’ve not specifically studied volcanoes but when the subject comes up I pay attention, and I’m familiar with it’s effects in Regency England. I’ve read a few really good Regencies that addressed that situation and surprised that more writers don’t use it as atmosphere if not focus in their stories. To find out that eruption was 100 times the eruption power and destruction of Mount St.Helen’s is staggering. I remember of course watching the news in shock when it happened. My gosh 40 years ago.
    Since we grew up in the Midwest, we’re quite familiar with tornadoes. And they were plentiful in Texas when we lived there. But surprisingly enough the closest experience we had was living in New York State. A tornado tore through our neighborhood going right between our house and our next door neighbor and very thankfully it was just barely gearing up steam before it built up and became much more destructive further along in its path. We lost a giant old tree in front of our house and miraculously it fell over parallel to our house. The piece of ground and sidewalk it took up with it was shocking. I was on the phone and starting hearing a curious noise and told my husband I needed to go. Just like that it sounded like a jet landing right over our house, I yelled (!) at my son to run to the middle of the house (near the chimney and no time to get to the basement) and then saw the windows in the kitchen covered by the bent trees in between our two houses…nothing but leaves, and it was over. I never saw the actual tornado but our neighbors across the street did, to their shock. The tree cleanup fascinated the neighborhood kids for a couple days. And zero damage to our house!
    Knowing of a handful of authors, and our son and daughter-in-law, and their friends, who live in Oregon we’re constantly aware of the fires and bad air quality. When we visited in June we saw St.Helen’s very clearly and Mt. Hood very closely. Of the so far dormant volcanoes in that mountain range, Mt. Hood is the most likely to erupt in the future. We can’t think about these things all the time or it would drive us nuts. The immediacy of the fires is bad enough. It’s been a horrible year for fires. I’ve got a friend in Australia I was quite worried about during those devastating fires.
    I’m so glad Hurricane Henri has moved off the coast and I hope he stays that way.
    We all have someone near and dear in locations plagued by hurricanes, tornadoes, fires and floods, life threatening ice storms, etc. But oh yes, we not only have to do our own part to help slow climate change, but urge our governing bodies to step up across the board.

    Reply
  95. Andrea, great post! I’ve not specifically studied volcanoes but when the subject comes up I pay attention, and I’m familiar with it’s effects in Regency England. I’ve read a few really good Regencies that addressed that situation and surprised that more writers don’t use it as atmosphere if not focus in their stories. To find out that eruption was 100 times the eruption power and destruction of Mount St.Helen’s is staggering. I remember of course watching the news in shock when it happened. My gosh 40 years ago.
    Since we grew up in the Midwest, we’re quite familiar with tornadoes. And they were plentiful in Texas when we lived there. But surprisingly enough the closest experience we had was living in New York State. A tornado tore through our neighborhood going right between our house and our next door neighbor and very thankfully it was just barely gearing up steam before it built up and became much more destructive further along in its path. We lost a giant old tree in front of our house and miraculously it fell over parallel to our house. The piece of ground and sidewalk it took up with it was shocking. I was on the phone and starting hearing a curious noise and told my husband I needed to go. Just like that it sounded like a jet landing right over our house, I yelled (!) at my son to run to the middle of the house (near the chimney and no time to get to the basement) and then saw the windows in the kitchen covered by the bent trees in between our two houses…nothing but leaves, and it was over. I never saw the actual tornado but our neighbors across the street did, to their shock. The tree cleanup fascinated the neighborhood kids for a couple days. And zero damage to our house!
    Knowing of a handful of authors, and our son and daughter-in-law, and their friends, who live in Oregon we’re constantly aware of the fires and bad air quality. When we visited in June we saw St.Helen’s very clearly and Mt. Hood very closely. Of the so far dormant volcanoes in that mountain range, Mt. Hood is the most likely to erupt in the future. We can’t think about these things all the time or it would drive us nuts. The immediacy of the fires is bad enough. It’s been a horrible year for fires. I’ve got a friend in Australia I was quite worried about during those devastating fires.
    I’m so glad Hurricane Henri has moved off the coast and I hope he stays that way.
    We all have someone near and dear in locations plagued by hurricanes, tornadoes, fires and floods, life threatening ice storms, etc. But oh yes, we not only have to do our own part to help slow climate change, but urge our governing bodies to step up across the board.

    Reply
  96. During the last decades the aftermath of volcanic eruptions got more and more attention by historians. One result of these researches was the attention bestowed to the 1783 eruption on Island. New research says that without this eruption there may not have been a French Revolution in 1789. Like the Tambora eruption it caused bad harvests and ensuing famines in nearly all of central and north europe.

    Reply
  97. During the last decades the aftermath of volcanic eruptions got more and more attention by historians. One result of these researches was the attention bestowed to the 1783 eruption on Island. New research says that without this eruption there may not have been a French Revolution in 1789. Like the Tambora eruption it caused bad harvests and ensuing famines in nearly all of central and north europe.

    Reply
  98. During the last decades the aftermath of volcanic eruptions got more and more attention by historians. One result of these researches was the attention bestowed to the 1783 eruption on Island. New research says that without this eruption there may not have been a French Revolution in 1789. Like the Tambora eruption it caused bad harvests and ensuing famines in nearly all of central and north europe.

    Reply
  99. During the last decades the aftermath of volcanic eruptions got more and more attention by historians. One result of these researches was the attention bestowed to the 1783 eruption on Island. New research says that without this eruption there may not have been a French Revolution in 1789. Like the Tambora eruption it caused bad harvests and ensuing famines in nearly all of central and north europe.

    Reply
  100. During the last decades the aftermath of volcanic eruptions got more and more attention by historians. One result of these researches was the attention bestowed to the 1783 eruption on Island. New research says that without this eruption there may not have been a French Revolution in 1789. Like the Tambora eruption it caused bad harvests and ensuing famines in nearly all of central and north europe.

    Reply
  101. I too have noticed that the Year without Summer is mentioned or given attention to in some newer regencies. Good research by the authors😀

    Reply
  102. I too have noticed that the Year without Summer is mentioned or given attention to in some newer regencies. Good research by the authors😀

    Reply
  103. I too have noticed that the Year without Summer is mentioned or given attention to in some newer regencies. Good research by the authors😀

    Reply
  104. I too have noticed that the Year without Summer is mentioned or given attention to in some newer regencies. Good research by the authors😀

    Reply
  105. I too have noticed that the Year without Summer is mentioned or given attention to in some newer regencies. Good research by the authors😀

    Reply

Leave a Comment