When Minor Characters Come to Life . . .

SussexAndrea here, juggling a multitude of pressing deadlines, and so invoking the Wenchly privilege of posting an oldie but goodie blog from the past. It seemed worthy of repeat, given all the controversy concerning the current Duke of Sussex. So without further ado . . .

I'm musing today on minor characters in a story, and how they can surprise you. Take, for example, my Wrexford & Sloane mystery, Murder at Kensington Palace. In doing research for the book, I had come across a paragraph or two that mentioned scientific soirees were occasionally held at Kensington Palace during the Regency because King George III’s sixth son (and ninth child), Prince Augustus Frederick, lived in one of the state apartments and was very interested in science.

Prince_Augustus_in_1782Aha! I think—it’s the perfect place for my opening scene! So, I make a note of it, doubly happy because I now have a great title for the book. When it comes down to writing the scene, I shuffle through all my notes and photos from my visit to the palace, as well as research I’ve done on the real-life scientific scholars who might have attended, as I have fun putting a few small cameos of actual people interacting with my fictional characters. And course, I remind myself to made a very brief mention of Prince Augustus Frederick—or the Duke of Sussex, the title he was granted by his father in 1801.

Naturally, I imagine this will only take a minute down rabbit hole. I only intend to have him walk by, and then have a few other people comment on some of his habits to make him a little individuality . . . However, I ended up being really surprised by what an interesting man he was. I had always thought of George III’s sons as a rather undistinguished lot (if not downright dislikable fellows.) And for me, Augustus Frederick was sort of lost in the shuffle of the 15 children.

Kensington Palace 1By all accounts, he was a “bookish and thoughtful” boy. He suffered from severe asthma—even so, at age thirteen he was packed off to study at university in Germany with two of his brothers, under the guidance of an English tutor. He was deemed too weak to undergo military training, and the plan was to go into the Church. He was very ill in the summer of1790, and after his studies were done, he was advised to avoid English winters because of his health. His travels took him through southern France and Italy, where he met another young Englishman whose liberal ideas on prison reform and other social ills greatly influenced him.

Prince_Augustus_FrederickThe King seemed to lose interest in the young prince—many letters about his next steps in life went unanswered. At loose end, Augustus ended up in Rome, where he stayed for some time. There, he met and fell in love with Lady Augusta Murray, daughter of the Earl of Dunmore. They married, but without permission of his father, which was in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act. Infuriated, the King refused to sanction the match. The couple returned to England—with Augusta pregnant—and tried again, this time at St. George’s of Hanover Square. Again, it was wasn’t recognized. Nonetheless, the couple remained together for a long time, and when they eventually parted, Augusta received a stipend from the prince, and he took an interest in his illegitimate children’s lives.

Kensington Palace 2jpgHistorians think one of the reasons the King was hard on his son was because of Augustus’s very liberal views on society. He supported the abolition of slavery as well as Catholic emancipation and the end of all civil restrictions on Jews and dissenters. He called for the repeal of the hated Corn Laws and also championed parliamentary reform—none of which endeared him to the highest circles of the aristocracy.

He was also a great supporter of the arts and sciences. He was served as president of the Society of the Arts as well as President of the Royal Society, one of the leading intellectual organizations in Britain. He was an avid book collector (a man after our own hearts!) and his private library contained over 50,000 books, which over 1,000 Bibles, and a collection of ancient manuscripts.

Sussex 2Augustus remained a rebel all his life. He married for the second time in 1831—and once again chose to thumb his nose at the Royal Marriage Act and didn’t ask for the King’s permission. The match lasted until his death (and Queen Victoria, who was very fond of her uncle, made his wife the Duchess of Inverness because she couldn’t officially be the Duchess of Sussex.) His wishes stated that he was not to receive a state funeral. Instead he was buried in a public cemetery, so his wife could be buried next to him when her time came.

Kensington Palace 3An interesting side note is that Augustus’s title of Duke of Sussex remained dormant after his death until Queen Elizabeth bestowed it on Prince Harry . . . another royal rebel. (Some people wonder whether she chose that particular title because of Augustus’s stand on abolition, and the fact that Meghan Markle would be the Duchess of Sussex. I find that a rather nice thought, and I imagine Augustus would approve.)

As I said, the Duke of Sussex was hardly mentioned in my book, and his name appears only as a small homage to the fact that scientific soirees did in fact take place at Kensington Palace. However, I was both surprised and happy to learn his story, and it’s one of those tiny details that makes research sucht a richly rewarding experience.

So what about you? Do you enjoy seeing cameo appearances of real-life [people in historical novels? Do you think they add a touch of authenticity or texture to fiction? (And if you care to dip a toe in the water, you are welcome to comment on Harry and his travails!)

120 thoughts on “When Minor Characters Come to Life . . .”

  1. I am quite happy to see real people making cameo appearances in historical fiction, Andrea.
    Thanks for this introduction to a the original Duke of Sussex (or was there a previous holder of the title?).

    Reply
  2. I am quite happy to see real people making cameo appearances in historical fiction, Andrea.
    Thanks for this introduction to a the original Duke of Sussex (or was there a previous holder of the title?).

    Reply
  3. I am quite happy to see real people making cameo appearances in historical fiction, Andrea.
    Thanks for this introduction to a the original Duke of Sussex (or was there a previous holder of the title?).

    Reply
  4. I am quite happy to see real people making cameo appearances in historical fiction, Andrea.
    Thanks for this introduction to a the original Duke of Sussex (or was there a previous holder of the title?).

    Reply
  5. I am quite happy to see real people making cameo appearances in historical fiction, Andrea.
    Thanks for this introduction to a the original Duke of Sussex (or was there a previous holder of the title?).

    Reply
  6. I too enjoy seeing real people get a cameo in a book. It adds a little something to historical fiction. The Duke certainly was an interesting person!

    Reply
  7. I too enjoy seeing real people get a cameo in a book. It adds a little something to historical fiction. The Duke certainly was an interesting person!

    Reply
  8. I too enjoy seeing real people get a cameo in a book. It adds a little something to historical fiction. The Duke certainly was an interesting person!

    Reply
  9. I too enjoy seeing real people get a cameo in a book. It adds a little something to historical fiction. The Duke certainly was an interesting person!

    Reply
  10. I too enjoy seeing real people get a cameo in a book. It adds a little something to historical fiction. The Duke certainly was an interesting person!

    Reply
  11. I definitely favor real people, places, and events in novels. Rabbit holes, too! The neat thing about ebooks is that I can click and experience my own rabbit hole whenever my interest is piqued. I probably average five-seven rabbit holes per book, in fact. Will be falling down this post’s rabbit hole in 3 … 2 … 1 !

    Reply
  12. I definitely favor real people, places, and events in novels. Rabbit holes, too! The neat thing about ebooks is that I can click and experience my own rabbit hole whenever my interest is piqued. I probably average five-seven rabbit holes per book, in fact. Will be falling down this post’s rabbit hole in 3 … 2 … 1 !

    Reply
  13. I definitely favor real people, places, and events in novels. Rabbit holes, too! The neat thing about ebooks is that I can click and experience my own rabbit hole whenever my interest is piqued. I probably average five-seven rabbit holes per book, in fact. Will be falling down this post’s rabbit hole in 3 … 2 … 1 !

    Reply
  14. I definitely favor real people, places, and events in novels. Rabbit holes, too! The neat thing about ebooks is that I can click and experience my own rabbit hole whenever my interest is piqued. I probably average five-seven rabbit holes per book, in fact. Will be falling down this post’s rabbit hole in 3 … 2 … 1 !

    Reply
  15. I definitely favor real people, places, and events in novels. Rabbit holes, too! The neat thing about ebooks is that I can click and experience my own rabbit hole whenever my interest is piqued. I probably average five-seven rabbit holes per book, in fact. Will be falling down this post’s rabbit hole in 3 … 2 … 1 !

    Reply
  16. As for real historical figures in fiction, I don’t have strong feelings about it one way or another. I just want it to be historically correct if they are used.
    I recently read something about Augustus so this wasn’t all new to me, although I did not realize that the title of Duke of Sussex had been dormant for so long. As for the current Duke, I wish him well. I think he is doing what he feels is right for himself and his family.

    Reply
  17. As for real historical figures in fiction, I don’t have strong feelings about it one way or another. I just want it to be historically correct if they are used.
    I recently read something about Augustus so this wasn’t all new to me, although I did not realize that the title of Duke of Sussex had been dormant for so long. As for the current Duke, I wish him well. I think he is doing what he feels is right for himself and his family.

    Reply
  18. As for real historical figures in fiction, I don’t have strong feelings about it one way or another. I just want it to be historically correct if they are used.
    I recently read something about Augustus so this wasn’t all new to me, although I did not realize that the title of Duke of Sussex had been dormant for so long. As for the current Duke, I wish him well. I think he is doing what he feels is right for himself and his family.

    Reply
  19. As for real historical figures in fiction, I don’t have strong feelings about it one way or another. I just want it to be historically correct if they are used.
    I recently read something about Augustus so this wasn’t all new to me, although I did not realize that the title of Duke of Sussex had been dormant for so long. As for the current Duke, I wish him well. I think he is doing what he feels is right for himself and his family.

    Reply
  20. As for real historical figures in fiction, I don’t have strong feelings about it one way or another. I just want it to be historically correct if they are used.
    I recently read something about Augustus so this wasn’t all new to me, although I did not realize that the title of Duke of Sussex had been dormant for so long. As for the current Duke, I wish him well. I think he is doing what he feels is right for himself and his family.

    Reply
  21. I love encountering real people in fiction. It generally sends me chasing down all sorts of rabbit holes—a lovely way to waste time.
    As for the current Duke of Sussex, I wish he’d shut up. There’s something distasteful about talking disparagingly about your family and their private lives. There is absolutely no way for them to respond. (But I didn’t think his mother should have done it either for the same reason.)

    Reply
  22. I love encountering real people in fiction. It generally sends me chasing down all sorts of rabbit holes—a lovely way to waste time.
    As for the current Duke of Sussex, I wish he’d shut up. There’s something distasteful about talking disparagingly about your family and their private lives. There is absolutely no way for them to respond. (But I didn’t think his mother should have done it either for the same reason.)

    Reply
  23. I love encountering real people in fiction. It generally sends me chasing down all sorts of rabbit holes—a lovely way to waste time.
    As for the current Duke of Sussex, I wish he’d shut up. There’s something distasteful about talking disparagingly about your family and their private lives. There is absolutely no way for them to respond. (But I didn’t think his mother should have done it either for the same reason.)

    Reply
  24. I love encountering real people in fiction. It generally sends me chasing down all sorts of rabbit holes—a lovely way to waste time.
    As for the current Duke of Sussex, I wish he’d shut up. There’s something distasteful about talking disparagingly about your family and their private lives. There is absolutely no way for them to respond. (But I didn’t think his mother should have done it either for the same reason.)

    Reply
  25. I love encountering real people in fiction. It generally sends me chasing down all sorts of rabbit holes—a lovely way to waste time.
    As for the current Duke of Sussex, I wish he’d shut up. There’s something distasteful about talking disparagingly about your family and their private lives. There is absolutely no way for them to respond. (But I didn’t think his mother should have done it either for the same reason.)

    Reply
  26. Glad you enjoy cameos. Kareni!
    That’s a really good question about whether there was an earlier Duke of Sussex. I will research it and report back. I tend to think no, because George III had six sons and each of them got a royal duke title. I would imagine he had to create new one to have six. But I will check!

    Reply
  27. Glad you enjoy cameos. Kareni!
    That’s a really good question about whether there was an earlier Duke of Sussex. I will research it and report back. I tend to think no, because George III had six sons and each of them got a royal duke title. I would imagine he had to create new one to have six. But I will check!

    Reply
  28. Glad you enjoy cameos. Kareni!
    That’s a really good question about whether there was an earlier Duke of Sussex. I will research it and report back. I tend to think no, because George III had six sons and each of them got a royal duke title. I would imagine he had to create new one to have six. But I will check!

    Reply
  29. Glad you enjoy cameos. Kareni!
    That’s a really good question about whether there was an earlier Duke of Sussex. I will research it and report back. I tend to think no, because George III had six sons and each of them got a royal duke title. I would imagine he had to create new one to have six. But I will check!

    Reply
  30. Glad you enjoy cameos. Kareni!
    That’s a really good question about whether there was an earlier Duke of Sussex. I will research it and report back. I tend to think no, because George III had six sons and each of them got a royal duke title. I would imagine he had to create new one to have six. But I will check!

    Reply
  31. Thanks, Teresa. I enjoy cameos too, so I’m glad to hear you do as well.
    Sussex really was an interesting person, and perhaps the most admirable of all King George III’s sons. (Not a high bar!)

    Reply
  32. Thanks, Teresa. I enjoy cameos too, so I’m glad to hear you do as well.
    Sussex really was an interesting person, and perhaps the most admirable of all King George III’s sons. (Not a high bar!)

    Reply
  33. Thanks, Teresa. I enjoy cameos too, so I’m glad to hear you do as well.
    Sussex really was an interesting person, and perhaps the most admirable of all King George III’s sons. (Not a high bar!)

    Reply
  34. Thanks, Teresa. I enjoy cameos too, so I’m glad to hear you do as well.
    Sussex really was an interesting person, and perhaps the most admirable of all King George III’s sons. (Not a high bar!)

    Reply
  35. Thanks, Teresa. I enjoy cameos too, so I’m glad to hear you do as well.
    Sussex really was an interesting person, and perhaps the most admirable of all King George III’s sons. (Not a high bar!)

    Reply
  36. I agree, Mary. If a real-life historical person appears in a novel, he/she should be depicted as accurately as possible.
    And yes,one has to feel for Harry. I can’t imagine the trauma the popparazzi have caused in his life, and it’s hard to find fault with him protecting his wife and children.Though it’s a shame he couldn’t stay part of his larger family. All families are complicated. It’s a shame when they break apart.

    Reply
  37. I agree, Mary. If a real-life historical person appears in a novel, he/she should be depicted as accurately as possible.
    And yes,one has to feel for Harry. I can’t imagine the trauma the popparazzi have caused in his life, and it’s hard to find fault with him protecting his wife and children.Though it’s a shame he couldn’t stay part of his larger family. All families are complicated. It’s a shame when they break apart.

    Reply
  38. I agree, Mary. If a real-life historical person appears in a novel, he/she should be depicted as accurately as possible.
    And yes,one has to feel for Harry. I can’t imagine the trauma the popparazzi have caused in his life, and it’s hard to find fault with him protecting his wife and children.Though it’s a shame he couldn’t stay part of his larger family. All families are complicated. It’s a shame when they break apart.

    Reply
  39. I agree, Mary. If a real-life historical person appears in a novel, he/she should be depicted as accurately as possible.
    And yes,one has to feel for Harry. I can’t imagine the trauma the popparazzi have caused in his life, and it’s hard to find fault with him protecting his wife and children.Though it’s a shame he couldn’t stay part of his larger family. All families are complicated. It’s a shame when they break apart.

    Reply
  40. I agree, Mary. If a real-life historical person appears in a novel, he/she should be depicted as accurately as possible.
    And yes,one has to feel for Harry. I can’t imagine the trauma the popparazzi have caused in his life, and it’s hard to find fault with him protecting his wife and children.Though it’s a shame he couldn’t stay part of his larger family. All families are complicated. It’s a shame when they break apart.

    Reply
  41. Totally agree on the rabbit holes, Lil!
    As for Harry. I feel sorry for him. I don’t think any of us can understand the pressure . . .but I also agree that rifts and unhappiness should have been handled iwth more discretion. Dirty laundry never looks good in public.

    Reply
  42. Totally agree on the rabbit holes, Lil!
    As for Harry. I feel sorry for him. I don’t think any of us can understand the pressure . . .but I also agree that rifts and unhappiness should have been handled iwth more discretion. Dirty laundry never looks good in public.

    Reply
  43. Totally agree on the rabbit holes, Lil!
    As for Harry. I feel sorry for him. I don’t think any of us can understand the pressure . . .but I also agree that rifts and unhappiness should have been handled iwth more discretion. Dirty laundry never looks good in public.

    Reply
  44. Totally agree on the rabbit holes, Lil!
    As for Harry. I feel sorry for him. I don’t think any of us can understand the pressure . . .but I also agree that rifts and unhappiness should have been handled iwth more discretion. Dirty laundry never looks good in public.

    Reply
  45. Totally agree on the rabbit holes, Lil!
    As for Harry. I feel sorry for him. I don’t think any of us can understand the pressure . . .but I also agree that rifts and unhappiness should have been handled iwth more discretion. Dirty laundry never looks good in public.

    Reply
  46. How fascinating Andrea – I didn’t know anything about him! And yes, I love cameos by real/historical people, as long as they are fairly small. Makes it more interesting and really sets the scene. Great post!

    Reply
  47. How fascinating Andrea – I didn’t know anything about him! And yes, I love cameos by real/historical people, as long as they are fairly small. Makes it more interesting and really sets the scene. Great post!

    Reply
  48. How fascinating Andrea – I didn’t know anything about him! And yes, I love cameos by real/historical people, as long as they are fairly small. Makes it more interesting and really sets the scene. Great post!

    Reply
  49. How fascinating Andrea – I didn’t know anything about him! And yes, I love cameos by real/historical people, as long as they are fairly small. Makes it more interesting and really sets the scene. Great post!

    Reply
  50. How fascinating Andrea – I didn’t know anything about him! And yes, I love cameos by real/historical people, as long as they are fairly small. Makes it more interesting and really sets the scene. Great post!

    Reply
  51. And if these pictures are correct, I think he was more handsome than the Prince Regent!
    Re the current Duke of Sussex; I feel sorry for him a great deal but I also don’t like all the stuff he keeps spouting. I don’t like seeing him put all that in the public view. And this latest with the paparazzi pursuit the other night; check the cameras–heaven knows there are plenty of them in NYC; those will tell the real story! But part of me feels like the media keeps blowing it all out of proportion. After all, put Harry or Meghan’s name on the title & it’s auto-click bait!

    Reply
  52. And if these pictures are correct, I think he was more handsome than the Prince Regent!
    Re the current Duke of Sussex; I feel sorry for him a great deal but I also don’t like all the stuff he keeps spouting. I don’t like seeing him put all that in the public view. And this latest with the paparazzi pursuit the other night; check the cameras–heaven knows there are plenty of them in NYC; those will tell the real story! But part of me feels like the media keeps blowing it all out of proportion. After all, put Harry or Meghan’s name on the title & it’s auto-click bait!

    Reply
  53. And if these pictures are correct, I think he was more handsome than the Prince Regent!
    Re the current Duke of Sussex; I feel sorry for him a great deal but I also don’t like all the stuff he keeps spouting. I don’t like seeing him put all that in the public view. And this latest with the paparazzi pursuit the other night; check the cameras–heaven knows there are plenty of them in NYC; those will tell the real story! But part of me feels like the media keeps blowing it all out of proportion. After all, put Harry or Meghan’s name on the title & it’s auto-click bait!

    Reply
  54. And if these pictures are correct, I think he was more handsome than the Prince Regent!
    Re the current Duke of Sussex; I feel sorry for him a great deal but I also don’t like all the stuff he keeps spouting. I don’t like seeing him put all that in the public view. And this latest with the paparazzi pursuit the other night; check the cameras–heaven knows there are plenty of them in NYC; those will tell the real story! But part of me feels like the media keeps blowing it all out of proportion. After all, put Harry or Meghan’s name on the title & it’s auto-click bait!

    Reply
  55. And if these pictures are correct, I think he was more handsome than the Prince Regent!
    Re the current Duke of Sussex; I feel sorry for him a great deal but I also don’t like all the stuff he keeps spouting. I don’t like seeing him put all that in the public view. And this latest with the paparazzi pursuit the other night; check the cameras–heaven knows there are plenty of them in NYC; those will tell the real story! But part of me feels like the media keeps blowing it all out of proportion. After all, put Harry or Meghan’s name on the title & it’s auto-click bait!

    Reply
  56. Yes, such an interesting character, isn’t he! I came across the story of him and Lady Augusta Murray when reading Memoirs of a Highland Lady by Elizabeth Grant. I’m considering having Lady Augusta as a minor character in one of my mysteries. 🙂

    Reply
  57. Yes, such an interesting character, isn’t he! I came across the story of him and Lady Augusta Murray when reading Memoirs of a Highland Lady by Elizabeth Grant. I’m considering having Lady Augusta as a minor character in one of my mysteries. 🙂

    Reply
  58. Yes, such an interesting character, isn’t he! I came across the story of him and Lady Augusta Murray when reading Memoirs of a Highland Lady by Elizabeth Grant. I’m considering having Lady Augusta as a minor character in one of my mysteries. 🙂

    Reply
  59. Yes, such an interesting character, isn’t he! I came across the story of him and Lady Augusta Murray when reading Memoirs of a Highland Lady by Elizabeth Grant. I’m considering having Lady Augusta as a minor character in one of my mysteries. 🙂

    Reply
  60. Yes, such an interesting character, isn’t he! I came across the story of him and Lady Augusta Murray when reading Memoirs of a Highland Lady by Elizabeth Grant. I’m considering having Lady Augusta as a minor character in one of my mysteries. 🙂

    Reply
  61. Keep those cameos coming! I love these informal history lessons which I can pursue into greater detail on my own. As for Harry, he has to make up his mind what he really wants his life to be.

    Reply
  62. Keep those cameos coming! I love these informal history lessons which I can pursue into greater detail on my own. As for Harry, he has to make up his mind what he really wants his life to be.

    Reply
  63. Keep those cameos coming! I love these informal history lessons which I can pursue into greater detail on my own. As for Harry, he has to make up his mind what he really wants his life to be.

    Reply
  64. Keep those cameos coming! I love these informal history lessons which I can pursue into greater detail on my own. As for Harry, he has to make up his mind what he really wants his life to be.

    Reply
  65. Keep those cameos coming! I love these informal history lessons which I can pursue into greater detail on my own. As for Harry, he has to make up his mind what he really wants his life to be.

    Reply
  66. I love cameos by actual people of the time famous, infamous or just a byline in history. I agree with Mary M. – ebooks make it so easy to find out more & I think it really adds to the enjoyment of the book.

    Reply
  67. I love cameos by actual people of the time famous, infamous or just a byline in history. I agree with Mary M. – ebooks make it so easy to find out more & I think it really adds to the enjoyment of the book.

    Reply
  68. I love cameos by actual people of the time famous, infamous or just a byline in history. I agree with Mary M. – ebooks make it so easy to find out more & I think it really adds to the enjoyment of the book.

    Reply
  69. I love cameos by actual people of the time famous, infamous or just a byline in history. I agree with Mary M. – ebooks make it so easy to find out more & I think it really adds to the enjoyment of the book.

    Reply
  70. I love cameos by actual people of the time famous, infamous or just a byline in history. I agree with Mary M. – ebooks make it so easy to find out more & I think it really adds to the enjoyment of the book.

    Reply
  71. Augustus sounds like a wonderful person. He was willing to live his life supporting people who did not have the luxury of his voice.
    Thanks for this post. I always enjoy the history you share with us.

    Reply
  72. Augustus sounds like a wonderful person. He was willing to live his life supporting people who did not have the luxury of his voice.
    Thanks for this post. I always enjoy the history you share with us.

    Reply
  73. Augustus sounds like a wonderful person. He was willing to live his life supporting people who did not have the luxury of his voice.
    Thanks for this post. I always enjoy the history you share with us.

    Reply
  74. Augustus sounds like a wonderful person. He was willing to live his life supporting people who did not have the luxury of his voice.
    Thanks for this post. I always enjoy the history you share with us.

    Reply
  75. Augustus sounds like a wonderful person. He was willing to live his life supporting people who did not have the luxury of his voice.
    Thanks for this post. I always enjoy the history you share with us.

    Reply
  76. I do feel sorry for both Dukes of Sussex. The original one, because his father was so petty and refused to recognize his marriage to an Earl’s daughter, which seems perfectly eligible. And the current one, because of his estrangement from the family. The consensus in the NY area is that those were British paps chasing the couple around, and people are quite annoyed about it, because New Yorkers are very chill about the celebrities in their midst. It’s a point of pride. The thing to do is briefly acknowledge them and then keep minding your own business.
    Well, I seem to have gone off topic! But yes, I do enjoy seeing cameos of real people in fiction.

    Reply
  77. I do feel sorry for both Dukes of Sussex. The original one, because his father was so petty and refused to recognize his marriage to an Earl’s daughter, which seems perfectly eligible. And the current one, because of his estrangement from the family. The consensus in the NY area is that those were British paps chasing the couple around, and people are quite annoyed about it, because New Yorkers are very chill about the celebrities in their midst. It’s a point of pride. The thing to do is briefly acknowledge them and then keep minding your own business.
    Well, I seem to have gone off topic! But yes, I do enjoy seeing cameos of real people in fiction.

    Reply
  78. I do feel sorry for both Dukes of Sussex. The original one, because his father was so petty and refused to recognize his marriage to an Earl’s daughter, which seems perfectly eligible. And the current one, because of his estrangement from the family. The consensus in the NY area is that those were British paps chasing the couple around, and people are quite annoyed about it, because New Yorkers are very chill about the celebrities in their midst. It’s a point of pride. The thing to do is briefly acknowledge them and then keep minding your own business.
    Well, I seem to have gone off topic! But yes, I do enjoy seeing cameos of real people in fiction.

    Reply
  79. I do feel sorry for both Dukes of Sussex. The original one, because his father was so petty and refused to recognize his marriage to an Earl’s daughter, which seems perfectly eligible. And the current one, because of his estrangement from the family. The consensus in the NY area is that those were British paps chasing the couple around, and people are quite annoyed about it, because New Yorkers are very chill about the celebrities in their midst. It’s a point of pride. The thing to do is briefly acknowledge them and then keep minding your own business.
    Well, I seem to have gone off topic! But yes, I do enjoy seeing cameos of real people in fiction.

    Reply
  80. I do feel sorry for both Dukes of Sussex. The original one, because his father was so petty and refused to recognize his marriage to an Earl’s daughter, which seems perfectly eligible. And the current one, because of his estrangement from the family. The consensus in the NY area is that those were British paps chasing the couple around, and people are quite annoyed about it, because New Yorkers are very chill about the celebrities in their midst. It’s a point of pride. The thing to do is briefly acknowledge them and then keep minding your own business.
    Well, I seem to have gone off topic! But yes, I do enjoy seeing cameos of real people in fiction.

    Reply
  81. Karen, you’re right—he does look way handsomer than his brothers. But who knows if it’s just artistic license.
    Harry is in a tough situation, and he could handle things better. Airing dirty laundry in public is never a pretty sight. But I also feel for him and the relentless press. As you say he’s click bait and that has to be hard on your personal life.

    Reply
  82. Karen, you’re right—he does look way handsomer than his brothers. But who knows if it’s just artistic license.
    Harry is in a tough situation, and he could handle things better. Airing dirty laundry in public is never a pretty sight. But I also feel for him and the relentless press. As you say he’s click bait and that has to be hard on your personal life.

    Reply
  83. Karen, you’re right—he does look way handsomer than his brothers. But who knows if it’s just artistic license.
    Harry is in a tough situation, and he could handle things better. Airing dirty laundry in public is never a pretty sight. But I also feel for him and the relentless press. As you say he’s click bait and that has to be hard on your personal life.

    Reply
  84. Karen, you’re right—he does look way handsomer than his brothers. But who knows if it’s just artistic license.
    Harry is in a tough situation, and he could handle things better. Airing dirty laundry in public is never a pretty sight. But I also feel for him and the relentless press. As you say he’s click bait and that has to be hard on your personal life.

    Reply
  85. Karen, you’re right—he does look way handsomer than his brothers. But who knows if it’s just artistic license.
    Harry is in a tough situation, and he could handle things better. Airing dirty laundry in public is never a pretty sight. But I also feel for him and the relentless press. As you say he’s click bait and that has to be hard on your personal life.

    Reply

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