When Minor Characters Come to Life . . .

SussexAndrea here, musing today on minor characters in a story, and how they can surprise you. Take, for example, my just-released mystery, Murder at Kensington Palace. In doing research for the book, I had come across a paragraph or two that mentioned scientific soirees were occasionally held at Kensington Palace during the Regency because King George III’s sixth son (and ninth child), Prince Augustus Frederick, lived in one of the state apartments and was very interested in science.

Prince_Augustus_in_1782Aha! I think—it’s the perfect place for my opening scene! So, I make a note of it, doubly happy because I now have a great title for the book. When it comes down to writing the scene, I shuffle through all my notes and photos from my visit to the palace, as well as research I’ve done on the real-life scientific scholars who might have attended, as I have fun putting a few small cameos of actual people interacting with my fictional characters. And course, I remind myself to made a very brief mention of Prince Augustus Frederick—or the Duke of Sussex, the title he was granted by his father in 1801.

Naturally, I imagine this will only take a minute down rabbit hole. I only intend to have him walk by, and then have a few other people comment on some of his habits to make him a little individuality . . . However, I ended up being really surprised by what an interesting man he was. I had always thought of George III’s sons as a rather undistinguished lot (if not downright dislikable fellows.) And for me, Augustus Frederick was sort of lost in the shuffle of the 15 children.

 

Kensington Palace 1By all accounts, he was a “bookish and thoughtful” boy. He suffered from severe asthma—even so, at age thirteen he was packed off to study at university in Germany with two of his brothers, under the guidance of an English tutor. He was deemed too weak to undergo military training, and the plan was to go into the Church. He was very ill in the summer of1790, and after his studies were done, he was advised to avoid English winters because of his health. His travels took him through southern France and Italy, where he met another young Englishman whose liberal ideas on prison reform and other social ills greatly influenced him.

Prince_Augustus_FrederickThe King seemed to lose interest in the young prince—many letters about his next steps in life went unanswered. At loose end, Augustus ended up in Rome, where he stayed for some time. There, he met and fell in love with Lady Augusta Murray, daughter of the Earl of Dunmore. They married, but without permission of his father, which was in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act. Infuriated, the King refused to sanction the match. The couple returned to England—with Augusta pregnant—and tried again, this time at St. George’s of Hanover Square. Again, it was wasn’t recognized. Nonetheless, the couple remained together for a long time, and when they eventually parted, Augusta received a stipend from the prince, and he took an interest in his illegitimate children’s lives.

Kensington Palace 2jpgHistorians think one of the reasons the King was hard on his son was because of Augustus’s very liberal views on society. He supported the abolition of slavery as well as Catholic emancipation and the end of all civil restrictions on Jews and dissenters. He called for the repeal of the hated Corn Laws and also championed parliamentary reform—none of which endeared him to the highest circles of the aristocracy.

He was also a great supporter of the arts and sciences. He was served as president of the Society of the Arts as well as President of the Royal Society, one of the leading intellectual organizations in Britain. He was an avid book collector (a man after our own hearts!) and his private library contained over 50,000 books, which over 1,000 Bibles, and a collection of ancient manuscripts.

Sussex 2Augustus remained a rebel all his life. He married for the second time in 1831—and once again chose to thumb his nose at the Royal Marriage Act and didn’t ask for the King’s permission. The match lasted until his death (and Queen Victoria, who was very fond of her uncle, made his wife the Duchess of Inverness because she couldn’t officially be the Duchess of Sussex.) His wishes stated that he was not to receive a state funeral. Instead he was buried in a public cemetery, so his wife could be buried next to him when her time came.

Kensington Palace 3An interesting side note is that Augustus’s title of Duke of Sussex remained dormant after his death until Queen Elizabeth bestowed it on Prince Harry . . . another royal rebel. (Some people wonder whether she chose that particular title because of Augustus’s stand on abolition, and the fact that Meghan Markle would be the Duchess of Sussex. I find that a rather nice thought, and I imagine Augustus would approve.)

As I said, the Duke of Sussex was hardly mentioned in my book, and his name appears only as a small homage to the fact that scientific soirees did in fact take place at Kensington Palace. However, I was both surprised and happy to learn his story, and it’s one of those tiny details that makes research sucht a richly rewarding experience.

So what about you? Do you enjoy seeing cameo appearances of real-life [people in historical novels? Do you think they add a touch of authenticity or texture to fiction? Or do you find them distracting?

160 thoughts on “When Minor Characters Come to Life . . .”

  1. How fascinating, Andrea! Like you, I had no idea that any of George III’s son were someone I’d like to meet. *G* You’re right that it’s a suitable title for Harry and Meghan, and I’m sure it wasn’t an accident.

    Reply
  2. How fascinating, Andrea! Like you, I had no idea that any of George III’s son were someone I’d like to meet. *G* You’re right that it’s a suitable title for Harry and Meghan, and I’m sure it wasn’t an accident.

    Reply
  3. How fascinating, Andrea! Like you, I had no idea that any of George III’s son were someone I’d like to meet. *G* You’re right that it’s a suitable title for Harry and Meghan, and I’m sure it wasn’t an accident.

    Reply
  4. How fascinating, Andrea! Like you, I had no idea that any of George III’s son were someone I’d like to meet. *G* You’re right that it’s a suitable title for Harry and Meghan, and I’m sure it wasn’t an accident.

    Reply
  5. How fascinating, Andrea! Like you, I had no idea that any of George III’s son were someone I’d like to meet. *G* You’re right that it’s a suitable title for Harry and Meghan, and I’m sure it wasn’t an accident.

    Reply
  6. How interesting. Once again you have come up with some fascinating details that I wouldn’t even think to look for.
    As for authentic side characters – I find them interesting as long as they are not too involved in the story. When that happens it can get a little distracting trying to determine if what I am reading is authentic.
    Glad you went down that rabbit hole.

    Reply
  7. How interesting. Once again you have come up with some fascinating details that I wouldn’t even think to look for.
    As for authentic side characters – I find them interesting as long as they are not too involved in the story. When that happens it can get a little distracting trying to determine if what I am reading is authentic.
    Glad you went down that rabbit hole.

    Reply
  8. How interesting. Once again you have come up with some fascinating details that I wouldn’t even think to look for.
    As for authentic side characters – I find them interesting as long as they are not too involved in the story. When that happens it can get a little distracting trying to determine if what I am reading is authentic.
    Glad you went down that rabbit hole.

    Reply
  9. How interesting. Once again you have come up with some fascinating details that I wouldn’t even think to look for.
    As for authentic side characters – I find them interesting as long as they are not too involved in the story. When that happens it can get a little distracting trying to determine if what I am reading is authentic.
    Glad you went down that rabbit hole.

    Reply
  10. How interesting. Once again you have come up with some fascinating details that I wouldn’t even think to look for.
    As for authentic side characters – I find them interesting as long as they are not too involved in the story. When that happens it can get a little distracting trying to determine if what I am reading is authentic.
    Glad you went down that rabbit hole.

    Reply
  11. I love when historicals have walk-ons for the people of the era. It helps bring depth and a sense of place and time to the work. My first serious venture in to write was a fantasy. The Hero’s sidekick developed into a more well-rounded character than either my hero or heroine. The book was not developing in the manner I planned. I had not matured as a writer that I could go with the flow so I chucked the project into the trash. I didn’t know until after my mother’s death that she rescued the project from the trash (as she did several other of my attempts at writing.) Will it see the light of day, no. But the lessons I learned still resonate with me.

    Reply
  12. I love when historicals have walk-ons for the people of the era. It helps bring depth and a sense of place and time to the work. My first serious venture in to write was a fantasy. The Hero’s sidekick developed into a more well-rounded character than either my hero or heroine. The book was not developing in the manner I planned. I had not matured as a writer that I could go with the flow so I chucked the project into the trash. I didn’t know until after my mother’s death that she rescued the project from the trash (as she did several other of my attempts at writing.) Will it see the light of day, no. But the lessons I learned still resonate with me.

    Reply
  13. I love when historicals have walk-ons for the people of the era. It helps bring depth and a sense of place and time to the work. My first serious venture in to write was a fantasy. The Hero’s sidekick developed into a more well-rounded character than either my hero or heroine. The book was not developing in the manner I planned. I had not matured as a writer that I could go with the flow so I chucked the project into the trash. I didn’t know until after my mother’s death that she rescued the project from the trash (as she did several other of my attempts at writing.) Will it see the light of day, no. But the lessons I learned still resonate with me.

    Reply
  14. I love when historicals have walk-ons for the people of the era. It helps bring depth and a sense of place and time to the work. My first serious venture in to write was a fantasy. The Hero’s sidekick developed into a more well-rounded character than either my hero or heroine. The book was not developing in the manner I planned. I had not matured as a writer that I could go with the flow so I chucked the project into the trash. I didn’t know until after my mother’s death that she rescued the project from the trash (as she did several other of my attempts at writing.) Will it see the light of day, no. But the lessons I learned still resonate with me.

    Reply
  15. I love when historicals have walk-ons for the people of the era. It helps bring depth and a sense of place and time to the work. My first serious venture in to write was a fantasy. The Hero’s sidekick developed into a more well-rounded character than either my hero or heroine. The book was not developing in the manner I planned. I had not matured as a writer that I could go with the flow so I chucked the project into the trash. I didn’t know until after my mother’s death that she rescued the project from the trash (as she did several other of my attempts at writing.) Will it see the light of day, no. But the lessons I learned still resonate with me.

    Reply
  16. Interesting post, I like learning of your writing processes and appreciate all of the research that you do in creating an enjoyable read. I also enjoy real-life side characters in fiction, it often sends me off on my own research and adds to the reading experience. I have learned so much about historical people and events over the years spurred by my fiction reading.

    Reply
  17. Interesting post, I like learning of your writing processes and appreciate all of the research that you do in creating an enjoyable read. I also enjoy real-life side characters in fiction, it often sends me off on my own research and adds to the reading experience. I have learned so much about historical people and events over the years spurred by my fiction reading.

    Reply
  18. Interesting post, I like learning of your writing processes and appreciate all of the research that you do in creating an enjoyable read. I also enjoy real-life side characters in fiction, it often sends me off on my own research and adds to the reading experience. I have learned so much about historical people and events over the years spurred by my fiction reading.

    Reply
  19. Interesting post, I like learning of your writing processes and appreciate all of the research that you do in creating an enjoyable read. I also enjoy real-life side characters in fiction, it often sends me off on my own research and adds to the reading experience. I have learned so much about historical people and events over the years spurred by my fiction reading.

    Reply
  20. Interesting post, I like learning of your writing processes and appreciate all of the research that you do in creating an enjoyable read. I also enjoy real-life side characters in fiction, it often sends me off on my own research and adds to the reading experience. I have learned so much about historical people and events over the years spurred by my fiction reading.

    Reply
  21. I love having real people wander through a story. Personally, I’m more likely to use people I dislike, like Sidmouth, so I can be nasty to them even after 200 years. I figure they deserve it.
    And I love it when authors introduce someone I don’t know or barely know. It provides me with another rabbit hole to dive into.

    Reply
  22. I love having real people wander through a story. Personally, I’m more likely to use people I dislike, like Sidmouth, so I can be nasty to them even after 200 years. I figure they deserve it.
    And I love it when authors introduce someone I don’t know or barely know. It provides me with another rabbit hole to dive into.

    Reply
  23. I love having real people wander through a story. Personally, I’m more likely to use people I dislike, like Sidmouth, so I can be nasty to them even after 200 years. I figure they deserve it.
    And I love it when authors introduce someone I don’t know or barely know. It provides me with another rabbit hole to dive into.

    Reply
  24. I love having real people wander through a story. Personally, I’m more likely to use people I dislike, like Sidmouth, so I can be nasty to them even after 200 years. I figure they deserve it.
    And I love it when authors introduce someone I don’t know or barely know. It provides me with another rabbit hole to dive into.

    Reply
  25. I love having real people wander through a story. Personally, I’m more likely to use people I dislike, like Sidmouth, so I can be nasty to them even after 200 years. I figure they deserve it.
    And I love it when authors introduce someone I don’t know or barely know. It provides me with another rabbit hole to dive into.

    Reply
  26. What a fascinating post, Andrea; I’ve definitely learned a few things this morning!
    I enjoy when historic figures make an appearance on the page; it adds veracity to the story (well, it does when I trust the author).

    Reply
  27. What a fascinating post, Andrea; I’ve definitely learned a few things this morning!
    I enjoy when historic figures make an appearance on the page; it adds veracity to the story (well, it does when I trust the author).

    Reply
  28. What a fascinating post, Andrea; I’ve definitely learned a few things this morning!
    I enjoy when historic figures make an appearance on the page; it adds veracity to the story (well, it does when I trust the author).

    Reply
  29. What a fascinating post, Andrea; I’ve definitely learned a few things this morning!
    I enjoy when historic figures make an appearance on the page; it adds veracity to the story (well, it does when I trust the author).

    Reply
  30. What a fascinating post, Andrea; I’ve definitely learned a few things this morning!
    I enjoy when historic figures make an appearance on the page; it adds veracity to the story (well, it does when I trust the author).

    Reply
  31. So glad you enjoyed the post, Mary! Discovering things you never expected is what makes so research so fun!
    I agree with you—if a real-life person is too involved in the storyline, it can get confusing and distracting for readers, who will start wondering whether the story is “true.” I try to be really careful about that, as I don’t want to blur the lines too much.

    Reply
  32. So glad you enjoyed the post, Mary! Discovering things you never expected is what makes so research so fun!
    I agree with you—if a real-life person is too involved in the storyline, it can get confusing and distracting for readers, who will start wondering whether the story is “true.” I try to be really careful about that, as I don’t want to blur the lines too much.

    Reply
  33. So glad you enjoyed the post, Mary! Discovering things you never expected is what makes so research so fun!
    I agree with you—if a real-life person is too involved in the storyline, it can get confusing and distracting for readers, who will start wondering whether the story is “true.” I try to be really careful about that, as I don’t want to blur the lines too much.

    Reply
  34. So glad you enjoyed the post, Mary! Discovering things you never expected is what makes so research so fun!
    I agree with you—if a real-life person is too involved in the storyline, it can get confusing and distracting for readers, who will start wondering whether the story is “true.” I try to be really careful about that, as I don’t want to blur the lines too much.

    Reply
  35. So glad you enjoyed the post, Mary! Discovering things you never expected is what makes so research so fun!
    I agree with you—if a real-life person is too involved in the storyline, it can get confusing and distracting for readers, who will start wondering whether the story is “true.” I try to be really careful about that, as I don’t want to blur the lines too much.

    Reply
  36. I agree—as a reader I like walk-ons too, just to add a little texture depth to the story. But they can’t be big players without changing the whole shape of the book.
    How interesting about the sidekick. Those things happen. And yes, one learns a LOT from the Muse simply taking charge. Hooray for your mother for saving the story. One should never toss away work. There are always lessons, and sometimes, you come back to them with just a slightly new perspective, which can make all the difference.

    Reply
  37. I agree—as a reader I like walk-ons too, just to add a little texture depth to the story. But they can’t be big players without changing the whole shape of the book.
    How interesting about the sidekick. Those things happen. And yes, one learns a LOT from the Muse simply taking charge. Hooray for your mother for saving the story. One should never toss away work. There are always lessons, and sometimes, you come back to them with just a slightly new perspective, which can make all the difference.

    Reply
  38. I agree—as a reader I like walk-ons too, just to add a little texture depth to the story. But they can’t be big players without changing the whole shape of the book.
    How interesting about the sidekick. Those things happen. And yes, one learns a LOT from the Muse simply taking charge. Hooray for your mother for saving the story. One should never toss away work. There are always lessons, and sometimes, you come back to them with just a slightly new perspective, which can make all the difference.

    Reply
  39. I agree—as a reader I like walk-ons too, just to add a little texture depth to the story. But they can’t be big players without changing the whole shape of the book.
    How interesting about the sidekick. Those things happen. And yes, one learns a LOT from the Muse simply taking charge. Hooray for your mother for saving the story. One should never toss away work. There are always lessons, and sometimes, you come back to them with just a slightly new perspective, which can make all the difference.

    Reply
  40. I agree—as a reader I like walk-ons too, just to add a little texture depth to the story. But they can’t be big players without changing the whole shape of the book.
    How interesting about the sidekick. Those things happen. And yes, one learns a LOT from the Muse simply taking charge. Hooray for your mother for saving the story. One should never toss away work. There are always lessons, and sometimes, you come back to them with just a slightly new perspective, which can make all the difference.

    Reply
  41. SO glad you enjoyed it, Kareni! It was such an unexpected discovery. I was sure all the sons of George III were pretty unimpressive fellows, Augustus Frederick was such a surprise. I love that about research rabbit holes.
    And ha! on the “trust” factor. We Wenches do try to do our homework and the history right!

    Reply
  42. SO glad you enjoyed it, Kareni! It was such an unexpected discovery. I was sure all the sons of George III were pretty unimpressive fellows, Augustus Frederick was such a surprise. I love that about research rabbit holes.
    And ha! on the “trust” factor. We Wenches do try to do our homework and the history right!

    Reply
  43. SO glad you enjoyed it, Kareni! It was such an unexpected discovery. I was sure all the sons of George III were pretty unimpressive fellows, Augustus Frederick was such a surprise. I love that about research rabbit holes.
    And ha! on the “trust” factor. We Wenches do try to do our homework and the history right!

    Reply
  44. SO glad you enjoyed it, Kareni! It was such an unexpected discovery. I was sure all the sons of George III were pretty unimpressive fellows, Augustus Frederick was such a surprise. I love that about research rabbit holes.
    And ha! on the “trust” factor. We Wenches do try to do our homework and the history right!

    Reply
  45. SO glad you enjoyed it, Kareni! It was such an unexpected discovery. I was sure all the sons of George III were pretty unimpressive fellows, Augustus Frederick was such a surprise. I love that about research rabbit holes.
    And ha! on the “trust” factor. We Wenches do try to do our homework and the history right!

    Reply
  46. I enjoy reading about famous people of the time entering a historical novel. It’s a fun surprise to learn about those who don’t follow the rules of the aristocratic household they were born into. You found a great one, Andrea, in Prince Augustus.
    I loved the latest Wrexford and Charlotte mystery. I didn’t want it to end, but at least I know there will be a next one in which I can’t wait to know the ending. I stayed up till 2 a.m. because I came home late from seeing an opera and didn’t want to wait to know who dunnit. I never suspected who it ended up being.

    Reply
  47. I enjoy reading about famous people of the time entering a historical novel. It’s a fun surprise to learn about those who don’t follow the rules of the aristocratic household they were born into. You found a great one, Andrea, in Prince Augustus.
    I loved the latest Wrexford and Charlotte mystery. I didn’t want it to end, but at least I know there will be a next one in which I can’t wait to know the ending. I stayed up till 2 a.m. because I came home late from seeing an opera and didn’t want to wait to know who dunnit. I never suspected who it ended up being.

    Reply
  48. I enjoy reading about famous people of the time entering a historical novel. It’s a fun surprise to learn about those who don’t follow the rules of the aristocratic household they were born into. You found a great one, Andrea, in Prince Augustus.
    I loved the latest Wrexford and Charlotte mystery. I didn’t want it to end, but at least I know there will be a next one in which I can’t wait to know the ending. I stayed up till 2 a.m. because I came home late from seeing an opera and didn’t want to wait to know who dunnit. I never suspected who it ended up being.

    Reply
  49. I enjoy reading about famous people of the time entering a historical novel. It’s a fun surprise to learn about those who don’t follow the rules of the aristocratic household they were born into. You found a great one, Andrea, in Prince Augustus.
    I loved the latest Wrexford and Charlotte mystery. I didn’t want it to end, but at least I know there will be a next one in which I can’t wait to know the ending. I stayed up till 2 a.m. because I came home late from seeing an opera and didn’t want to wait to know who dunnit. I never suspected who it ended up being.

    Reply
  50. I enjoy reading about famous people of the time entering a historical novel. It’s a fun surprise to learn about those who don’t follow the rules of the aristocratic household they were born into. You found a great one, Andrea, in Prince Augustus.
    I loved the latest Wrexford and Charlotte mystery. I didn’t want it to end, but at least I know there will be a next one in which I can’t wait to know the ending. I stayed up till 2 a.m. because I came home late from seeing an opera and didn’t want to wait to know who dunnit. I never suspected who it ended up being.

    Reply
  51. This is a great story, and I am enjoying it more because August is a name passed down among the men in my family(my grandfather’s first name, and my father and brother’s middle name)

    Reply
  52. This is a great story, and I am enjoying it more because August is a name passed down among the men in my family(my grandfather’s first name, and my father and brother’s middle name)

    Reply
  53. This is a great story, and I am enjoying it more because August is a name passed down among the men in my family(my grandfather’s first name, and my father and brother’s middle name)

    Reply
  54. This is a great story, and I am enjoying it more because August is a name passed down among the men in my family(my grandfather’s first name, and my father and brother’s middle name)

    Reply
  55. This is a great story, and I am enjoying it more because August is a name passed down among the men in my family(my grandfather’s first name, and my father and brother’s middle name)

    Reply
  56. Wonderfully interesting post Andrea. Didn’t know about any of this. He sounds like a very likable fellow. I do like real people popping up now and again in fiction.

    Reply
  57. Wonderfully interesting post Andrea. Didn’t know about any of this. He sounds like a very likable fellow. I do like real people popping up now and again in fiction.

    Reply
  58. Wonderfully interesting post Andrea. Didn’t know about any of this. He sounds like a very likable fellow. I do like real people popping up now and again in fiction.

    Reply
  59. Wonderfully interesting post Andrea. Didn’t know about any of this. He sounds like a very likable fellow. I do like real people popping up now and again in fiction.

    Reply
  60. Wonderfully interesting post Andrea. Didn’t know about any of this. He sounds like a very likable fellow. I do like real people popping up now and again in fiction.

    Reply
  61. That was so fascinating, Andrea, and I absolutely love the connection to Harry and Meghan. That will be a wonderful legacy they can pass on to their own children. I think cameo appearances by real-life people enhance historical fiction tremendously, despite how frequently learning about them distracts already easily-distractible authors! I researched the acting Royal Governor of New York during the start of the American Revolution for a novel and was astonished to learn he left his post in 1775 at age 83, the father of ten children and an acclaimed botanist and public health champion. History hold so many interesting tales!

    Reply
  62. That was so fascinating, Andrea, and I absolutely love the connection to Harry and Meghan. That will be a wonderful legacy they can pass on to their own children. I think cameo appearances by real-life people enhance historical fiction tremendously, despite how frequently learning about them distracts already easily-distractible authors! I researched the acting Royal Governor of New York during the start of the American Revolution for a novel and was astonished to learn he left his post in 1775 at age 83, the father of ten children and an acclaimed botanist and public health champion. History hold so many interesting tales!

    Reply
  63. That was so fascinating, Andrea, and I absolutely love the connection to Harry and Meghan. That will be a wonderful legacy they can pass on to their own children. I think cameo appearances by real-life people enhance historical fiction tremendously, despite how frequently learning about them distracts already easily-distractible authors! I researched the acting Royal Governor of New York during the start of the American Revolution for a novel and was astonished to learn he left his post in 1775 at age 83, the father of ten children and an acclaimed botanist and public health champion. History hold so many interesting tales!

    Reply
  64. That was so fascinating, Andrea, and I absolutely love the connection to Harry and Meghan. That will be a wonderful legacy they can pass on to their own children. I think cameo appearances by real-life people enhance historical fiction tremendously, despite how frequently learning about them distracts already easily-distractible authors! I researched the acting Royal Governor of New York during the start of the American Revolution for a novel and was astonished to learn he left his post in 1775 at age 83, the father of ten children and an acclaimed botanist and public health champion. History hold so many interesting tales!

    Reply
  65. That was so fascinating, Andrea, and I absolutely love the connection to Harry and Meghan. That will be a wonderful legacy they can pass on to their own children. I think cameo appearances by real-life people enhance historical fiction tremendously, despite how frequently learning about them distracts already easily-distractible authors! I researched the acting Royal Governor of New York during the start of the American Revolution for a novel and was astonished to learn he left his post in 1775 at age 83, the father of ten children and an acclaimed botanist and public health champion. History hold so many interesting tales!

    Reply
  66. Thank you so much for introducing me to Augustus. He does sound like he had a quick and curious mind. For some reason, that is not something I would ever have associated with that family.
    I do enjoy real people who appear in historical novels. But, for me it must be somewhat possible and realistic.
    As always, when y’all introduce me to someone in history, I go and dive into the internet. His son from his marriage to Augusta (I have no idea how anyone in the family ever knew who they were talking to)was the first person to be recorded as having multiple sclerosis.
    There were two children from this marriage a boy named Augustus (the one mentioned above) and a girl named Augusta. The apparently did not have much imagination when it came to names.

    Reply
  67. Thank you so much for introducing me to Augustus. He does sound like he had a quick and curious mind. For some reason, that is not something I would ever have associated with that family.
    I do enjoy real people who appear in historical novels. But, for me it must be somewhat possible and realistic.
    As always, when y’all introduce me to someone in history, I go and dive into the internet. His son from his marriage to Augusta (I have no idea how anyone in the family ever knew who they were talking to)was the first person to be recorded as having multiple sclerosis.
    There were two children from this marriage a boy named Augustus (the one mentioned above) and a girl named Augusta. The apparently did not have much imagination when it came to names.

    Reply
  68. Thank you so much for introducing me to Augustus. He does sound like he had a quick and curious mind. For some reason, that is not something I would ever have associated with that family.
    I do enjoy real people who appear in historical novels. But, for me it must be somewhat possible and realistic.
    As always, when y’all introduce me to someone in history, I go and dive into the internet. His son from his marriage to Augusta (I have no idea how anyone in the family ever knew who they were talking to)was the first person to be recorded as having multiple sclerosis.
    There were two children from this marriage a boy named Augustus (the one mentioned above) and a girl named Augusta. The apparently did not have much imagination when it came to names.

    Reply
  69. Thank you so much for introducing me to Augustus. He does sound like he had a quick and curious mind. For some reason, that is not something I would ever have associated with that family.
    I do enjoy real people who appear in historical novels. But, for me it must be somewhat possible and realistic.
    As always, when y’all introduce me to someone in history, I go and dive into the internet. His son from his marriage to Augusta (I have no idea how anyone in the family ever knew who they were talking to)was the first person to be recorded as having multiple sclerosis.
    There were two children from this marriage a boy named Augustus (the one mentioned above) and a girl named Augusta. The apparently did not have much imagination when it came to names.

    Reply
  70. Thank you so much for introducing me to Augustus. He does sound like he had a quick and curious mind. For some reason, that is not something I would ever have associated with that family.
    I do enjoy real people who appear in historical novels. But, for me it must be somewhat possible and realistic.
    As always, when y’all introduce me to someone in history, I go and dive into the internet. His son from his marriage to Augusta (I have no idea how anyone in the family ever knew who they were talking to)was the first person to be recorded as having multiple sclerosis.
    There were two children from this marriage a boy named Augustus (the one mentioned above) and a girl named Augusta. The apparently did not have much imagination when it came to names.

    Reply
  71. Many of the stories we read, cover a very short span of history. (some are less than 1/2 year) I like it when inventors are part of the story as that shows us how life was changing with inventions that have changed our lives. Such as farming equipment, steam engines, mining improvements, transportation, printing, electricity, communications etc. These changed the lives of the characters we enjoy.
    As for major historical figures appearing, they can bring a unique event into the lives of the characters and help us understand their lives.
    I found your posting very interesting. Thank you.

    Reply
  72. Many of the stories we read, cover a very short span of history. (some are less than 1/2 year) I like it when inventors are part of the story as that shows us how life was changing with inventions that have changed our lives. Such as farming equipment, steam engines, mining improvements, transportation, printing, electricity, communications etc. These changed the lives of the characters we enjoy.
    As for major historical figures appearing, they can bring a unique event into the lives of the characters and help us understand their lives.
    I found your posting very interesting. Thank you.

    Reply
  73. Many of the stories we read, cover a very short span of history. (some are less than 1/2 year) I like it when inventors are part of the story as that shows us how life was changing with inventions that have changed our lives. Such as farming equipment, steam engines, mining improvements, transportation, printing, electricity, communications etc. These changed the lives of the characters we enjoy.
    As for major historical figures appearing, they can bring a unique event into the lives of the characters and help us understand their lives.
    I found your posting very interesting. Thank you.

    Reply
  74. Many of the stories we read, cover a very short span of history. (some are less than 1/2 year) I like it when inventors are part of the story as that shows us how life was changing with inventions that have changed our lives. Such as farming equipment, steam engines, mining improvements, transportation, printing, electricity, communications etc. These changed the lives of the characters we enjoy.
    As for major historical figures appearing, they can bring a unique event into the lives of the characters and help us understand their lives.
    I found your posting very interesting. Thank you.

    Reply
  75. Many of the stories we read, cover a very short span of history. (some are less than 1/2 year) I like it when inventors are part of the story as that shows us how life was changing with inventions that have changed our lives. Such as farming equipment, steam engines, mining improvements, transportation, printing, electricity, communications etc. These changed the lives of the characters we enjoy.
    As for major historical figures appearing, they can bring a unique event into the lives of the characters and help us understand their lives.
    I found your posting very interesting. Thank you.

    Reply
  76. I LOVE when my historical romance or historical fiction stories includes true characters and tidbits. Two of my favorite authors – James Rollins and Steve Berry – always include a “fact or fiction” section at the end of their books – kind of like a long Author’s Note. I truly appreciate this – even when they say they based a certain cathedral after a certain real one with a few modifications to suite the story. If any character is real, Please let us know!
    Book hugs,
    Molly

    Reply
  77. I LOVE when my historical romance or historical fiction stories includes true characters and tidbits. Two of my favorite authors – James Rollins and Steve Berry – always include a “fact or fiction” section at the end of their books – kind of like a long Author’s Note. I truly appreciate this – even when they say they based a certain cathedral after a certain real one with a few modifications to suite the story. If any character is real, Please let us know!
    Book hugs,
    Molly

    Reply
  78. I LOVE when my historical romance or historical fiction stories includes true characters and tidbits. Two of my favorite authors – James Rollins and Steve Berry – always include a “fact or fiction” section at the end of their books – kind of like a long Author’s Note. I truly appreciate this – even when they say they based a certain cathedral after a certain real one with a few modifications to suite the story. If any character is real, Please let us know!
    Book hugs,
    Molly

    Reply
  79. I LOVE when my historical romance or historical fiction stories includes true characters and tidbits. Two of my favorite authors – James Rollins and Steve Berry – always include a “fact or fiction” section at the end of their books – kind of like a long Author’s Note. I truly appreciate this – even when they say they based a certain cathedral after a certain real one with a few modifications to suite the story. If any character is real, Please let us know!
    Book hugs,
    Molly

    Reply
  80. I LOVE when my historical romance or historical fiction stories includes true characters and tidbits. Two of my favorite authors – James Rollins and Steve Berry – always include a “fact or fiction” section at the end of their books – kind of like a long Author’s Note. I truly appreciate this – even when they say they based a certain cathedral after a certain real one with a few modifications to suite the story. If any character is real, Please let us know!
    Book hugs,
    Molly

    Reply
  81. I’m coming late to this post, so my response is an echo. I enjoy reading about real historical characaters; I often research them after meeting them in a novel, and I didn’t know anything at all about Augustus until you wrote about him. Thank you for enriching my life.

    Reply
  82. I’m coming late to this post, so my response is an echo. I enjoy reading about real historical characaters; I often research them after meeting them in a novel, and I didn’t know anything at all about Augustus until you wrote about him. Thank you for enriching my life.

    Reply
  83. I’m coming late to this post, so my response is an echo. I enjoy reading about real historical characaters; I often research them after meeting them in a novel, and I didn’t know anything at all about Augustus until you wrote about him. Thank you for enriching my life.

    Reply
  84. I’m coming late to this post, so my response is an echo. I enjoy reading about real historical characaters; I often research them after meeting them in a novel, and I didn’t know anything at all about Augustus until you wrote about him. Thank you for enriching my life.

    Reply
  85. I’m coming late to this post, so my response is an echo. I enjoy reading about real historical characaters; I often research them after meeting them in a novel, and I didn’t know anything at all about Augustus until you wrote about him. Thank you for enriching my life.

    Reply

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