When is a Rogue…?

TvnawnewsmSo, I have a book hitting the shelves in a few weeks, and everyone's anticipating a new Rogues book. And it is, sort of. It's set in the Rogues' World, but to be blunt, I've run out of Rogues! Not long ago I realized that my Company of Rogues series was the longest-running, still live, series in historical romance. But now I realize it's come to its natural end.

When I wrote the first one, An Arranged Marriage,  long, long ago, (first draft 1977) I gave the hero, Nicholas Delaney, some friends, because he was going to need them. From somewhere (writing magic here) came the idea of a schooboy group and them keeping in touch, as school friends tend to. All the details about the Rogues trickled out over the subsequent decades as I occasionally wrote another Rogue's story. Amoldlarge

Simply because it seemed more interesting I created a variety of young men, then later I had to explain why some of them were at Harrow.

It wasn't usual for the heir to a great title to go to a school, but there was Lucien de Vaux, Marquess of Arden, heir to the Duke of Belcraven. In my own defense, he was a late edition. He wasn't in the first draft of An Arranged Marriage, but by the time I was rewriting and preparing it for publication  in 1990, I'd already written most of An Unwilling Bride, Lucien's story, and I thought it would be clever to make him a Rogue. UB800The inherent problem didn't occur to me until later.

The explanation? His father wanted him to learn to get on with lesser mortals — and when you know the family story there are many layers to that! Djebook

Miles Cavanagh, the Irish Rogue, was also an oddity, but the explanation was simpler. As he's the heir to an Irish earldom, his family want him to learn to get along with the English.

Another aspect that eventually occurred to me is one that affects nearly all historical romance — these men's fathers die off awfully young!

At the time of An Arranged Marriage (1814) the Rogues are all in their mid-twenties, so quite likely their fathers, if alive, would be around fifty. Life expectancy back then wasn't as short as some people think. The statistics are slewed by the terrible death rate among babies and young children. Once a person reached adulthood, their chance of living to sixty was the same as today, and eighty wasn't extraordinary.

Nicholas isn't a peer, but his brother's an earl so their father is dead. Miles wouldn't be heir to the Earl of Kilgoran if his father was alive. I decided Sir Stephen Ball was too young to have earned a knighthood, so he's obviously inherited a baronetcy. Francis, Lord Middlethorpe's father is dead, which I make part of his backstory. The only Rogues with living fathers are Simon St Bride, and Lord Darius Debenham.

TrarwwmjBack in 1977 I also killed off 2 of the original 12 Rogues. I never feel able to totally dodge reality and as these young gentlemen had grown up during the Napoleonic Wars some of them would have died — off went Lord Roger Merryhew and Allan Ingram.

So I had 10, and I settled the last of them, Dare, in To Rescue a Rogue, in 2006.

There were some natural spin-offs, but then I went off to write more Malloren books, set in the 1760s. Eventually I was summoned back, in part by reader demand for the story of David Kerslake, earl and smuggling master from The Dragon's Bride. My readers also asked about Tdyalmodthe families of the dead Rogues, which led to last year's book, Too Dangerous for a Lady, featuring a sister of Roger Merryhew.

At the end of that book, Beau Braydon, the hero's friend, received the shocking news that he'd inherited a viscountcy. As he's a wealthy London man, there's no bright side to that for him and his was clearly the next story.

But he's not a Rogue, or even connected to one. His destiny, widowed Kathryn Cateril, is no Roguish connection either. I resisted the temptation to make her one, and at that point realized that I was going to enjoy writing completely fresh characters.

In addition, the book's triggering incident is the death of Princess Charlotte in November 1817. When the action moves to London en early December, who's going to be there? The happily married Rogues will be at their estates, preparing for Christmas. (Reality bites again!)

As it happened the events of Too Dangerous for a Lady had entangled the new Viscount Dauntry with a secret government department that has Roguish connections, so a few Rogues do make an appearance to help him. Hal Beaumont is around, because his wife Blanche, is performing at Drury Lane. Stephen Ball is also there for political reasons. Leander, Lord Charrington, makes a quick trip to London on business and regrets that. But that's all folks. I decided not to force anything, so most of the book is without Rogues on the page, though I hope my readers know they're all in that "world" happily with their families.

You can read two excerpts from this book, starting here.

The book I'm writing now is also triggered by the death of Princess Charlotte, and runs along a similar timeline. As it's in the "Rogues' World" there are elements my readers will recognize (the Dowager Countess of Cawle, for one) but neither Lord Kynaston nor Lady Ariana Boxstall even know the Company of Rogues exist, and again I'm thoroughly enjoying writing new characters.

Will this be a problem? I don't have any Rogues left to play principal parts, and I'm not going to march them through my books merely as stage props. They can enjoy their happy, rural lives as much as possible, but if they can reasonably be of use, I will summon them. Otherwise, my books will be stand-alones within the Rogues' World.

How do you feel about series in historical romance? Are you ready for stand-alones, which is what we always used to have, going back to Georgette Heyer?

One commenter on this blog will receive an Advanced Reading Copy of The Viscount Needs a Wife. I'll draw the name on Friday.

Cheers,

Jo

 

 

545 thoughts on “When is a Rogue…?”

  1. I really appreciate your honesty Jo! It’s hard to strike a balance between that lovely familiarity with and affection for established characters and the excitement and challenge of new ones. As a reader I think that the issue is we all fell in love with the Rogues a little (Miles is my favourite) and therefore want them to be happy and to see them happy- although inherently wedded bliss isn’t always super exciting! That said, would you consider a follow up? I read a Regency years ago that had an unusual plot- a couple struggling to conceive and the associated social fallout. They fell in love all over again through the adversity- it was a great device.
    Anyway, sure I will love the Beau book and hope I win the advance copy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  2. I really appreciate your honesty Jo! It’s hard to strike a balance between that lovely familiarity with and affection for established characters and the excitement and challenge of new ones. As a reader I think that the issue is we all fell in love with the Rogues a little (Miles is my favourite) and therefore want them to be happy and to see them happy- although inherently wedded bliss isn’t always super exciting! That said, would you consider a follow up? I read a Regency years ago that had an unusual plot- a couple struggling to conceive and the associated social fallout. They fell in love all over again through the adversity- it was a great device.
    Anyway, sure I will love the Beau book and hope I win the advance copy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  3. I really appreciate your honesty Jo! It’s hard to strike a balance between that lovely familiarity with and affection for established characters and the excitement and challenge of new ones. As a reader I think that the issue is we all fell in love with the Rogues a little (Miles is my favourite) and therefore want them to be happy and to see them happy- although inherently wedded bliss isn’t always super exciting! That said, would you consider a follow up? I read a Regency years ago that had an unusual plot- a couple struggling to conceive and the associated social fallout. They fell in love all over again through the adversity- it was a great device.
    Anyway, sure I will love the Beau book and hope I win the advance copy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  4. I really appreciate your honesty Jo! It’s hard to strike a balance between that lovely familiarity with and affection for established characters and the excitement and challenge of new ones. As a reader I think that the issue is we all fell in love with the Rogues a little (Miles is my favourite) and therefore want them to be happy and to see them happy- although inherently wedded bliss isn’t always super exciting! That said, would you consider a follow up? I read a Regency years ago that had an unusual plot- a couple struggling to conceive and the associated social fallout. They fell in love all over again through the adversity- it was a great device.
    Anyway, sure I will love the Beau book and hope I win the advance copy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  5. I really appreciate your honesty Jo! It’s hard to strike a balance between that lovely familiarity with and affection for established characters and the excitement and challenge of new ones. As a reader I think that the issue is we all fell in love with the Rogues a little (Miles is my favourite) and therefore want them to be happy and to see them happy- although inherently wedded bliss isn’t always super exciting! That said, would you consider a follow up? I read a Regency years ago that had an unusual plot- a couple struggling to conceive and the associated social fallout. They fell in love all over again through the adversity- it was a great device.
    Anyway, sure I will love the Beau book and hope I win the advance copy πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  6. I love series of historical romances, however, as long as the book is enjoyable, I don’t really care if it’s in a series or not.
    All that matters is that the story will have us clenched to the book, hoping to finish as soon as possible and, at the same time, never finish it, because it’s so good!
    I do have a small preference for series, but, as I said, I don’t mind at all if the book is a stand-alone, especially if it is in a world I’d love.

    Reply
  7. I love series of historical romances, however, as long as the book is enjoyable, I don’t really care if it’s in a series or not.
    All that matters is that the story will have us clenched to the book, hoping to finish as soon as possible and, at the same time, never finish it, because it’s so good!
    I do have a small preference for series, but, as I said, I don’t mind at all if the book is a stand-alone, especially if it is in a world I’d love.

    Reply
  8. I love series of historical romances, however, as long as the book is enjoyable, I don’t really care if it’s in a series or not.
    All that matters is that the story will have us clenched to the book, hoping to finish as soon as possible and, at the same time, never finish it, because it’s so good!
    I do have a small preference for series, but, as I said, I don’t mind at all if the book is a stand-alone, especially if it is in a world I’d love.

    Reply
  9. I love series of historical romances, however, as long as the book is enjoyable, I don’t really care if it’s in a series or not.
    All that matters is that the story will have us clenched to the book, hoping to finish as soon as possible and, at the same time, never finish it, because it’s so good!
    I do have a small preference for series, but, as I said, I don’t mind at all if the book is a stand-alone, especially if it is in a world I’d love.

    Reply
  10. I love series of historical romances, however, as long as the book is enjoyable, I don’t really care if it’s in a series or not.
    All that matters is that the story will have us clenched to the book, hoping to finish as soon as possible and, at the same time, never finish it, because it’s so good!
    I do have a small preference for series, but, as I said, I don’t mind at all if the book is a stand-alone, especially if it is in a world I’d love.

    Reply
  11. I love series, but not every book needs to be one. However, I do love glimpses of previous characters mentioned or seen. Just checking in and seeing what’ they are up to.

    Reply
  12. I love series, but not every book needs to be one. However, I do love glimpses of previous characters mentioned or seen. Just checking in and seeing what’ they are up to.

    Reply
  13. I love series, but not every book needs to be one. However, I do love glimpses of previous characters mentioned or seen. Just checking in and seeing what’ they are up to.

    Reply
  14. I love series, but not every book needs to be one. However, I do love glimpses of previous characters mentioned or seen. Just checking in and seeing what’ they are up to.

    Reply
  15. I love series, but not every book needs to be one. However, I do love glimpses of previous characters mentioned or seen. Just checking in and seeing what’ they are up to.

    Reply
  16. I am parched-in-the desert thirsty for some stanadlones, so I am thrilled to read this post. There’s something exciting in starting with fresh characters and a new adventure, old friends off happily-ever-aftering as they well deserve.

    Reply
  17. I am parched-in-the desert thirsty for some stanadlones, so I am thrilled to read this post. There’s something exciting in starting with fresh characters and a new adventure, old friends off happily-ever-aftering as they well deserve.

    Reply
  18. I am parched-in-the desert thirsty for some stanadlones, so I am thrilled to read this post. There’s something exciting in starting with fresh characters and a new adventure, old friends off happily-ever-aftering as they well deserve.

    Reply
  19. I am parched-in-the desert thirsty for some stanadlones, so I am thrilled to read this post. There’s something exciting in starting with fresh characters and a new adventure, old friends off happily-ever-aftering as they well deserve.

    Reply
  20. I am parched-in-the desert thirsty for some stanadlones, so I am thrilled to read this post. There’s something exciting in starting with fresh characters and a new adventure, old friends off happily-ever-aftering as they well deserve.

    Reply
  21. Usually I love series, historical or contemporary, if I can see a leading thread I’m compelled to read every book, I love to find again past heroes, to follow their lives… But problem with series it’s that at some point you run out of ideas, and then eventually the stories loose their originality so maybe at a certain point it’s better to leave the old characters live their gained lives….(😱) and going on with new characters as you are doing, sometimes a hint of a rogue dropped in the new stories will recall us of them with satisfaction. All in all I read your books not just because of a serie but because I love your writing, your heroes and the way you drag me in your characters feelings. Hoping to have written correctly….
    Ciao from Rome !

    Reply
  22. Usually I love series, historical or contemporary, if I can see a leading thread I’m compelled to read every book, I love to find again past heroes, to follow their lives… But problem with series it’s that at some point you run out of ideas, and then eventually the stories loose their originality so maybe at a certain point it’s better to leave the old characters live their gained lives….(😱) and going on with new characters as you are doing, sometimes a hint of a rogue dropped in the new stories will recall us of them with satisfaction. All in all I read your books not just because of a serie but because I love your writing, your heroes and the way you drag me in your characters feelings. Hoping to have written correctly….
    Ciao from Rome !

    Reply
  23. Usually I love series, historical or contemporary, if I can see a leading thread I’m compelled to read every book, I love to find again past heroes, to follow their lives… But problem with series it’s that at some point you run out of ideas, and then eventually the stories loose their originality so maybe at a certain point it’s better to leave the old characters live their gained lives….(😱) and going on with new characters as you are doing, sometimes a hint of a rogue dropped in the new stories will recall us of them with satisfaction. All in all I read your books not just because of a serie but because I love your writing, your heroes and the way you drag me in your characters feelings. Hoping to have written correctly….
    Ciao from Rome !

    Reply
  24. Usually I love series, historical or contemporary, if I can see a leading thread I’m compelled to read every book, I love to find again past heroes, to follow their lives… But problem with series it’s that at some point you run out of ideas, and then eventually the stories loose their originality so maybe at a certain point it’s better to leave the old characters live their gained lives….(😱) and going on with new characters as you are doing, sometimes a hint of a rogue dropped in the new stories will recall us of them with satisfaction. All in all I read your books not just because of a serie but because I love your writing, your heroes and the way you drag me in your characters feelings. Hoping to have written correctly….
    Ciao from Rome !

    Reply
  25. Usually I love series, historical or contemporary, if I can see a leading thread I’m compelled to read every book, I love to find again past heroes, to follow their lives… But problem with series it’s that at some point you run out of ideas, and then eventually the stories loose their originality so maybe at a certain point it’s better to leave the old characters live their gained lives….(😱) and going on with new characters as you are doing, sometimes a hint of a rogue dropped in the new stories will recall us of them with satisfaction. All in all I read your books not just because of a serie but because I love your writing, your heroes and the way you drag me in your characters feelings. Hoping to have written correctly….
    Ciao from Rome !

    Reply
  26. I like series because you get to maintain a relationship with characters over a period of time. Always good to know that there is another great book/story to follow when you finish the current book. I agree with you that there is no point in forcing a character into a story just because the stories are contemporaneous.
    A pleasure to read anything you write – would love to win an ARC

    Reply
  27. I like series because you get to maintain a relationship with characters over a period of time. Always good to know that there is another great book/story to follow when you finish the current book. I agree with you that there is no point in forcing a character into a story just because the stories are contemporaneous.
    A pleasure to read anything you write – would love to win an ARC

    Reply
  28. I like series because you get to maintain a relationship with characters over a period of time. Always good to know that there is another great book/story to follow when you finish the current book. I agree with you that there is no point in forcing a character into a story just because the stories are contemporaneous.
    A pleasure to read anything you write – would love to win an ARC

    Reply
  29. I like series because you get to maintain a relationship with characters over a period of time. Always good to know that there is another great book/story to follow when you finish the current book. I agree with you that there is no point in forcing a character into a story just because the stories are contemporaneous.
    A pleasure to read anything you write – would love to win an ARC

    Reply
  30. I like series because you get to maintain a relationship with characters over a period of time. Always good to know that there is another great book/story to follow when you finish the current book. I agree with you that there is no point in forcing a character into a story just because the stories are contemporaneous.
    A pleasure to read anything you write – would love to win an ARC

    Reply
  31. A follow up is possible, Lucy, but I prefer to think of their lives as smooth and happy.
    I’m more likely to write something about a friend or relative. If it comes naturally to me. I’m not going to strain for it!

    Reply
  32. A follow up is possible, Lucy, but I prefer to think of their lives as smooth and happy.
    I’m more likely to write something about a friend or relative. If it comes naturally to me. I’m not going to strain for it!

    Reply
  33. A follow up is possible, Lucy, but I prefer to think of their lives as smooth and happy.
    I’m more likely to write something about a friend or relative. If it comes naturally to me. I’m not going to strain for it!

    Reply
  34. A follow up is possible, Lucy, but I prefer to think of their lives as smooth and happy.
    I’m more likely to write something about a friend or relative. If it comes naturally to me. I’m not going to strain for it!

    Reply
  35. A follow up is possible, Lucy, but I prefer to think of their lives as smooth and happy.
    I’m more likely to write something about a friend or relative. If it comes naturally to me. I’m not going to strain for it!

    Reply
  36. While I enjoy a good romance series, and I think the original Rogue series is one of the best, I love standalone books. I feel like the romance publishing world’s obsession with series has started to get sort of ridiculous. I actually make a point of seeking out standalone books and look forward to meeting new characters. Kudos for your honesty and I can’t wait to read The Viscount Needs a Wife.

    Reply
  37. While I enjoy a good romance series, and I think the original Rogue series is one of the best, I love standalone books. I feel like the romance publishing world’s obsession with series has started to get sort of ridiculous. I actually make a point of seeking out standalone books and look forward to meeting new characters. Kudos for your honesty and I can’t wait to read The Viscount Needs a Wife.

    Reply
  38. While I enjoy a good romance series, and I think the original Rogue series is one of the best, I love standalone books. I feel like the romance publishing world’s obsession with series has started to get sort of ridiculous. I actually make a point of seeking out standalone books and look forward to meeting new characters. Kudos for your honesty and I can’t wait to read The Viscount Needs a Wife.

    Reply
  39. While I enjoy a good romance series, and I think the original Rogue series is one of the best, I love standalone books. I feel like the romance publishing world’s obsession with series has started to get sort of ridiculous. I actually make a point of seeking out standalone books and look forward to meeting new characters. Kudos for your honesty and I can’t wait to read The Viscount Needs a Wife.

    Reply
  40. While I enjoy a good romance series, and I think the original Rogue series is one of the best, I love standalone books. I feel like the romance publishing world’s obsession with series has started to get sort of ridiculous. I actually make a point of seeking out standalone books and look forward to meeting new characters. Kudos for your honesty and I can’t wait to read The Viscount Needs a Wife.

    Reply
  41. I’ve always written series for exactly the reason you give, Carolyn. To stick with characters over a period of time. But all good things come to an end!

    Reply
  42. I’ve always written series for exactly the reason you give, Carolyn. To stick with characters over a period of time. But all good things come to an end!

    Reply
  43. I’ve always written series for exactly the reason you give, Carolyn. To stick with characters over a period of time. But all good things come to an end!

    Reply
  44. I’ve always written series for exactly the reason you give, Carolyn. To stick with characters over a period of time. But all good things come to an end!

    Reply
  45. I’ve always written series for exactly the reason you give, Carolyn. To stick with characters over a period of time. But all good things come to an end!

    Reply
  46. Although following a series is fun – as you get far more out of the characters and it is satisfying to see their lives continue a part of someone else’s story – it is also intriguing to meet new characters who are in the same setting but not of the same circle. Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all – but stand alone books can be equally as satisfying.

    Reply
  47. Although following a series is fun – as you get far more out of the characters and it is satisfying to see their lives continue a part of someone else’s story – it is also intriguing to meet new characters who are in the same setting but not of the same circle. Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all – but stand alone books can be equally as satisfying.

    Reply
  48. Although following a series is fun – as you get far more out of the characters and it is satisfying to see their lives continue a part of someone else’s story – it is also intriguing to meet new characters who are in the same setting but not of the same circle. Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all – but stand alone books can be equally as satisfying.

    Reply
  49. Although following a series is fun – as you get far more out of the characters and it is satisfying to see their lives continue a part of someone else’s story – it is also intriguing to meet new characters who are in the same setting but not of the same circle. Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all – but stand alone books can be equally as satisfying.

    Reply
  50. Although following a series is fun – as you get far more out of the characters and it is satisfying to see their lives continue a part of someone else’s story – it is also intriguing to meet new characters who are in the same setting but not of the same circle. Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all – but stand alone books can be equally as satisfying.

    Reply
  51. I like a series, but I don’t like them to be too long. Six to eight books seems the ideal length to me. They seem to run out of steam after a while.
    I too, like to see characters from other books make cameo appearances. Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.

    Reply
  52. I like a series, but I don’t like them to be too long. Six to eight books seems the ideal length to me. They seem to run out of steam after a while.
    I too, like to see characters from other books make cameo appearances. Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.

    Reply
  53. I like a series, but I don’t like them to be too long. Six to eight books seems the ideal length to me. They seem to run out of steam after a while.
    I too, like to see characters from other books make cameo appearances. Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.

    Reply
  54. I like a series, but I don’t like them to be too long. Six to eight books seems the ideal length to me. They seem to run out of steam after a while.
    I too, like to see characters from other books make cameo appearances. Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.

    Reply
  55. I like a series, but I don’t like them to be too long. Six to eight books seems the ideal length to me. They seem to run out of steam after a while.
    I too, like to see characters from other books make cameo appearances. Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.

    Reply
  56. While I thoroughly love your Rogues world, I am frustrated with so many series from authors who seem to use the genre to “hook” us into buying the next book-and the next.
    I read a lot, and stand alone book so less stressful as I don’t have to look back at previous stories to remember the characters from books I read months before.

    Reply
  57. While I thoroughly love your Rogues world, I am frustrated with so many series from authors who seem to use the genre to “hook” us into buying the next book-and the next.
    I read a lot, and stand alone book so less stressful as I don’t have to look back at previous stories to remember the characters from books I read months before.

    Reply
  58. While I thoroughly love your Rogues world, I am frustrated with so many series from authors who seem to use the genre to “hook” us into buying the next book-and the next.
    I read a lot, and stand alone book so less stressful as I don’t have to look back at previous stories to remember the characters from books I read months before.

    Reply
  59. While I thoroughly love your Rogues world, I am frustrated with so many series from authors who seem to use the genre to “hook” us into buying the next book-and the next.
    I read a lot, and stand alone book so less stressful as I don’t have to look back at previous stories to remember the characters from books I read months before.

    Reply
  60. While I thoroughly love your Rogues world, I am frustrated with so many series from authors who seem to use the genre to “hook” us into buying the next book-and the next.
    I read a lot, and stand alone book so less stressful as I don’t have to look back at previous stories to remember the characters from books I read months before.

    Reply
  61. Series, yes. If there is a legitimate way for a Rogue to appear, yes,
    But you know what? I really like your writing. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t have finished your series in the first place.
    So if they reasonably fit, fine. If they don’t, I’ll still keep reading!

    Reply
  62. Series, yes. If there is a legitimate way for a Rogue to appear, yes,
    But you know what? I really like your writing. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t have finished your series in the first place.
    So if they reasonably fit, fine. If they don’t, I’ll still keep reading!

    Reply
  63. Series, yes. If there is a legitimate way for a Rogue to appear, yes,
    But you know what? I really like your writing. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t have finished your series in the first place.
    So if they reasonably fit, fine. If they don’t, I’ll still keep reading!

    Reply
  64. Series, yes. If there is a legitimate way for a Rogue to appear, yes,
    But you know what? I really like your writing. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t have finished your series in the first place.
    So if they reasonably fit, fine. If they don’t, I’ll still keep reading!

    Reply
  65. Series, yes. If there is a legitimate way for a Rogue to appear, yes,
    But you know what? I really like your writing. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t have finished your series in the first place.
    So if they reasonably fit, fine. If they don’t, I’ll still keep reading!

    Reply
  66. I discovered Mary Balogh and Mary Jo Putney before series became popular and I never missed a book, just as I have never missed a Company of Rogues book. I love Grace Burrowes and you need a chart to link her intertwining characters. If a book keeps me turning the pages to find out what happens to these characters, it doesn’t matter if it’s stand aone or part of a series! That is the ultimate test!
    You have missed one Rogue. Hal Beaumont and Blanche never had their story. Maybe you could write at least a novella of how he convinces her to marry him.

    Reply
  67. I discovered Mary Balogh and Mary Jo Putney before series became popular and I never missed a book, just as I have never missed a Company of Rogues book. I love Grace Burrowes and you need a chart to link her intertwining characters. If a book keeps me turning the pages to find out what happens to these characters, it doesn’t matter if it’s stand aone or part of a series! That is the ultimate test!
    You have missed one Rogue. Hal Beaumont and Blanche never had their story. Maybe you could write at least a novella of how he convinces her to marry him.

    Reply
  68. I discovered Mary Balogh and Mary Jo Putney before series became popular and I never missed a book, just as I have never missed a Company of Rogues book. I love Grace Burrowes and you need a chart to link her intertwining characters. If a book keeps me turning the pages to find out what happens to these characters, it doesn’t matter if it’s stand aone or part of a series! That is the ultimate test!
    You have missed one Rogue. Hal Beaumont and Blanche never had their story. Maybe you could write at least a novella of how he convinces her to marry him.

    Reply
  69. I discovered Mary Balogh and Mary Jo Putney before series became popular and I never missed a book, just as I have never missed a Company of Rogues book. I love Grace Burrowes and you need a chart to link her intertwining characters. If a book keeps me turning the pages to find out what happens to these characters, it doesn’t matter if it’s stand aone or part of a series! That is the ultimate test!
    You have missed one Rogue. Hal Beaumont and Blanche never had their story. Maybe you could write at least a novella of how he convinces her to marry him.

    Reply
  70. I discovered Mary Balogh and Mary Jo Putney before series became popular and I never missed a book, just as I have never missed a Company of Rogues book. I love Grace Burrowes and you need a chart to link her intertwining characters. If a book keeps me turning the pages to find out what happens to these characters, it doesn’t matter if it’s stand aone or part of a series! That is the ultimate test!
    You have missed one Rogue. Hal Beaumont and Blanche never had their story. Maybe you could write at least a novella of how he convinces her to marry him.

    Reply
  71. I stand with most of your readers. I love series, even those that go beyond the original characters, stories of the children for example (Stephanie Laurens), but I can go with you for a new series. I collect all of your books to read again and again. I too would love an ARC.

    Reply
  72. I stand with most of your readers. I love series, even those that go beyond the original characters, stories of the children for example (Stephanie Laurens), but I can go with you for a new series. I collect all of your books to read again and again. I too would love an ARC.

    Reply
  73. I stand with most of your readers. I love series, even those that go beyond the original characters, stories of the children for example (Stephanie Laurens), but I can go with you for a new series. I collect all of your books to read again and again. I too would love an ARC.

    Reply
  74. I stand with most of your readers. I love series, even those that go beyond the original characters, stories of the children for example (Stephanie Laurens), but I can go with you for a new series. I collect all of your books to read again and again. I too would love an ARC.

    Reply
  75. I stand with most of your readers. I love series, even those that go beyond the original characters, stories of the children for example (Stephanie Laurens), but I can go with you for a new series. I collect all of your books to read again and again. I too would love an ARC.

    Reply
  76. I very much enjoy your “Rogue” series but just enjoy Regency historical novels as my go to reading. The inner connection of the stories made me go back and re read many of the books…spaced years apart and just enlarged my enjoyment! Please keep writing as you are one of the best!

    Reply
  77. I very much enjoy your “Rogue” series but just enjoy Regency historical novels as my go to reading. The inner connection of the stories made me go back and re read many of the books…spaced years apart and just enlarged my enjoyment! Please keep writing as you are one of the best!

    Reply
  78. I very much enjoy your “Rogue” series but just enjoy Regency historical novels as my go to reading. The inner connection of the stories made me go back and re read many of the books…spaced years apart and just enlarged my enjoyment! Please keep writing as you are one of the best!

    Reply
  79. I very much enjoy your “Rogue” series but just enjoy Regency historical novels as my go to reading. The inner connection of the stories made me go back and re read many of the books…spaced years apart and just enlarged my enjoyment! Please keep writing as you are one of the best!

    Reply
  80. I very much enjoy your “Rogue” series but just enjoy Regency historical novels as my go to reading. The inner connection of the stories made me go back and re read many of the books…spaced years apart and just enlarged my enjoyment! Please keep writing as you are one of the best!

    Reply
  81. This is the first series that I started reading and it is very special to me. I love the Rogues! It lead me to the Malloren world and I love that series, as well. I knew the Rogues would eventually end, they had to, there were only so many of them. I must admit though, I was secretly hoping that the two you killed off would have miraculously came back due to some sort of mistake in their identities, but I understand your reasoning there. As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…I’m ALL in there, too. Thank you, Jo, for filling us in.

    Reply
  82. This is the first series that I started reading and it is very special to me. I love the Rogues! It lead me to the Malloren world and I love that series, as well. I knew the Rogues would eventually end, they had to, there were only so many of them. I must admit though, I was secretly hoping that the two you killed off would have miraculously came back due to some sort of mistake in their identities, but I understand your reasoning there. As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…I’m ALL in there, too. Thank you, Jo, for filling us in.

    Reply
  83. This is the first series that I started reading and it is very special to me. I love the Rogues! It lead me to the Malloren world and I love that series, as well. I knew the Rogues would eventually end, they had to, there were only so many of them. I must admit though, I was secretly hoping that the two you killed off would have miraculously came back due to some sort of mistake in their identities, but I understand your reasoning there. As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…I’m ALL in there, too. Thank you, Jo, for filling us in.

    Reply
  84. This is the first series that I started reading and it is very special to me. I love the Rogues! It lead me to the Malloren world and I love that series, as well. I knew the Rogues would eventually end, they had to, there were only so many of them. I must admit though, I was secretly hoping that the two you killed off would have miraculously came back due to some sort of mistake in their identities, but I understand your reasoning there. As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…I’m ALL in there, too. Thank you, Jo, for filling us in.

    Reply
  85. This is the first series that I started reading and it is very special to me. I love the Rogues! It lead me to the Malloren world and I love that series, as well. I knew the Rogues would eventually end, they had to, there were only so many of them. I must admit though, I was secretly hoping that the two you killed off would have miraculously came back due to some sort of mistake in their identities, but I understand your reasoning there. As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…I’m ALL in there, too. Thank you, Jo, for filling us in.

    Reply
  86. I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)
    When I read an entire series, it’s not because I want to know more about that particular group of characters, but because I like the kind of characters that author creates, if that makes sense. SO in a way, any books an author writes, especially those set in a particular time or place, are part of a series. I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.

    Reply
  87. I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)
    When I read an entire series, it’s not because I want to know more about that particular group of characters, but because I like the kind of characters that author creates, if that makes sense. SO in a way, any books an author writes, especially those set in a particular time or place, are part of a series. I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.

    Reply
  88. I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)
    When I read an entire series, it’s not because I want to know more about that particular group of characters, but because I like the kind of characters that author creates, if that makes sense. SO in a way, any books an author writes, especially those set in a particular time or place, are part of a series. I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.

    Reply
  89. I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)
    When I read an entire series, it’s not because I want to know more about that particular group of characters, but because I like the kind of characters that author creates, if that makes sense. SO in a way, any books an author writes, especially those set in a particular time or place, are part of a series. I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.

    Reply
  90. I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)
    When I read an entire series, it’s not because I want to know more about that particular group of characters, but because I like the kind of characters that author creates, if that makes sense. SO in a way, any books an author writes, especially those set in a particular time or place, are part of a series. I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.

    Reply
  91. I’m fine with stand-alone titles. I’m more concerned about good plots and accurate portrayals of the period, two areas in which you excel! I’ve been reading a series, NOT by a Wench, that has me grinding my teeth over the anachronisms. Reading TVNAW will be a pleasure. (And now you’ve got me worried about Leander….)

    Reply
  92. I’m fine with stand-alone titles. I’m more concerned about good plots and accurate portrayals of the period, two areas in which you excel! I’ve been reading a series, NOT by a Wench, that has me grinding my teeth over the anachronisms. Reading TVNAW will be a pleasure. (And now you’ve got me worried about Leander….)

    Reply
  93. I’m fine with stand-alone titles. I’m more concerned about good plots and accurate portrayals of the period, two areas in which you excel! I’ve been reading a series, NOT by a Wench, that has me grinding my teeth over the anachronisms. Reading TVNAW will be a pleasure. (And now you’ve got me worried about Leander….)

    Reply
  94. I’m fine with stand-alone titles. I’m more concerned about good plots and accurate portrayals of the period, two areas in which you excel! I’ve been reading a series, NOT by a Wench, that has me grinding my teeth over the anachronisms. Reading TVNAW will be a pleasure. (And now you’ve got me worried about Leander….)

    Reply
  95. I’m fine with stand-alone titles. I’m more concerned about good plots and accurate portrayals of the period, two areas in which you excel! I’ve been reading a series, NOT by a Wench, that has me grinding my teeth over the anachronisms. Reading TVNAW will be a pleasure. (And now you’ve got me worried about Leander….)

    Reply
  96. I love series in which you get to see how some of your favourite characters are getting on, and be introduced to new favourites, whose stories I can happily anticipate. It is sad when a series ends, but in most cases they must. You can’t just keep inventing new long lost relations to keep the readers insatiable appetites satisfied (well, I suppose you could, but it would get rather boring after a while!). I loved the rogues, and wish that Roger and Allen had been a wee bit more careful on the Peninsula, but you are at the logical place to stop. One day, when Victorian stories come back in vogue maybe a shoot off series about the rogues children would be nice. I’d like especially to know what becomes of the Rossiter kids, and Arabella! However, I will enjoy a new group of heroes and heroines as well, and look forward to these lovely new characters!

    Reply
  97. I love series in which you get to see how some of your favourite characters are getting on, and be introduced to new favourites, whose stories I can happily anticipate. It is sad when a series ends, but in most cases they must. You can’t just keep inventing new long lost relations to keep the readers insatiable appetites satisfied (well, I suppose you could, but it would get rather boring after a while!). I loved the rogues, and wish that Roger and Allen had been a wee bit more careful on the Peninsula, but you are at the logical place to stop. One day, when Victorian stories come back in vogue maybe a shoot off series about the rogues children would be nice. I’d like especially to know what becomes of the Rossiter kids, and Arabella! However, I will enjoy a new group of heroes and heroines as well, and look forward to these lovely new characters!

    Reply
  98. I love series in which you get to see how some of your favourite characters are getting on, and be introduced to new favourites, whose stories I can happily anticipate. It is sad when a series ends, but in most cases they must. You can’t just keep inventing new long lost relations to keep the readers insatiable appetites satisfied (well, I suppose you could, but it would get rather boring after a while!). I loved the rogues, and wish that Roger and Allen had been a wee bit more careful on the Peninsula, but you are at the logical place to stop. One day, when Victorian stories come back in vogue maybe a shoot off series about the rogues children would be nice. I’d like especially to know what becomes of the Rossiter kids, and Arabella! However, I will enjoy a new group of heroes and heroines as well, and look forward to these lovely new characters!

    Reply
  99. I love series in which you get to see how some of your favourite characters are getting on, and be introduced to new favourites, whose stories I can happily anticipate. It is sad when a series ends, but in most cases they must. You can’t just keep inventing new long lost relations to keep the readers insatiable appetites satisfied (well, I suppose you could, but it would get rather boring after a while!). I loved the rogues, and wish that Roger and Allen had been a wee bit more careful on the Peninsula, but you are at the logical place to stop. One day, when Victorian stories come back in vogue maybe a shoot off series about the rogues children would be nice. I’d like especially to know what becomes of the Rossiter kids, and Arabella! However, I will enjoy a new group of heroes and heroines as well, and look forward to these lovely new characters!

    Reply
  100. I love series in which you get to see how some of your favourite characters are getting on, and be introduced to new favourites, whose stories I can happily anticipate. It is sad when a series ends, but in most cases they must. You can’t just keep inventing new long lost relations to keep the readers insatiable appetites satisfied (well, I suppose you could, but it would get rather boring after a while!). I loved the rogues, and wish that Roger and Allen had been a wee bit more careful on the Peninsula, but you are at the logical place to stop. One day, when Victorian stories come back in vogue maybe a shoot off series about the rogues children would be nice. I’d like especially to know what becomes of the Rossiter kids, and Arabella! However, I will enjoy a new group of heroes and heroines as well, and look forward to these lovely new characters!

    Reply
  101. I’ll happily read stand alones or series books. But when I know a book is part of a series, I long to see the previous characters and find out how they’re doing. If I recall correctly, in your recent book, a couple of the Rogues appeared, but I missed seeing their wives!
    And I regretted that you sent Cyn Malloren off to Canada, because he was my favorite Malloren brother, and I wanted to see him again.

    Reply
  102. I’ll happily read stand alones or series books. But when I know a book is part of a series, I long to see the previous characters and find out how they’re doing. If I recall correctly, in your recent book, a couple of the Rogues appeared, but I missed seeing their wives!
    And I regretted that you sent Cyn Malloren off to Canada, because he was my favorite Malloren brother, and I wanted to see him again.

    Reply
  103. I’ll happily read stand alones or series books. But when I know a book is part of a series, I long to see the previous characters and find out how they’re doing. If I recall correctly, in your recent book, a couple of the Rogues appeared, but I missed seeing their wives!
    And I regretted that you sent Cyn Malloren off to Canada, because he was my favorite Malloren brother, and I wanted to see him again.

    Reply
  104. I’ll happily read stand alones or series books. But when I know a book is part of a series, I long to see the previous characters and find out how they’re doing. If I recall correctly, in your recent book, a couple of the Rogues appeared, but I missed seeing their wives!
    And I regretted that you sent Cyn Malloren off to Canada, because he was my favorite Malloren brother, and I wanted to see him again.

    Reply
  105. I’ll happily read stand alones or series books. But when I know a book is part of a series, I long to see the previous characters and find out how they’re doing. If I recall correctly, in your recent book, a couple of the Rogues appeared, but I missed seeing their wives!
    And I regretted that you sent Cyn Malloren off to Canada, because he was my favorite Malloren brother, and I wanted to see him again.

    Reply
  106. What they all said (oddly enough including that I read Balogh and Putney before I met you).
    I do love series. I also love stand-alones. I truly believe that authors write best (and thereby better satisfy their readers) when they write what they (the authors) want to write. DO NOT force older characters into your books. Follow your muse and we your devoted readers will continue to follow you.

    Reply
  107. What they all said (oddly enough including that I read Balogh and Putney before I met you).
    I do love series. I also love stand-alones. I truly believe that authors write best (and thereby better satisfy their readers) when they write what they (the authors) want to write. DO NOT force older characters into your books. Follow your muse and we your devoted readers will continue to follow you.

    Reply
  108. What they all said (oddly enough including that I read Balogh and Putney before I met you).
    I do love series. I also love stand-alones. I truly believe that authors write best (and thereby better satisfy their readers) when they write what they (the authors) want to write. DO NOT force older characters into your books. Follow your muse and we your devoted readers will continue to follow you.

    Reply
  109. What they all said (oddly enough including that I read Balogh and Putney before I met you).
    I do love series. I also love stand-alones. I truly believe that authors write best (and thereby better satisfy their readers) when they write what they (the authors) want to write. DO NOT force older characters into your books. Follow your muse and we your devoted readers will continue to follow you.

    Reply
  110. What they all said (oddly enough including that I read Balogh and Putney before I met you).
    I do love series. I also love stand-alones. I truly believe that authors write best (and thereby better satisfy their readers) when they write what they (the authors) want to write. DO NOT force older characters into your books. Follow your muse and we your devoted readers will continue to follow you.

    Reply
  111. “Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all”
    So true, Louise. I don’t feel in any danger of losing the Rogues entirely, especially when it comes to the Season of 1818.

    Reply
  112. “Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all”
    So true, Louise. I don’t feel in any danger of losing the Rogues entirely, especially when it comes to the Season of 1818.

    Reply
  113. “Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all”
    So true, Louise. I don’t feel in any danger of losing the Rogues entirely, especially when it comes to the Season of 1818.

    Reply
  114. “Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all”
    So true, Louise. I don’t feel in any danger of losing the Rogues entirely, especially when it comes to the Season of 1818.

    Reply
  115. “Of course there will be some overlap – the TON were a comparatively small group after all”
    So true, Louise. I don’t feel in any danger of losing the Rogues entirely, especially when it comes to the Season of 1818.

    Reply
  116. ” Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.”
    That’s the big danger, Mary.

    Reply
  117. ” Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.”
    That’s the big danger, Mary.

    Reply
  118. ” Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.”
    That’s the big danger, Mary.

    Reply
  119. ” Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.”
    That’s the big danger, Mary.

    Reply
  120. ” Although, if you are not familiar with the series it can just seem like a lot of very irrelevant characters that have lines.”
    That’s the big danger, Mary.

    Reply
  121. It’s true that Hal and Blanche never had a book, but I do feel their story has been told.
    They both appear in The Viscount Needs a Wife, so you’ll see they’re happy.

    Reply
  122. It’s true that Hal and Blanche never had a book, but I do feel their story has been told.
    They both appear in The Viscount Needs a Wife, so you’ll see they’re happy.

    Reply
  123. It’s true that Hal and Blanche never had a book, but I do feel their story has been told.
    They both appear in The Viscount Needs a Wife, so you’ll see they’re happy.

    Reply
  124. It’s true that Hal and Blanche never had a book, but I do feel their story has been told.
    They both appear in The Viscount Needs a Wife, so you’ll see they’re happy.

    Reply
  125. It’s true that Hal and Blanche never had a book, but I do feel their story has been told.
    They both appear in The Viscount Needs a Wife, so you’ll see they’re happy.

    Reply
  126. “As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…”
    Thanks, Vicki! I don’t think I’ll start another series. I’ll just keep writing in my “worlds” and if past characters turn up, so be it.

    Reply
  127. “As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…”
    Thanks, Vicki! I don’t think I’ll start another series. I’ll just keep writing in my “worlds” and if past characters turn up, so be it.

    Reply
  128. “As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…”
    Thanks, Vicki! I don’t think I’ll start another series. I’ll just keep writing in my “worlds” and if past characters turn up, so be it.

    Reply
  129. “As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…”
    Thanks, Vicki! I don’t think I’ll start another series. I’ll just keep writing in my “worlds” and if past characters turn up, so be it.

    Reply
  130. “As far as stand alone books, I’m cool with them, they are by YOU! I’ve tried to track down every book by you, be they series, stand alone or compilations. There’s no way that I would stop reading your stories just because they aren’t a series but if you start another one…”
    Thanks, Vicki! I don’t think I’ll start another series. I’ll just keep writing in my “worlds” and if past characters turn up, so be it.

    Reply
  131. “I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.”
    Thank you, Lillian. That’s what I’m going to be doing.

    Reply
  132. “I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.”
    Thank you, Lillian. That’s what I’m going to be doing.

    Reply
  133. “I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.”
    Thank you, Lillian. That’s what I’m going to be doing.

    Reply
  134. “I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.”
    Thank you, Lillian. That’s what I’m going to be doing.

    Reply
  135. “I love books set in the Malloren world, but I don’t need any Mallorens to actually appear.”
    Thank you, Lillian. That’s what I’m going to be doing.

    Reply
  136. No need to worry about Leander, Linda. He’s just a bit annoyed that he popped up to London in time to be dragged into a delicate matter to do with the royal family.
    To quote: “β€œI am not,” Charrington said, β€œtraveling to Italy to interrogate the Princess of Wales on a matter of murder.””

    Reply
  137. No need to worry about Leander, Linda. He’s just a bit annoyed that he popped up to London in time to be dragged into a delicate matter to do with the royal family.
    To quote: “β€œI am not,” Charrington said, β€œtraveling to Italy to interrogate the Princess of Wales on a matter of murder.””

    Reply
  138. No need to worry about Leander, Linda. He’s just a bit annoyed that he popped up to London in time to be dragged into a delicate matter to do with the royal family.
    To quote: “β€œI am not,” Charrington said, β€œtraveling to Italy to interrogate the Princess of Wales on a matter of murder.””

    Reply
  139. No need to worry about Leander, Linda. He’s just a bit annoyed that he popped up to London in time to be dragged into a delicate matter to do with the royal family.
    To quote: “β€œI am not,” Charrington said, β€œtraveling to Italy to interrogate the Princess of Wales on a matter of murder.””

    Reply
  140. No need to worry about Leander, Linda. He’s just a bit annoyed that he popped up to London in time to be dragged into a delicate matter to do with the royal family.
    To quote: “β€œI am not,” Charrington said, β€œtraveling to Italy to interrogate the Princess of Wales on a matter of murder.””

    Reply
  141. I’m going to continue in the Rogues’ World, Jana, 1818 to 1820, and I’m unlikely to go into the children’s lives as I don’t like the Victorian age. So we’ll see who comes to me with a story to tell.

    Reply
  142. I’m going to continue in the Rogues’ World, Jana, 1818 to 1820, and I’m unlikely to go into the children’s lives as I don’t like the Victorian age. So we’ll see who comes to me with a story to tell.

    Reply
  143. I’m going to continue in the Rogues’ World, Jana, 1818 to 1820, and I’m unlikely to go into the children’s lives as I don’t like the Victorian age. So we’ll see who comes to me with a story to tell.

    Reply
  144. I’m going to continue in the Rogues’ World, Jana, 1818 to 1820, and I’m unlikely to go into the children’s lives as I don’t like the Victorian age. So we’ll see who comes to me with a story to tell.

    Reply
  145. I’m going to continue in the Rogues’ World, Jana, 1818 to 1820, and I’m unlikely to go into the children’s lives as I don’t like the Victorian age. So we’ll see who comes to me with a story to tell.

    Reply
  146. My first love is always a series because it feels like the story just keeps going and going without an ending! But with you writing the book, Jo, I will happily read it, as I know it will be good!

    Reply
  147. My first love is always a series because it feels like the story just keeps going and going without an ending! But with you writing the book, Jo, I will happily read it, as I know it will be good!

    Reply
  148. My first love is always a series because it feels like the story just keeps going and going without an ending! But with you writing the book, Jo, I will happily read it, as I know it will be good!

    Reply
  149. My first love is always a series because it feels like the story just keeps going and going without an ending! But with you writing the book, Jo, I will happily read it, as I know it will be good!

    Reply
  150. My first love is always a series because it feels like the story just keeps going and going without an ending! But with you writing the book, Jo, I will happily read it, as I know it will be good!

    Reply
  151. Don’t need series to enjoy your books as they are all enjoyable as stand alones. I like the Mallorans as well I’ d love to meet the viscount. Even in series I usually judge books on an individual basis.
    Write as the spirit moves. it will be a good story.

    Reply
  152. Don’t need series to enjoy your books as they are all enjoyable as stand alones. I like the Mallorans as well I’ d love to meet the viscount. Even in series I usually judge books on an individual basis.
    Write as the spirit moves. it will be a good story.

    Reply
  153. Don’t need series to enjoy your books as they are all enjoyable as stand alones. I like the Mallorans as well I’ d love to meet the viscount. Even in series I usually judge books on an individual basis.
    Write as the spirit moves. it will be a good story.

    Reply
  154. Don’t need series to enjoy your books as they are all enjoyable as stand alones. I like the Mallorans as well I’ d love to meet the viscount. Even in series I usually judge books on an individual basis.
    Write as the spirit moves. it will be a good story.

    Reply
  155. Don’t need series to enjoy your books as they are all enjoyable as stand alones. I like the Mallorans as well I’ d love to meet the viscount. Even in series I usually judge books on an individual basis.
    Write as the spirit moves. it will be a good story.

    Reply
  156. Jo, I love your books – they are on the keeper shelves!
    Every so often, I’ll run into a dry spell, when nothing seems to snag my interest. That’s when I go back to my favorites shelf and dive back into your Rogues series. By the time I’m finished, the world is fresh again, and I’m smiling!
    As long as you keep writing, I’ll keep reading that which you write. Live long and prosper!

    Reply
  157. Jo, I love your books – they are on the keeper shelves!
    Every so often, I’ll run into a dry spell, when nothing seems to snag my interest. That’s when I go back to my favorites shelf and dive back into your Rogues series. By the time I’m finished, the world is fresh again, and I’m smiling!
    As long as you keep writing, I’ll keep reading that which you write. Live long and prosper!

    Reply
  158. Jo, I love your books – they are on the keeper shelves!
    Every so often, I’ll run into a dry spell, when nothing seems to snag my interest. That’s when I go back to my favorites shelf and dive back into your Rogues series. By the time I’m finished, the world is fresh again, and I’m smiling!
    As long as you keep writing, I’ll keep reading that which you write. Live long and prosper!

    Reply
  159. Jo, I love your books – they are on the keeper shelves!
    Every so often, I’ll run into a dry spell, when nothing seems to snag my interest. That’s when I go back to my favorites shelf and dive back into your Rogues series. By the time I’m finished, the world is fresh again, and I’m smiling!
    As long as you keep writing, I’ll keep reading that which you write. Live long and prosper!

    Reply
  160. Jo, I love your books – they are on the keeper shelves!
    Every so often, I’ll run into a dry spell, when nothing seems to snag my interest. That’s when I go back to my favorites shelf and dive back into your Rogues series. By the time I’m finished, the world is fresh again, and I’m smiling!
    As long as you keep writing, I’ll keep reading that which you write. Live long and prosper!

    Reply
  161. “I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)”
    Exactly that! With the review books I get, I often get book #4 without ever even seeing or hearing about the earlier books. I want to be able to jump in anywhere.
    It can be fun to have a little more “insider knowledge” when you’ve read the other books in a series, but not to the point the newbie reader is completely lost.

    Reply
  162. “I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)”
    Exactly that! With the review books I get, I often get book #4 without ever even seeing or hearing about the earlier books. I want to be able to jump in anywhere.
    It can be fun to have a little more “insider knowledge” when you’ve read the other books in a series, but not to the point the newbie reader is completely lost.

    Reply
  163. “I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)”
    Exactly that! With the review books I get, I often get book #4 without ever even seeing or hearing about the earlier books. I want to be able to jump in anywhere.
    It can be fun to have a little more “insider knowledge” when you’ve read the other books in a series, but not to the point the newbie reader is completely lost.

    Reply
  164. “I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)”
    Exactly that! With the review books I get, I often get book #4 without ever even seeing or hearing about the earlier books. I want to be able to jump in anywhere.
    It can be fun to have a little more “insider knowledge” when you’ve read the other books in a series, but not to the point the newbie reader is completely lost.

    Reply
  165. “I tend to read all books as stand-alone, whether they are part of a series or not, and in a good series, like yours, the books are written in a way to make that possible. (As an aside, it would be foolish of authors not to do that, since there is no guarantee that the first book a reader picks up will be the first of a the series.)”
    Exactly that! With the review books I get, I often get book #4 without ever even seeing or hearing about the earlier books. I want to be able to jump in anywhere.
    It can be fun to have a little more “insider knowledge” when you’ve read the other books in a series, but not to the point the newbie reader is completely lost.

    Reply
  166. I am glad you have come to this very balanced decision. I do love the connections that appear in your books as it allows us some material to imagine the futures of our favourite characters but do agree that a series has a natural end. While I enjoyed the last two books I did not connect with them in the way I did with some of the earlier ones. It will be very interesting to explore a new set of people and their worlds while occasionally encountering old friends. It has always seemed unnatural that Heyer’s characters never went to a ball or picnic given by a contemporary from another book.

    Reply
  167. I am glad you have come to this very balanced decision. I do love the connections that appear in your books as it allows us some material to imagine the futures of our favourite characters but do agree that a series has a natural end. While I enjoyed the last two books I did not connect with them in the way I did with some of the earlier ones. It will be very interesting to explore a new set of people and their worlds while occasionally encountering old friends. It has always seemed unnatural that Heyer’s characters never went to a ball or picnic given by a contemporary from another book.

    Reply
  168. I am glad you have come to this very balanced decision. I do love the connections that appear in your books as it allows us some material to imagine the futures of our favourite characters but do agree that a series has a natural end. While I enjoyed the last two books I did not connect with them in the way I did with some of the earlier ones. It will be very interesting to explore a new set of people and their worlds while occasionally encountering old friends. It has always seemed unnatural that Heyer’s characters never went to a ball or picnic given by a contemporary from another book.

    Reply
  169. I am glad you have come to this very balanced decision. I do love the connections that appear in your books as it allows us some material to imagine the futures of our favourite characters but do agree that a series has a natural end. While I enjoyed the last two books I did not connect with them in the way I did with some of the earlier ones. It will be very interesting to explore a new set of people and their worlds while occasionally encountering old friends. It has always seemed unnatural that Heyer’s characters never went to a ball or picnic given by a contemporary from another book.

    Reply
  170. I am glad you have come to this very balanced decision. I do love the connections that appear in your books as it allows us some material to imagine the futures of our favourite characters but do agree that a series has a natural end. While I enjoyed the last two books I did not connect with them in the way I did with some of the earlier ones. It will be very interesting to explore a new set of people and their worlds while occasionally encountering old friends. It has always seemed unnatural that Heyer’s characters never went to a ball or picnic given by a contemporary from another book.

    Reply
  171. Your stories are always worth waiting for, whether they are in a series or not. So, take us on whatever journey you like, if it needs a Rogue or even a Malleron, then by all means write them in. New characters don’t need any group to shore them up, unless there’s still outlying intrigue left unexpectantly about that could harm your central character.

    Reply
  172. Your stories are always worth waiting for, whether they are in a series or not. So, take us on whatever journey you like, if it needs a Rogue or even a Malleron, then by all means write them in. New characters don’t need any group to shore them up, unless there’s still outlying intrigue left unexpectantly about that could harm your central character.

    Reply
  173. Your stories are always worth waiting for, whether they are in a series or not. So, take us on whatever journey you like, if it needs a Rogue or even a Malleron, then by all means write them in. New characters don’t need any group to shore them up, unless there’s still outlying intrigue left unexpectantly about that could harm your central character.

    Reply
  174. Your stories are always worth waiting for, whether they are in a series or not. So, take us on whatever journey you like, if it needs a Rogue or even a Malleron, then by all means write them in. New characters don’t need any group to shore them up, unless there’s still outlying intrigue left unexpectantly about that could harm your central character.

    Reply
  175. Your stories are always worth waiting for, whether they are in a series or not. So, take us on whatever journey you like, if it needs a Rogue or even a Malleron, then by all means write them in. New characters don’t need any group to shore them up, unless there’s still outlying intrigue left unexpectantly about that could harm your central character.

    Reply
  176. Jo, I think series books are enjoyable in part because they allow the reader to become familiar not only with the characters but also with the setting. I know a lot more about Regency-era London than I ever would have without your ( and others’) Regency romances! But like you, I need a bit of realism in my fantasy world. I’ve often thought it would be amusing to create an encyclpaedia of Regency romance aristocracy, a Parallel Universe Peerage, describing, linking and cross-referencing all the noble characters I have encountered in novels over the years What a tangled web that would be!
    I think I prefer stand-alone novels most of the time. Sometimes the later books in series can seem a bit contrived (not yours of course!). The exception for me is when secondary characters develop such compelling personas that they demand having a book of their own, and I get impatient for the novelist to write it.
    PS I don’t need the free copy. I always buy your booksπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ˜ƒπŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦

    Reply
  177. Jo, I think series books are enjoyable in part because they allow the reader to become familiar not only with the characters but also with the setting. I know a lot more about Regency-era London than I ever would have without your ( and others’) Regency romances! But like you, I need a bit of realism in my fantasy world. I’ve often thought it would be amusing to create an encyclpaedia of Regency romance aristocracy, a Parallel Universe Peerage, describing, linking and cross-referencing all the noble characters I have encountered in novels over the years What a tangled web that would be!
    I think I prefer stand-alone novels most of the time. Sometimes the later books in series can seem a bit contrived (not yours of course!). The exception for me is when secondary characters develop such compelling personas that they demand having a book of their own, and I get impatient for the novelist to write it.
    PS I don’t need the free copy. I always buy your booksπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ˜ƒπŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦

    Reply
  178. Jo, I think series books are enjoyable in part because they allow the reader to become familiar not only with the characters but also with the setting. I know a lot more about Regency-era London than I ever would have without your ( and others’) Regency romances! But like you, I need a bit of realism in my fantasy world. I’ve often thought it would be amusing to create an encyclpaedia of Regency romance aristocracy, a Parallel Universe Peerage, describing, linking and cross-referencing all the noble characters I have encountered in novels over the years What a tangled web that would be!
    I think I prefer stand-alone novels most of the time. Sometimes the later books in series can seem a bit contrived (not yours of course!). The exception for me is when secondary characters develop such compelling personas that they demand having a book of their own, and I get impatient for the novelist to write it.
    PS I don’t need the free copy. I always buy your booksπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ˜ƒπŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦

    Reply
  179. Jo, I think series books are enjoyable in part because they allow the reader to become familiar not only with the characters but also with the setting. I know a lot more about Regency-era London than I ever would have without your ( and others’) Regency romances! But like you, I need a bit of realism in my fantasy world. I’ve often thought it would be amusing to create an encyclpaedia of Regency romance aristocracy, a Parallel Universe Peerage, describing, linking and cross-referencing all the noble characters I have encountered in novels over the years What a tangled web that would be!
    I think I prefer stand-alone novels most of the time. Sometimes the later books in series can seem a bit contrived (not yours of course!). The exception for me is when secondary characters develop such compelling personas that they demand having a book of their own, and I get impatient for the novelist to write it.
    PS I don’t need the free copy. I always buy your booksπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ˜ƒπŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦

    Reply
  180. Jo, I think series books are enjoyable in part because they allow the reader to become familiar not only with the characters but also with the setting. I know a lot more about Regency-era London than I ever would have without your ( and others’) Regency romances! But like you, I need a bit of realism in my fantasy world. I’ve often thought it would be amusing to create an encyclpaedia of Regency romance aristocracy, a Parallel Universe Peerage, describing, linking and cross-referencing all the noble characters I have encountered in novels over the years What a tangled web that would be!
    I think I prefer stand-alone novels most of the time. Sometimes the later books in series can seem a bit contrived (not yours of course!). The exception for me is when secondary characters develop such compelling personas that they demand having a book of their own, and I get impatient for the novelist to write it.
    PS I don’t need the free copy. I always buy your booksπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§πŸ˜ƒπŸ‡¨πŸ‡¦

    Reply
  181. Hi Jo,
    I personally don’t read a series of books from one era. Mainly I purchase books at Library book sales or get them from my sisters. Can’t afford $4 to $8 bucks for a paperback. I love everything about the Rogues from your WordWench articles. I was not an early reader but found out I loved to read from my older sister (many, many yrs. ago) when we were both younger. She gave me a Phyllis Whitney or Georgette Heyer to read and I was hooked. So I read every night before sleep and it’s wonderful to go off with a story in my mind. Thanks so much for all the information from WordWenches I enjoy you articles very much. Diane

    Reply
  182. Hi Jo,
    I personally don’t read a series of books from one era. Mainly I purchase books at Library book sales or get them from my sisters. Can’t afford $4 to $8 bucks for a paperback. I love everything about the Rogues from your WordWench articles. I was not an early reader but found out I loved to read from my older sister (many, many yrs. ago) when we were both younger. She gave me a Phyllis Whitney or Georgette Heyer to read and I was hooked. So I read every night before sleep and it’s wonderful to go off with a story in my mind. Thanks so much for all the information from WordWenches I enjoy you articles very much. Diane

    Reply
  183. Hi Jo,
    I personally don’t read a series of books from one era. Mainly I purchase books at Library book sales or get them from my sisters. Can’t afford $4 to $8 bucks for a paperback. I love everything about the Rogues from your WordWench articles. I was not an early reader but found out I loved to read from my older sister (many, many yrs. ago) when we were both younger. She gave me a Phyllis Whitney or Georgette Heyer to read and I was hooked. So I read every night before sleep and it’s wonderful to go off with a story in my mind. Thanks so much for all the information from WordWenches I enjoy you articles very much. Diane

    Reply
  184. Hi Jo,
    I personally don’t read a series of books from one era. Mainly I purchase books at Library book sales or get them from my sisters. Can’t afford $4 to $8 bucks for a paperback. I love everything about the Rogues from your WordWench articles. I was not an early reader but found out I loved to read from my older sister (many, many yrs. ago) when we were both younger. She gave me a Phyllis Whitney or Georgette Heyer to read and I was hooked. So I read every night before sleep and it’s wonderful to go off with a story in my mind. Thanks so much for all the information from WordWenches I enjoy you articles very much. Diane

    Reply
  185. Hi Jo,
    I personally don’t read a series of books from one era. Mainly I purchase books at Library book sales or get them from my sisters. Can’t afford $4 to $8 bucks for a paperback. I love everything about the Rogues from your WordWench articles. I was not an early reader but found out I loved to read from my older sister (many, many yrs. ago) when we were both younger. She gave me a Phyllis Whitney or Georgette Heyer to read and I was hooked. So I read every night before sleep and it’s wonderful to go off with a story in my mind. Thanks so much for all the information from WordWenches I enjoy you articles very much. Diane

    Reply
  186. Sneaking in a Rogue in the background of a stand alone would be fun. As to anachronisms, the worst I remember was the heroine was sailing on a Clipper ship and eating chocolate bonbons long before they were invented! One series I started on in the second book had me going back to the first and so on. It comes out once a year! Set in WWII you get history, romance and watch the character grow. Billy Boyle Series. It reminds me of the Rogues as you care about all the characters and want to see them eventually happy. I am looking forward to your new book. Like you I love the Regencies and don’t like the Victorian era.

    Reply
  187. Sneaking in a Rogue in the background of a stand alone would be fun. As to anachronisms, the worst I remember was the heroine was sailing on a Clipper ship and eating chocolate bonbons long before they were invented! One series I started on in the second book had me going back to the first and so on. It comes out once a year! Set in WWII you get history, romance and watch the character grow. Billy Boyle Series. It reminds me of the Rogues as you care about all the characters and want to see them eventually happy. I am looking forward to your new book. Like you I love the Regencies and don’t like the Victorian era.

    Reply
  188. Sneaking in a Rogue in the background of a stand alone would be fun. As to anachronisms, the worst I remember was the heroine was sailing on a Clipper ship and eating chocolate bonbons long before they were invented! One series I started on in the second book had me going back to the first and so on. It comes out once a year! Set in WWII you get history, romance and watch the character grow. Billy Boyle Series. It reminds me of the Rogues as you care about all the characters and want to see them eventually happy. I am looking forward to your new book. Like you I love the Regencies and don’t like the Victorian era.

    Reply
  189. Sneaking in a Rogue in the background of a stand alone would be fun. As to anachronisms, the worst I remember was the heroine was sailing on a Clipper ship and eating chocolate bonbons long before they were invented! One series I started on in the second book had me going back to the first and so on. It comes out once a year! Set in WWII you get history, romance and watch the character grow. Billy Boyle Series. It reminds me of the Rogues as you care about all the characters and want to see them eventually happy. I am looking forward to your new book. Like you I love the Regencies and don’t like the Victorian era.

    Reply
  190. Sneaking in a Rogue in the background of a stand alone would be fun. As to anachronisms, the worst I remember was the heroine was sailing on a Clipper ship and eating chocolate bonbons long before they were invented! One series I started on in the second book had me going back to the first and so on. It comes out once a year! Set in WWII you get history, romance and watch the character grow. Billy Boyle Series. It reminds me of the Rogues as you care about all the characters and want to see them eventually happy. I am looking forward to your new book. Like you I love the Regencies and don’t like the Victorian era.

    Reply
  191. I have no problem with the hero/heroine living happily ever after. This is the Romance genre, after all. Cinderella fare. I also find that a secondary character in a series has to have their personality changed slightly to fit the hero/heroine mold when it is their turn to have their story told. Suddenly within a few months, someone turns from a wimp, or a young child, or a slightly vulgar person, or a follower to a leader with brilliant insight and understanding, etc. In modern series, I dislike that an entire town isn’t married and we have a series where everybody finds mr./ms. perfect. Bottom Line: I like standalones; I like serials when they stay strong, but would rather have standalones than repetition of plot, etc., However serials are indeed enjoyable when they maintain the same standards as the first one (the one which made me excited to anticipate the next.) Ending the Rogues was necessary. Their story was told. They deserve to be living happily ever after. Can’t stay on the great stage forever as the same persona. They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.

    Reply
  192. I have no problem with the hero/heroine living happily ever after. This is the Romance genre, after all. Cinderella fare. I also find that a secondary character in a series has to have their personality changed slightly to fit the hero/heroine mold when it is their turn to have their story told. Suddenly within a few months, someone turns from a wimp, or a young child, or a slightly vulgar person, or a follower to a leader with brilliant insight and understanding, etc. In modern series, I dislike that an entire town isn’t married and we have a series where everybody finds mr./ms. perfect. Bottom Line: I like standalones; I like serials when they stay strong, but would rather have standalones than repetition of plot, etc., However serials are indeed enjoyable when they maintain the same standards as the first one (the one which made me excited to anticipate the next.) Ending the Rogues was necessary. Their story was told. They deserve to be living happily ever after. Can’t stay on the great stage forever as the same persona. They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.

    Reply
  193. I have no problem with the hero/heroine living happily ever after. This is the Romance genre, after all. Cinderella fare. I also find that a secondary character in a series has to have their personality changed slightly to fit the hero/heroine mold when it is their turn to have their story told. Suddenly within a few months, someone turns from a wimp, or a young child, or a slightly vulgar person, or a follower to a leader with brilliant insight and understanding, etc. In modern series, I dislike that an entire town isn’t married and we have a series where everybody finds mr./ms. perfect. Bottom Line: I like standalones; I like serials when they stay strong, but would rather have standalones than repetition of plot, etc., However serials are indeed enjoyable when they maintain the same standards as the first one (the one which made me excited to anticipate the next.) Ending the Rogues was necessary. Their story was told. They deserve to be living happily ever after. Can’t stay on the great stage forever as the same persona. They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.

    Reply
  194. I have no problem with the hero/heroine living happily ever after. This is the Romance genre, after all. Cinderella fare. I also find that a secondary character in a series has to have their personality changed slightly to fit the hero/heroine mold when it is their turn to have their story told. Suddenly within a few months, someone turns from a wimp, or a young child, or a slightly vulgar person, or a follower to a leader with brilliant insight and understanding, etc. In modern series, I dislike that an entire town isn’t married and we have a series where everybody finds mr./ms. perfect. Bottom Line: I like standalones; I like serials when they stay strong, but would rather have standalones than repetition of plot, etc., However serials are indeed enjoyable when they maintain the same standards as the first one (the one which made me excited to anticipate the next.) Ending the Rogues was necessary. Their story was told. They deserve to be living happily ever after. Can’t stay on the great stage forever as the same persona. They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.

    Reply
  195. I have no problem with the hero/heroine living happily ever after. This is the Romance genre, after all. Cinderella fare. I also find that a secondary character in a series has to have their personality changed slightly to fit the hero/heroine mold when it is their turn to have their story told. Suddenly within a few months, someone turns from a wimp, or a young child, or a slightly vulgar person, or a follower to a leader with brilliant insight and understanding, etc. In modern series, I dislike that an entire town isn’t married and we have a series where everybody finds mr./ms. perfect. Bottom Line: I like standalones; I like serials when they stay strong, but would rather have standalones than repetition of plot, etc., However serials are indeed enjoyable when they maintain the same standards as the first one (the one which made me excited to anticipate the next.) Ending the Rogues was necessary. Their story was told. They deserve to be living happily ever after. Can’t stay on the great stage forever as the same persona. They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.

    Reply
  196. I loved the Rogues series. Maybe it’s time to write about the next generation. Their kids!! It would be interesting to see how they handle the next generation of the grown up version of themselves. Oh boy! The trouble that the kids could get into would be fun to read about.

    Reply
  197. I loved the Rogues series. Maybe it’s time to write about the next generation. Their kids!! It would be interesting to see how they handle the next generation of the grown up version of themselves. Oh boy! The trouble that the kids could get into would be fun to read about.

    Reply
  198. I loved the Rogues series. Maybe it’s time to write about the next generation. Their kids!! It would be interesting to see how they handle the next generation of the grown up version of themselves. Oh boy! The trouble that the kids could get into would be fun to read about.

    Reply
  199. I loved the Rogues series. Maybe it’s time to write about the next generation. Their kids!! It would be interesting to see how they handle the next generation of the grown up version of themselves. Oh boy! The trouble that the kids could get into would be fun to read about.

    Reply
  200. I loved the Rogues series. Maybe it’s time to write about the next generation. Their kids!! It would be interesting to see how they handle the next generation of the grown up version of themselves. Oh boy! The trouble that the kids could get into would be fun to read about.

    Reply
  201. I think that series books are super. I look forward to a continuing look at old friends and new. The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series. Read one after another as one huge book. Wonderful! After I read a series I like to wait awhile and then go back and read one after another in a whole binge thing. What fun! After your new book I may go back and reread the whole series which lives on my keeper shelf and on my Kindle.

    Reply
  202. I think that series books are super. I look forward to a continuing look at old friends and new. The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series. Read one after another as one huge book. Wonderful! After I read a series I like to wait awhile and then go back and read one after another in a whole binge thing. What fun! After your new book I may go back and reread the whole series which lives on my keeper shelf and on my Kindle.

    Reply
  203. I think that series books are super. I look forward to a continuing look at old friends and new. The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series. Read one after another as one huge book. Wonderful! After I read a series I like to wait awhile and then go back and read one after another in a whole binge thing. What fun! After your new book I may go back and reread the whole series which lives on my keeper shelf and on my Kindle.

    Reply
  204. I think that series books are super. I look forward to a continuing look at old friends and new. The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series. Read one after another as one huge book. Wonderful! After I read a series I like to wait awhile and then go back and read one after another in a whole binge thing. What fun! After your new book I may go back and reread the whole series which lives on my keeper shelf and on my Kindle.

    Reply
  205. I think that series books are super. I look forward to a continuing look at old friends and new. The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series. Read one after another as one huge book. Wonderful! After I read a series I like to wait awhile and then go back and read one after another in a whole binge thing. What fun! After your new book I may go back and reread the whole series which lives on my keeper shelf and on my Kindle.

    Reply
  206. I read what you write, happily awaiting each new book . Rogues, Mallorens, or stand alone. I will always enjoy your great characters and the stories you tell. Regency romance has always been my favorite time period to read and you do it so well.

    Reply
  207. I read what you write, happily awaiting each new book . Rogues, Mallorens, or stand alone. I will always enjoy your great characters and the stories you tell. Regency romance has always been my favorite time period to read and you do it so well.

    Reply
  208. I read what you write, happily awaiting each new book . Rogues, Mallorens, or stand alone. I will always enjoy your great characters and the stories you tell. Regency romance has always been my favorite time period to read and you do it so well.

    Reply
  209. I read what you write, happily awaiting each new book . Rogues, Mallorens, or stand alone. I will always enjoy your great characters and the stories you tell. Regency romance has always been my favorite time period to read and you do it so well.

    Reply
  210. I read what you write, happily awaiting each new book . Rogues, Mallorens, or stand alone. I will always enjoy your great characters and the stories you tell. Regency romance has always been my favorite time period to read and you do it so well.

    Reply
  211. I love series and I love stand-alone books. I love series because it gives you the opportunity to learn more about the characters (beyond their epilogues). I love the idea of such close bonds between friends and families. They do however come to a point when they need to end as that particular series. I like how Grace Burrowes has managed to create her own little population for England. She has a number of series, but with interconnected characters. Like Nicholas Haddonfield — he appears in many of her books — and he and his sisters even have their own series of books. All of that interconnectivity (is that a word???) sort of makes you feel like you are picking up the morning paper to read about your community. So — if you decide to expand and/or invest more in your existing Rogues, you could start another series and have them make appearances here an there.
    I also like stand-alones as long as they make me feel that I’m through when the book ends. Don’t create such interesting secondary characters that I want to know what happens to them (wrap them up in an epilogue or something).
    I love your books — and your Rogues.

    Reply
  212. I love series and I love stand-alone books. I love series because it gives you the opportunity to learn more about the characters (beyond their epilogues). I love the idea of such close bonds between friends and families. They do however come to a point when they need to end as that particular series. I like how Grace Burrowes has managed to create her own little population for England. She has a number of series, but with interconnected characters. Like Nicholas Haddonfield — he appears in many of her books — and he and his sisters even have their own series of books. All of that interconnectivity (is that a word???) sort of makes you feel like you are picking up the morning paper to read about your community. So — if you decide to expand and/or invest more in your existing Rogues, you could start another series and have them make appearances here an there.
    I also like stand-alones as long as they make me feel that I’m through when the book ends. Don’t create such interesting secondary characters that I want to know what happens to them (wrap them up in an epilogue or something).
    I love your books — and your Rogues.

    Reply
  213. I love series and I love stand-alone books. I love series because it gives you the opportunity to learn more about the characters (beyond their epilogues). I love the idea of such close bonds between friends and families. They do however come to a point when they need to end as that particular series. I like how Grace Burrowes has managed to create her own little population for England. She has a number of series, but with interconnected characters. Like Nicholas Haddonfield — he appears in many of her books — and he and his sisters even have their own series of books. All of that interconnectivity (is that a word???) sort of makes you feel like you are picking up the morning paper to read about your community. So — if you decide to expand and/or invest more in your existing Rogues, you could start another series and have them make appearances here an there.
    I also like stand-alones as long as they make me feel that I’m through when the book ends. Don’t create such interesting secondary characters that I want to know what happens to them (wrap them up in an epilogue or something).
    I love your books — and your Rogues.

    Reply
  214. I love series and I love stand-alone books. I love series because it gives you the opportunity to learn more about the characters (beyond their epilogues). I love the idea of such close bonds between friends and families. They do however come to a point when they need to end as that particular series. I like how Grace Burrowes has managed to create her own little population for England. She has a number of series, but with interconnected characters. Like Nicholas Haddonfield — he appears in many of her books — and he and his sisters even have their own series of books. All of that interconnectivity (is that a word???) sort of makes you feel like you are picking up the morning paper to read about your community. So — if you decide to expand and/or invest more in your existing Rogues, you could start another series and have them make appearances here an there.
    I also like stand-alones as long as they make me feel that I’m through when the book ends. Don’t create such interesting secondary characters that I want to know what happens to them (wrap them up in an epilogue or something).
    I love your books — and your Rogues.

    Reply
  215. I love series and I love stand-alone books. I love series because it gives you the opportunity to learn more about the characters (beyond their epilogues). I love the idea of such close bonds between friends and families. They do however come to a point when they need to end as that particular series. I like how Grace Burrowes has managed to create her own little population for England. She has a number of series, but with interconnected characters. Like Nicholas Haddonfield — he appears in many of her books — and he and his sisters even have their own series of books. All of that interconnectivity (is that a word???) sort of makes you feel like you are picking up the morning paper to read about your community. So — if you decide to expand and/or invest more in your existing Rogues, you could start another series and have them make appearances here an there.
    I also like stand-alones as long as they make me feel that I’m through when the book ends. Don’t create such interesting secondary characters that I want to know what happens to them (wrap them up in an epilogue or something).
    I love your books — and your Rogues.

    Reply
  216. Sheila, I always felt the same way about Heyer, which is why I started writing series. I have popped old characters in here and there as hosts and hostesses etc, and I can continue to do that.

    Reply
  217. Sheila, I always felt the same way about Heyer, which is why I started writing series. I have popped old characters in here and there as hosts and hostesses etc, and I can continue to do that.

    Reply
  218. Sheila, I always felt the same way about Heyer, which is why I started writing series. I have popped old characters in here and there as hosts and hostesses etc, and I can continue to do that.

    Reply
  219. Sheila, I always felt the same way about Heyer, which is why I started writing series. I have popped old characters in here and there as hosts and hostesses etc, and I can continue to do that.

    Reply
  220. Sheila, I always felt the same way about Heyer, which is why I started writing series. I have popped old characters in here and there as hosts and hostesses etc, and I can continue to do that.

    Reply
  221. It’s true, Frances, that sometimes secondary characters do demand a story. I’ll always be open to that.
    A Peerage of Regency romance would be huge and very complex. But fascinating!

    Reply
  222. It’s true, Frances, that sometimes secondary characters do demand a story. I’ll always be open to that.
    A Peerage of Regency romance would be huge and very complex. But fascinating!

    Reply
  223. It’s true, Frances, that sometimes secondary characters do demand a story. I’ll always be open to that.
    A Peerage of Regency romance would be huge and very complex. But fascinating!

    Reply
  224. It’s true, Frances, that sometimes secondary characters do demand a story. I’ll always be open to that.
    A Peerage of Regency romance would be huge and very complex. But fascinating!

    Reply
  225. It’s true, Frances, that sometimes secondary characters do demand a story. I’ll always be open to that.
    A Peerage of Regency romance would be huge and very complex. But fascinating!

    Reply
  226. “They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.”
    Definitely!They have a lot of work to do, but I don’t think anyone wants novels wrapped around the Reform Bill etc, and I don’t want to write them!

    Reply
  227. “They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.”
    Definitely!They have a lot of work to do, but I don’t think anyone wants novels wrapped around the Reform Bill etc, and I don’t want to write them!

    Reply
  228. “They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.”
    Definitely!They have a lot of work to do, but I don’t think anyone wants novels wrapped around the Reform Bill etc, and I don’t want to write them!

    Reply
  229. “They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.”
    Definitely!They have a lot of work to do, but I don’t think anyone wants novels wrapped around the Reform Bill etc, and I don’t want to write them!

    Reply
  230. “They have to grow into great Parliamentarians, landholders, and family men/women now.”
    Definitely!They have a lot of work to do, but I don’t think anyone wants novels wrapped around the Reform Bill etc, and I don’t want to write them!

    Reply
  231. “The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series.”
    Or just a lot of books, Helen. Lovely. They don’t have to be a series, to me.

    Reply
  232. “The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series.”
    Or just a lot of books, Helen. Lovely. They don’t have to be a series, to me.

    Reply
  233. “The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series.”
    Or just a lot of books, Helen. Lovely. They don’t have to be a series, to me.

    Reply
  234. “The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series.”
    Or just a lot of books, Helen. Lovely. They don’t have to be a series, to me.

    Reply
  235. “The best one is to find a new author and discover that they have written a huge series.”
    Or just a lot of books, Helen. Lovely. They don’t have to be a series, to me.

    Reply
  236. I love an historical series. They are fun to read and really you do not have to read the entire series as each book stands on its own. A series is like having epilogues to each story and I love that. I will miss the rogues.

    Reply
  237. I love an historical series. They are fun to read and really you do not have to read the entire series as each book stands on its own. A series is like having epilogues to each story and I love that. I will miss the rogues.

    Reply
  238. I love an historical series. They are fun to read and really you do not have to read the entire series as each book stands on its own. A series is like having epilogues to each story and I love that. I will miss the rogues.

    Reply
  239. I love an historical series. They are fun to read and really you do not have to read the entire series as each book stands on its own. A series is like having epilogues to each story and I love that. I will miss the rogues.

    Reply
  240. I love an historical series. They are fun to read and really you do not have to read the entire series as each book stands on its own. A series is like having epilogues to each story and I love that. I will miss the rogues.

    Reply
  241. A good series (such as your’s and the other Wenches) can be truly satisfying. But, I must admit that finite shelf space can certainly make series collecting difficult! Having been “brought up” on the single regencies of Heyer and the ’80s, it is nice not to feel obligated to re-read earlier titles in a series so you can remember who is who!

    Reply
  242. A good series (such as your’s and the other Wenches) can be truly satisfying. But, I must admit that finite shelf space can certainly make series collecting difficult! Having been “brought up” on the single regencies of Heyer and the ’80s, it is nice not to feel obligated to re-read earlier titles in a series so you can remember who is who!

    Reply
  243. A good series (such as your’s and the other Wenches) can be truly satisfying. But, I must admit that finite shelf space can certainly make series collecting difficult! Having been “brought up” on the single regencies of Heyer and the ’80s, it is nice not to feel obligated to re-read earlier titles in a series so you can remember who is who!

    Reply
  244. A good series (such as your’s and the other Wenches) can be truly satisfying. But, I must admit that finite shelf space can certainly make series collecting difficult! Having been “brought up” on the single regencies of Heyer and the ’80s, it is nice not to feel obligated to re-read earlier titles in a series so you can remember who is who!

    Reply
  245. A good series (such as your’s and the other Wenches) can be truly satisfying. But, I must admit that finite shelf space can certainly make series collecting difficult! Having been “brought up” on the single regencies of Heyer and the ’80s, it is nice not to feel obligated to re-read earlier titles in a series so you can remember who is who!

    Reply
  246. I’m open to both. I like series but standalone are nice too. I prefer a series not to feel forced so I can understand why authors don’t always like to write one.

    Reply
  247. I’m open to both. I like series but standalone are nice too. I prefer a series not to feel forced so I can understand why authors don’t always like to write one.

    Reply
  248. I’m open to both. I like series but standalone are nice too. I prefer a series not to feel forced so I can understand why authors don’t always like to write one.

    Reply
  249. I’m open to both. I like series but standalone are nice too. I prefer a series not to feel forced so I can understand why authors don’t always like to write one.

    Reply
  250. I’m open to both. I like series but standalone are nice too. I prefer a series not to feel forced so I can understand why authors don’t always like to write one.

    Reply
  251. Its always great to read, hear about characters, their development, and attitudes and how they conquered those challenges with the help of a female πŸ™‚
    I would enjoy reading the stories mentioned, have to wait til I get some money though due to tight budget.

    Reply
  252. Its always great to read, hear about characters, their development, and attitudes and how they conquered those challenges with the help of a female πŸ™‚
    I would enjoy reading the stories mentioned, have to wait til I get some money though due to tight budget.

    Reply
  253. Its always great to read, hear about characters, their development, and attitudes and how they conquered those challenges with the help of a female πŸ™‚
    I would enjoy reading the stories mentioned, have to wait til I get some money though due to tight budget.

    Reply
  254. Its always great to read, hear about characters, their development, and attitudes and how they conquered those challenges with the help of a female πŸ™‚
    I would enjoy reading the stories mentioned, have to wait til I get some money though due to tight budget.

    Reply
  255. Its always great to read, hear about characters, their development, and attitudes and how they conquered those challenges with the help of a female πŸ™‚
    I would enjoy reading the stories mentioned, have to wait til I get some money though due to tight budget.

    Reply
  256. I love both…series and standalone. Totally agree that you’ve reached the logical conclusion for this series.
    Lisa Kleypas linked two of her series – the Hathaway’s and The Wallflowers in Mine Til Midnight very nicely. none of the characters seemed forced.
    The problem I see with continuing a series onwards and covering the children is you end up having to kill off important people from earlier in the series. That does not give me, the reader, a HEA feeling.
    Actually, I can think of 2 or 3 series that went on a bit too long and they just lost their mojo. It wasn’t just me being older 10 years later either. When I reread the earlier books they are STILL better than the later ones.
    So definitely write what you want because anytime a person is forced to write about anything or a certain way, invariably it gets all ….. messed up.

    Reply
  257. I love both…series and standalone. Totally agree that you’ve reached the logical conclusion for this series.
    Lisa Kleypas linked two of her series – the Hathaway’s and The Wallflowers in Mine Til Midnight very nicely. none of the characters seemed forced.
    The problem I see with continuing a series onwards and covering the children is you end up having to kill off important people from earlier in the series. That does not give me, the reader, a HEA feeling.
    Actually, I can think of 2 or 3 series that went on a bit too long and they just lost their mojo. It wasn’t just me being older 10 years later either. When I reread the earlier books they are STILL better than the later ones.
    So definitely write what you want because anytime a person is forced to write about anything or a certain way, invariably it gets all ….. messed up.

    Reply
  258. I love both…series and standalone. Totally agree that you’ve reached the logical conclusion for this series.
    Lisa Kleypas linked two of her series – the Hathaway’s and The Wallflowers in Mine Til Midnight very nicely. none of the characters seemed forced.
    The problem I see with continuing a series onwards and covering the children is you end up having to kill off important people from earlier in the series. That does not give me, the reader, a HEA feeling.
    Actually, I can think of 2 or 3 series that went on a bit too long and they just lost their mojo. It wasn’t just me being older 10 years later either. When I reread the earlier books they are STILL better than the later ones.
    So definitely write what you want because anytime a person is forced to write about anything or a certain way, invariably it gets all ….. messed up.

    Reply
  259. I love both…series and standalone. Totally agree that you’ve reached the logical conclusion for this series.
    Lisa Kleypas linked two of her series – the Hathaway’s and The Wallflowers in Mine Til Midnight very nicely. none of the characters seemed forced.
    The problem I see with continuing a series onwards and covering the children is you end up having to kill off important people from earlier in the series. That does not give me, the reader, a HEA feeling.
    Actually, I can think of 2 or 3 series that went on a bit too long and they just lost their mojo. It wasn’t just me being older 10 years later either. When I reread the earlier books they are STILL better than the later ones.
    So definitely write what you want because anytime a person is forced to write about anything or a certain way, invariably it gets all ….. messed up.

    Reply
  260. I love both…series and standalone. Totally agree that you’ve reached the logical conclusion for this series.
    Lisa Kleypas linked two of her series – the Hathaway’s and The Wallflowers in Mine Til Midnight very nicely. none of the characters seemed forced.
    The problem I see with continuing a series onwards and covering the children is you end up having to kill off important people from earlier in the series. That does not give me, the reader, a HEA feeling.
    Actually, I can think of 2 or 3 series that went on a bit too long and they just lost their mojo. It wasn’t just me being older 10 years later either. When I reread the earlier books they are STILL better than the later ones.
    So definitely write what you want because anytime a person is forced to write about anything or a certain way, invariably it gets all ….. messed up.

    Reply
  261. I know a courtesan and an one arm commoner aren’t the usual hero and heroine which is why I suggested a novella. Maybe an ebook for all the Rogue fans! Thank you for your imaginative and diverse characters. I always read your books from beinning to end! And always await the next!

    Reply
  262. I know a courtesan and an one arm commoner aren’t the usual hero and heroine which is why I suggested a novella. Maybe an ebook for all the Rogue fans! Thank you for your imaginative and diverse characters. I always read your books from beinning to end! And always await the next!

    Reply
  263. I know a courtesan and an one arm commoner aren’t the usual hero and heroine which is why I suggested a novella. Maybe an ebook for all the Rogue fans! Thank you for your imaginative and diverse characters. I always read your books from beinning to end! And always await the next!

    Reply
  264. I know a courtesan and an one arm commoner aren’t the usual hero and heroine which is why I suggested a novella. Maybe an ebook for all the Rogue fans! Thank you for your imaginative and diverse characters. I always read your books from beinning to end! And always await the next!

    Reply
  265. I know a courtesan and an one arm commoner aren’t the usual hero and heroine which is why I suggested a novella. Maybe an ebook for all the Rogue fans! Thank you for your imaginative and diverse characters. I always read your books from beinning to end! And always await the next!

    Reply
  266. I actually prefer standalones because I’m slightly OCD. I can’t stand to read them out of order, and, almost without fail, I stumble upon authors I like in the middle of a series and it just about drives me crazy to have to go backwards in a story to catch the previous ones. Fortunately I’ve been reading yours since the days of Lord Reybourne’s Betrothed and The Stanforth Secrets, so I’ve been able to read all of them in order.
    That being said, I do also enjoy series for reason’s mentioned previously by others. I like the opportunity to revisit old friends. But, series for series sake isn’t good. A writer has to be able to do it well (which you do). The series that I dislike are the ones where we get three or four couples’ partial stories. I don’t want to read soap operas in novel form (found one or two of those this year and pretty much quit reading those authors unless it was a standalone book).
    I also wish they would quit classifying the multi-book series with the same couple as romance, maybe call it suspense with a romantic subplot, but let us know we wont’ get the whole story in one book, please! I want a romance to have an HEA by the final page, not a “to be continued…” There are only a couple of series like I’ve just described that I like, but for the most part I avoid them if possible. If I wind up with one that ends with an obvious “stay tuned for the next episode of Dick and Jane” and wasn’t told about that up front, I’m not usually a happy camper.
    So basically, if you write it, I will most likely read it (yes, there ARE things I will not read no matter who the author is, but so far that hasn’t been you). Thanks for the years of wonderful reading!

    Reply
  267. I actually prefer standalones because I’m slightly OCD. I can’t stand to read them out of order, and, almost without fail, I stumble upon authors I like in the middle of a series and it just about drives me crazy to have to go backwards in a story to catch the previous ones. Fortunately I’ve been reading yours since the days of Lord Reybourne’s Betrothed and The Stanforth Secrets, so I’ve been able to read all of them in order.
    That being said, I do also enjoy series for reason’s mentioned previously by others. I like the opportunity to revisit old friends. But, series for series sake isn’t good. A writer has to be able to do it well (which you do). The series that I dislike are the ones where we get three or four couples’ partial stories. I don’t want to read soap operas in novel form (found one or two of those this year and pretty much quit reading those authors unless it was a standalone book).
    I also wish they would quit classifying the multi-book series with the same couple as romance, maybe call it suspense with a romantic subplot, but let us know we wont’ get the whole story in one book, please! I want a romance to have an HEA by the final page, not a “to be continued…” There are only a couple of series like I’ve just described that I like, but for the most part I avoid them if possible. If I wind up with one that ends with an obvious “stay tuned for the next episode of Dick and Jane” and wasn’t told about that up front, I’m not usually a happy camper.
    So basically, if you write it, I will most likely read it (yes, there ARE things I will not read no matter who the author is, but so far that hasn’t been you). Thanks for the years of wonderful reading!

    Reply
  268. I actually prefer standalones because I’m slightly OCD. I can’t stand to read them out of order, and, almost without fail, I stumble upon authors I like in the middle of a series and it just about drives me crazy to have to go backwards in a story to catch the previous ones. Fortunately I’ve been reading yours since the days of Lord Reybourne’s Betrothed and The Stanforth Secrets, so I’ve been able to read all of them in order.
    That being said, I do also enjoy series for reason’s mentioned previously by others. I like the opportunity to revisit old friends. But, series for series sake isn’t good. A writer has to be able to do it well (which you do). The series that I dislike are the ones where we get three or four couples’ partial stories. I don’t want to read soap operas in novel form (found one or two of those this year and pretty much quit reading those authors unless it was a standalone book).
    I also wish they would quit classifying the multi-book series with the same couple as romance, maybe call it suspense with a romantic subplot, but let us know we wont’ get the whole story in one book, please! I want a romance to have an HEA by the final page, not a “to be continued…” There are only a couple of series like I’ve just described that I like, but for the most part I avoid them if possible. If I wind up with one that ends with an obvious “stay tuned for the next episode of Dick and Jane” and wasn’t told about that up front, I’m not usually a happy camper.
    So basically, if you write it, I will most likely read it (yes, there ARE things I will not read no matter who the author is, but so far that hasn’t been you). Thanks for the years of wonderful reading!

    Reply
  269. I actually prefer standalones because I’m slightly OCD. I can’t stand to read them out of order, and, almost without fail, I stumble upon authors I like in the middle of a series and it just about drives me crazy to have to go backwards in a story to catch the previous ones. Fortunately I’ve been reading yours since the days of Lord Reybourne’s Betrothed and The Stanforth Secrets, so I’ve been able to read all of them in order.
    That being said, I do also enjoy series for reason’s mentioned previously by others. I like the opportunity to revisit old friends. But, series for series sake isn’t good. A writer has to be able to do it well (which you do). The series that I dislike are the ones where we get three or four couples’ partial stories. I don’t want to read soap operas in novel form (found one or two of those this year and pretty much quit reading those authors unless it was a standalone book).
    I also wish they would quit classifying the multi-book series with the same couple as romance, maybe call it suspense with a romantic subplot, but let us know we wont’ get the whole story in one book, please! I want a romance to have an HEA by the final page, not a “to be continued…” There are only a couple of series like I’ve just described that I like, but for the most part I avoid them if possible. If I wind up with one that ends with an obvious “stay tuned for the next episode of Dick and Jane” and wasn’t told about that up front, I’m not usually a happy camper.
    So basically, if you write it, I will most likely read it (yes, there ARE things I will not read no matter who the author is, but so far that hasn’t been you). Thanks for the years of wonderful reading!

    Reply
  270. I actually prefer standalones because I’m slightly OCD. I can’t stand to read them out of order, and, almost without fail, I stumble upon authors I like in the middle of a series and it just about drives me crazy to have to go backwards in a story to catch the previous ones. Fortunately I’ve been reading yours since the days of Lord Reybourne’s Betrothed and The Stanforth Secrets, so I’ve been able to read all of them in order.
    That being said, I do also enjoy series for reason’s mentioned previously by others. I like the opportunity to revisit old friends. But, series for series sake isn’t good. A writer has to be able to do it well (which you do). The series that I dislike are the ones where we get three or four couples’ partial stories. I don’t want to read soap operas in novel form (found one or two of those this year and pretty much quit reading those authors unless it was a standalone book).
    I also wish they would quit classifying the multi-book series with the same couple as romance, maybe call it suspense with a romantic subplot, but let us know we wont’ get the whole story in one book, please! I want a romance to have an HEA by the final page, not a “to be continued…” There are only a couple of series like I’ve just described that I like, but for the most part I avoid them if possible. If I wind up with one that ends with an obvious “stay tuned for the next episode of Dick and Jane” and wasn’t told about that up front, I’m not usually a happy camper.
    So basically, if you write it, I will most likely read it (yes, there ARE things I will not read no matter who the author is, but so far that hasn’t been you). Thanks for the years of wonderful reading!

    Reply
  271. The Rogues will still be around, Raylene, just not as principals or even with significant parts in the books. It is still the Rogues’ World!

    Reply
  272. The Rogues will still be around, Raylene, just not as principals or even with significant parts in the books. It is still the Rogues’ World!

    Reply
  273. The Rogues will still be around, Raylene, just not as principals or even with significant parts in the books. It is still the Rogues’ World!

    Reply
  274. The Rogues will still be around, Raylene, just not as principals or even with significant parts in the books. It is still the Rogues’ World!

    Reply
  275. The Rogues will still be around, Raylene, just not as principals or even with significant parts in the books. It is still the Rogues’ World!

    Reply
  276. Thanks, Vicki. I don’t have two series in the same timeline that I could link, but I’m enjoying writing stand-alones in the same world as earlier books.

    Reply
  277. Thanks, Vicki. I don’t have two series in the same timeline that I could link, but I’m enjoying writing stand-alones in the same world as earlier books.

    Reply
  278. Thanks, Vicki. I don’t have two series in the same timeline that I could link, but I’m enjoying writing stand-alones in the same world as earlier books.

    Reply
  279. Thanks, Vicki. I don’t have two series in the same timeline that I could link, but I’m enjoying writing stand-alones in the same world as earlier books.

    Reply
  280. Thanks, Vicki. I don’t have two series in the same timeline that I could link, but I’m enjoying writing stand-alones in the same world as earlier books.

    Reply
  281. Jo,
    Love the Rogues, but standalones are great written in the world you created. Series fiction is a little like crisps, “you can’t eat just one” and I enjoy them, but a shared world is equally enjoyable.
    You write, and we will read. Thanks you for some great characters and for letting us visit your Regency England.
    Sandi Lang

    Reply
  282. Jo,
    Love the Rogues, but standalones are great written in the world you created. Series fiction is a little like crisps, “you can’t eat just one” and I enjoy them, but a shared world is equally enjoyable.
    You write, and we will read. Thanks you for some great characters and for letting us visit your Regency England.
    Sandi Lang

    Reply
  283. Jo,
    Love the Rogues, but standalones are great written in the world you created. Series fiction is a little like crisps, “you can’t eat just one” and I enjoy them, but a shared world is equally enjoyable.
    You write, and we will read. Thanks you for some great characters and for letting us visit your Regency England.
    Sandi Lang

    Reply
  284. Jo,
    Love the Rogues, but standalones are great written in the world you created. Series fiction is a little like crisps, “you can’t eat just one” and I enjoy them, but a shared world is equally enjoyable.
    You write, and we will read. Thanks you for some great characters and for letting us visit your Regency England.
    Sandi Lang

    Reply
  285. Jo,
    Love the Rogues, but standalones are great written in the world you created. Series fiction is a little like crisps, “you can’t eat just one” and I enjoy them, but a shared world is equally enjoyable.
    You write, and we will read. Thanks you for some great characters and for letting us visit your Regency England.
    Sandi Lang

    Reply
  286. I love series, I loved the Rogues, but stand alone books are fine also. Just keep them coming! I usually read any thing from my favorite authors thanks.

    Reply
  287. I love series, I loved the Rogues, but stand alone books are fine also. Just keep them coming! I usually read any thing from my favorite authors thanks.

    Reply
  288. I love series, I loved the Rogues, but stand alone books are fine also. Just keep them coming! I usually read any thing from my favorite authors thanks.

    Reply
  289. I love series, I loved the Rogues, but stand alone books are fine also. Just keep them coming! I usually read any thing from my favorite authors thanks.

    Reply
  290. I love series, I loved the Rogues, but stand alone books are fine also. Just keep them coming! I usually read any thing from my favorite authors thanks.

    Reply
  291. I do not like the end of anything….but if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book, it will have to be ok with me. You are the boss of the characters, and I have enjoyed all your books. Please, just keep on keeping on….more is always good!

    Reply
  292. I do not like the end of anything….but if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book, it will have to be ok with me. You are the boss of the characters, and I have enjoyed all your books. Please, just keep on keeping on….more is always good!

    Reply
  293. I do not like the end of anything….but if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book, it will have to be ok with me. You are the boss of the characters, and I have enjoyed all your books. Please, just keep on keeping on….more is always good!

    Reply
  294. I do not like the end of anything….but if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book, it will have to be ok with me. You are the boss of the characters, and I have enjoyed all your books. Please, just keep on keeping on….more is always good!

    Reply
  295. I do not like the end of anything….but if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book, it will have to be ok with me. You are the boss of the characters, and I have enjoyed all your books. Please, just keep on keeping on….more is always good!

    Reply
  296. I love a series. I do have a couple of problems with them though. I don’t remember from one book to another who did what, so if a character shows up from another book I become distracted trying to place them. I think a series that is connected by the place the characters live is fun.

    Reply
  297. I love a series. I do have a couple of problems with them though. I don’t remember from one book to another who did what, so if a character shows up from another book I become distracted trying to place them. I think a series that is connected by the place the characters live is fun.

    Reply
  298. I love a series. I do have a couple of problems with them though. I don’t remember from one book to another who did what, so if a character shows up from another book I become distracted trying to place them. I think a series that is connected by the place the characters live is fun.

    Reply
  299. I love a series. I do have a couple of problems with them though. I don’t remember from one book to another who did what, so if a character shows up from another book I become distracted trying to place them. I think a series that is connected by the place the characters live is fun.

    Reply
  300. I love a series. I do have a couple of problems with them though. I don’t remember from one book to another who did what, so if a character shows up from another book I become distracted trying to place them. I think a series that is connected by the place the characters live is fun.

    Reply
  301. I enjoy both stand-alones and series. One prrobem is like the ENTIRE series before I start reading. This leads to a full basement! Then I’ve tried to read each book, but keep it after I read to e abe to read the next in the series. This again leads to DULL Vawmwnr! No easy answer since I do reread some books seeral times in particular parts. Then I also share many of my books with several other readers, BUT they usually come back to me eventually. So I’ve answered in a rather long involved way, but one thing, I LOVZE to read and since I’m now a widow, I can indulge myself. Read when I want to at my own pace!

    Reply
  302. I enjoy both stand-alones and series. One prrobem is like the ENTIRE series before I start reading. This leads to a full basement! Then I’ve tried to read each book, but keep it after I read to e abe to read the next in the series. This again leads to DULL Vawmwnr! No easy answer since I do reread some books seeral times in particular parts. Then I also share many of my books with several other readers, BUT they usually come back to me eventually. So I’ve answered in a rather long involved way, but one thing, I LOVZE to read and since I’m now a widow, I can indulge myself. Read when I want to at my own pace!

    Reply
  303. I enjoy both stand-alones and series. One prrobem is like the ENTIRE series before I start reading. This leads to a full basement! Then I’ve tried to read each book, but keep it after I read to e abe to read the next in the series. This again leads to DULL Vawmwnr! No easy answer since I do reread some books seeral times in particular parts. Then I also share many of my books with several other readers, BUT they usually come back to me eventually. So I’ve answered in a rather long involved way, but one thing, I LOVZE to read and since I’m now a widow, I can indulge myself. Read when I want to at my own pace!

    Reply
  304. I enjoy both stand-alones and series. One prrobem is like the ENTIRE series before I start reading. This leads to a full basement! Then I’ve tried to read each book, but keep it after I read to e abe to read the next in the series. This again leads to DULL Vawmwnr! No easy answer since I do reread some books seeral times in particular parts. Then I also share many of my books with several other readers, BUT they usually come back to me eventually. So I’ve answered in a rather long involved way, but one thing, I LOVZE to read and since I’m now a widow, I can indulge myself. Read when I want to at my own pace!

    Reply
  305. I enjoy both stand-alones and series. One prrobem is like the ENTIRE series before I start reading. This leads to a full basement! Then I’ve tried to read each book, but keep it after I read to e abe to read the next in the series. This again leads to DULL Vawmwnr! No easy answer since I do reread some books seeral times in particular parts. Then I also share many of my books with several other readers, BUT they usually come back to me eventually. So I’ve answered in a rather long involved way, but one thing, I LOVZE to read and since I’m now a widow, I can indulge myself. Read when I want to at my own pace!

    Reply
  306. I think your solutions is brilliant and reasonable. The Rogues were so much fun that it is hard for we readers to completely given them up, but you are right: the end of reasonably connected characters is the end of the official “Rogue” books. Thanks so much for your brilliant writing and wonderful imagination.

    Reply
  307. I think your solutions is brilliant and reasonable. The Rogues were so much fun that it is hard for we readers to completely given them up, but you are right: the end of reasonably connected characters is the end of the official “Rogue” books. Thanks so much for your brilliant writing and wonderful imagination.

    Reply
  308. I think your solutions is brilliant and reasonable. The Rogues were so much fun that it is hard for we readers to completely given them up, but you are right: the end of reasonably connected characters is the end of the official “Rogue” books. Thanks so much for your brilliant writing and wonderful imagination.

    Reply
  309. I think your solutions is brilliant and reasonable. The Rogues were so much fun that it is hard for we readers to completely given them up, but you are right: the end of reasonably connected characters is the end of the official “Rogue” books. Thanks so much for your brilliant writing and wonderful imagination.

    Reply
  310. I think your solutions is brilliant and reasonable. The Rogues were so much fun that it is hard for we readers to completely given them up, but you are right: the end of reasonably connected characters is the end of the official “Rogue” books. Thanks so much for your brilliant writing and wonderful imagination.

    Reply
  311. Whilst I like series I also like standalone providing the story and characters engage me. I am a huge Georgette Heyer fan and although she did not do a series as such there were a few books where characters reappeared – Leonie and the Duke of Avon appear in The Devils Cub and Dominic and Mary from that book appear in An Infamous Army as do several characters from Regency Buck. I would have liked it if she had done this with some of her other books – a glimpse of how some of her characters are getting on.
    With you series both Mallorens and The Rogues I like the fact that although the stories of all the original linked characters have been told we get the occasional glimpse of them in the books set in their world where that is appropriate.
    I also like that your books can be read as standalone even though they are part of a series. I do not like those series where effectively the main storyline is spread over several books. Once I have started this type of series I need to know the outcome so sometimes therefore end up reading books which are not particularly well written and where the ultimate plot development is weak.

    Reply
  312. Whilst I like series I also like standalone providing the story and characters engage me. I am a huge Georgette Heyer fan and although she did not do a series as such there were a few books where characters reappeared – Leonie and the Duke of Avon appear in The Devils Cub and Dominic and Mary from that book appear in An Infamous Army as do several characters from Regency Buck. I would have liked it if she had done this with some of her other books – a glimpse of how some of her characters are getting on.
    With you series both Mallorens and The Rogues I like the fact that although the stories of all the original linked characters have been told we get the occasional glimpse of them in the books set in their world where that is appropriate.
    I also like that your books can be read as standalone even though they are part of a series. I do not like those series where effectively the main storyline is spread over several books. Once I have started this type of series I need to know the outcome so sometimes therefore end up reading books which are not particularly well written and where the ultimate plot development is weak.

    Reply
  313. Whilst I like series I also like standalone providing the story and characters engage me. I am a huge Georgette Heyer fan and although she did not do a series as such there were a few books where characters reappeared – Leonie and the Duke of Avon appear in The Devils Cub and Dominic and Mary from that book appear in An Infamous Army as do several characters from Regency Buck. I would have liked it if she had done this with some of her other books – a glimpse of how some of her characters are getting on.
    With you series both Mallorens and The Rogues I like the fact that although the stories of all the original linked characters have been told we get the occasional glimpse of them in the books set in their world where that is appropriate.
    I also like that your books can be read as standalone even though they are part of a series. I do not like those series where effectively the main storyline is spread over several books. Once I have started this type of series I need to know the outcome so sometimes therefore end up reading books which are not particularly well written and where the ultimate plot development is weak.

    Reply
  314. Whilst I like series I also like standalone providing the story and characters engage me. I am a huge Georgette Heyer fan and although she did not do a series as such there were a few books where characters reappeared – Leonie and the Duke of Avon appear in The Devils Cub and Dominic and Mary from that book appear in An Infamous Army as do several characters from Regency Buck. I would have liked it if she had done this with some of her other books – a glimpse of how some of her characters are getting on.
    With you series both Mallorens and The Rogues I like the fact that although the stories of all the original linked characters have been told we get the occasional glimpse of them in the books set in their world where that is appropriate.
    I also like that your books can be read as standalone even though they are part of a series. I do not like those series where effectively the main storyline is spread over several books. Once I have started this type of series I need to know the outcome so sometimes therefore end up reading books which are not particularly well written and where the ultimate plot development is weak.

    Reply
  315. Whilst I like series I also like standalone providing the story and characters engage me. I am a huge Georgette Heyer fan and although she did not do a series as such there were a few books where characters reappeared – Leonie and the Duke of Avon appear in The Devils Cub and Dominic and Mary from that book appear in An Infamous Army as do several characters from Regency Buck. I would have liked it if she had done this with some of her other books – a glimpse of how some of her characters are getting on.
    With you series both Mallorens and The Rogues I like the fact that although the stories of all the original linked characters have been told we get the occasional glimpse of them in the books set in their world where that is appropriate.
    I also like that your books can be read as standalone even though they are part of a series. I do not like those series where effectively the main storyline is spread over several books. Once I have started this type of series I need to know the outcome so sometimes therefore end up reading books which are not particularly well written and where the ultimate plot development is weak.

    Reply
  316. I like both series and stand alones but getting a new series book often leads me to reread the earlier books in the series. I love to reread old friends.

    Reply
  317. I like both series and stand alones but getting a new series book often leads me to reread the earlier books in the series. I love to reread old friends.

    Reply
  318. I like both series and stand alones but getting a new series book often leads me to reread the earlier books in the series. I love to reread old friends.

    Reply
  319. I like both series and stand alones but getting a new series book often leads me to reread the earlier books in the series. I love to reread old friends.

    Reply
  320. I like both series and stand alones but getting a new series book often leads me to reread the earlier books in the series. I love to reread old friends.

    Reply
  321. If a book is well written, and with some humor, I don’t care if it’s a series or not, though series seem to be the trend right now. (Is anyone even publishing stand-alone’s?) I tend to get particular about consistency in series books, and will sometimes go back to check details to see if I mis-remembered, or if the author and editor missed something — which is distracting. I just want a good story that either touches my heart or makes me think. Thanks for writing so many good ones.

    Reply
  322. If a book is well written, and with some humor, I don’t care if it’s a series or not, though series seem to be the trend right now. (Is anyone even publishing stand-alone’s?) I tend to get particular about consistency in series books, and will sometimes go back to check details to see if I mis-remembered, or if the author and editor missed something — which is distracting. I just want a good story that either touches my heart or makes me think. Thanks for writing so many good ones.

    Reply
  323. If a book is well written, and with some humor, I don’t care if it’s a series or not, though series seem to be the trend right now. (Is anyone even publishing stand-alone’s?) I tend to get particular about consistency in series books, and will sometimes go back to check details to see if I mis-remembered, or if the author and editor missed something — which is distracting. I just want a good story that either touches my heart or makes me think. Thanks for writing so many good ones.

    Reply
  324. If a book is well written, and with some humor, I don’t care if it’s a series or not, though series seem to be the trend right now. (Is anyone even publishing stand-alone’s?) I tend to get particular about consistency in series books, and will sometimes go back to check details to see if I mis-remembered, or if the author and editor missed something — which is distracting. I just want a good story that either touches my heart or makes me think. Thanks for writing so many good ones.

    Reply
  325. If a book is well written, and with some humor, I don’t care if it’s a series or not, though series seem to be the trend right now. (Is anyone even publishing stand-alone’s?) I tend to get particular about consistency in series books, and will sometimes go back to check details to see if I mis-remembered, or if the author and editor missed something — which is distracting. I just want a good story that either touches my heart or makes me think. Thanks for writing so many good ones.

    Reply
  326. I love series, and encountering characters from previous books. It’s like running into an old friend unexpectedly. I just re-read Forbidden Affections, so maybe some of those characters could show up in a future book?

    Reply
  327. I love series, and encountering characters from previous books. It’s like running into an old friend unexpectedly. I just re-read Forbidden Affections, so maybe some of those characters could show up in a future book?

    Reply
  328. I love series, and encountering characters from previous books. It’s like running into an old friend unexpectedly. I just re-read Forbidden Affections, so maybe some of those characters could show up in a future book?

    Reply
  329. I love series, and encountering characters from previous books. It’s like running into an old friend unexpectedly. I just re-read Forbidden Affections, so maybe some of those characters could show up in a future book?

    Reply
  330. I love series, and encountering characters from previous books. It’s like running into an old friend unexpectedly. I just re-read Forbidden Affections, so maybe some of those characters could show up in a future book?

    Reply
  331. I like series and seeing characters come back, but not as just eye candy. New characters, new story lines, my favorite time in history, what’s not to love!

    Reply
  332. I like series and seeing characters come back, but not as just eye candy. New characters, new story lines, my favorite time in history, what’s not to love!

    Reply
  333. I like series and seeing characters come back, but not as just eye candy. New characters, new story lines, my favorite time in history, what’s not to love!

    Reply
  334. I like series and seeing characters come back, but not as just eye candy. New characters, new story lines, my favorite time in history, what’s not to love!

    Reply
  335. I like series and seeing characters come back, but not as just eye candy. New characters, new story lines, my favorite time in history, what’s not to love!

    Reply
  336. I’ll read anything you write. I own pretty much all of your work and often go back to read favorites. Forbidden Magic, a stand-alone, is one of my favorites, but I like the series, too. My objection to series is when they become so crowded with characters that there seems to be no room for anyone other than heroes and heroines. If all the stars from previous books make an appearance, there is not much room left for villains or buffoons, and the story suffers.

    Reply
  337. I’ll read anything you write. I own pretty much all of your work and often go back to read favorites. Forbidden Magic, a stand-alone, is one of my favorites, but I like the series, too. My objection to series is when they become so crowded with characters that there seems to be no room for anyone other than heroes and heroines. If all the stars from previous books make an appearance, there is not much room left for villains or buffoons, and the story suffers.

    Reply
  338. I’ll read anything you write. I own pretty much all of your work and often go back to read favorites. Forbidden Magic, a stand-alone, is one of my favorites, but I like the series, too. My objection to series is when they become so crowded with characters that there seems to be no room for anyone other than heroes and heroines. If all the stars from previous books make an appearance, there is not much room left for villains or buffoons, and the story suffers.

    Reply
  339. I’ll read anything you write. I own pretty much all of your work and often go back to read favorites. Forbidden Magic, a stand-alone, is one of my favorites, but I like the series, too. My objection to series is when they become so crowded with characters that there seems to be no room for anyone other than heroes and heroines. If all the stars from previous books make an appearance, there is not much room left for villains or buffoons, and the story suffers.

    Reply
  340. I’ll read anything you write. I own pretty much all of your work and often go back to read favorites. Forbidden Magic, a stand-alone, is one of my favorites, but I like the series, too. My objection to series is when they become so crowded with characters that there seems to be no room for anyone other than heroes and heroines. If all the stars from previous books make an appearance, there is not much room left for villains or buffoons, and the story suffers.

    Reply
  341. “if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book…”
    That’s basically it, Linnea.

    Reply
  342. “if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book…”
    That’s basically it, Linnea.

    Reply
  343. “if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book…”
    That’s basically it, Linnea.

    Reply
  344. “if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book…”
    That’s basically it, Linnea.

    Reply
  345. “if all the rogues are floating around in the background, with nothing bad happening so they are not involved in the current book…”
    That’s basically it, Linnea.

    Reply
  346. Kay, I agree that it’s easier to read a stand-alone, especially if it’s been a while since the previous book. And I’m writing one a year these days!

    Reply
  347. Kay, I agree that it’s easier to read a stand-alone, especially if it’s been a while since the previous book. And I’m writing one a year these days!

    Reply
  348. Kay, I agree that it’s easier to read a stand-alone, especially if it’s been a while since the previous book. And I’m writing one a year these days!

    Reply
  349. Kay, I agree that it’s easier to read a stand-alone, especially if it’s been a while since the previous book. And I’m writing one a year these days!

    Reply
  350. Kay, I agree that it’s easier to read a stand-alone, especially if it’s been a while since the previous book. And I’m writing one a year these days!

    Reply