What’s in a name? More like: What’s my name?

Mom_thumbnail_9My first book written by “me” came out this week!!Queen_shadows_1

Let me explain. Written by me means: by my “real” name now: Edith Felber. (It’s a true Historical novel: Queen of Shadows: A Novel of Isabella, Wife of King Edward II, NAL Trade paperback- and it got great reviews.)

And I have a Historical Romance coming out in three weeks by your old friend, Edith Layton: For the Love of a Pirate, from Avon. (I think you’ll love it.)Forloveofapirate_2

Now, it’s true I’m a Gemini – and I laugh a lot about being a schizoid personality too. But neither “Felber” or “Layton” is really my real name.

I had a real name but I lost it. Or rather, I gave it away.

In the olde days when I got married, in our society, women lost their “real” name when they met a man they wanted to marry. And they didn’t think twice about it. I did. But I did it anyway. I learned to be recognized as someone else. At first, it felt like an alias, and then it became me.

Then I took an extra name, another new one, when I assumed a pseudonym for my writing. By then, being someone else, signing someone else’s name as my own, and etc. was easy.

Still, the name I wrote over and over again in elementary school: the name I learned to identify myself with, was lost. Ditched when I got married. Vanished. I felt both good and bad about it.

When my daughter grew up she solved that problem for herself. She kept her maiden name. They didn’t do that when I was young.

Maybe that’s why being two writers in two names with two different genre’s feels so right to me now.
After all, I’ve been assuming names since I reached adulthood.

Did you jetison your born identity when you got married? Do you ever regret it? Would you do it now if you were getting married? How do you feel about it?

Edith Laulicht, Felber, Layton: otherwise known as “Mom,” “Hey Lady — who taught you how to drive?!” and “Am I speaking to the lady of the house?” among other printable things.

BOOK SIGNING ALERT!!!

For all of you readers who are anywhere near Carle Place, Long Island, New York this Friday night, November 17th, I will be signing my new book “QUEEN OF SHADOWS” at 7:30PM at the new, enormous double decker Barnes & Noble there. It’s in the Country Glen Shopping Center, you can’t miss it — it’s two stories high!

I (the woman of many names) would love to see you!

51 thoughts on “What’s in a name? More like: What’s my name?”

  1. LOL about your alternative identities, Edith.
    When my older sister got married, she kept the name Putney. I didn’t even know it was legal! But once she explained that it was, I immediately decided that it sounded like a fine idea to me. Putney I was born and Putney I shall remain.
    As for QUEEN OF SHADOWS, I was lucky enough to read it early, and I have only one thing to say: BUY IT!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  2. LOL about your alternative identities, Edith.
    When my older sister got married, she kept the name Putney. I didn’t even know it was legal! But once she explained that it was, I immediately decided that it sounded like a fine idea to me. Putney I was born and Putney I shall remain.
    As for QUEEN OF SHADOWS, I was lucky enough to read it early, and I have only one thing to say: BUY IT!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  3. LOL about your alternative identities, Edith.
    When my older sister got married, she kept the name Putney. I didn’t even know it was legal! But once she explained that it was, I immediately decided that it sounded like a fine idea to me. Putney I was born and Putney I shall remain.
    As for QUEEN OF SHADOWS, I was lucky enough to read it early, and I have only one thing to say: BUY IT!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  4. What’s in a name? My father changed his when he had a blow-up with HIS dad (while still living in the UK) and took his mother’s maiden name. No idea if it was legal or not, and at this late stage it doesn’t matter except to say that because of this, I never had sentiments towards MY maiden name.
    When I married, I happily ditched it for my husband’s. When I ditched HIM 12 years later, I remembered what a pain it was to change my name, and that for much of my professional career I had HIS name, so I kept it. I’ve had several friends that made the same choice.
    It doesn’t bother me in the least.

    Reply
  5. What’s in a name? My father changed his when he had a blow-up with HIS dad (while still living in the UK) and took his mother’s maiden name. No idea if it was legal or not, and at this late stage it doesn’t matter except to say that because of this, I never had sentiments towards MY maiden name.
    When I married, I happily ditched it for my husband’s. When I ditched HIM 12 years later, I remembered what a pain it was to change my name, and that for much of my professional career I had HIS name, so I kept it. I’ve had several friends that made the same choice.
    It doesn’t bother me in the least.

    Reply
  6. What’s in a name? My father changed his when he had a blow-up with HIS dad (while still living in the UK) and took his mother’s maiden name. No idea if it was legal or not, and at this late stage it doesn’t matter except to say that because of this, I never had sentiments towards MY maiden name.
    When I married, I happily ditched it for my husband’s. When I ditched HIM 12 years later, I remembered what a pain it was to change my name, and that for much of my professional career I had HIS name, so I kept it. I’ve had several friends that made the same choice.
    It doesn’t bother me in the least.

    Reply
  7. I know what you mean about multiple names, Edith–having more than one as an author, and as a person too — very confusing. Also, it’s hard to give up the name you grew up with, the one that helped form your identity.
    My maiden name is Italian with a spelling and pronunciation that can be confusing, so it was kinda nice to have my husband’s straightforward last name of King. But I like my maiden name and didn’t want to lose it — so I adapted it as my middle name, using the full name instead of an initial on documents, letterheads, and so on. It’s been a good solution.
    When my first book was sold, they thought the Italian name was too hard to pronounce and spell, and liked the straightforward one. For the second publisher, I wanted to keep the other name for other books, so we came up with a pseudonym. So between home and work, I juggle several names.
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  8. I know what you mean about multiple names, Edith–having more than one as an author, and as a person too — very confusing. Also, it’s hard to give up the name you grew up with, the one that helped form your identity.
    My maiden name is Italian with a spelling and pronunciation that can be confusing, so it was kinda nice to have my husband’s straightforward last name of King. But I like my maiden name and didn’t want to lose it — so I adapted it as my middle name, using the full name instead of an initial on documents, letterheads, and so on. It’s been a good solution.
    When my first book was sold, they thought the Italian name was too hard to pronounce and spell, and liked the straightforward one. For the second publisher, I wanted to keep the other name for other books, so we came up with a pseudonym. So between home and work, I juggle several names.
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  9. I know what you mean about multiple names, Edith–having more than one as an author, and as a person too — very confusing. Also, it’s hard to give up the name you grew up with, the one that helped form your identity.
    My maiden name is Italian with a spelling and pronunciation that can be confusing, so it was kinda nice to have my husband’s straightforward last name of King. But I like my maiden name and didn’t want to lose it — so I adapted it as my middle name, using the full name instead of an initial on documents, letterheads, and so on. It’s been a good solution.
    When my first book was sold, they thought the Italian name was too hard to pronounce and spell, and liked the straightforward one. For the second publisher, I wanted to keep the other name for other books, so we came up with a pseudonym. So between home and work, I juggle several names.
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  10. By the time I reached adulthood, changing my quite uncommon Albanian surname to a husband’s made no sense to me. By the time I did marry, I had a professional career in my maiden name. Yet I did change my name when I published, for reasons like Susan/Sarah’s–Chase is much easier to pronounce.

    Reply
  11. By the time I reached adulthood, changing my quite uncommon Albanian surname to a husband’s made no sense to me. By the time I did marry, I had a professional career in my maiden name. Yet I did change my name when I published, for reasons like Susan/Sarah’s–Chase is much easier to pronounce.

    Reply
  12. By the time I reached adulthood, changing my quite uncommon Albanian surname to a husband’s made no sense to me. By the time I did marry, I had a professional career in my maiden name. Yet I did change my name when I published, for reasons like Susan/Sarah’s–Chase is much easier to pronounce.

    Reply
  13. I’ve not married, so I didn’t face the choice. My sister did what Susan Sarah did – moved her maiden name to middle name. I’d probably do the same.
    The big question for me is, what name do the children take when the wife keeps her maiden name? Of course the tradition is taking the husband’s last name. Some people hyphenate wife/husband name (Mary Smith and Jay Jones have a daughter Amy Smith-Jones). But then what is “Amy”‘s daughter’s last name? Should girls take their mom’s name, and boys their father’s? There’s really no more reason for the convention of children taking the last name of the father than for the wife to. Isn’t there a naming convention in Latin countries where the mother’s name is a part of the children’s name, and then everything shifts when a woman marries?
    There may be drawbacks to tradition/ convention, but simplicity is one advantage. Although I do think it would be harder for me now – at 45 – to take someone else’s last name, than it would have been at 18 or 25.
    As for pseudonyms, in this world where people can know everything about you at the click of a mouse I think I would prefer to publish with a pseudonym. And I’d like to have the option of being everyday me or Author Me. But then I’m quirky that way. Almost like the people with superstitions about telling others their real name…

    Reply
  14. I’ve not married, so I didn’t face the choice. My sister did what Susan Sarah did – moved her maiden name to middle name. I’d probably do the same.
    The big question for me is, what name do the children take when the wife keeps her maiden name? Of course the tradition is taking the husband’s last name. Some people hyphenate wife/husband name (Mary Smith and Jay Jones have a daughter Amy Smith-Jones). But then what is “Amy”‘s daughter’s last name? Should girls take their mom’s name, and boys their father’s? There’s really no more reason for the convention of children taking the last name of the father than for the wife to. Isn’t there a naming convention in Latin countries where the mother’s name is a part of the children’s name, and then everything shifts when a woman marries?
    There may be drawbacks to tradition/ convention, but simplicity is one advantage. Although I do think it would be harder for me now – at 45 – to take someone else’s last name, than it would have been at 18 or 25.
    As for pseudonyms, in this world where people can know everything about you at the click of a mouse I think I would prefer to publish with a pseudonym. And I’d like to have the option of being everyday me or Author Me. But then I’m quirky that way. Almost like the people with superstitions about telling others their real name…

    Reply
  15. I’ve not married, so I didn’t face the choice. My sister did what Susan Sarah did – moved her maiden name to middle name. I’d probably do the same.
    The big question for me is, what name do the children take when the wife keeps her maiden name? Of course the tradition is taking the husband’s last name. Some people hyphenate wife/husband name (Mary Smith and Jay Jones have a daughter Amy Smith-Jones). But then what is “Amy”‘s daughter’s last name? Should girls take their mom’s name, and boys their father’s? There’s really no more reason for the convention of children taking the last name of the father than for the wife to. Isn’t there a naming convention in Latin countries where the mother’s name is a part of the children’s name, and then everything shifts when a woman marries?
    There may be drawbacks to tradition/ convention, but simplicity is one advantage. Although I do think it would be harder for me now – at 45 – to take someone else’s last name, than it would have been at 18 or 25.
    As for pseudonyms, in this world where people can know everything about you at the click of a mouse I think I would prefer to publish with a pseudonym. And I’d like to have the option of being everyday me or Author Me. But then I’m quirky that way. Almost like the people with superstitions about telling others their real name…

    Reply
  16. I’ve had your book on order with Amazon since it was firsts mentioned on WW’s. Can’t wait to read it.
    Names… I gave mine up when I got married. Never occurred to me to do otherwise. I don’t regret it.
    I think if I were ever to become published, I would like it to be under a different name. And perhaps even a different mug shot. A young blonde with a come hither smile, if you please.
    But, right now, that’s the least of my worries. I’m too busy trying to figure out how they trained racehorses in 1817.

    Reply
  17. I’ve had your book on order with Amazon since it was firsts mentioned on WW’s. Can’t wait to read it.
    Names… I gave mine up when I got married. Never occurred to me to do otherwise. I don’t regret it.
    I think if I were ever to become published, I would like it to be under a different name. And perhaps even a different mug shot. A young blonde with a come hither smile, if you please.
    But, right now, that’s the least of my worries. I’m too busy trying to figure out how they trained racehorses in 1817.

    Reply
  18. I’ve had your book on order with Amazon since it was firsts mentioned on WW’s. Can’t wait to read it.
    Names… I gave mine up when I got married. Never occurred to me to do otherwise. I don’t regret it.
    I think if I were ever to become published, I would like it to be under a different name. And perhaps even a different mug shot. A young blonde with a come hither smile, if you please.
    But, right now, that’s the least of my worries. I’m too busy trying to figure out how they trained racehorses in 1817.

    Reply
  19. Jo here. I happily ditched Dunn for Beverley. Much more interesting, so I’ve never regretted it.
    I think couples should choose whatever name they want. His, hers, a combination, or something completely new. The debate over it might be an interesting test of future harmony, both with the couple and the extended family.*g*
    I also eschewed Josephine for Jo fairly early in life because I just didn’t like Josephine. Perhaps it was subconscious because I had lost Mary very early in life. I was baptised Mary Josephine, but according to family lore my next older sister objected because she would rather have been Mary, so I became Josephine to keep the peace.
    So we all play with names, don’t we? And I think that’s an interesting aspect of characters. Most of them will have had different names at different parts of their life, and may still be known by different names to different people in the present. It can add depth to their personality.
    BTW, I do know how to spell dysentry. Sheesh! It gave me a shock when I realized what I’d done. Shouldn’t write posts in a hurry.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  20. Jo here. I happily ditched Dunn for Beverley. Much more interesting, so I’ve never regretted it.
    I think couples should choose whatever name they want. His, hers, a combination, or something completely new. The debate over it might be an interesting test of future harmony, both with the couple and the extended family.*g*
    I also eschewed Josephine for Jo fairly early in life because I just didn’t like Josephine. Perhaps it was subconscious because I had lost Mary very early in life. I was baptised Mary Josephine, but according to family lore my next older sister objected because she would rather have been Mary, so I became Josephine to keep the peace.
    So we all play with names, don’t we? And I think that’s an interesting aspect of characters. Most of them will have had different names at different parts of their life, and may still be known by different names to different people in the present. It can add depth to their personality.
    BTW, I do know how to spell dysentry. Sheesh! It gave me a shock when I realized what I’d done. Shouldn’t write posts in a hurry.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  21. Jo here. I happily ditched Dunn for Beverley. Much more interesting, so I’ve never regretted it.
    I think couples should choose whatever name they want. His, hers, a combination, or something completely new. The debate over it might be an interesting test of future harmony, both with the couple and the extended family.*g*
    I also eschewed Josephine for Jo fairly early in life because I just didn’t like Josephine. Perhaps it was subconscious because I had lost Mary very early in life. I was baptised Mary Josephine, but according to family lore my next older sister objected because she would rather have been Mary, so I became Josephine to keep the peace.
    So we all play with names, don’t we? And I think that’s an interesting aspect of characters. Most of them will have had different names at different parts of their life, and may still be known by different names to different people in the present. It can add depth to their personality.
    BTW, I do know how to spell dysentry. Sheesh! It gave me a shock when I realized what I’d done. Shouldn’t write posts in a hurry.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  22. Women were just starting to keep their maiden names when I married. I thought about it. IMO Chelikowsky is much more interesting sounding than Gordon. But, I was afraid my dh would feel hurt. So, I started using my maiden name as my middle name. My daugher (and grandkidds) went with a hyphenated last name: Gordon-Stacey. Classy sounding, but kind of a pain for alphbetizing. Someimes people put it under G, sometimes S. She also gets mail addressed to Stacey Gordon.

    Reply
  23. Women were just starting to keep their maiden names when I married. I thought about it. IMO Chelikowsky is much more interesting sounding than Gordon. But, I was afraid my dh would feel hurt. So, I started using my maiden name as my middle name. My daugher (and grandkidds) went with a hyphenated last name: Gordon-Stacey. Classy sounding, but kind of a pain for alphbetizing. Someimes people put it under G, sometimes S. She also gets mail addressed to Stacey Gordon.

    Reply
  24. Women were just starting to keep their maiden names when I married. I thought about it. IMO Chelikowsky is much more interesting sounding than Gordon. But, I was afraid my dh would feel hurt. So, I started using my maiden name as my middle name. My daugher (and grandkidds) went with a hyphenated last name: Gordon-Stacey. Classy sounding, but kind of a pain for alphbetizing. Someimes people put it under G, sometimes S. She also gets mail addressed to Stacey Gordon.

    Reply
  25. Jean, you remind me that Beverley does create some problems. Of course nearly everyone in America seems to want to spell it Beverly, but in addition, it strikes them as so strongly a first name that I a get a lot of interactions like this.
    “Last name?”
    “Beverley.”
    Pitying look. “LAST name.”
    I even sometimes get junk mail addressed to Beverley Jo.
    Now I ask, if you had to choose which is the first name, which the last, which would you choose?
    But it adds a little interest to the more humdrum moments in life.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  26. Jean, you remind me that Beverley does create some problems. Of course nearly everyone in America seems to want to spell it Beverly, but in addition, it strikes them as so strongly a first name that I a get a lot of interactions like this.
    “Last name?”
    “Beverley.”
    Pitying look. “LAST name.”
    I even sometimes get junk mail addressed to Beverley Jo.
    Now I ask, if you had to choose which is the first name, which the last, which would you choose?
    But it adds a little interest to the more humdrum moments in life.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  27. Jean, you remind me that Beverley does create some problems. Of course nearly everyone in America seems to want to spell it Beverly, but in addition, it strikes them as so strongly a first name that I a get a lot of interactions like this.
    “Last name?”
    “Beverley.”
    Pitying look. “LAST name.”
    I even sometimes get junk mail addressed to Beverley Jo.
    Now I ask, if you had to choose which is the first name, which the last, which would you choose?
    But it adds a little interest to the more humdrum moments in life.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  28. I kept my birth name (“maiden” name) when I married. Our two daughters have my husband’s last name, and their middle names are my surname and my middle name, respectively–our stab at being egalitarian and traditional at the same time! After almost 20 years of marriage, I do sometimes think about changing my name to his–mine is the Most Common Surname in America, and his (while relatively simple to spell) is so unusual that there probably aren’t 100 people in the country who share it. But actually the name I have the most trouble with is my first name. Many people seem not to hear “Melinda” properly–I am often called Melissa, Melanie, Marilyn–and once even Minerva! (Perhaps the trouble is that I’m a Gemini too?)

    Reply
  29. I kept my birth name (“maiden” name) when I married. Our two daughters have my husband’s last name, and their middle names are my surname and my middle name, respectively–our stab at being egalitarian and traditional at the same time! After almost 20 years of marriage, I do sometimes think about changing my name to his–mine is the Most Common Surname in America, and his (while relatively simple to spell) is so unusual that there probably aren’t 100 people in the country who share it. But actually the name I have the most trouble with is my first name. Many people seem not to hear “Melinda” properly–I am often called Melissa, Melanie, Marilyn–and once even Minerva! (Perhaps the trouble is that I’m a Gemini too?)

    Reply
  30. I kept my birth name (“maiden” name) when I married. Our two daughters have my husband’s last name, and their middle names are my surname and my middle name, respectively–our stab at being egalitarian and traditional at the same time! After almost 20 years of marriage, I do sometimes think about changing my name to his–mine is the Most Common Surname in America, and his (while relatively simple to spell) is so unusual that there probably aren’t 100 people in the country who share it. But actually the name I have the most trouble with is my first name. Many people seem not to hear “Melinda” properly–I am often called Melissa, Melanie, Marilyn–and once even Minerva! (Perhaps the trouble is that I’m a Gemini too?)

    Reply
  31. Interesting to note, also, that it has long been common in Scotland for women to keep their maiden names. Even in the 19th and 20th centuries, when the practice of changing names at marriage was widespread and expected elsewhere, Scottish women often chose not to do so. If Jean MacDonald married John Graham, she’d still be referred to as Jean MacDonald, even in legal documents, noted as the wife of John Graham. Theoretically it goes back to the more equitable status of women in Celtic Scotland than other parts of Britain, and pride in clan names as well, though kids took the father’s name.
    My Scottish grandmother took my Irish grandfather’s name, but she used Fraser as her middle name, now that I think of it. I’d forgotten about that….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  32. Interesting to note, also, that it has long been common in Scotland for women to keep their maiden names. Even in the 19th and 20th centuries, when the practice of changing names at marriage was widespread and expected elsewhere, Scottish women often chose not to do so. If Jean MacDonald married John Graham, she’d still be referred to as Jean MacDonald, even in legal documents, noted as the wife of John Graham. Theoretically it goes back to the more equitable status of women in Celtic Scotland than other parts of Britain, and pride in clan names as well, though kids took the father’s name.
    My Scottish grandmother took my Irish grandfather’s name, but she used Fraser as her middle name, now that I think of it. I’d forgotten about that….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  33. Interesting to note, also, that it has long been common in Scotland for women to keep their maiden names. Even in the 19th and 20th centuries, when the practice of changing names at marriage was widespread and expected elsewhere, Scottish women often chose not to do so. If Jean MacDonald married John Graham, she’d still be referred to as Jean MacDonald, even in legal documents, noted as the wife of John Graham. Theoretically it goes back to the more equitable status of women in Celtic Scotland than other parts of Britain, and pride in clan names as well, though kids took the father’s name.
    My Scottish grandmother took my Irish grandfather’s name, but she used Fraser as her middle name, now that I think of it. I’d forgotten about that….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  34. Edith,
    Is this the story of Isabella Angouleme? She made several appearances in Sharon Kay Penman’s HERE BE DRAGONS.
    I can’t wait to buy your book. I’m off to Amazon now!

    Reply
  35. Edith,
    Is this the story of Isabella Angouleme? She made several appearances in Sharon Kay Penman’s HERE BE DRAGONS.
    I can’t wait to buy your book. I’m off to Amazon now!

    Reply
  36. Edith,
    Is this the story of Isabella Angouleme? She made several appearances in Sharon Kay Penman’s HERE BE DRAGONS.
    I can’t wait to buy your book. I’m off to Amazon now!

    Reply
  37. I gladly gave up my italian maiden name which had two capital letters and an apostrophe. When you have an apostrophe in your name (and it isn’t O’Brien) you discover how illiterate the world is. I was never filed in the correct place. Many people wanted to turn the apostrophe into a period so that the first letter of my last name became a middle initial. Or else they decided it was an ‘i’.
    It was not only misfiled but grievously mispronounced. The first day of school was always a trial–worse when I went to Junior High and there were six new teachers to mangle my name.
    My DH came with the lovely pronounceable, spellable name of Black and I saw that as one of his assets. 🙂

    Reply
  38. I gladly gave up my italian maiden name which had two capital letters and an apostrophe. When you have an apostrophe in your name (and it isn’t O’Brien) you discover how illiterate the world is. I was never filed in the correct place. Many people wanted to turn the apostrophe into a period so that the first letter of my last name became a middle initial. Or else they decided it was an ‘i’.
    It was not only misfiled but grievously mispronounced. The first day of school was always a trial–worse when I went to Junior High and there were six new teachers to mangle my name.
    My DH came with the lovely pronounceable, spellable name of Black and I saw that as one of his assets. 🙂

    Reply
  39. I gladly gave up my italian maiden name which had two capital letters and an apostrophe. When you have an apostrophe in your name (and it isn’t O’Brien) you discover how illiterate the world is. I was never filed in the correct place. Many people wanted to turn the apostrophe into a period so that the first letter of my last name became a middle initial. Or else they decided it was an ‘i’.
    It was not only misfiled but grievously mispronounced. The first day of school was always a trial–worse when I went to Junior High and there were six new teachers to mangle my name.
    My DH came with the lovely pronounceable, spellable name of Black and I saw that as one of his assets. 🙂

    Reply
  40. I was glad to get rid of mine – it’s a fine name, but I’d have changed it even if I hadn’t married for Security Reasons. My sister in law was determined to keep her name until she married a man with an even longer Italian name and she caved.
    I purchased that first work of the Felber Woman today – the bookseller asked about it and turned out to never have read a Layton despite being a romance fan. I think I shamed her enough, but I’m bringing thumbscrews next week just in case.

    Reply
  41. I was glad to get rid of mine – it’s a fine name, but I’d have changed it even if I hadn’t married for Security Reasons. My sister in law was determined to keep her name until she married a man with an even longer Italian name and she caved.
    I purchased that first work of the Felber Woman today – the bookseller asked about it and turned out to never have read a Layton despite being a romance fan. I think I shamed her enough, but I’m bringing thumbscrews next week just in case.

    Reply
  42. I was glad to get rid of mine – it’s a fine name, but I’d have changed it even if I hadn’t married for Security Reasons. My sister in law was determined to keep her name until she married a man with an even longer Italian name and she caved.
    I purchased that first work of the Felber Woman today – the bookseller asked about it and turned out to never have read a Layton despite being a romance fan. I think I shamed her enough, but I’m bringing thumbscrews next week just in case.

    Reply
  43. I kept my maiden name, actually I didn’t have a choice. Since 1982 it has become law in Québec to have married women keep their names. Why? Well because it had become too much of an administrative paper nightmare to have couples marry, divorce and remarry, always changing names. My mother who’s name had been Laurin since her wedding to my dad in 1952, had to get used to being called Bousquet again.
    So I am still a Laurin! My kids do not have my last name. We agreed that Norris would be much better for them. We live in Ontario and I find myself constantly having to spell my name, I wouldn’t put my children through so much hassel.
    My husband’s family hasn’t taken my keeping my maiden name well. They weren’t too keen on his choice of spouse and not taking his name came as an insult in their eyes. They actually think it has something to do with my being a Québécoise and a seperatist!! That couldn’t be farther from the truth.
    Like Edith, I’ll answer to all of the followin: Mrs. Norris, Hey you! or Eric’s, Caleb’s and Gabrielle’s Mom… as long as it isn’t a mean or derogatory name.

    Reply
  44. I kept my maiden name, actually I didn’t have a choice. Since 1982 it has become law in Québec to have married women keep their names. Why? Well because it had become too much of an administrative paper nightmare to have couples marry, divorce and remarry, always changing names. My mother who’s name had been Laurin since her wedding to my dad in 1952, had to get used to being called Bousquet again.
    So I am still a Laurin! My kids do not have my last name. We agreed that Norris would be much better for them. We live in Ontario and I find myself constantly having to spell my name, I wouldn’t put my children through so much hassel.
    My husband’s family hasn’t taken my keeping my maiden name well. They weren’t too keen on his choice of spouse and not taking his name came as an insult in their eyes. They actually think it has something to do with my being a Québécoise and a seperatist!! That couldn’t be farther from the truth.
    Like Edith, I’ll answer to all of the followin: Mrs. Norris, Hey you! or Eric’s, Caleb’s and Gabrielle’s Mom… as long as it isn’t a mean or derogatory name.

    Reply
  45. I kept my maiden name, actually I didn’t have a choice. Since 1982 it has become law in Québec to have married women keep their names. Why? Well because it had become too much of an administrative paper nightmare to have couples marry, divorce and remarry, always changing names. My mother who’s name had been Laurin since her wedding to my dad in 1952, had to get used to being called Bousquet again.
    So I am still a Laurin! My kids do not have my last name. We agreed that Norris would be much better for them. We live in Ontario and I find myself constantly having to spell my name, I wouldn’t put my children through so much hassel.
    My husband’s family hasn’t taken my keeping my maiden name well. They weren’t too keen on his choice of spouse and not taking his name came as an insult in their eyes. They actually think it has something to do with my being a Québécoise and a seperatist!! That couldn’t be farther from the truth.
    Like Edith, I’ll answer to all of the followin: Mrs. Norris, Hey you! or Eric’s, Caleb’s and Gabrielle’s Mom… as long as it isn’t a mean or derogatory name.

    Reply
  46. I did change my last name when I married — it never occurred to me not to, and pretty much regretted it ever since! But I do use my maiden name as my middle name now.
    But, it too caused some interesting conversations:
    What’s your last name?
    It’s Irish.
    Well, what is it?
    I told you, it’s Irish.
    Your name, not your nationality.
    It’s Irish.
    P.S. Edith, I recently read (and enjoyed) Adam’s book and I’m looking forward to reading both of yours, whichever name may be on the cover!

    Reply
  47. I did change my last name when I married — it never occurred to me not to, and pretty much regretted it ever since! But I do use my maiden name as my middle name now.
    But, it too caused some interesting conversations:
    What’s your last name?
    It’s Irish.
    Well, what is it?
    I told you, it’s Irish.
    Your name, not your nationality.
    It’s Irish.
    P.S. Edith, I recently read (and enjoyed) Adam’s book and I’m looking forward to reading both of yours, whichever name may be on the cover!

    Reply
  48. I did change my last name when I married — it never occurred to me not to, and pretty much regretted it ever since! But I do use my maiden name as my middle name now.
    But, it too caused some interesting conversations:
    What’s your last name?
    It’s Irish.
    Well, what is it?
    I told you, it’s Irish.
    Your name, not your nationality.
    It’s Irish.
    P.S. Edith, I recently read (and enjoyed) Adam’s book and I’m looking forward to reading both of yours, whichever name may be on the cover!

    Reply
  49. I’m not married, so this isn’t a problem for me, but when I *do* get married I will be trading in my surname. This is mostly because it’s unusual; people can’t spell it. It doesn’t sound English either, although the family has been in the UK for over 400 years.
    I go by lots of different names, depending on who I’m with. Online I’m Hallie, but my real name is Hayley. I started playing online at 14, when I hated my name because it was so common amongst my age group. I wanted to use my middle name (Elizabeth), but my family couldn’t quite deal with that, so the majority of people who know me in real life call me Hayley.
    My family, on the other hand, calls me Hayley-Beth or Hayley-Belle. Except my brother, who went through a stage of calling me Spud.
    I answer to most things, though; I have three sisters and a brother, and answer to all of their names, not to mention Emily, which is my much younger cousin’s name.
    If/When I get published, I’m going to be use Lizzie Hyde as a pseudonym – a diminutive of my middle name and my grandmother’s maiden name. It’s sensible in this day and age not to use your real name, I think.
    🙂

    Reply
  50. I’m not married, so this isn’t a problem for me, but when I *do* get married I will be trading in my surname. This is mostly because it’s unusual; people can’t spell it. It doesn’t sound English either, although the family has been in the UK for over 400 years.
    I go by lots of different names, depending on who I’m with. Online I’m Hallie, but my real name is Hayley. I started playing online at 14, when I hated my name because it was so common amongst my age group. I wanted to use my middle name (Elizabeth), but my family couldn’t quite deal with that, so the majority of people who know me in real life call me Hayley.
    My family, on the other hand, calls me Hayley-Beth or Hayley-Belle. Except my brother, who went through a stage of calling me Spud.
    I answer to most things, though; I have three sisters and a brother, and answer to all of their names, not to mention Emily, which is my much younger cousin’s name.
    If/When I get published, I’m going to be use Lizzie Hyde as a pseudonym – a diminutive of my middle name and my grandmother’s maiden name. It’s sensible in this day and age not to use your real name, I think.
    🙂

    Reply
  51. I’m not married, so this isn’t a problem for me, but when I *do* get married I will be trading in my surname. This is mostly because it’s unusual; people can’t spell it. It doesn’t sound English either, although the family has been in the UK for over 400 years.
    I go by lots of different names, depending on who I’m with. Online I’m Hallie, but my real name is Hayley. I started playing online at 14, when I hated my name because it was so common amongst my age group. I wanted to use my middle name (Elizabeth), but my family couldn’t quite deal with that, so the majority of people who know me in real life call me Hayley.
    My family, on the other hand, calls me Hayley-Beth or Hayley-Belle. Except my brother, who went through a stage of calling me Spud.
    I answer to most things, though; I have three sisters and a brother, and answer to all of their names, not to mention Emily, which is my much younger cousin’s name.
    If/When I get published, I’m going to be use Lizzie Hyde as a pseudonym – a diminutive of my middle name and my grandmother’s maiden name. It’s sensible in this day and age not to use your real name, I think.
    🙂

    Reply

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