What’s your fancy? Rough or smooth?

First a bit of boasting. Lady Beware is selling extremely well! Thus far it’s made #66 on the USA Today bestseller list, #3 on the Borders/Waldenbooks paperback romance list, #15 on the Publishers Weekly mass market paperback list, and #35 on the extended New York Times paperback list.Lbgoodsm_3

(In case you’re interested in the differences — the USAT is nearly all books published; tho Borders/Waldenbooks is as said, paperback romance; the PW is all mass market; NYT is all paperbacks, including trade paperbacks. Now wasn’t that fun!*G*)

But being on the lists is lots of fun, and now it’s summertime, so great dark chocolate all around!

And let’s celebrate by ogling manly chests. We’ve touched on this before, and it certainly stirs debate everywhere — male chest hair.

“Why do all those cover models wax their chests?” people ask. “No man has a hairless chest,” a friend of mine insisted. “It has to be waxed.”

I’m here to say that it’s largely a matter of geography, and it’s my opinion and experience that Englishmen are a lot less likely to have chest hair than some other nationalities. So, with many historicals being set in England, lack of chest hair isn’t unreasonable. No, honestly! as they used to say in a TV program a long, long time ago. (It was a good one.)

Lennon_2 Consider, for example, some famous Englishmen. For discretion’s sake, I trimmed the picture of John Lennon.

On to Mick Jagger. Jag3 source here

I think you’ll agree he’s very unlikely to ever have shaved or waxed his chest! Jagger Source here

In the interests of fairness, I tried to find a picture of Ioan Gruffyd’s chest (would be nice, wouldn’t it?) but couldn’t. What I did discover was an extreme lack of pictures of manly chests on line. Looking at pictures of celebrities, often there’s more chest exposed on the lady on their arm than on them. This seems most unfair.

Yes, I know I could find lots on certain sorts of sites. Not going there.*G*

But Ioan probably is hirsute because he’s a different type — a dark Welshman. Like Tom Jones, for example, who never was too shy about his chest hair. Except that again, I could hardly find anything! No wonder naked chests are popular with some romance readers.

Tjones On the other hands, this picture of Sir Tom in younger days shows very little hair, so perhaps I’m wrong.
You might find the accompanying story interesting as another wrinkle on everyday life in Britain.
Newspaper article

Any comments on differences in social nuances between North America and Britain?

I tried thinking of recent handsome English personalities — and kept landing on Welsh, Scottish and Irish! Someone help me out here.

Ah, Sean Bean! Good Yorkshire lad. Did you know he was an artist’s model/inspiration in a movie about Caravaggio? The things one learns writing blogs!Caravaggio13

Just a bit of hair there, I think. Low down.

And talking about art. I confess, I didn’t know John Singer Sargent painted nudes, but
Sargent site.Sargent

And of course there’s the famous Michelangelo Adam. Presumably Italian, though.

So, struggling for more examples. I went to the famous Fiennes family, which is, I think, as English as they come. And found hair.Jospephfiennes Though again, shockingly coy about it!

But you might want to read the article about Joseph Fiennes ancestor Frederick Benjamin Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, 16th Baron Saye and Sele, for a glimpse into a typical aristocratic family.
Article.

My conclusion is, smooth is perfectly authentic in your English hero, but if you like, you can have a bit of rough. Don’t mind me if I prefer smooth. ๐Ÿ™‚

So, what do you think? Does it bother you to even think of a man with a smooth chest? Do you feel he can’t be as manly as one with hair there?

Do you think the more hair the more manly? If so, where does it stop?

And do you have any great illustrations to direct us to to support your agrument?

Jo

205 thoughts on “What’s your fancy? Rough or smooth?”

  1. I can be anecdotal – until his 40’s Spouse was pretty hairless and my family is about 50/50 in that regard. I, myself, prefer the lanky and hairless men. You can keep Robin Williams and Charles Atlas, ladies.

    Reply
  2. I can be anecdotal – until his 40’s Spouse was pretty hairless and my family is about 50/50 in that regard. I, myself, prefer the lanky and hairless men. You can keep Robin Williams and Charles Atlas, ladies.

    Reply
  3. I can be anecdotal – until his 40’s Spouse was pretty hairless and my family is about 50/50 in that regard. I, myself, prefer the lanky and hairless men. You can keep Robin Williams and Charles Atlas, ladies.

    Reply
  4. I can be anecdotal – until his 40’s Spouse was pretty hairless and my family is about 50/50 in that regard. I, myself, prefer the lanky and hairless men. You can keep Robin Williams and Charles Atlas, ladies.

    Reply
  5. I can be anecdotal – until his 40’s Spouse was pretty hairless and my family is about 50/50 in that regard. I, myself, prefer the lanky and hairless men. You can keep Robin Williams and Charles Atlas, ladies.

    Reply
  6. There seems to be some sort of equation of hair and manliness in our minds. It reminds me of a comment made by one of the “help” in a Dorothy Sayers novel. 2 maids were speculating about Lord Peter and his lack of chest hair, wondering if he was a “real man”. Then one said (something like this, I’m paraphrasing), “there was this man over in the next county who was as hairy as a carriage rug and he never was able to father a child.” Lack of chest hair certainly doesn’t interfere with the Asian man’s ability to sire children. I reckon it’s related to secondary sexual characteristics (like deeper voice). We can’t inspect the genitalia for developmental stage in the social setting, so we infer from what is visible. I think the twinkle in his eyes is a much more reliable indicator of the state of his hormones than any amount of hair.
    As for my personal preference, I like a little hair but not enough to think he’s got a too-close relationship with our simian relatives.

    Reply
  7. There seems to be some sort of equation of hair and manliness in our minds. It reminds me of a comment made by one of the “help” in a Dorothy Sayers novel. 2 maids were speculating about Lord Peter and his lack of chest hair, wondering if he was a “real man”. Then one said (something like this, I’m paraphrasing), “there was this man over in the next county who was as hairy as a carriage rug and he never was able to father a child.” Lack of chest hair certainly doesn’t interfere with the Asian man’s ability to sire children. I reckon it’s related to secondary sexual characteristics (like deeper voice). We can’t inspect the genitalia for developmental stage in the social setting, so we infer from what is visible. I think the twinkle in his eyes is a much more reliable indicator of the state of his hormones than any amount of hair.
    As for my personal preference, I like a little hair but not enough to think he’s got a too-close relationship with our simian relatives.

    Reply
  8. There seems to be some sort of equation of hair and manliness in our minds. It reminds me of a comment made by one of the “help” in a Dorothy Sayers novel. 2 maids were speculating about Lord Peter and his lack of chest hair, wondering if he was a “real man”. Then one said (something like this, I’m paraphrasing), “there was this man over in the next county who was as hairy as a carriage rug and he never was able to father a child.” Lack of chest hair certainly doesn’t interfere with the Asian man’s ability to sire children. I reckon it’s related to secondary sexual characteristics (like deeper voice). We can’t inspect the genitalia for developmental stage in the social setting, so we infer from what is visible. I think the twinkle in his eyes is a much more reliable indicator of the state of his hormones than any amount of hair.
    As for my personal preference, I like a little hair but not enough to think he’s got a too-close relationship with our simian relatives.

    Reply
  9. There seems to be some sort of equation of hair and manliness in our minds. It reminds me of a comment made by one of the “help” in a Dorothy Sayers novel. 2 maids were speculating about Lord Peter and his lack of chest hair, wondering if he was a “real man”. Then one said (something like this, I’m paraphrasing), “there was this man over in the next county who was as hairy as a carriage rug and he never was able to father a child.” Lack of chest hair certainly doesn’t interfere with the Asian man’s ability to sire children. I reckon it’s related to secondary sexual characteristics (like deeper voice). We can’t inspect the genitalia for developmental stage in the social setting, so we infer from what is visible. I think the twinkle in his eyes is a much more reliable indicator of the state of his hormones than any amount of hair.
    As for my personal preference, I like a little hair but not enough to think he’s got a too-close relationship with our simian relatives.

    Reply
  10. There seems to be some sort of equation of hair and manliness in our minds. It reminds me of a comment made by one of the “help” in a Dorothy Sayers novel. 2 maids were speculating about Lord Peter and his lack of chest hair, wondering if he was a “real man”. Then one said (something like this, I’m paraphrasing), “there was this man over in the next county who was as hairy as a carriage rug and he never was able to father a child.” Lack of chest hair certainly doesn’t interfere with the Asian man’s ability to sire children. I reckon it’s related to secondary sexual characteristics (like deeper voice). We can’t inspect the genitalia for developmental stage in the social setting, so we infer from what is visible. I think the twinkle in his eyes is a much more reliable indicator of the state of his hormones than any amount of hair.
    As for my personal preference, I like a little hair but not enough to think he’s got a too-close relationship with our simian relatives.

    Reply
  11. I think I might be old enough to be Ioan’s mother, but I find him truly adorable. I have his Burberry ad w/ Rachel Weicz (sp?) on my bulletin board right this minute. Was he never topless in Horatio Hormblower, diving down to untangle something? Please look again, Jo!

    Reply
  12. I think I might be old enough to be Ioan’s mother, but I find him truly adorable. I have his Burberry ad w/ Rachel Weicz (sp?) on my bulletin board right this minute. Was he never topless in Horatio Hormblower, diving down to untangle something? Please look again, Jo!

    Reply
  13. I think I might be old enough to be Ioan’s mother, but I find him truly adorable. I have his Burberry ad w/ Rachel Weicz (sp?) on my bulletin board right this minute. Was he never topless in Horatio Hormblower, diving down to untangle something? Please look again, Jo!

    Reply
  14. I think I might be old enough to be Ioan’s mother, but I find him truly adorable. I have his Burberry ad w/ Rachel Weicz (sp?) on my bulletin board right this minute. Was he never topless in Horatio Hormblower, diving down to untangle something? Please look again, Jo!

    Reply
  15. I think I might be old enough to be Ioan’s mother, but I find him truly adorable. I have his Burberry ad w/ Rachel Weicz (sp?) on my bulletin board right this minute. Was he never topless in Horatio Hormblower, diving down to untangle something? Please look again, Jo!

    Reply
  16. I feel funny confessing that my husband’s chest is hairless… it’s almost like sharing pendendo size… almost.
    My husband is of Dutch descent. I don’t know if that’s a contributing factor, but he’s hairless, but has a full head of hair!
    I am with Liz… oh am I with Liz on this… I have the hots for hairless, lanky men, a al Mick Jagger, Steven Tyler, Sting (Cathy panting at the very thought). Needless to say, I am more than indifferent about beefy, hairy men. Ick.
    In fact, when I was young and single, I had three turn-offs, in this order:
    1. Smoker (wouldn’t date one, ever)
    2. Too muscular
    3. Too hairy

    Reply
  17. I feel funny confessing that my husband’s chest is hairless… it’s almost like sharing pendendo size… almost.
    My husband is of Dutch descent. I don’t know if that’s a contributing factor, but he’s hairless, but has a full head of hair!
    I am with Liz… oh am I with Liz on this… I have the hots for hairless, lanky men, a al Mick Jagger, Steven Tyler, Sting (Cathy panting at the very thought). Needless to say, I am more than indifferent about beefy, hairy men. Ick.
    In fact, when I was young and single, I had three turn-offs, in this order:
    1. Smoker (wouldn’t date one, ever)
    2. Too muscular
    3. Too hairy

    Reply
  18. I feel funny confessing that my husband’s chest is hairless… it’s almost like sharing pendendo size… almost.
    My husband is of Dutch descent. I don’t know if that’s a contributing factor, but he’s hairless, but has a full head of hair!
    I am with Liz… oh am I with Liz on this… I have the hots for hairless, lanky men, a al Mick Jagger, Steven Tyler, Sting (Cathy panting at the very thought). Needless to say, I am more than indifferent about beefy, hairy men. Ick.
    In fact, when I was young and single, I had three turn-offs, in this order:
    1. Smoker (wouldn’t date one, ever)
    2. Too muscular
    3. Too hairy

    Reply
  19. I feel funny confessing that my husband’s chest is hairless… it’s almost like sharing pendendo size… almost.
    My husband is of Dutch descent. I don’t know if that’s a contributing factor, but he’s hairless, but has a full head of hair!
    I am with Liz… oh am I with Liz on this… I have the hots for hairless, lanky men, a al Mick Jagger, Steven Tyler, Sting (Cathy panting at the very thought). Needless to say, I am more than indifferent about beefy, hairy men. Ick.
    In fact, when I was young and single, I had three turn-offs, in this order:
    1. Smoker (wouldn’t date one, ever)
    2. Too muscular
    3. Too hairy

    Reply
  20. I feel funny confessing that my husband’s chest is hairless… it’s almost like sharing pendendo size… almost.
    My husband is of Dutch descent. I don’t know if that’s a contributing factor, but he’s hairless, but has a full head of hair!
    I am with Liz… oh am I with Liz on this… I have the hots for hairless, lanky men, a al Mick Jagger, Steven Tyler, Sting (Cathy panting at the very thought). Needless to say, I am more than indifferent about beefy, hairy men. Ick.
    In fact, when I was young and single, I had three turn-offs, in this order:
    1. Smoker (wouldn’t date one, ever)
    2. Too muscular
    3. Too hairy

    Reply
  21. I prefer to look at actors, cover models etc. with hairless chests. On the other hand, I don’t mind reading about hairy chest, in fact most hero’s that have hairless chests on the cover have hair on their chest when you read the story. This is so the heroine has something to run her fingers through. On the subject of cover art, it is my understanding that when one draws/paints hair on chests for a book cover, it ends up looking like dirt, which is why its not done more. At least that’s what I hear. And of course hair on the back is an ick factor.

    Reply
  22. I prefer to look at actors, cover models etc. with hairless chests. On the other hand, I don’t mind reading about hairy chest, in fact most hero’s that have hairless chests on the cover have hair on their chest when you read the story. This is so the heroine has something to run her fingers through. On the subject of cover art, it is my understanding that when one draws/paints hair on chests for a book cover, it ends up looking like dirt, which is why its not done more. At least that’s what I hear. And of course hair on the back is an ick factor.

    Reply
  23. I prefer to look at actors, cover models etc. with hairless chests. On the other hand, I don’t mind reading about hairy chest, in fact most hero’s that have hairless chests on the cover have hair on their chest when you read the story. This is so the heroine has something to run her fingers through. On the subject of cover art, it is my understanding that when one draws/paints hair on chests for a book cover, it ends up looking like dirt, which is why its not done more. At least that’s what I hear. And of course hair on the back is an ick factor.

    Reply
  24. I prefer to look at actors, cover models etc. with hairless chests. On the other hand, I don’t mind reading about hairy chest, in fact most hero’s that have hairless chests on the cover have hair on their chest when you read the story. This is so the heroine has something to run her fingers through. On the subject of cover art, it is my understanding that when one draws/paints hair on chests for a book cover, it ends up looking like dirt, which is why its not done more. At least that’s what I hear. And of course hair on the back is an ick factor.

    Reply
  25. I prefer to look at actors, cover models etc. with hairless chests. On the other hand, I don’t mind reading about hairy chest, in fact most hero’s that have hairless chests on the cover have hair on their chest when you read the story. This is so the heroine has something to run her fingers through. On the subject of cover art, it is my understanding that when one draws/paints hair on chests for a book cover, it ends up looking like dirt, which is why its not done more. At least that’s what I hear. And of course hair on the back is an ick factor.

    Reply
  26. Well, my preference is for a hair on the chest. I know James Purefoy and Adrian Paul have hair on their chests:
    http://jamespurefoy.us/rome-gallery/romes1-4-gallery/rs1ep4-072.jpg
    (not the best angle of his face, though)
    http://www.adrianpaul.net/earlycareer.html
    (scroll down on this page)
    I’m pretty certain Colin Firth has chest hair too, but can’t find any pics.
    And Matthew MacFadyen definitely does:
    http://tinyurl.com/olxse
    And my dh, of Irish/Scottish heritage does as well.
    Of course, there is such a thing as TOO much hair – when it looks like a carpet and no skin is visible.
    That was a nice way to spend part of my morning, but I’d best get on with other things now ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  27. Well, my preference is for a hair on the chest. I know James Purefoy and Adrian Paul have hair on their chests:
    http://jamespurefoy.us/rome-gallery/romes1-4-gallery/rs1ep4-072.jpg
    (not the best angle of his face, though)
    http://www.adrianpaul.net/earlycareer.html
    (scroll down on this page)
    I’m pretty certain Colin Firth has chest hair too, but can’t find any pics.
    And Matthew MacFadyen definitely does:
    http://tinyurl.com/olxse
    And my dh, of Irish/Scottish heritage does as well.
    Of course, there is such a thing as TOO much hair – when it looks like a carpet and no skin is visible.
    That was a nice way to spend part of my morning, but I’d best get on with other things now ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  28. Well, my preference is for a hair on the chest. I know James Purefoy and Adrian Paul have hair on their chests:
    http://jamespurefoy.us/rome-gallery/romes1-4-gallery/rs1ep4-072.jpg
    (not the best angle of his face, though)
    http://www.adrianpaul.net/earlycareer.html
    (scroll down on this page)
    I’m pretty certain Colin Firth has chest hair too, but can’t find any pics.
    And Matthew MacFadyen definitely does:
    http://tinyurl.com/olxse
    And my dh, of Irish/Scottish heritage does as well.
    Of course, there is such a thing as TOO much hair – when it looks like a carpet and no skin is visible.
    That was a nice way to spend part of my morning, but I’d best get on with other things now ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  29. Well, my preference is for a hair on the chest. I know James Purefoy and Adrian Paul have hair on their chests:
    http://jamespurefoy.us/rome-gallery/romes1-4-gallery/rs1ep4-072.jpg
    (not the best angle of his face, though)
    http://www.adrianpaul.net/earlycareer.html
    (scroll down on this page)
    I’m pretty certain Colin Firth has chest hair too, but can’t find any pics.
    And Matthew MacFadyen definitely does:
    http://tinyurl.com/olxse
    And my dh, of Irish/Scottish heritage does as well.
    Of course, there is such a thing as TOO much hair – when it looks like a carpet and no skin is visible.
    That was a nice way to spend part of my morning, but I’d best get on with other things now ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  30. Well, my preference is for a hair on the chest. I know James Purefoy and Adrian Paul have hair on their chests:
    http://jamespurefoy.us/rome-gallery/romes1-4-gallery/rs1ep4-072.jpg
    (not the best angle of his face, though)
    http://www.adrianpaul.net/earlycareer.html
    (scroll down on this page)
    I’m pretty certain Colin Firth has chest hair too, but can’t find any pics.
    And Matthew MacFadyen definitely does:
    http://tinyurl.com/olxse
    And my dh, of Irish/Scottish heritage does as well.
    Of course, there is such a thing as TOO much hair – when it looks like a carpet and no skin is visible.
    That was a nice way to spend part of my morning, but I’d best get on with other things now ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  31. Sign me up for the island of smooth-chested men! Hairy chests (and let us not even venture to the land of the hairy back *shudder*) are a huge turnoff for me. I really hate it when Iโ€™m reading a novel and it gushes on and on about the heroโ€™s manly, hairy chest. Ick. You might as well tell me he also has a pockmarked face and no front teeth, cause the romance of it all is now sullied.
    Whenever I see a man with tons of body hair I hear my motherโ€™s voice saying (in a not so lady-like way): โ€œIf I wanted to f*ck and ape, Iโ€™d go to the zoo.โ€ I think I was eight when I heard her say that as we drove past a construction site full of men whoโ€™d qualify for a โ€œbearโ€ calendar if you know what I mean, and Iโ€™ve never forgotten it.
    Do you think it has something to do with what youโ€™re used to? My dad and both grandfathers are pretty much hair-less (Scottish/English on one side, Native American on the other). And the girlfriends I have who like โ€˜em hirsute all have hairy fathers and brothers from what Iโ€™ve seen.

    Reply
  32. Sign me up for the island of smooth-chested men! Hairy chests (and let us not even venture to the land of the hairy back *shudder*) are a huge turnoff for me. I really hate it when Iโ€™m reading a novel and it gushes on and on about the heroโ€™s manly, hairy chest. Ick. You might as well tell me he also has a pockmarked face and no front teeth, cause the romance of it all is now sullied.
    Whenever I see a man with tons of body hair I hear my motherโ€™s voice saying (in a not so lady-like way): โ€œIf I wanted to f*ck and ape, Iโ€™d go to the zoo.โ€ I think I was eight when I heard her say that as we drove past a construction site full of men whoโ€™d qualify for a โ€œbearโ€ calendar if you know what I mean, and Iโ€™ve never forgotten it.
    Do you think it has something to do with what youโ€™re used to? My dad and both grandfathers are pretty much hair-less (Scottish/English on one side, Native American on the other). And the girlfriends I have who like โ€˜em hirsute all have hairy fathers and brothers from what Iโ€™ve seen.

    Reply
  33. Sign me up for the island of smooth-chested men! Hairy chests (and let us not even venture to the land of the hairy back *shudder*) are a huge turnoff for me. I really hate it when Iโ€™m reading a novel and it gushes on and on about the heroโ€™s manly, hairy chest. Ick. You might as well tell me he also has a pockmarked face and no front teeth, cause the romance of it all is now sullied.
    Whenever I see a man with tons of body hair I hear my motherโ€™s voice saying (in a not so lady-like way): โ€œIf I wanted to f*ck and ape, Iโ€™d go to the zoo.โ€ I think I was eight when I heard her say that as we drove past a construction site full of men whoโ€™d qualify for a โ€œbearโ€ calendar if you know what I mean, and Iโ€™ve never forgotten it.
    Do you think it has something to do with what youโ€™re used to? My dad and both grandfathers are pretty much hair-less (Scottish/English on one side, Native American on the other). And the girlfriends I have who like โ€˜em hirsute all have hairy fathers and brothers from what Iโ€™ve seen.

    Reply
  34. Sign me up for the island of smooth-chested men! Hairy chests (and let us not even venture to the land of the hairy back *shudder*) are a huge turnoff for me. I really hate it when Iโ€™m reading a novel and it gushes on and on about the heroโ€™s manly, hairy chest. Ick. You might as well tell me he also has a pockmarked face and no front teeth, cause the romance of it all is now sullied.
    Whenever I see a man with tons of body hair I hear my motherโ€™s voice saying (in a not so lady-like way): โ€œIf I wanted to f*ck and ape, Iโ€™d go to the zoo.โ€ I think I was eight when I heard her say that as we drove past a construction site full of men whoโ€™d qualify for a โ€œbearโ€ calendar if you know what I mean, and Iโ€™ve never forgotten it.
    Do you think it has something to do with what youโ€™re used to? My dad and both grandfathers are pretty much hair-less (Scottish/English on one side, Native American on the other). And the girlfriends I have who like โ€˜em hirsute all have hairy fathers and brothers from what Iโ€™ve seen.

    Reply
  35. Sign me up for the island of smooth-chested men! Hairy chests (and let us not even venture to the land of the hairy back *shudder*) are a huge turnoff for me. I really hate it when Iโ€™m reading a novel and it gushes on and on about the heroโ€™s manly, hairy chest. Ick. You might as well tell me he also has a pockmarked face and no front teeth, cause the romance of it all is now sullied.
    Whenever I see a man with tons of body hair I hear my motherโ€™s voice saying (in a not so lady-like way): โ€œIf I wanted to f*ck and ape, Iโ€™d go to the zoo.โ€ I think I was eight when I heard her say that as we drove past a construction site full of men whoโ€™d qualify for a โ€œbearโ€ calendar if you know what I mean, and Iโ€™ve never forgotten it.
    Do you think it has something to do with what youโ€™re used to? My dad and both grandfathers are pretty much hair-less (Scottish/English on one side, Native American on the other). And the girlfriends I have who like โ€˜em hirsute all have hairy fathers and brothers from what Iโ€™ve seen.

    Reply
  36. Nice pictures, Teresa.
    As for MacFadyen, I assume he’s Scots or Irish, and I was mostly talking about English men. There are distinctly different ancestries, though of course a lot of blending by now. (But we’re talking historicals, when there was less.)More in common with Dutch and Scandinavian, in many places.
    That’s why I expected more from Welsh Tom.
    Is Firth from Scottish ancestry? Sounds as if he should be.
    “Cathy, who has stopped back to say she’s been ogling that picture of Sean Bean in a diaper. HOT!”
    LOL, Cathy. It does seem like a movie worth tracking down, doesn’t it?
    Good point, Kalen, about our taste in these things being connected to what we’re used to in the family.
    Interesting, isn’t it, that nearly all women are completely turned off by back hair. There’s no real logic to it, is there?
    Back to cover models, I do find it very odd when they have no hair in their arm pits. Best to avoid those raised arm posts, sirs!
    Mind you, I find women’s hairless pits visually odd, too. Just odd looking. Perhaps all armpits should be kept hidden. LOL!
    Jo

    Reply
  37. Nice pictures, Teresa.
    As for MacFadyen, I assume he’s Scots or Irish, and I was mostly talking about English men. There are distinctly different ancestries, though of course a lot of blending by now. (But we’re talking historicals, when there was less.)More in common with Dutch and Scandinavian, in many places.
    That’s why I expected more from Welsh Tom.
    Is Firth from Scottish ancestry? Sounds as if he should be.
    “Cathy, who has stopped back to say she’s been ogling that picture of Sean Bean in a diaper. HOT!”
    LOL, Cathy. It does seem like a movie worth tracking down, doesn’t it?
    Good point, Kalen, about our taste in these things being connected to what we’re used to in the family.
    Interesting, isn’t it, that nearly all women are completely turned off by back hair. There’s no real logic to it, is there?
    Back to cover models, I do find it very odd when they have no hair in their arm pits. Best to avoid those raised arm posts, sirs!
    Mind you, I find women’s hairless pits visually odd, too. Just odd looking. Perhaps all armpits should be kept hidden. LOL!
    Jo

    Reply
  38. Nice pictures, Teresa.
    As for MacFadyen, I assume he’s Scots or Irish, and I was mostly talking about English men. There are distinctly different ancestries, though of course a lot of blending by now. (But we’re talking historicals, when there was less.)More in common with Dutch and Scandinavian, in many places.
    That’s why I expected more from Welsh Tom.
    Is Firth from Scottish ancestry? Sounds as if he should be.
    “Cathy, who has stopped back to say she’s been ogling that picture of Sean Bean in a diaper. HOT!”
    LOL, Cathy. It does seem like a movie worth tracking down, doesn’t it?
    Good point, Kalen, about our taste in these things being connected to what we’re used to in the family.
    Interesting, isn’t it, that nearly all women are completely turned off by back hair. There’s no real logic to it, is there?
    Back to cover models, I do find it very odd when they have no hair in their arm pits. Best to avoid those raised arm posts, sirs!
    Mind you, I find women’s hairless pits visually odd, too. Just odd looking. Perhaps all armpits should be kept hidden. LOL!
    Jo

    Reply
  39. Nice pictures, Teresa.
    As for MacFadyen, I assume he’s Scots or Irish, and I was mostly talking about English men. There are distinctly different ancestries, though of course a lot of blending by now. (But we’re talking historicals, when there was less.)More in common with Dutch and Scandinavian, in many places.
    That’s why I expected more from Welsh Tom.
    Is Firth from Scottish ancestry? Sounds as if he should be.
    “Cathy, who has stopped back to say she’s been ogling that picture of Sean Bean in a diaper. HOT!”
    LOL, Cathy. It does seem like a movie worth tracking down, doesn’t it?
    Good point, Kalen, about our taste in these things being connected to what we’re used to in the family.
    Interesting, isn’t it, that nearly all women are completely turned off by back hair. There’s no real logic to it, is there?
    Back to cover models, I do find it very odd when they have no hair in their arm pits. Best to avoid those raised arm posts, sirs!
    Mind you, I find women’s hairless pits visually odd, too. Just odd looking. Perhaps all armpits should be kept hidden. LOL!
    Jo

    Reply
  40. Nice pictures, Teresa.
    As for MacFadyen, I assume he’s Scots or Irish, and I was mostly talking about English men. There are distinctly different ancestries, though of course a lot of blending by now. (But we’re talking historicals, when there was less.)More in common with Dutch and Scandinavian, in many places.
    That’s why I expected more from Welsh Tom.
    Is Firth from Scottish ancestry? Sounds as if he should be.
    “Cathy, who has stopped back to say she’s been ogling that picture of Sean Bean in a diaper. HOT!”
    LOL, Cathy. It does seem like a movie worth tracking down, doesn’t it?
    Good point, Kalen, about our taste in these things being connected to what we’re used to in the family.
    Interesting, isn’t it, that nearly all women are completely turned off by back hair. There’s no real logic to it, is there?
    Back to cover models, I do find it very odd when they have no hair in their arm pits. Best to avoid those raised arm posts, sirs!
    Mind you, I find women’s hairless pits visually odd, too. Just odd looking. Perhaps all armpits should be kept hidden. LOL!
    Jo

    Reply
  41. Both my ancestors and my husband’s obviously missed the memo about the British being light on body hair. My husband and his brothers are something like half-English and hairy, and my family is at least half Scots-Irish and runs to hairy men (and, speaking from personal experience, women who can’t get by with unshaven legs or ungroomed eyebrows). A lot of us are dark-haired, too, though in theory that could be from our French and Native American ancestors. But I’ve seen plenty of Brits with the exact same dark-haired, dark-eyed, pale olive skinned coloring I have.
    Though, now that I think of it, several of my brothers and cousins have hair everywhere BUT their chests and backs–hairy arms and legs, good beards, thick eyebrows, thick hair until they go bald, but smoothish chests.
    Jo, have you seen reports of that recent study that all the people of the British Isles are basically the same genetic stock? IIRC, the strongest genetic contribution is from the pre-Celtic original population, and it’s fairly uniformly present throughout the area. On one level, it makes sense, but it surprised me, because I do think there are different British regional looks. E.g. I think of Ioan Gruffudd as looking Welsh rather than English, with his strong bone structure and gorgeous dark coloring, and of Sean Bean and Christopher Eccleston (to name two more of my British secret celebrity boyfriends) as looking as well as sounding like the Northerners they are.
    Anyway…I don’t have a preference one way or another WRT chest hair, but I think a man ought to have strong eyebrows, be able to grow a good beard, have some hair on his legs and arms, etc. Which, as I think about it, sounds as if I was programmed at an early age to like the hair pattern I grew up around…

    Reply
  42. Both my ancestors and my husband’s obviously missed the memo about the British being light on body hair. My husband and his brothers are something like half-English and hairy, and my family is at least half Scots-Irish and runs to hairy men (and, speaking from personal experience, women who can’t get by with unshaven legs or ungroomed eyebrows). A lot of us are dark-haired, too, though in theory that could be from our French and Native American ancestors. But I’ve seen plenty of Brits with the exact same dark-haired, dark-eyed, pale olive skinned coloring I have.
    Though, now that I think of it, several of my brothers and cousins have hair everywhere BUT their chests and backs–hairy arms and legs, good beards, thick eyebrows, thick hair until they go bald, but smoothish chests.
    Jo, have you seen reports of that recent study that all the people of the British Isles are basically the same genetic stock? IIRC, the strongest genetic contribution is from the pre-Celtic original population, and it’s fairly uniformly present throughout the area. On one level, it makes sense, but it surprised me, because I do think there are different British regional looks. E.g. I think of Ioan Gruffudd as looking Welsh rather than English, with his strong bone structure and gorgeous dark coloring, and of Sean Bean and Christopher Eccleston (to name two more of my British secret celebrity boyfriends) as looking as well as sounding like the Northerners they are.
    Anyway…I don’t have a preference one way or another WRT chest hair, but I think a man ought to have strong eyebrows, be able to grow a good beard, have some hair on his legs and arms, etc. Which, as I think about it, sounds as if I was programmed at an early age to like the hair pattern I grew up around…

    Reply
  43. Both my ancestors and my husband’s obviously missed the memo about the British being light on body hair. My husband and his brothers are something like half-English and hairy, and my family is at least half Scots-Irish and runs to hairy men (and, speaking from personal experience, women who can’t get by with unshaven legs or ungroomed eyebrows). A lot of us are dark-haired, too, though in theory that could be from our French and Native American ancestors. But I’ve seen plenty of Brits with the exact same dark-haired, dark-eyed, pale olive skinned coloring I have.
    Though, now that I think of it, several of my brothers and cousins have hair everywhere BUT their chests and backs–hairy arms and legs, good beards, thick eyebrows, thick hair until they go bald, but smoothish chests.
    Jo, have you seen reports of that recent study that all the people of the British Isles are basically the same genetic stock? IIRC, the strongest genetic contribution is from the pre-Celtic original population, and it’s fairly uniformly present throughout the area. On one level, it makes sense, but it surprised me, because I do think there are different British regional looks. E.g. I think of Ioan Gruffudd as looking Welsh rather than English, with his strong bone structure and gorgeous dark coloring, and of Sean Bean and Christopher Eccleston (to name two more of my British secret celebrity boyfriends) as looking as well as sounding like the Northerners they are.
    Anyway…I don’t have a preference one way or another WRT chest hair, but I think a man ought to have strong eyebrows, be able to grow a good beard, have some hair on his legs and arms, etc. Which, as I think about it, sounds as if I was programmed at an early age to like the hair pattern I grew up around…

    Reply
  44. Both my ancestors and my husband’s obviously missed the memo about the British being light on body hair. My husband and his brothers are something like half-English and hairy, and my family is at least half Scots-Irish and runs to hairy men (and, speaking from personal experience, women who can’t get by with unshaven legs or ungroomed eyebrows). A lot of us are dark-haired, too, though in theory that could be from our French and Native American ancestors. But I’ve seen plenty of Brits with the exact same dark-haired, dark-eyed, pale olive skinned coloring I have.
    Though, now that I think of it, several of my brothers and cousins have hair everywhere BUT their chests and backs–hairy arms and legs, good beards, thick eyebrows, thick hair until they go bald, but smoothish chests.
    Jo, have you seen reports of that recent study that all the people of the British Isles are basically the same genetic stock? IIRC, the strongest genetic contribution is from the pre-Celtic original population, and it’s fairly uniformly present throughout the area. On one level, it makes sense, but it surprised me, because I do think there are different British regional looks. E.g. I think of Ioan Gruffudd as looking Welsh rather than English, with his strong bone structure and gorgeous dark coloring, and of Sean Bean and Christopher Eccleston (to name two more of my British secret celebrity boyfriends) as looking as well as sounding like the Northerners they are.
    Anyway…I don’t have a preference one way or another WRT chest hair, but I think a man ought to have strong eyebrows, be able to grow a good beard, have some hair on his legs and arms, etc. Which, as I think about it, sounds as if I was programmed at an early age to like the hair pattern I grew up around…

    Reply
  45. Both my ancestors and my husband’s obviously missed the memo about the British being light on body hair. My husband and his brothers are something like half-English and hairy, and my family is at least half Scots-Irish and runs to hairy men (and, speaking from personal experience, women who can’t get by with unshaven legs or ungroomed eyebrows). A lot of us are dark-haired, too, though in theory that could be from our French and Native American ancestors. But I’ve seen plenty of Brits with the exact same dark-haired, dark-eyed, pale olive skinned coloring I have.
    Though, now that I think of it, several of my brothers and cousins have hair everywhere BUT their chests and backs–hairy arms and legs, good beards, thick eyebrows, thick hair until they go bald, but smoothish chests.
    Jo, have you seen reports of that recent study that all the people of the British Isles are basically the same genetic stock? IIRC, the strongest genetic contribution is from the pre-Celtic original population, and it’s fairly uniformly present throughout the area. On one level, it makes sense, but it surprised me, because I do think there are different British regional looks. E.g. I think of Ioan Gruffudd as looking Welsh rather than English, with his strong bone structure and gorgeous dark coloring, and of Sean Bean and Christopher Eccleston (to name two more of my British secret celebrity boyfriends) as looking as well as sounding like the Northerners they are.
    Anyway…I don’t have a preference one way or another WRT chest hair, but I think a man ought to have strong eyebrows, be able to grow a good beard, have some hair on his legs and arms, etc. Which, as I think about it, sounds as if I was programmed at an early age to like the hair pattern I grew up around…

    Reply
  46. Always nice to have pix of shirtless guys to start off the weekend, Jo! *g*
    As well as being pleasant eye-candy, they also make a good argument for sleekly unhairy Englishmen as the rule. But I’m still going to toss my two bits into the discussion in favor of the occasional “rough” English aristocrat — the guys who seem to make up most of the current crop of historical romance heroes.
    While the average Jack in Sussex or London was likely to marry a local Joan and produce the next generation in their fair-haired image, the grand folks in the palace often looked abroad for spouses — and imported more exotic gene pools in the process.
    My current favorite English king, Charles II, had a French mother and an Italian grandmother, and married a Portuguese princess. As a result, he was markedly, untraditionally, un-English in appearance (swarthy, lean, tall, and hairy.)
    While Charles sired no legitimate children, he had at least 14 ilegitmate sons and daughters who were all enobled with titles and estates. Two of the mistress-mothers were also non-English and considered dark: Lucy Walters was Welsh, and Louise de Kerouelle was French.
    Nine separate dukedoms were spread among the six sons: Monmouth, Buccleuch, Southampton, Northumberland, Grafton, Cleveland, St. Albans, Richmond, and Lennox. There being no apparent stigma to royal bastards, all fourteen children married well, into the “best” families, and carried Charles’s swarthy gene pool into every corner of the English peerage.
    All of which is an elaborate justification for a perfectly accurate English dark duke-hero with a hairy chest. *g*
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  47. Always nice to have pix of shirtless guys to start off the weekend, Jo! *g*
    As well as being pleasant eye-candy, they also make a good argument for sleekly unhairy Englishmen as the rule. But I’m still going to toss my two bits into the discussion in favor of the occasional “rough” English aristocrat — the guys who seem to make up most of the current crop of historical romance heroes.
    While the average Jack in Sussex or London was likely to marry a local Joan and produce the next generation in their fair-haired image, the grand folks in the palace often looked abroad for spouses — and imported more exotic gene pools in the process.
    My current favorite English king, Charles II, had a French mother and an Italian grandmother, and married a Portuguese princess. As a result, he was markedly, untraditionally, un-English in appearance (swarthy, lean, tall, and hairy.)
    While Charles sired no legitimate children, he had at least 14 ilegitmate sons and daughters who were all enobled with titles and estates. Two of the mistress-mothers were also non-English and considered dark: Lucy Walters was Welsh, and Louise de Kerouelle was French.
    Nine separate dukedoms were spread among the six sons: Monmouth, Buccleuch, Southampton, Northumberland, Grafton, Cleveland, St. Albans, Richmond, and Lennox. There being no apparent stigma to royal bastards, all fourteen children married well, into the “best” families, and carried Charles’s swarthy gene pool into every corner of the English peerage.
    All of which is an elaborate justification for a perfectly accurate English dark duke-hero with a hairy chest. *g*
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  48. Always nice to have pix of shirtless guys to start off the weekend, Jo! *g*
    As well as being pleasant eye-candy, they also make a good argument for sleekly unhairy Englishmen as the rule. But I’m still going to toss my two bits into the discussion in favor of the occasional “rough” English aristocrat — the guys who seem to make up most of the current crop of historical romance heroes.
    While the average Jack in Sussex or London was likely to marry a local Joan and produce the next generation in their fair-haired image, the grand folks in the palace often looked abroad for spouses — and imported more exotic gene pools in the process.
    My current favorite English king, Charles II, had a French mother and an Italian grandmother, and married a Portuguese princess. As a result, he was markedly, untraditionally, un-English in appearance (swarthy, lean, tall, and hairy.)
    While Charles sired no legitimate children, he had at least 14 ilegitmate sons and daughters who were all enobled with titles and estates. Two of the mistress-mothers were also non-English and considered dark: Lucy Walters was Welsh, and Louise de Kerouelle was French.
    Nine separate dukedoms were spread among the six sons: Monmouth, Buccleuch, Southampton, Northumberland, Grafton, Cleveland, St. Albans, Richmond, and Lennox. There being no apparent stigma to royal bastards, all fourteen children married well, into the “best” families, and carried Charles’s swarthy gene pool into every corner of the English peerage.
    All of which is an elaborate justification for a perfectly accurate English dark duke-hero with a hairy chest. *g*
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  49. Always nice to have pix of shirtless guys to start off the weekend, Jo! *g*
    As well as being pleasant eye-candy, they also make a good argument for sleekly unhairy Englishmen as the rule. But I’m still going to toss my two bits into the discussion in favor of the occasional “rough” English aristocrat — the guys who seem to make up most of the current crop of historical romance heroes.
    While the average Jack in Sussex or London was likely to marry a local Joan and produce the next generation in their fair-haired image, the grand folks in the palace often looked abroad for spouses — and imported more exotic gene pools in the process.
    My current favorite English king, Charles II, had a French mother and an Italian grandmother, and married a Portuguese princess. As a result, he was markedly, untraditionally, un-English in appearance (swarthy, lean, tall, and hairy.)
    While Charles sired no legitimate children, he had at least 14 ilegitmate sons and daughters who were all enobled with titles and estates. Two of the mistress-mothers were also non-English and considered dark: Lucy Walters was Welsh, and Louise de Kerouelle was French.
    Nine separate dukedoms were spread among the six sons: Monmouth, Buccleuch, Southampton, Northumberland, Grafton, Cleveland, St. Albans, Richmond, and Lennox. There being no apparent stigma to royal bastards, all fourteen children married well, into the “best” families, and carried Charles’s swarthy gene pool into every corner of the English peerage.
    All of which is an elaborate justification for a perfectly accurate English dark duke-hero with a hairy chest. *g*
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  50. Always nice to have pix of shirtless guys to start off the weekend, Jo! *g*
    As well as being pleasant eye-candy, they also make a good argument for sleekly unhairy Englishmen as the rule. But I’m still going to toss my two bits into the discussion in favor of the occasional “rough” English aristocrat — the guys who seem to make up most of the current crop of historical romance heroes.
    While the average Jack in Sussex or London was likely to marry a local Joan and produce the next generation in their fair-haired image, the grand folks in the palace often looked abroad for spouses — and imported more exotic gene pools in the process.
    My current favorite English king, Charles II, had a French mother and an Italian grandmother, and married a Portuguese princess. As a result, he was markedly, untraditionally, un-English in appearance (swarthy, lean, tall, and hairy.)
    While Charles sired no legitimate children, he had at least 14 ilegitmate sons and daughters who were all enobled with titles and estates. Two of the mistress-mothers were also non-English and considered dark: Lucy Walters was Welsh, and Louise de Kerouelle was French.
    Nine separate dukedoms were spread among the six sons: Monmouth, Buccleuch, Southampton, Northumberland, Grafton, Cleveland, St. Albans, Richmond, and Lennox. There being no apparent stigma to royal bastards, all fourteen children married well, into the “best” families, and carried Charles’s swarthy gene pool into every corner of the English peerage.
    All of which is an elaborate justification for a perfectly accurate English dark duke-hero with a hairy chest. *g*
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  51. Optimum for me is a moderate amount of nicely shaped chest hair; that enticing downward arrow! But I’m not hung up on it; I’ve known bears and I’ve known smoothies. The only thing that really looks gross to me is the guy whose beard, though shaven on his face, crawls right down his neck and into the opening of his shirt! Eeek! What IS that?
    A hairy guy is comfy in the winter, a smooth one is slippery in the summer. I like being able to touch SKIN, but I definitely don’t like sticking to it. And what about nipple sucking? You can’t get a really good suction going if there’s a lot of hair in the way. You end up making a noise like a leaky bike tire being tested in a bucket of water. Or someone desperately struggilng to restrain a fart.
    When it comes to the heros of romance novels, I’ve noticed that it doesn’t actually make much difference to me how they’re described. I get the picture more from words like “dignified” or from descriptions of what they do than from a catalog of features, and once I get the picture, no emphasis on his blond hair is going to influence me if my mind’s eye has created a brunette. I wonder how many readers do rely on the author for a picture of the hero? Looks like we’ve all got our favorite types, and could just plug in whatever it is without disturbing the story at all… unless his resemblance to Napoleon is going to be a factor in the plot, of course. It might be interesting to ask readers to describe their favorite heros without referring back to the books! Anybody out there looking for a dissertation topic?

    Reply
  52. Optimum for me is a moderate amount of nicely shaped chest hair; that enticing downward arrow! But I’m not hung up on it; I’ve known bears and I’ve known smoothies. The only thing that really looks gross to me is the guy whose beard, though shaven on his face, crawls right down his neck and into the opening of his shirt! Eeek! What IS that?
    A hairy guy is comfy in the winter, a smooth one is slippery in the summer. I like being able to touch SKIN, but I definitely don’t like sticking to it. And what about nipple sucking? You can’t get a really good suction going if there’s a lot of hair in the way. You end up making a noise like a leaky bike tire being tested in a bucket of water. Or someone desperately struggilng to restrain a fart.
    When it comes to the heros of romance novels, I’ve noticed that it doesn’t actually make much difference to me how they’re described. I get the picture more from words like “dignified” or from descriptions of what they do than from a catalog of features, and once I get the picture, no emphasis on his blond hair is going to influence me if my mind’s eye has created a brunette. I wonder how many readers do rely on the author for a picture of the hero? Looks like we’ve all got our favorite types, and could just plug in whatever it is without disturbing the story at all… unless his resemblance to Napoleon is going to be a factor in the plot, of course. It might be interesting to ask readers to describe their favorite heros without referring back to the books! Anybody out there looking for a dissertation topic?

    Reply
  53. Optimum for me is a moderate amount of nicely shaped chest hair; that enticing downward arrow! But I’m not hung up on it; I’ve known bears and I’ve known smoothies. The only thing that really looks gross to me is the guy whose beard, though shaven on his face, crawls right down his neck and into the opening of his shirt! Eeek! What IS that?
    A hairy guy is comfy in the winter, a smooth one is slippery in the summer. I like being able to touch SKIN, but I definitely don’t like sticking to it. And what about nipple sucking? You can’t get a really good suction going if there’s a lot of hair in the way. You end up making a noise like a leaky bike tire being tested in a bucket of water. Or someone desperately struggilng to restrain a fart.
    When it comes to the heros of romance novels, I’ve noticed that it doesn’t actually make much difference to me how they’re described. I get the picture more from words like “dignified” or from descriptions of what they do than from a catalog of features, and once I get the picture, no emphasis on his blond hair is going to influence me if my mind’s eye has created a brunette. I wonder how many readers do rely on the author for a picture of the hero? Looks like we’ve all got our favorite types, and could just plug in whatever it is without disturbing the story at all… unless his resemblance to Napoleon is going to be a factor in the plot, of course. It might be interesting to ask readers to describe their favorite heros without referring back to the books! Anybody out there looking for a dissertation topic?

    Reply
  54. Optimum for me is a moderate amount of nicely shaped chest hair; that enticing downward arrow! But I’m not hung up on it; I’ve known bears and I’ve known smoothies. The only thing that really looks gross to me is the guy whose beard, though shaven on his face, crawls right down his neck and into the opening of his shirt! Eeek! What IS that?
    A hairy guy is comfy in the winter, a smooth one is slippery in the summer. I like being able to touch SKIN, but I definitely don’t like sticking to it. And what about nipple sucking? You can’t get a really good suction going if there’s a lot of hair in the way. You end up making a noise like a leaky bike tire being tested in a bucket of water. Or someone desperately struggilng to restrain a fart.
    When it comes to the heros of romance novels, I’ve noticed that it doesn’t actually make much difference to me how they’re described. I get the picture more from words like “dignified” or from descriptions of what they do than from a catalog of features, and once I get the picture, no emphasis on his blond hair is going to influence me if my mind’s eye has created a brunette. I wonder how many readers do rely on the author for a picture of the hero? Looks like we’ve all got our favorite types, and could just plug in whatever it is without disturbing the story at all… unless his resemblance to Napoleon is going to be a factor in the plot, of course. It might be interesting to ask readers to describe their favorite heros without referring back to the books! Anybody out there looking for a dissertation topic?

    Reply
  55. Optimum for me is a moderate amount of nicely shaped chest hair; that enticing downward arrow! But I’m not hung up on it; I’ve known bears and I’ve known smoothies. The only thing that really looks gross to me is the guy whose beard, though shaven on his face, crawls right down his neck and into the opening of his shirt! Eeek! What IS that?
    A hairy guy is comfy in the winter, a smooth one is slippery in the summer. I like being able to touch SKIN, but I definitely don’t like sticking to it. And what about nipple sucking? You can’t get a really good suction going if there’s a lot of hair in the way. You end up making a noise like a leaky bike tire being tested in a bucket of water. Or someone desperately struggilng to restrain a fart.
    When it comes to the heros of romance novels, I’ve noticed that it doesn’t actually make much difference to me how they’re described. I get the picture more from words like “dignified” or from descriptions of what they do than from a catalog of features, and once I get the picture, no emphasis on his blond hair is going to influence me if my mind’s eye has created a brunette. I wonder how many readers do rely on the author for a picture of the hero? Looks like we’ve all got our favorite types, and could just plug in whatever it is without disturbing the story at all… unless his resemblance to Napoleon is going to be a factor in the plot, of course. It might be interesting to ask readers to describe their favorite heros without referring back to the books! Anybody out there looking for a dissertation topic?

    Reply
  56. Just a small comment. Sean Bean is worth ogling in any of his work, young or older, but Gerry Butler, the Scot is absolute perfection and he is a somewhat hairy fellow.

    Reply
  57. Just a small comment. Sean Bean is worth ogling in any of his work, young or older, but Gerry Butler, the Scot is absolute perfection and he is a somewhat hairy fellow.

    Reply
  58. Just a small comment. Sean Bean is worth ogling in any of his work, young or older, but Gerry Butler, the Scot is absolute perfection and he is a somewhat hairy fellow.

    Reply
  59. Just a small comment. Sean Bean is worth ogling in any of his work, young or older, but Gerry Butler, the Scot is absolute perfection and he is a somewhat hairy fellow.

    Reply
  60. Just a small comment. Sean Bean is worth ogling in any of his work, young or older, but Gerry Butler, the Scot is absolute perfection and he is a somewhat hairy fellow.

    Reply
  61. My personal preference is for not too much chest hair on a man, but just enough for “texture” beneath my hands as I rub him after lovemaking (you ladies know what I mean). Too much smoothness would, for ME, be like having bedded a pre-adolescent, and some instinct deep inside of me simply cringes and stops dead at the mental image that conjures.
    My husband is 100% Italian, but no — not the werewolf most people might assume him to be. He has just enough hair everywhere to make smile proudly.
    I don’t believe there is any one nationality that is stuck with any one physical, stereotypical trait.
    That said, I don’t care for too much hero-chest/man-titty to show on the covers of romance novels. The cover of “Lady Beware” is gorgeous and about as close to perfect as anything I’ve seen this year. That hero is to-die-for.

    Reply
  62. My personal preference is for not too much chest hair on a man, but just enough for “texture” beneath my hands as I rub him after lovemaking (you ladies know what I mean). Too much smoothness would, for ME, be like having bedded a pre-adolescent, and some instinct deep inside of me simply cringes and stops dead at the mental image that conjures.
    My husband is 100% Italian, but no — not the werewolf most people might assume him to be. He has just enough hair everywhere to make smile proudly.
    I don’t believe there is any one nationality that is stuck with any one physical, stereotypical trait.
    That said, I don’t care for too much hero-chest/man-titty to show on the covers of romance novels. The cover of “Lady Beware” is gorgeous and about as close to perfect as anything I’ve seen this year. That hero is to-die-for.

    Reply
  63. My personal preference is for not too much chest hair on a man, but just enough for “texture” beneath my hands as I rub him after lovemaking (you ladies know what I mean). Too much smoothness would, for ME, be like having bedded a pre-adolescent, and some instinct deep inside of me simply cringes and stops dead at the mental image that conjures.
    My husband is 100% Italian, but no — not the werewolf most people might assume him to be. He has just enough hair everywhere to make smile proudly.
    I don’t believe there is any one nationality that is stuck with any one physical, stereotypical trait.
    That said, I don’t care for too much hero-chest/man-titty to show on the covers of romance novels. The cover of “Lady Beware” is gorgeous and about as close to perfect as anything I’ve seen this year. That hero is to-die-for.

    Reply
  64. My personal preference is for not too much chest hair on a man, but just enough for “texture” beneath my hands as I rub him after lovemaking (you ladies know what I mean). Too much smoothness would, for ME, be like having bedded a pre-adolescent, and some instinct deep inside of me simply cringes and stops dead at the mental image that conjures.
    My husband is 100% Italian, but no — not the werewolf most people might assume him to be. He has just enough hair everywhere to make smile proudly.
    I don’t believe there is any one nationality that is stuck with any one physical, stereotypical trait.
    That said, I don’t care for too much hero-chest/man-titty to show on the covers of romance novels. The cover of “Lady Beware” is gorgeous and about as close to perfect as anything I’ve seen this year. That hero is to-die-for.

    Reply
  65. My personal preference is for not too much chest hair on a man, but just enough for “texture” beneath my hands as I rub him after lovemaking (you ladies know what I mean). Too much smoothness would, for ME, be like having bedded a pre-adolescent, and some instinct deep inside of me simply cringes and stops dead at the mental image that conjures.
    My husband is 100% Italian, but no — not the werewolf most people might assume him to be. He has just enough hair everywhere to make smile proudly.
    I don’t believe there is any one nationality that is stuck with any one physical, stereotypical trait.
    That said, I don’t care for too much hero-chest/man-titty to show on the covers of romance novels. The cover of “Lady Beware” is gorgeous and about as close to perfect as anything I’ve seen this year. That hero is to-die-for.

    Reply
  66. I don’t care one way or the other about chest hair. In some instances, a smooth chest is more appropriate, as in body builders, where muscle definition is important, or in glossy magazine advertisements.
    It does seem that the very slender Mick Jagger-type men have a tendency toward little or no hair, but I don’t find that body style a turn-on. It’s too androgynous. It reminds me of an adolescent boy, and the lack of chest hair emphasizes that for me. I prefer a more substantial body style–with or without hairy chests.

    Reply
  67. I don’t care one way or the other about chest hair. In some instances, a smooth chest is more appropriate, as in body builders, where muscle definition is important, or in glossy magazine advertisements.
    It does seem that the very slender Mick Jagger-type men have a tendency toward little or no hair, but I don’t find that body style a turn-on. It’s too androgynous. It reminds me of an adolescent boy, and the lack of chest hair emphasizes that for me. I prefer a more substantial body style–with or without hairy chests.

    Reply
  68. I don’t care one way or the other about chest hair. In some instances, a smooth chest is more appropriate, as in body builders, where muscle definition is important, or in glossy magazine advertisements.
    It does seem that the very slender Mick Jagger-type men have a tendency toward little or no hair, but I don’t find that body style a turn-on. It’s too androgynous. It reminds me of an adolescent boy, and the lack of chest hair emphasizes that for me. I prefer a more substantial body style–with or without hairy chests.

    Reply
  69. I don’t care one way or the other about chest hair. In some instances, a smooth chest is more appropriate, as in body builders, where muscle definition is important, or in glossy magazine advertisements.
    It does seem that the very slender Mick Jagger-type men have a tendency toward little or no hair, but I don’t find that body style a turn-on. It’s too androgynous. It reminds me of an adolescent boy, and the lack of chest hair emphasizes that for me. I prefer a more substantial body style–with or without hairy chests.

    Reply
  70. I don’t care one way or the other about chest hair. In some instances, a smooth chest is more appropriate, as in body builders, where muscle definition is important, or in glossy magazine advertisements.
    It does seem that the very slender Mick Jagger-type men have a tendency toward little or no hair, but I don’t find that body style a turn-on. It’s too androgynous. It reminds me of an adolescent boy, and the lack of chest hair emphasizes that for me. I prefer a more substantial body style–with or without hairy chests.

    Reply
  71. Interesting comments. I’m with those who are not very bothered one way or the other by the amount of male body-hair, though too close a resemblance to a gorilla is not attractive. I also think that it is unwise to generalise too much about nationalities. I should say that the full range, from epicene smoothness to an all-over thick pelt, is to be found amongst men of English, Welsh, Scots and Irish pedigree.
    One point that nobody has made, somewhat to my surprise, is that chest hair on men often continues to develop *after* the person is fully physically mature: the man who had very little or none at the age of twenty-five will sometimes have developed a moderate amount by the time he is forty. Not the ‘carriage-rug’ variety (I thought of the comment about Lord Peter in Sayers’s ‘Busman’s Honeymoon’ too!) – that is usually evident early on – but the average/middle range.
    What I do find unsatisfactory is lack of (potential) facial hair in a man. I like a man to be *able* to grow a decent beard, even if he chooses to be clean-shaven.

    Reply
  72. Interesting comments. I’m with those who are not very bothered one way or the other by the amount of male body-hair, though too close a resemblance to a gorilla is not attractive. I also think that it is unwise to generalise too much about nationalities. I should say that the full range, from epicene smoothness to an all-over thick pelt, is to be found amongst men of English, Welsh, Scots and Irish pedigree.
    One point that nobody has made, somewhat to my surprise, is that chest hair on men often continues to develop *after* the person is fully physically mature: the man who had very little or none at the age of twenty-five will sometimes have developed a moderate amount by the time he is forty. Not the ‘carriage-rug’ variety (I thought of the comment about Lord Peter in Sayers’s ‘Busman’s Honeymoon’ too!) – that is usually evident early on – but the average/middle range.
    What I do find unsatisfactory is lack of (potential) facial hair in a man. I like a man to be *able* to grow a decent beard, even if he chooses to be clean-shaven.

    Reply
  73. Interesting comments. I’m with those who are not very bothered one way or the other by the amount of male body-hair, though too close a resemblance to a gorilla is not attractive. I also think that it is unwise to generalise too much about nationalities. I should say that the full range, from epicene smoothness to an all-over thick pelt, is to be found amongst men of English, Welsh, Scots and Irish pedigree.
    One point that nobody has made, somewhat to my surprise, is that chest hair on men often continues to develop *after* the person is fully physically mature: the man who had very little or none at the age of twenty-five will sometimes have developed a moderate amount by the time he is forty. Not the ‘carriage-rug’ variety (I thought of the comment about Lord Peter in Sayers’s ‘Busman’s Honeymoon’ too!) – that is usually evident early on – but the average/middle range.
    What I do find unsatisfactory is lack of (potential) facial hair in a man. I like a man to be *able* to grow a decent beard, even if he chooses to be clean-shaven.

    Reply
  74. Interesting comments. I’m with those who are not very bothered one way or the other by the amount of male body-hair, though too close a resemblance to a gorilla is not attractive. I also think that it is unwise to generalise too much about nationalities. I should say that the full range, from epicene smoothness to an all-over thick pelt, is to be found amongst men of English, Welsh, Scots and Irish pedigree.
    One point that nobody has made, somewhat to my surprise, is that chest hair on men often continues to develop *after* the person is fully physically mature: the man who had very little or none at the age of twenty-five will sometimes have developed a moderate amount by the time he is forty. Not the ‘carriage-rug’ variety (I thought of the comment about Lord Peter in Sayers’s ‘Busman’s Honeymoon’ too!) – that is usually evident early on – but the average/middle range.
    What I do find unsatisfactory is lack of (potential) facial hair in a man. I like a man to be *able* to grow a decent beard, even if he chooses to be clean-shaven.

    Reply
  75. Interesting comments. I’m with those who are not very bothered one way or the other by the amount of male body-hair, though too close a resemblance to a gorilla is not attractive. I also think that it is unwise to generalise too much about nationalities. I should say that the full range, from epicene smoothness to an all-over thick pelt, is to be found amongst men of English, Welsh, Scots and Irish pedigree.
    One point that nobody has made, somewhat to my surprise, is that chest hair on men often continues to develop *after* the person is fully physically mature: the man who had very little or none at the age of twenty-five will sometimes have developed a moderate amount by the time he is forty. Not the ‘carriage-rug’ variety (I thought of the comment about Lord Peter in Sayers’s ‘Busman’s Honeymoon’ too!) – that is usually evident early on – but the average/middle range.
    What I do find unsatisfactory is lack of (potential) facial hair in a man. I like a man to be *able* to grow a decent beard, even if he chooses to be clean-shaven.

    Reply
  76. MacFadyen and Firth are both English born, though obviously their ancestry could be different.
    But what about the late Andy Gibb? AFAIK, he was English as English can be and it was he who started me down the road of liking men with hair on their chests.
    Maybe I’ll just go look at more photos of James Purefoy.
    And then dig up my copy of A Knight’s Tale and check out Paul Bettany in his “Chaucer without clothes scenes”!!! Can’t remember if he has a light dusting on his chest or not.
    AH, sometimes research is so tough *g*.

    Reply
  77. MacFadyen and Firth are both English born, though obviously their ancestry could be different.
    But what about the late Andy Gibb? AFAIK, he was English as English can be and it was he who started me down the road of liking men with hair on their chests.
    Maybe I’ll just go look at more photos of James Purefoy.
    And then dig up my copy of A Knight’s Tale and check out Paul Bettany in his “Chaucer without clothes scenes”!!! Can’t remember if he has a light dusting on his chest or not.
    AH, sometimes research is so tough *g*.

    Reply
  78. MacFadyen and Firth are both English born, though obviously their ancestry could be different.
    But what about the late Andy Gibb? AFAIK, he was English as English can be and it was he who started me down the road of liking men with hair on their chests.
    Maybe I’ll just go look at more photos of James Purefoy.
    And then dig up my copy of A Knight’s Tale and check out Paul Bettany in his “Chaucer without clothes scenes”!!! Can’t remember if he has a light dusting on his chest or not.
    AH, sometimes research is so tough *g*.

    Reply
  79. MacFadyen and Firth are both English born, though obviously their ancestry could be different.
    But what about the late Andy Gibb? AFAIK, he was English as English can be and it was he who started me down the road of liking men with hair on their chests.
    Maybe I’ll just go look at more photos of James Purefoy.
    And then dig up my copy of A Knight’s Tale and check out Paul Bettany in his “Chaucer without clothes scenes”!!! Can’t remember if he has a light dusting on his chest or not.
    AH, sometimes research is so tough *g*.

    Reply
  80. MacFadyen and Firth are both English born, though obviously their ancestry could be different.
    But what about the late Andy Gibb? AFAIK, he was English as English can be and it was he who started me down the road of liking men with hair on their chests.
    Maybe I’ll just go look at more photos of James Purefoy.
    And then dig up my copy of A Knight’s Tale and check out Paul Bettany in his “Chaucer without clothes scenes”!!! Can’t remember if he has a light dusting on his chest or not.
    AH, sometimes research is so tough *g*.

    Reply
  81. I like a modicum of chest hair on my men and none on the back. By the way, I watched Graham Norton last night and they had some guy on who was getting his back, and other bits waxed and was quite hairy. Clive Owen who is English also has a bit of chest hair.

    Reply
  82. I like a modicum of chest hair on my men and none on the back. By the way, I watched Graham Norton last night and they had some guy on who was getting his back, and other bits waxed and was quite hairy. Clive Owen who is English also has a bit of chest hair.

    Reply
  83. I like a modicum of chest hair on my men and none on the back. By the way, I watched Graham Norton last night and they had some guy on who was getting his back, and other bits waxed and was quite hairy. Clive Owen who is English also has a bit of chest hair.

    Reply
  84. I like a modicum of chest hair on my men and none on the back. By the way, I watched Graham Norton last night and they had some guy on who was getting his back, and other bits waxed and was quite hairy. Clive Owen who is English also has a bit of chest hair.

    Reply
  85. I like a modicum of chest hair on my men and none on the back. By the way, I watched Graham Norton last night and they had some guy on who was getting his back, and other bits waxed and was quite hairy. Clive Owen who is English also has a bit of chest hair.

    Reply
  86. The worst thing? That half-shaved stubble-chest thing that I’ve seen on a few covers lately. *shudder* What is up with that? I just saw the cover of a m/m romance (MY FAIR CAPTAIN) on one of the blogs out there and I was horrified.

    Reply
  87. The worst thing? That half-shaved stubble-chest thing that I’ve seen on a few covers lately. *shudder* What is up with that? I just saw the cover of a m/m romance (MY FAIR CAPTAIN) on one of the blogs out there and I was horrified.

    Reply
  88. The worst thing? That half-shaved stubble-chest thing that I’ve seen on a few covers lately. *shudder* What is up with that? I just saw the cover of a m/m romance (MY FAIR CAPTAIN) on one of the blogs out there and I was horrified.

    Reply
  89. The worst thing? That half-shaved stubble-chest thing that I’ve seen on a few covers lately. *shudder* What is up with that? I just saw the cover of a m/m romance (MY FAIR CAPTAIN) on one of the blogs out there and I was horrified.

    Reply
  90. The worst thing? That half-shaved stubble-chest thing that I’ve seen on a few covers lately. *shudder* What is up with that? I just saw the cover of a m/m romance (MY FAIR CAPTAIN) on one of the blogs out there and I was horrified.

    Reply
  91. See, as far as I’m concerned this is yet one more reason to keep the men clothed on the covers. We can all imagine them with just the chest musculature and hirsuteness we personally find most pleasing, without a pesky image to contradict us. ๐Ÿ™‚
    My pet peeve about barechested cover models isn’t hair or lack thereof so much as that overdeveloped body builder look. While I don’t like slight, androgynous men, I dislike the over-muscled look even more. I like men who look like they’re fit from leading an active lifestyle, not because they live at the gym and obsess over their 6-pack!
    Really, the sexiest men-on-covers I’ve seen in a long time weren’t on romances and were fully clothed. I’m thinking of this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Jack-Absolute-C-C-Humphreys/dp/0312358229/ref=pd_bbs_2/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182538802&sr=8-2
    And this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Sharpes-Honour-Richard-Adventure-16/dp/014029435X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182539186&sr=1-1
    Obviously I’m a sucker for men in uniform, preferably with swords. But give me a cover like that and I’ll be smiling every time I open or close the book. Give me a shirtless man, and I’m usually trying to read the book without looking at the cover, and I try DESPERATELY to hide it from view if I’m reading the book on a bus or plane.

    Reply
  92. See, as far as I’m concerned this is yet one more reason to keep the men clothed on the covers. We can all imagine them with just the chest musculature and hirsuteness we personally find most pleasing, without a pesky image to contradict us. ๐Ÿ™‚
    My pet peeve about barechested cover models isn’t hair or lack thereof so much as that overdeveloped body builder look. While I don’t like slight, androgynous men, I dislike the over-muscled look even more. I like men who look like they’re fit from leading an active lifestyle, not because they live at the gym and obsess over their 6-pack!
    Really, the sexiest men-on-covers I’ve seen in a long time weren’t on romances and were fully clothed. I’m thinking of this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Jack-Absolute-C-C-Humphreys/dp/0312358229/ref=pd_bbs_2/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182538802&sr=8-2
    And this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Sharpes-Honour-Richard-Adventure-16/dp/014029435X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182539186&sr=1-1
    Obviously I’m a sucker for men in uniform, preferably with swords. But give me a cover like that and I’ll be smiling every time I open or close the book. Give me a shirtless man, and I’m usually trying to read the book without looking at the cover, and I try DESPERATELY to hide it from view if I’m reading the book on a bus or plane.

    Reply
  93. See, as far as I’m concerned this is yet one more reason to keep the men clothed on the covers. We can all imagine them with just the chest musculature and hirsuteness we personally find most pleasing, without a pesky image to contradict us. ๐Ÿ™‚
    My pet peeve about barechested cover models isn’t hair or lack thereof so much as that overdeveloped body builder look. While I don’t like slight, androgynous men, I dislike the over-muscled look even more. I like men who look like they’re fit from leading an active lifestyle, not because they live at the gym and obsess over their 6-pack!
    Really, the sexiest men-on-covers I’ve seen in a long time weren’t on romances and were fully clothed. I’m thinking of this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Jack-Absolute-C-C-Humphreys/dp/0312358229/ref=pd_bbs_2/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182538802&sr=8-2
    And this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Sharpes-Honour-Richard-Adventure-16/dp/014029435X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182539186&sr=1-1
    Obviously I’m a sucker for men in uniform, preferably with swords. But give me a cover like that and I’ll be smiling every time I open or close the book. Give me a shirtless man, and I’m usually trying to read the book without looking at the cover, and I try DESPERATELY to hide it from view if I’m reading the book on a bus or plane.

    Reply
  94. See, as far as I’m concerned this is yet one more reason to keep the men clothed on the covers. We can all imagine them with just the chest musculature and hirsuteness we personally find most pleasing, without a pesky image to contradict us. ๐Ÿ™‚
    My pet peeve about barechested cover models isn’t hair or lack thereof so much as that overdeveloped body builder look. While I don’t like slight, androgynous men, I dislike the over-muscled look even more. I like men who look like they’re fit from leading an active lifestyle, not because they live at the gym and obsess over their 6-pack!
    Really, the sexiest men-on-covers I’ve seen in a long time weren’t on romances and were fully clothed. I’m thinking of this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Jack-Absolute-C-C-Humphreys/dp/0312358229/ref=pd_bbs_2/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182538802&sr=8-2
    And this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Sharpes-Honour-Richard-Adventure-16/dp/014029435X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182539186&sr=1-1
    Obviously I’m a sucker for men in uniform, preferably with swords. But give me a cover like that and I’ll be smiling every time I open or close the book. Give me a shirtless man, and I’m usually trying to read the book without looking at the cover, and I try DESPERATELY to hide it from view if I’m reading the book on a bus or plane.

    Reply
  95. See, as far as I’m concerned this is yet one more reason to keep the men clothed on the covers. We can all imagine them with just the chest musculature and hirsuteness we personally find most pleasing, without a pesky image to contradict us. ๐Ÿ™‚
    My pet peeve about barechested cover models isn’t hair or lack thereof so much as that overdeveloped body builder look. While I don’t like slight, androgynous men, I dislike the over-muscled look even more. I like men who look like they’re fit from leading an active lifestyle, not because they live at the gym and obsess over their 6-pack!
    Really, the sexiest men-on-covers I’ve seen in a long time weren’t on romances and were fully clothed. I’m thinking of this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Jack-Absolute-C-C-Humphreys/dp/0312358229/ref=pd_bbs_2/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182538802&sr=8-2
    And this one:
    http://www.amazon.com/Sharpes-Honour-Richard-Adventure-16/dp/014029435X/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-1290100-8579643?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182539186&sr=1-1
    Obviously I’m a sucker for men in uniform, preferably with swords. But give me a cover like that and I’ll be smiling every time I open or close the book. Give me a shirtless man, and I’m usually trying to read the book without looking at the cover, and I try DESPERATELY to hide it from view if I’m reading the book on a bus or plane.

    Reply
  96. Jo here.
    SusanK,very interesting about the English supposed to be from the same gene pool. As you say, plenty of regional differences.
    Susan/Miranda (we Wenches love to debate things!) though the monarchy married out a lot, I don’t think the aristocracy did. For one thing, alliances abroad were rarely useful, and even alliances between, say, a lord in Oxfordshire and one in Lanarkshire didn’t offer a lot.
    Also, before the mid to late 18th century the majority of unions were local because travel was tricky, especially for women. Unless Court was called for, why slog days to get to London when you could socialize nearby in summer or on nights with a good moon?
    Like many of these things, it would be great to do some research.
    Actually, there was a very interesting discussion on the All About Romance “Back Fence” discussion board. It’s gone now, and I’m not sure it’s archived.
    The basic question was: Are today’s British historical heroes actually American men? It spun off to are they modern American men, but it’s a valid question.
    North American women buy and read the vast majority of historical romances published. Maybe they’re dictating a particular taste? It’s worth another blog, really, but we can spin off the discussion here if anyone wants. We have all weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Jo

    Reply
  97. Jo here.
    SusanK,very interesting about the English supposed to be from the same gene pool. As you say, plenty of regional differences.
    Susan/Miranda (we Wenches love to debate things!) though the monarchy married out a lot, I don’t think the aristocracy did. For one thing, alliances abroad were rarely useful, and even alliances between, say, a lord in Oxfordshire and one in Lanarkshire didn’t offer a lot.
    Also, before the mid to late 18th century the majority of unions were local because travel was tricky, especially for women. Unless Court was called for, why slog days to get to London when you could socialize nearby in summer or on nights with a good moon?
    Like many of these things, it would be great to do some research.
    Actually, there was a very interesting discussion on the All About Romance “Back Fence” discussion board. It’s gone now, and I’m not sure it’s archived.
    The basic question was: Are today’s British historical heroes actually American men? It spun off to are they modern American men, but it’s a valid question.
    North American women buy and read the vast majority of historical romances published. Maybe they’re dictating a particular taste? It’s worth another blog, really, but we can spin off the discussion here if anyone wants. We have all weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Jo

    Reply
  98. Jo here.
    SusanK,very interesting about the English supposed to be from the same gene pool. As you say, plenty of regional differences.
    Susan/Miranda (we Wenches love to debate things!) though the monarchy married out a lot, I don’t think the aristocracy did. For one thing, alliances abroad were rarely useful, and even alliances between, say, a lord in Oxfordshire and one in Lanarkshire didn’t offer a lot.
    Also, before the mid to late 18th century the majority of unions were local because travel was tricky, especially for women. Unless Court was called for, why slog days to get to London when you could socialize nearby in summer or on nights with a good moon?
    Like many of these things, it would be great to do some research.
    Actually, there was a very interesting discussion on the All About Romance “Back Fence” discussion board. It’s gone now, and I’m not sure it’s archived.
    The basic question was: Are today’s British historical heroes actually American men? It spun off to are they modern American men, but it’s a valid question.
    North American women buy and read the vast majority of historical romances published. Maybe they’re dictating a particular taste? It’s worth another blog, really, but we can spin off the discussion here if anyone wants. We have all weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Jo

    Reply
  99. Jo here.
    SusanK,very interesting about the English supposed to be from the same gene pool. As you say, plenty of regional differences.
    Susan/Miranda (we Wenches love to debate things!) though the monarchy married out a lot, I don’t think the aristocracy did. For one thing, alliances abroad were rarely useful, and even alliances between, say, a lord in Oxfordshire and one in Lanarkshire didn’t offer a lot.
    Also, before the mid to late 18th century the majority of unions were local because travel was tricky, especially for women. Unless Court was called for, why slog days to get to London when you could socialize nearby in summer or on nights with a good moon?
    Like many of these things, it would be great to do some research.
    Actually, there was a very interesting discussion on the All About Romance “Back Fence” discussion board. It’s gone now, and I’m not sure it’s archived.
    The basic question was: Are today’s British historical heroes actually American men? It spun off to are they modern American men, but it’s a valid question.
    North American women buy and read the vast majority of historical romances published. Maybe they’re dictating a particular taste? It’s worth another blog, really, but we can spin off the discussion here if anyone wants. We have all weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Jo

    Reply
  100. Jo here.
    SusanK,very interesting about the English supposed to be from the same gene pool. As you say, plenty of regional differences.
    Susan/Miranda (we Wenches love to debate things!) though the monarchy married out a lot, I don’t think the aristocracy did. For one thing, alliances abroad were rarely useful, and even alliances between, say, a lord in Oxfordshire and one in Lanarkshire didn’t offer a lot.
    Also, before the mid to late 18th century the majority of unions were local because travel was tricky, especially for women. Unless Court was called for, why slog days to get to London when you could socialize nearby in summer or on nights with a good moon?
    Like many of these things, it would be great to do some research.
    Actually, there was a very interesting discussion on the All About Romance “Back Fence” discussion board. It’s gone now, and I’m not sure it’s archived.
    The basic question was: Are today’s British historical heroes actually American men? It spun off to are they modern American men, but it’s a valid question.
    North American women buy and read the vast majority of historical romances published. Maybe they’re dictating a particular taste? It’s worth another blog, really, but we can spin off the discussion here if anyone wants. We have all weekend. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Jo

    Reply
  101. Jo here again.
    Ah, facial hair! I like beards, but I don’t like stubble. The one thing I’d change about House is that damned stubble.
    I asked once how they keep that length of stubble and someone said there are razors that trim it just that high. That seems pretty daft to me.
    Now yes, a hero of a certain beard type can get a stubble when he can’t get to his razor, but I expect a nice clean shave ASAP!
    And yes, I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  102. Jo here again.
    Ah, facial hair! I like beards, but I don’t like stubble. The one thing I’d change about House is that damned stubble.
    I asked once how they keep that length of stubble and someone said there are razors that trim it just that high. That seems pretty daft to me.
    Now yes, a hero of a certain beard type can get a stubble when he can’t get to his razor, but I expect a nice clean shave ASAP!
    And yes, I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  103. Jo here again.
    Ah, facial hair! I like beards, but I don’t like stubble. The one thing I’d change about House is that damned stubble.
    I asked once how they keep that length of stubble and someone said there are razors that trim it just that high. That seems pretty daft to me.
    Now yes, a hero of a certain beard type can get a stubble when he can’t get to his razor, but I expect a nice clean shave ASAP!
    And yes, I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  104. Jo here again.
    Ah, facial hair! I like beards, but I don’t like stubble. The one thing I’d change about House is that damned stubble.
    I asked once how they keep that length of stubble and someone said there are razors that trim it just that high. That seems pretty daft to me.
    Now yes, a hero of a certain beard type can get a stubble when he can’t get to his razor, but I expect a nice clean shave ASAP!
    And yes, I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  105. Jo here again.
    Ah, facial hair! I like beards, but I don’t like stubble. The one thing I’d change about House is that damned stubble.
    I asked once how they keep that length of stubble and someone said there are razors that trim it just that high. That seems pretty daft to me.
    Now yes, a hero of a certain beard type can get a stubble when he can’t get to his razor, but I expect a nice clean shave ASAP!
    And yes, I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  106. Jo said: ‘I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.’
    So do I. That hint of decadence, of sexual ambiguity… But then, I was a young woman in the 1960s, and I like that sort of thing. The hair I really, really love on a male is long hair on the head; beard optional, but welcome, but flowing locks and a masculine face – yum.
    The young Mick Jagger – what can I say? And now he’s the old Mick Jagger, that’s fine, because I am much the same age as he is.
    ๐Ÿ˜€
    The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet. DNA analysis is still an emerging and developing science, and though it will undoubtedly eventually explain a lot of things that are currently obscure, we should be aware that there will probably be changes of direction, and that the geneticists working alongside archaeologists will be able eventually to refine conclusions much more precisely than is possible at present. Anyone who has tracked, as I have, the discovery and development of an important new scientific method (C14 analysis) over some 50 years knows that it takes a few decades for it to be fully understood.
    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  107. Jo said: ‘I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.’
    So do I. That hint of decadence, of sexual ambiguity… But then, I was a young woman in the 1960s, and I like that sort of thing. The hair I really, really love on a male is long hair on the head; beard optional, but welcome, but flowing locks and a masculine face – yum.
    The young Mick Jagger – what can I say? And now he’s the old Mick Jagger, that’s fine, because I am much the same age as he is.
    ๐Ÿ˜€
    The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet. DNA analysis is still an emerging and developing science, and though it will undoubtedly eventually explain a lot of things that are currently obscure, we should be aware that there will probably be changes of direction, and that the geneticists working alongside archaeologists will be able eventually to refine conclusions much more precisely than is possible at present. Anyone who has tracked, as I have, the discovery and development of an important new scientific method (C14 analysis) over some 50 years knows that it takes a few decades for it to be fully understood.
    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  108. Jo said: ‘I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.’
    So do I. That hint of decadence, of sexual ambiguity… But then, I was a young woman in the 1960s, and I like that sort of thing. The hair I really, really love on a male is long hair on the head; beard optional, but welcome, but flowing locks and a masculine face – yum.
    The young Mick Jagger – what can I say? And now he’s the old Mick Jagger, that’s fine, because I am much the same age as he is.
    ๐Ÿ˜€
    The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet. DNA analysis is still an emerging and developing science, and though it will undoubtedly eventually explain a lot of things that are currently obscure, we should be aware that there will probably be changes of direction, and that the geneticists working alongside archaeologists will be able eventually to refine conclusions much more precisely than is possible at present. Anyone who has tracked, as I have, the discovery and development of an important new scientific method (C14 analysis) over some 50 years knows that it takes a few decades for it to be fully understood.
    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  109. Jo said: ‘I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.’
    So do I. That hint of decadence, of sexual ambiguity… But then, I was a young woman in the 1960s, and I like that sort of thing. The hair I really, really love on a male is long hair on the head; beard optional, but welcome, but flowing locks and a masculine face – yum.
    The young Mick Jagger – what can I say? And now he’s the old Mick Jagger, that’s fine, because I am much the same age as he is.
    ๐Ÿ˜€
    The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet. DNA analysis is still an emerging and developing science, and though it will undoubtedly eventually explain a lot of things that are currently obscure, we should be aware that there will probably be changes of direction, and that the geneticists working alongside archaeologists will be able eventually to refine conclusions much more precisely than is possible at present. Anyone who has tracked, as I have, the discovery and development of an important new scientific method (C14 analysis) over some 50 years knows that it takes a few decades for it to be fully understood.
    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  110. Jo said: ‘I adore androgyny as long as the man’s nature is thoroughly male. Which is very possible.’
    So do I. That hint of decadence, of sexual ambiguity… But then, I was a young woman in the 1960s, and I like that sort of thing. The hair I really, really love on a male is long hair on the head; beard optional, but welcome, but flowing locks and a masculine face – yum.
    The young Mick Jagger – what can I say? And now he’s the old Mick Jagger, that’s fine, because I am much the same age as he is.
    ๐Ÿ˜€
    The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet. DNA analysis is still an emerging and developing science, and though it will undoubtedly eventually explain a lot of things that are currently obscure, we should be aware that there will probably be changes of direction, and that the geneticists working alongside archaeologists will be able eventually to refine conclusions much more precisely than is possible at present. Anyone who has tracked, as I have, the discovery and development of an important new scientific method (C14 analysis) over some 50 years knows that it takes a few decades for it to be fully understood.
    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply
  111. “The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet.”
    I agree. It makes sense, though, because it’s not like any of the various invaders down through the millennia were bent on genocide, so whoever was there first would still be, well, *there*. On the other hand, since we know so little about the pre-Celtic inhabitants of Britain, it’s kind of strange to think that those of us who are of British or Irish ancestry might well *be* them, as much or more than we are Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norman, etc.

    Reply
  112. “The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet.”
    I agree. It makes sense, though, because it’s not like any of the various invaders down through the millennia were bent on genocide, so whoever was there first would still be, well, *there*. On the other hand, since we know so little about the pre-Celtic inhabitants of Britain, it’s kind of strange to think that those of us who are of British or Irish ancestry might well *be* them, as much or more than we are Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norman, etc.

    Reply
  113. “The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet.”
    I agree. It makes sense, though, because it’s not like any of the various invaders down through the millennia were bent on genocide, so whoever was there first would still be, well, *there*. On the other hand, since we know so little about the pre-Celtic inhabitants of Britain, it’s kind of strange to think that those of us who are of British or Irish ancestry might well *be* them, as much or more than we are Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norman, etc.

    Reply
  114. “The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet.”
    I agree. It makes sense, though, because it’s not like any of the various invaders down through the millennia were bent on genocide, so whoever was there first would still be, well, *there*. On the other hand, since we know so little about the pre-Celtic inhabitants of Britain, it’s kind of strange to think that those of us who are of British or Irish ancestry might well *be* them, as much or more than we are Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norman, etc.

    Reply
  115. “The point about common genetic inheritance in the UK is interesting, but far from conclusive as yet.”
    I agree. It makes sense, though, because it’s not like any of the various invaders down through the millennia were bent on genocide, so whoever was there first would still be, well, *there*. On the other hand, since we know so little about the pre-Celtic inhabitants of Britain, it’s kind of strange to think that those of us who are of British or Irish ancestry might well *be* them, as much or more than we are Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Norman, etc.

    Reply
  116. Don’t care about hair or no hair on their fronts, both are fine. It’s hair on their backs that kinda icks me out.
    And I feel completely justified in engaging in a body quality bias discussion. Women are expected to have smooth legs and underarms (in the States). If I have to put up with that inconvenience, I get to voice my druthers!
    Of course, reading all these comments, I can’t help thinking of the chest-waxing scene in The Forty-Year-Old Virgin. Yikes! It’s a Man-O-Lantern, LOL.

    Reply
  117. Don’t care about hair or no hair on their fronts, both are fine. It’s hair on their backs that kinda icks me out.
    And I feel completely justified in engaging in a body quality bias discussion. Women are expected to have smooth legs and underarms (in the States). If I have to put up with that inconvenience, I get to voice my druthers!
    Of course, reading all these comments, I can’t help thinking of the chest-waxing scene in The Forty-Year-Old Virgin. Yikes! It’s a Man-O-Lantern, LOL.

    Reply
  118. Don’t care about hair or no hair on their fronts, both are fine. It’s hair on their backs that kinda icks me out.
    And I feel completely justified in engaging in a body quality bias discussion. Women are expected to have smooth legs and underarms (in the States). If I have to put up with that inconvenience, I get to voice my druthers!
    Of course, reading all these comments, I can’t help thinking of the chest-waxing scene in The Forty-Year-Old Virgin. Yikes! It’s a Man-O-Lantern, LOL.

    Reply
  119. Don’t care about hair or no hair on their fronts, both are fine. It’s hair on their backs that kinda icks me out.
    And I feel completely justified in engaging in a body quality bias discussion. Women are expected to have smooth legs and underarms (in the States). If I have to put up with that inconvenience, I get to voice my druthers!
    Of course, reading all these comments, I can’t help thinking of the chest-waxing scene in The Forty-Year-Old Virgin. Yikes! It’s a Man-O-Lantern, LOL.

    Reply
  120. Don’t care about hair or no hair on their fronts, both are fine. It’s hair on their backs that kinda icks me out.
    And I feel completely justified in engaging in a body quality bias discussion. Women are expected to have smooth legs and underarms (in the States). If I have to put up with that inconvenience, I get to voice my druthers!
    Of course, reading all these comments, I can’t help thinking of the chest-waxing scene in The Forty-Year-Old Virgin. Yikes! It’s a Man-O-Lantern, LOL.

    Reply
  121. Cathy here again ~
    It’s 9:43 p.m. on Friday night and I’m studying the Sean Bean photo for androgynous traits. Not seein’ it. I am, however, seeing the bit of hair… down low… There is nothing androgynous about those thighs, with their hard but manageable mounds and swales to the slim and masculine hip. The torso is long. Atlas was never as smooth as Sean Bean… This man is sinewy and proportionate. I can nearly feel the smoothness of his skin, taut over hard, lean muscle. With his blood vessels not buried under swollen muscles, he’s so warm to the touch…. SLURP!
    “Sean,” I say, slipping the tip of my pinky finger into his inny/outie bellie button, “how are you feeling tonight?” Of course I say it like that because I know exactly how he’s feeling… hard and smooth and oh so manageable. His skin smells like molten gold and incense, and just a hint of sweat.
    With a lazy smile spreading across the lower half of his face, he says “Not to bad,” in his Yorkshire accent.
    SLURP!
    Cathy, who has just revealed herself a total flake… Oh, Jo, why did you post that picture?

    Reply
  122. Cathy here again ~
    It’s 9:43 p.m. on Friday night and I’m studying the Sean Bean photo for androgynous traits. Not seein’ it. I am, however, seeing the bit of hair… down low… There is nothing androgynous about those thighs, with their hard but manageable mounds and swales to the slim and masculine hip. The torso is long. Atlas was never as smooth as Sean Bean… This man is sinewy and proportionate. I can nearly feel the smoothness of his skin, taut over hard, lean muscle. With his blood vessels not buried under swollen muscles, he’s so warm to the touch…. SLURP!
    “Sean,” I say, slipping the tip of my pinky finger into his inny/outie bellie button, “how are you feeling tonight?” Of course I say it like that because I know exactly how he’s feeling… hard and smooth and oh so manageable. His skin smells like molten gold and incense, and just a hint of sweat.
    With a lazy smile spreading across the lower half of his face, he says “Not to bad,” in his Yorkshire accent.
    SLURP!
    Cathy, who has just revealed herself a total flake… Oh, Jo, why did you post that picture?

    Reply
  123. Cathy here again ~
    It’s 9:43 p.m. on Friday night and I’m studying the Sean Bean photo for androgynous traits. Not seein’ it. I am, however, seeing the bit of hair… down low… There is nothing androgynous about those thighs, with their hard but manageable mounds and swales to the slim and masculine hip. The torso is long. Atlas was never as smooth as Sean Bean… This man is sinewy and proportionate. I can nearly feel the smoothness of his skin, taut over hard, lean muscle. With his blood vessels not buried under swollen muscles, he’s so warm to the touch…. SLURP!
    “Sean,” I say, slipping the tip of my pinky finger into his inny/outie bellie button, “how are you feeling tonight?” Of course I say it like that because I know exactly how he’s feeling… hard and smooth and oh so manageable. His skin smells like molten gold and incense, and just a hint of sweat.
    With a lazy smile spreading across the lower half of his face, he says “Not to bad,” in his Yorkshire accent.
    SLURP!
    Cathy, who has just revealed herself a total flake… Oh, Jo, why did you post that picture?

    Reply
  124. Cathy here again ~
    It’s 9:43 p.m. on Friday night and I’m studying the Sean Bean photo for androgynous traits. Not seein’ it. I am, however, seeing the bit of hair… down low… There is nothing androgynous about those thighs, with their hard but manageable mounds and swales to the slim and masculine hip. The torso is long. Atlas was never as smooth as Sean Bean… This man is sinewy and proportionate. I can nearly feel the smoothness of his skin, taut over hard, lean muscle. With his blood vessels not buried under swollen muscles, he’s so warm to the touch…. SLURP!
    “Sean,” I say, slipping the tip of my pinky finger into his inny/outie bellie button, “how are you feeling tonight?” Of course I say it like that because I know exactly how he’s feeling… hard and smooth and oh so manageable. His skin smells like molten gold and incense, and just a hint of sweat.
    With a lazy smile spreading across the lower half of his face, he says “Not to bad,” in his Yorkshire accent.
    SLURP!
    Cathy, who has just revealed herself a total flake… Oh, Jo, why did you post that picture?

    Reply
  125. Cathy here again ~
    It’s 9:43 p.m. on Friday night and I’m studying the Sean Bean photo for androgynous traits. Not seein’ it. I am, however, seeing the bit of hair… down low… There is nothing androgynous about those thighs, with their hard but manageable mounds and swales to the slim and masculine hip. The torso is long. Atlas was never as smooth as Sean Bean… This man is sinewy and proportionate. I can nearly feel the smoothness of his skin, taut over hard, lean muscle. With his blood vessels not buried under swollen muscles, he’s so warm to the touch…. SLURP!
    “Sean,” I say, slipping the tip of my pinky finger into his inny/outie bellie button, “how are you feeling tonight?” Of course I say it like that because I know exactly how he’s feeling… hard and smooth and oh so manageable. His skin smells like molten gold and incense, and just a hint of sweat.
    With a lazy smile spreading across the lower half of his face, he says “Not to bad,” in his Yorkshire accent.
    SLURP!
    Cathy, who has just revealed herself a total flake… Oh, Jo, why did you post that picture?

    Reply
  126. Well….it’s often been said that the human backside is the shape it is due to much fence-sitting….
    I like both.
    And btw – the males of our family are Brit (Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cornwall, Isle of Mann) and are QUITE hairy. My ex was all Celt and was similarly hirsute.
    I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.
    And now for the beards. They look great on the right guys. (Our family’s men all sport beards and they are much more handsome with, I think). But I also like a nice clean shaven type. I am NOT a fan of stubble, though I have several friends who like the ‘just rolled off the couch look’ very much.
    And JO – I’m just finishing Lady Beware, so no time to look for pictures, sorry. (It’s great. I was really looking forward to it and am enjoying it even more than I’d anticipated. And I LIKE Horatio….great hero. Perfect. That is to say, slightly flawed).
    Thank you!! I’m already waiting for the next one….

    Reply
  127. Well….it’s often been said that the human backside is the shape it is due to much fence-sitting….
    I like both.
    And btw – the males of our family are Brit (Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cornwall, Isle of Mann) and are QUITE hairy. My ex was all Celt and was similarly hirsute.
    I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.
    And now for the beards. They look great on the right guys. (Our family’s men all sport beards and they are much more handsome with, I think). But I also like a nice clean shaven type. I am NOT a fan of stubble, though I have several friends who like the ‘just rolled off the couch look’ very much.
    And JO – I’m just finishing Lady Beware, so no time to look for pictures, sorry. (It’s great. I was really looking forward to it and am enjoying it even more than I’d anticipated. And I LIKE Horatio….great hero. Perfect. That is to say, slightly flawed).
    Thank you!! I’m already waiting for the next one….

    Reply
  128. Well….it’s often been said that the human backside is the shape it is due to much fence-sitting….
    I like both.
    And btw – the males of our family are Brit (Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cornwall, Isle of Mann) and are QUITE hairy. My ex was all Celt and was similarly hirsute.
    I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.
    And now for the beards. They look great on the right guys. (Our family’s men all sport beards and they are much more handsome with, I think). But I also like a nice clean shaven type. I am NOT a fan of stubble, though I have several friends who like the ‘just rolled off the couch look’ very much.
    And JO – I’m just finishing Lady Beware, so no time to look for pictures, sorry. (It’s great. I was really looking forward to it and am enjoying it even more than I’d anticipated. And I LIKE Horatio….great hero. Perfect. That is to say, slightly flawed).
    Thank you!! I’m already waiting for the next one….

    Reply
  129. Well….it’s often been said that the human backside is the shape it is due to much fence-sitting….
    I like both.
    And btw – the males of our family are Brit (Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cornwall, Isle of Mann) and are QUITE hairy. My ex was all Celt and was similarly hirsute.
    I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.
    And now for the beards. They look great on the right guys. (Our family’s men all sport beards and they are much more handsome with, I think). But I also like a nice clean shaven type. I am NOT a fan of stubble, though I have several friends who like the ‘just rolled off the couch look’ very much.
    And JO – I’m just finishing Lady Beware, so no time to look for pictures, sorry. (It’s great. I was really looking forward to it and am enjoying it even more than I’d anticipated. And I LIKE Horatio….great hero. Perfect. That is to say, slightly flawed).
    Thank you!! I’m already waiting for the next one….

    Reply
  130. Well….it’s often been said that the human backside is the shape it is due to much fence-sitting….
    I like both.
    And btw – the males of our family are Brit (Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cornwall, Isle of Mann) and are QUITE hairy. My ex was all Celt and was similarly hirsute.
    I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.
    And now for the beards. They look great on the right guys. (Our family’s men all sport beards and they are much more handsome with, I think). But I also like a nice clean shaven type. I am NOT a fan of stubble, though I have several friends who like the ‘just rolled off the couch look’ very much.
    And JO – I’m just finishing Lady Beware, so no time to look for pictures, sorry. (It’s great. I was really looking forward to it and am enjoying it even more than I’d anticipated. And I LIKE Horatio….great hero. Perfect. That is to say, slightly flawed).
    Thank you!! I’m already waiting for the next one….

    Reply
  131. LOL, Cathy! Glad to know the Word Wenches once more did their bit for womankind!*G*
    Androgyny is an interesting word. It doesn’t mean feminine. It means both. So not ultra feminine, but not ultra masculine. Right in the middle with, as I like to think, the best of both. ๐Ÿ™‚
    But I’d agree. Sean Bean isn’t androgynous. Just a nice manly smoothie. Mostly smoothie. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Talking about androgyny,take a look at this picture!I really did think it was a woman in drag.I suppose the funny hat doesn’t help, but there’s the pose as well.
    http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=3144
    General Tarleton even looks as if he’s fixing his garter. But his military record was certainly not wimpy.Quite the opposite in the American Revolution.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  132. LOL, Cathy! Glad to know the Word Wenches once more did their bit for womankind!*G*
    Androgyny is an interesting word. It doesn’t mean feminine. It means both. So not ultra feminine, but not ultra masculine. Right in the middle with, as I like to think, the best of both. ๐Ÿ™‚
    But I’d agree. Sean Bean isn’t androgynous. Just a nice manly smoothie. Mostly smoothie. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Talking about androgyny,take a look at this picture!I really did think it was a woman in drag.I suppose the funny hat doesn’t help, but there’s the pose as well.
    http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=3144
    General Tarleton even looks as if he’s fixing his garter. But his military record was certainly not wimpy.Quite the opposite in the American Revolution.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  133. LOL, Cathy! Glad to know the Word Wenches once more did their bit for womankind!*G*
    Androgyny is an interesting word. It doesn’t mean feminine. It means both. So not ultra feminine, but not ultra masculine. Right in the middle with, as I like to think, the best of both. ๐Ÿ™‚
    But I’d agree. Sean Bean isn’t androgynous. Just a nice manly smoothie. Mostly smoothie. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Talking about androgyny,take a look at this picture!I really did think it was a woman in drag.I suppose the funny hat doesn’t help, but there’s the pose as well.
    http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=3144
    General Tarleton even looks as if he’s fixing his garter. But his military record was certainly not wimpy.Quite the opposite in the American Revolution.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  134. LOL, Cathy! Glad to know the Word Wenches once more did their bit for womankind!*G*
    Androgyny is an interesting word. It doesn’t mean feminine. It means both. So not ultra feminine, but not ultra masculine. Right in the middle with, as I like to think, the best of both. ๐Ÿ™‚
    But I’d agree. Sean Bean isn’t androgynous. Just a nice manly smoothie. Mostly smoothie. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Talking about androgyny,take a look at this picture!I really did think it was a woman in drag.I suppose the funny hat doesn’t help, but there’s the pose as well.
    http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=3144
    General Tarleton even looks as if he’s fixing his garter. But his military record was certainly not wimpy.Quite the opposite in the American Revolution.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  135. LOL, Cathy! Glad to know the Word Wenches once more did their bit for womankind!*G*
    Androgyny is an interesting word. It doesn’t mean feminine. It means both. So not ultra feminine, but not ultra masculine. Right in the middle with, as I like to think, the best of both. ๐Ÿ™‚
    But I’d agree. Sean Bean isn’t androgynous. Just a nice manly smoothie. Mostly smoothie. ๐Ÿ™‚
    Talking about androgyny,take a look at this picture!I really did think it was a woman in drag.I suppose the funny hat doesn’t help, but there’s the pose as well.
    http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/image.asp?id=3144
    General Tarleton even looks as if he’s fixing his garter. But his military record was certainly not wimpy.Quite the opposite in the American Revolution.
    Jo ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  136. I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man (and I saw the real man in person in Paris—!) but that stubble has got to go. For one thing, all that razor burn just wouldn’t be very much fun at all.
    I’m weighing in on the less-hairy side of the line. I can tolerate a little hair, but prefer less rather than more.
    And…oh! those pictures reminded me of how much I once loved Mick Jagger. Gracias.

    Reply
  137. I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man (and I saw the real man in person in Paris—!) but that stubble has got to go. For one thing, all that razor burn just wouldn’t be very much fun at all.
    I’m weighing in on the less-hairy side of the line. I can tolerate a little hair, but prefer less rather than more.
    And…oh! those pictures reminded me of how much I once loved Mick Jagger. Gracias.

    Reply
  138. I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man (and I saw the real man in person in Paris—!) but that stubble has got to go. For one thing, all that razor burn just wouldn’t be very much fun at all.
    I’m weighing in on the less-hairy side of the line. I can tolerate a little hair, but prefer less rather than more.
    And…oh! those pictures reminded me of how much I once loved Mick Jagger. Gracias.

    Reply
  139. I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man (and I saw the real man in person in Paris—!) but that stubble has got to go. For one thing, all that razor burn just wouldn’t be very much fun at all.
    I’m weighing in on the less-hairy side of the line. I can tolerate a little hair, but prefer less rather than more.
    And…oh! those pictures reminded me of how much I once loved Mick Jagger. Gracias.

    Reply
  140. I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man (and I saw the real man in person in Paris—!) but that stubble has got to go. For one thing, all that razor burn just wouldn’t be very much fun at all.
    I’m weighing in on the less-hairy side of the line. I can tolerate a little hair, but prefer less rather than more.
    And…oh! those pictures reminded me of how much I once loved Mick Jagger. Gracias.

    Reply
  141. “I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.”
    MJ, I completely agree, and this goes for more than chest hair, too.
    Actually, I think that whatever kind of chest hair my lover had would be the kind I most like.
    There’s something about love that makes even the weird stuff about your beloved’s body attractive.
    Lots of the men I “notice” in my real life these days (yes, I’m married, but I’m not dead) aren’t really swoon-worthy physically at all–they’re the ones with the wicked sense of humor, or the kind heart, or the funny glasses. They’re attractive to me because I have liked and admired them, and that “frisson” comes on the heels of the friendship and admiration.
    In my “unreal” life–I’m not too crazy about looking at photos of my fave movie stars, either. For example, Colin Firth or Alan Rickman. You’re right, Jo, their still photos leave me cold. I think, “They’re not that cute. . .” And then I see them in a movie and I completely melt into a puddle.
    PS Want to see Rupert Everett in drag? Look here (it’s a Colin Firth site. . . scroll down a bit for Rupert)
    http://www.firth.com/saint_gal01.html

    Reply
  142. “I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.”
    MJ, I completely agree, and this goes for more than chest hair, too.
    Actually, I think that whatever kind of chest hair my lover had would be the kind I most like.
    There’s something about love that makes even the weird stuff about your beloved’s body attractive.
    Lots of the men I “notice” in my real life these days (yes, I’m married, but I’m not dead) aren’t really swoon-worthy physically at all–they’re the ones with the wicked sense of humor, or the kind heart, or the funny glasses. They’re attractive to me because I have liked and admired them, and that “frisson” comes on the heels of the friendship and admiration.
    In my “unreal” life–I’m not too crazy about looking at photos of my fave movie stars, either. For example, Colin Firth or Alan Rickman. You’re right, Jo, their still photos leave me cold. I think, “They’re not that cute. . .” And then I see them in a movie and I completely melt into a puddle.
    PS Want to see Rupert Everett in drag? Look here (it’s a Colin Firth site. . . scroll down a bit for Rupert)
    http://www.firth.com/saint_gal01.html

    Reply
  143. “I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.”
    MJ, I completely agree, and this goes for more than chest hair, too.
    Actually, I think that whatever kind of chest hair my lover had would be the kind I most like.
    There’s something about love that makes even the weird stuff about your beloved’s body attractive.
    Lots of the men I “notice” in my real life these days (yes, I’m married, but I’m not dead) aren’t really swoon-worthy physically at all–they’re the ones with the wicked sense of humor, or the kind heart, or the funny glasses. They’re attractive to me because I have liked and admired them, and that “frisson” comes on the heels of the friendship and admiration.
    In my “unreal” life–I’m not too crazy about looking at photos of my fave movie stars, either. For example, Colin Firth or Alan Rickman. You’re right, Jo, their still photos leave me cold. I think, “They’re not that cute. . .” And then I see them in a movie and I completely melt into a puddle.
    PS Want to see Rupert Everett in drag? Look here (it’s a Colin Firth site. . . scroll down a bit for Rupert)
    http://www.firth.com/saint_gal01.html

    Reply
  144. “I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.”
    MJ, I completely agree, and this goes for more than chest hair, too.
    Actually, I think that whatever kind of chest hair my lover had would be the kind I most like.
    There’s something about love that makes even the weird stuff about your beloved’s body attractive.
    Lots of the men I “notice” in my real life these days (yes, I’m married, but I’m not dead) aren’t really swoon-worthy physically at all–they’re the ones with the wicked sense of humor, or the kind heart, or the funny glasses. They’re attractive to me because I have liked and admired them, and that “frisson” comes on the heels of the friendship and admiration.
    In my “unreal” life–I’m not too crazy about looking at photos of my fave movie stars, either. For example, Colin Firth or Alan Rickman. You’re right, Jo, their still photos leave me cold. I think, “They’re not that cute. . .” And then I see them in a movie and I completely melt into a puddle.
    PS Want to see Rupert Everett in drag? Look here (it’s a Colin Firth site. . . scroll down a bit for Rupert)
    http://www.firth.com/saint_gal01.html

    Reply
  145. “I’ve enjoyed the sight of many variations of manly chest hair. And firmly believe that what you have is far less important that what you do with it.”
    MJ, I completely agree, and this goes for more than chest hair, too.
    Actually, I think that whatever kind of chest hair my lover had would be the kind I most like.
    There’s something about love that makes even the weird stuff about your beloved’s body attractive.
    Lots of the men I “notice” in my real life these days (yes, I’m married, but I’m not dead) aren’t really swoon-worthy physically at all–they’re the ones with the wicked sense of humor, or the kind heart, or the funny glasses. They’re attractive to me because I have liked and admired them, and that “frisson” comes on the heels of the friendship and admiration.
    In my “unreal” life–I’m not too crazy about looking at photos of my fave movie stars, either. For example, Colin Firth or Alan Rickman. You’re right, Jo, their still photos leave me cold. I think, “They’re not that cute. . .” And then I see them in a movie and I completely melt into a puddle.
    PS Want to see Rupert Everett in drag? Look here (it’s a Colin Firth site. . . scroll down a bit for Rupert)
    http://www.firth.com/saint_gal01.html

    Reply
  146. I went back to check out that picture of Fiennes.
    I ended up being distracted from the chest hair by his elegant fingers! Look at the way they hold that quill.
    I’m a sucker for beautiful hands.

    Reply
  147. I went back to check out that picture of Fiennes.
    I ended up being distracted from the chest hair by his elegant fingers! Look at the way they hold that quill.
    I’m a sucker for beautiful hands.

    Reply
  148. I went back to check out that picture of Fiennes.
    I ended up being distracted from the chest hair by his elegant fingers! Look at the way they hold that quill.
    I’m a sucker for beautiful hands.

    Reply
  149. I went back to check out that picture of Fiennes.
    I ended up being distracted from the chest hair by his elegant fingers! Look at the way they hold that quill.
    I’m a sucker for beautiful hands.

    Reply
  150. I went back to check out that picture of Fiennes.
    I ended up being distracted from the chest hair by his elegant fingers! Look at the way they hold that quill.
    I’m a sucker for beautiful hands.

    Reply
  151. “I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man”
    Am the only one amused by the idea of “Bertie Wooster, sex symbol”? LOL! Let alone the prancing ninny of Roman general he played in Blackadder.
    I agree that House is hot, but I must admit I’m always waiting for him to get into a jam and need Jeeves to come and rescue him . . . if they get Stephen Fry to guest star I’ll be in alt!

    Reply
  152. “I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man”
    Am the only one amused by the idea of “Bertie Wooster, sex symbol”? LOL! Let alone the prancing ninny of Roman general he played in Blackadder.
    I agree that House is hot, but I must admit I’m always waiting for him to get into a jam and need Jeeves to come and rescue him . . . if they get Stephen Fry to guest star I’ll be in alt!

    Reply
  153. “I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man”
    Am the only one amused by the idea of “Bertie Wooster, sex symbol”? LOL! Let alone the prancing ninny of Roman general he played in Blackadder.
    I agree that House is hot, but I must admit I’m always waiting for him to get into a jam and need Jeeves to come and rescue him . . . if they get Stephen Fry to guest star I’ll be in alt!

    Reply
  154. “I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man”
    Am the only one amused by the idea of “Bertie Wooster, sex symbol”? LOL! Let alone the prancing ninny of Roman general he played in Blackadder.
    I agree that House is hot, but I must admit I’m always waiting for him to get into a jam and need Jeeves to come and rescue him . . . if they get Stephen Fry to guest star I’ll be in alt!

    Reply
  155. “I so agree with you on House–I think he’s a very sexy man”
    Am the only one amused by the idea of “Bertie Wooster, sex symbol”? LOL! Let alone the prancing ninny of Roman general he played in Blackadder.
    I agree that House is hot, but I must admit I’m always waiting for him to get into a jam and need Jeeves to come and rescue him . . . if they get Stephen Fry to guest star I’ll be in alt!

    Reply
  156. ~~picky, picky!
    Yes. I know: A hairy guy is something of a curse! Don’t want to see a hairy back (or, backside, for that matter; what to do, about all that Grizzly bear stuff??)
    ~~Commenting on a Woman’s Romance Site, is quite the education. As wonderful as reading the posts!
    Okay. Now, if on;y women would take as much care in shaving as men do!
    (just a thought..)
    xx,b.

    Reply
  157. ~~picky, picky!
    Yes. I know: A hairy guy is something of a curse! Don’t want to see a hairy back (or, backside, for that matter; what to do, about all that Grizzly bear stuff??)
    ~~Commenting on a Woman’s Romance Site, is quite the education. As wonderful as reading the posts!
    Okay. Now, if on;y women would take as much care in shaving as men do!
    (just a thought..)
    xx,b.

    Reply
  158. ~~picky, picky!
    Yes. I know: A hairy guy is something of a curse! Don’t want to see a hairy back (or, backside, for that matter; what to do, about all that Grizzly bear stuff??)
    ~~Commenting on a Woman’s Romance Site, is quite the education. As wonderful as reading the posts!
    Okay. Now, if on;y women would take as much care in shaving as men do!
    (just a thought..)
    xx,b.

    Reply
  159. ~~picky, picky!
    Yes. I know: A hairy guy is something of a curse! Don’t want to see a hairy back (or, backside, for that matter; what to do, about all that Grizzly bear stuff??)
    ~~Commenting on a Woman’s Romance Site, is quite the education. As wonderful as reading the posts!
    Okay. Now, if on;y women would take as much care in shaving as men do!
    (just a thought..)
    xx,b.

    Reply
  160. ~~picky, picky!
    Yes. I know: A hairy guy is something of a curse! Don’t want to see a hairy back (or, backside, for that matter; what to do, about all that Grizzly bear stuff??)
    ~~Commenting on a Woman’s Romance Site, is quite the education. As wonderful as reading the posts!
    Okay. Now, if on;y women would take as much care in shaving as men do!
    (just a thought..)
    xx,b.

    Reply
  161. I don’t have a strong preference for smooth vs. hairy chests when I’m reading a book, as long as his chest doesn’t look like a bearskin rug.
    In real life, I prefer a smooth (or at least mostly-smooth) chest. I don’t like hair in my teeth, and really prefer the feel of smooth muscles under my fingertips. But that’s just me. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  162. I don’t have a strong preference for smooth vs. hairy chests when I’m reading a book, as long as his chest doesn’t look like a bearskin rug.
    In real life, I prefer a smooth (or at least mostly-smooth) chest. I don’t like hair in my teeth, and really prefer the feel of smooth muscles under my fingertips. But that’s just me. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  163. I don’t have a strong preference for smooth vs. hairy chests when I’m reading a book, as long as his chest doesn’t look like a bearskin rug.
    In real life, I prefer a smooth (or at least mostly-smooth) chest. I don’t like hair in my teeth, and really prefer the feel of smooth muscles under my fingertips. But that’s just me. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  164. I don’t have a strong preference for smooth vs. hairy chests when I’m reading a book, as long as his chest doesn’t look like a bearskin rug.
    In real life, I prefer a smooth (or at least mostly-smooth) chest. I don’t like hair in my teeth, and really prefer the feel of smooth muscles under my fingertips. But that’s just me. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  165. I don’t have a strong preference for smooth vs. hairy chests when I’m reading a book, as long as his chest doesn’t look like a bearskin rug.
    In real life, I prefer a smooth (or at least mostly-smooth) chest. I don’t like hair in my teeth, and really prefer the feel of smooth muscles under my fingertips. But that’s just me. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  166. I highly recommend that people rent the DVD of “Caravaggio”. Derek Jarman, the director, had a unique vision (an understatement if there ever was one) and the movie is stuffed with anachronisms (motorcycles, cigars, etc), but the images and story have stayed with me for a very long time. It stars Tilda Swinton, who has her own unique beauty, and Sean Bean, who as the still from the film shows is stunningly handsome. Unfortunately, I don’t remember the name of the actor who played Caravaggio.
    And thank you for the link to the books about Jack Absolute, which I hadn’t heard of. The Shakespeare Theatre here in Washington did “The Rivals” recently, and the play is still a hoot 250 years after it was written. What fun to think that JA stars on in his own books!

    Reply
  167. I highly recommend that people rent the DVD of “Caravaggio”. Derek Jarman, the director, had a unique vision (an understatement if there ever was one) and the movie is stuffed with anachronisms (motorcycles, cigars, etc), but the images and story have stayed with me for a very long time. It stars Tilda Swinton, who has her own unique beauty, and Sean Bean, who as the still from the film shows is stunningly handsome. Unfortunately, I don’t remember the name of the actor who played Caravaggio.
    And thank you for the link to the books about Jack Absolute, which I hadn’t heard of. The Shakespeare Theatre here in Washington did “The Rivals” recently, and the play is still a hoot 250 years after it was written. What fun to think that JA stars on in his own books!

    Reply
  168. I highly recommend that people rent the DVD of “Caravaggio”. Derek Jarman, the director, had a unique vision (an understatement if there ever was one) and the movie is stuffed with anachronisms (motorcycles, cigars, etc), but the images and story have stayed with me for a very long time. It stars Tilda Swinton, who has her own unique beauty, and Sean Bean, who as the still from the film shows is stunningly handsome. Unfortunately, I don’t remember the name of the actor who played Caravaggio.
    And thank you for the link to the books about Jack Absolute, which I hadn’t heard of. The Shakespeare Theatre here in Washington did “The Rivals” recently, and the play is still a hoot 250 years after it was written. What fun to think that JA stars on in his own books!

    Reply
  169. I highly recommend that people rent the DVD of “Caravaggio”. Derek Jarman, the director, had a unique vision (an understatement if there ever was one) and the movie is stuffed with anachronisms (motorcycles, cigars, etc), but the images and story have stayed with me for a very long time. It stars Tilda Swinton, who has her own unique beauty, and Sean Bean, who as the still from the film shows is stunningly handsome. Unfortunately, I don’t remember the name of the actor who played Caravaggio.
    And thank you for the link to the books about Jack Absolute, which I hadn’t heard of. The Shakespeare Theatre here in Washington did “The Rivals” recently, and the play is still a hoot 250 years after it was written. What fun to think that JA stars on in his own books!

    Reply
  170. I highly recommend that people rent the DVD of “Caravaggio”. Derek Jarman, the director, had a unique vision (an understatement if there ever was one) and the movie is stuffed with anachronisms (motorcycles, cigars, etc), but the images and story have stayed with me for a very long time. It stars Tilda Swinton, who has her own unique beauty, and Sean Bean, who as the still from the film shows is stunningly handsome. Unfortunately, I don’t remember the name of the actor who played Caravaggio.
    And thank you for the link to the books about Jack Absolute, which I hadn’t heard of. The Shakespeare Theatre here in Washington did “The Rivals” recently, and the play is still a hoot 250 years after it was written. What fun to think that JA stars on in his own books!

    Reply

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