What’s Underfoot,

Wench bond-street-gillray-elaine-golden

Bond Street and a passel of gentlemen

Joanna here, back with another exciting dispatch from the universe of the past. Talking about roads, in fact.

I was going to wax eloquent on road building in general, starting with the madly competent engineering Romans and going right on till I got to ugly but practical tar-bound macadam in 1902, pioneered by a Swiss doctor in Monaco.

Have you ever noticed how very many Victorian doctors invented things? I worry a bit about their patients, what with the physicians studying refrigeration, road surfaces, and coca cola instead of, for instance, gall bladders.

Back to roads.

I quickly discovered the history of road construction and law is mind-numblingly dull, so I decided to throw myself directly into what roads and pavements would have looked like in Regency London. This is not precisely enthralling, but better than Turnpike Trusts, believe me.

We're going straight to the hard, permanent, waterproof stuff laid down on city walkways and roadways to distinguish them from the endless tracks of dirt and muddy ruts with which the countryside was plentifully supplied.

Were there dirt roadways in the city of London?
Some, probably.

Wench a_view_on_the_thames_with_numerous_ships_and_figures_on_the_wharf-rowlandson 1818 crop

Probably some wheeled and foot traffic on Thames side
Wench dirt street

Here's a dirt road arriving at the edge of town

Dirt roadways approached the edges of the city, of course.
I imagine one of the welcome signs of arriving in London was the rumble and clack of London roads under wheel or hoof. The banks of the Thames were unpaved and frankly mucky I should think and travelled by foot and the odd wagon. It's likely that some of the smallest alleys in the rookeries were essentially drainage swales washed out by the downpours and unpaved.

But on the whole, London was paved.

The paving was most generally cobbles, bricks, and in some places large, flat flagstones.We are pre-macadam here.

To see examples of these elements, head up to the Gillray painting way above to the left.
I'll wait while you go find it.
It's up at the beginning.
Bond Street.
We get a bit of social commentary there as well. Just a splendid opportunity to see what was underfoot in the Regency in both the literal and metaphorical sense.

First off, there's the cobblestone street. Click on the picture to get a closer view of it. More cobblestone down on the right at the bottom.

Wench cow-keepers-shop-1825-george-scharf-001

Square flagstones in the shop and on the walk

There in Gillray's Bond Street we're made vividly aware of how mucky (or dusty, in season) the cobblestone road with its traffic of horses and wagons would have been. Those crossing-sweepers who cleared a path at the corner earned their little tip, apparently.

See the curb. These curbs were a usual appurtenance of the better streets. Kept the walkway a little drier, likely. And then on the walkway itself never, in England, a sidewalk we see the larger, square-cut flagstones. We'd find thee flagstones on the fancier streets where there were shops. They'd be common for interior courtyards 

I will make a writer's confession here. What I had been in the habit of calling 'cobblestone' seems to be referred to as 'cobbles' in the period. 'Cobblestones' may have been a bit of an Americanism at the time.

The word 'cobble' refers to the size and shape of the stones, rather than to what they're made of, which would usually be granite. (i.e. rock.) Thus 'cobbles' means 'a buncha

Wench street scene west end C18

nicely regular cobbles
Wench cobbletone

nicely random cobbles

naturally round stones smoothed by the natural action of rivers and handy for prying up and throwing at somebody'.

If you look over to the right you will see a line of bollards separating the walkway from the street. This is another Regency feature I see a lot of. They may use it when they don't want to put in a curb. One might think of it as something for the stray pedestrian to shelter behind.

Moving on to technique. The brick or stone or flagstone was generally laid dry that is, in a bed of sand. In courtyards, stables and the like that got a lot of traffic the brick or stone might be laid in mortar to keep it just firmly as heck in place. I will just point out, though, that one of the many advantages of sand-laid cobblestone was that it didn't crack with freezing and thawing which it would start to do if you laid it in mortar, thus creating unsightly crevices in the public thoroughfare. Just saying.

Now the bricks could be laid lengthwise so that they look like brick or laid on end so that they look like "are those bricks or half bricks?" It's thirty-two statue bricks to cover a yard when you lay them longways but sixty-two stood endwise if you want a thicker road, courtyard, or walkway altogether. And that is more than most people will tell you about laying brick roads.  The brck roads in Oz were laid longwise and thus would have been thirty-two per square yard, in case you have ever wondered.

 

So. What's on YOUR walkway these days? Or what was on your childhood walkway? Or even, will you get behind the City Council's desire to redo the whole downtown in cobblestone which is almost the definition of a municipal wild hare?

185 thoughts on “What’s Underfoot,”

  1. I’ve often thought I’d like to be in on infrastructure planning. (Not execution, though!) Such a great puzzle, planning geography, demographics, materials, traffic flow, etc. Hmm. Sort of like writing a book …
    I think of this especially while traveling a freeway near my home. Twenty years ago, it started as an expansion of a two-lane road, at first just two lanes each way with a dirt divider. Then they had to put a low wire fence down the middle because cars were slowing and making u-turns across the middle, causing accidents. Next, they tried concrete dividers, since some people ignored or didn’t see the wire. Before long, they had to expand the road to three lanes each way, which could have been foreseen as the road serviced a very large new commercial district and circled most of the metropolitan area. Now we’re having a couple of years of very annoying construction as they expand it further to four lanes each way. (It’s awful driving on dug-up lane lines where they’ve moved them, plus you never know which on/off ramps are closed.)
    Ah, but the glory of driving on the newly laid (rubberized for quiet) paving when it’s done. It’s a luxury unknown in the cobblestoned Regency.

    Reply
  2. I’ve often thought I’d like to be in on infrastructure planning. (Not execution, though!) Such a great puzzle, planning geography, demographics, materials, traffic flow, etc. Hmm. Sort of like writing a book …
    I think of this especially while traveling a freeway near my home. Twenty years ago, it started as an expansion of a two-lane road, at first just two lanes each way with a dirt divider. Then they had to put a low wire fence down the middle because cars were slowing and making u-turns across the middle, causing accidents. Next, they tried concrete dividers, since some people ignored or didn’t see the wire. Before long, they had to expand the road to three lanes each way, which could have been foreseen as the road serviced a very large new commercial district and circled most of the metropolitan area. Now we’re having a couple of years of very annoying construction as they expand it further to four lanes each way. (It’s awful driving on dug-up lane lines where they’ve moved them, plus you never know which on/off ramps are closed.)
    Ah, but the glory of driving on the newly laid (rubberized for quiet) paving when it’s done. It’s a luxury unknown in the cobblestoned Regency.

    Reply
  3. I’ve often thought I’d like to be in on infrastructure planning. (Not execution, though!) Such a great puzzle, planning geography, demographics, materials, traffic flow, etc. Hmm. Sort of like writing a book …
    I think of this especially while traveling a freeway near my home. Twenty years ago, it started as an expansion of a two-lane road, at first just two lanes each way with a dirt divider. Then they had to put a low wire fence down the middle because cars were slowing and making u-turns across the middle, causing accidents. Next, they tried concrete dividers, since some people ignored or didn’t see the wire. Before long, they had to expand the road to three lanes each way, which could have been foreseen as the road serviced a very large new commercial district and circled most of the metropolitan area. Now we’re having a couple of years of very annoying construction as they expand it further to four lanes each way. (It’s awful driving on dug-up lane lines where they’ve moved them, plus you never know which on/off ramps are closed.)
    Ah, but the glory of driving on the newly laid (rubberized for quiet) paving when it’s done. It’s a luxury unknown in the cobblestoned Regency.

    Reply
  4. I’ve often thought I’d like to be in on infrastructure planning. (Not execution, though!) Such a great puzzle, planning geography, demographics, materials, traffic flow, etc. Hmm. Sort of like writing a book …
    I think of this especially while traveling a freeway near my home. Twenty years ago, it started as an expansion of a two-lane road, at first just two lanes each way with a dirt divider. Then they had to put a low wire fence down the middle because cars were slowing and making u-turns across the middle, causing accidents. Next, they tried concrete dividers, since some people ignored or didn’t see the wire. Before long, they had to expand the road to three lanes each way, which could have been foreseen as the road serviced a very large new commercial district and circled most of the metropolitan area. Now we’re having a couple of years of very annoying construction as they expand it further to four lanes each way. (It’s awful driving on dug-up lane lines where they’ve moved them, plus you never know which on/off ramps are closed.)
    Ah, but the glory of driving on the newly laid (rubberized for quiet) paving when it’s done. It’s a luxury unknown in the cobblestoned Regency.

    Reply
  5. I’ve often thought I’d like to be in on infrastructure planning. (Not execution, though!) Such a great puzzle, planning geography, demographics, materials, traffic flow, etc. Hmm. Sort of like writing a book …
    I think of this especially while traveling a freeway near my home. Twenty years ago, it started as an expansion of a two-lane road, at first just two lanes each way with a dirt divider. Then they had to put a low wire fence down the middle because cars were slowing and making u-turns across the middle, causing accidents. Next, they tried concrete dividers, since some people ignored or didn’t see the wire. Before long, they had to expand the road to three lanes each way, which could have been foreseen as the road serviced a very large new commercial district and circled most of the metropolitan area. Now we’re having a couple of years of very annoying construction as they expand it further to four lanes each way. (It’s awful driving on dug-up lane lines where they’ve moved them, plus you never know which on/off ramps are closed.)
    Ah, but the glory of driving on the newly laid (rubberized for quiet) paving when it’s done. It’s a luxury unknown in the cobblestoned Regency.

    Reply
  6. What a great post, Joanna, thank you! A couple of decades ago, when I moved to the little Yorkshire town that is now my home, the wide payments fronting the shops were still flagged with large square stones (apparently Yorkshire stone was and still is favoured for London pavements). Where they had sunk over the years, though they tended to be a little uneven. Now they have been replaced by uniform paving, smooth and flat, but not so charming.

    Reply
  7. What a great post, Joanna, thank you! A couple of decades ago, when I moved to the little Yorkshire town that is now my home, the wide payments fronting the shops were still flagged with large square stones (apparently Yorkshire stone was and still is favoured for London pavements). Where they had sunk over the years, though they tended to be a little uneven. Now they have been replaced by uniform paving, smooth and flat, but not so charming.

    Reply
  8. What a great post, Joanna, thank you! A couple of decades ago, when I moved to the little Yorkshire town that is now my home, the wide payments fronting the shops were still flagged with large square stones (apparently Yorkshire stone was and still is favoured for London pavements). Where they had sunk over the years, though they tended to be a little uneven. Now they have been replaced by uniform paving, smooth and flat, but not so charming.

    Reply
  9. What a great post, Joanna, thank you! A couple of decades ago, when I moved to the little Yorkshire town that is now my home, the wide payments fronting the shops were still flagged with large square stones (apparently Yorkshire stone was and still is favoured for London pavements). Where they had sunk over the years, though they tended to be a little uneven. Now they have been replaced by uniform paving, smooth and flat, but not so charming.

    Reply
  10. What a great post, Joanna, thank you! A couple of decades ago, when I moved to the little Yorkshire town that is now my home, the wide payments fronting the shops were still flagged with large square stones (apparently Yorkshire stone was and still is favoured for London pavements). Where they had sunk over the years, though they tended to be a little uneven. Now they have been replaced by uniform paving, smooth and flat, but not so charming.

    Reply
  11. Maybe I’m a little off subject here, but the first thing that I noticed in the Gillray painting were the ladies long skirts dragging in the dirt.
    I do remember some streets that were brick that were still around in my youth. Charming to look at, but slippery in wet weather, and dangerous if wearing heals.
    Interesting post Joanna!

    Reply
  12. Maybe I’m a little off subject here, but the first thing that I noticed in the Gillray painting were the ladies long skirts dragging in the dirt.
    I do remember some streets that were brick that were still around in my youth. Charming to look at, but slippery in wet weather, and dangerous if wearing heals.
    Interesting post Joanna!

    Reply
  13. Maybe I’m a little off subject here, but the first thing that I noticed in the Gillray painting were the ladies long skirts dragging in the dirt.
    I do remember some streets that were brick that were still around in my youth. Charming to look at, but slippery in wet weather, and dangerous if wearing heals.
    Interesting post Joanna!

    Reply
  14. Maybe I’m a little off subject here, but the first thing that I noticed in the Gillray painting were the ladies long skirts dragging in the dirt.
    I do remember some streets that were brick that were still around in my youth. Charming to look at, but slippery in wet weather, and dangerous if wearing heals.
    Interesting post Joanna!

    Reply
  15. Maybe I’m a little off subject here, but the first thing that I noticed in the Gillray painting were the ladies long skirts dragging in the dirt.
    I do remember some streets that were brick that were still around in my youth. Charming to look at, but slippery in wet weather, and dangerous if wearing heals.
    Interesting post Joanna!

    Reply
  16. I live in a Regency Square which was built in 1827 – we have a print of the original developer’s advertisement in Brighton. Our pavements are large (much larger than I am used to seeing in London) Yorkstone flags, some of which have grooves in them so they’re less slippery in the wet and we have a curb rather than bollards. They are (still) not mortared, some of them are decidedly wobbly when it’s been raining – you can hear the puddles squelching beneath the flags! The road itself has been resurfaced with tarmac, but you can still see the cobbles at the margin nearest the gardens.

    Reply
  17. I live in a Regency Square which was built in 1827 – we have a print of the original developer’s advertisement in Brighton. Our pavements are large (much larger than I am used to seeing in London) Yorkstone flags, some of which have grooves in them so they’re less slippery in the wet and we have a curb rather than bollards. They are (still) not mortared, some of them are decidedly wobbly when it’s been raining – you can hear the puddles squelching beneath the flags! The road itself has been resurfaced with tarmac, but you can still see the cobbles at the margin nearest the gardens.

    Reply
  18. I live in a Regency Square which was built in 1827 – we have a print of the original developer’s advertisement in Brighton. Our pavements are large (much larger than I am used to seeing in London) Yorkstone flags, some of which have grooves in them so they’re less slippery in the wet and we have a curb rather than bollards. They are (still) not mortared, some of them are decidedly wobbly when it’s been raining – you can hear the puddles squelching beneath the flags! The road itself has been resurfaced with tarmac, but you can still see the cobbles at the margin nearest the gardens.

    Reply
  19. I live in a Regency Square which was built in 1827 – we have a print of the original developer’s advertisement in Brighton. Our pavements are large (much larger than I am used to seeing in London) Yorkstone flags, some of which have grooves in them so they’re less slippery in the wet and we have a curb rather than bollards. They are (still) not mortared, some of them are decidedly wobbly when it’s been raining – you can hear the puddles squelching beneath the flags! The road itself has been resurfaced with tarmac, but you can still see the cobbles at the margin nearest the gardens.

    Reply
  20. I live in a Regency Square which was built in 1827 – we have a print of the original developer’s advertisement in Brighton. Our pavements are large (much larger than I am used to seeing in London) Yorkstone flags, some of which have grooves in them so they’re less slippery in the wet and we have a curb rather than bollards. They are (still) not mortared, some of them are decidedly wobbly when it’s been raining – you can hear the puddles squelching beneath the flags! The road itself has been resurfaced with tarmac, but you can still see the cobbles at the margin nearest the gardens.

    Reply
  21. There was a patch of road near me that went without repairs for a lo;ng time after a bad winter did a number on it. Every time I jounced along over it, I reminded myself that this was probably what good going was like in the Regency period.
    Near my sister, there is a wealthy suburb with cobblestone streets. They definitely keep people from driving too fast, being bone-jarring even at slow speeds. Nor are they comfortable to walk on. They seem to be an aesthetically pleasing way to keep unwanted visitors away.

    Reply
  22. There was a patch of road near me that went without repairs for a lo;ng time after a bad winter did a number on it. Every time I jounced along over it, I reminded myself that this was probably what good going was like in the Regency period.
    Near my sister, there is a wealthy suburb with cobblestone streets. They definitely keep people from driving too fast, being bone-jarring even at slow speeds. Nor are they comfortable to walk on. They seem to be an aesthetically pleasing way to keep unwanted visitors away.

    Reply
  23. There was a patch of road near me that went without repairs for a lo;ng time after a bad winter did a number on it. Every time I jounced along over it, I reminded myself that this was probably what good going was like in the Regency period.
    Near my sister, there is a wealthy suburb with cobblestone streets. They definitely keep people from driving too fast, being bone-jarring even at slow speeds. Nor are they comfortable to walk on. They seem to be an aesthetically pleasing way to keep unwanted visitors away.

    Reply
  24. There was a patch of road near me that went without repairs for a lo;ng time after a bad winter did a number on it. Every time I jounced along over it, I reminded myself that this was probably what good going was like in the Regency period.
    Near my sister, there is a wealthy suburb with cobblestone streets. They definitely keep people from driving too fast, being bone-jarring even at slow speeds. Nor are they comfortable to walk on. They seem to be an aesthetically pleasing way to keep unwanted visitors away.

    Reply
  25. There was a patch of road near me that went without repairs for a lo;ng time after a bad winter did a number on it. Every time I jounced along over it, I reminded myself that this was probably what good going was like in the Regency period.
    Near my sister, there is a wealthy suburb with cobblestone streets. They definitely keep people from driving too fast, being bone-jarring even at slow speeds. Nor are they comfortable to walk on. They seem to be an aesthetically pleasing way to keep unwanted visitors away.

    Reply
  26. I remember cobblestoned streets from my childhood. The “Sidewalks” were cement but the major street by City Hall and the Court buildings was paved with granite Cobblestones. I am fairly sure that they were cement set; they never wobbled when you crossed them. But crossing them on foot was no fun — even for a grade-school child in grade-school flats!
    As an interesting side note: St. Louis cobblestones were quarried and cut to cobblestone size, from a nearby area called Elephant Rocks. It is now a state park. The granite boulders at Elephant Rocks are huge! Some of them are probably truly as large as elephants.

    Reply
  27. I remember cobblestoned streets from my childhood. The “Sidewalks” were cement but the major street by City Hall and the Court buildings was paved with granite Cobblestones. I am fairly sure that they were cement set; they never wobbled when you crossed them. But crossing them on foot was no fun — even for a grade-school child in grade-school flats!
    As an interesting side note: St. Louis cobblestones were quarried and cut to cobblestone size, from a nearby area called Elephant Rocks. It is now a state park. The granite boulders at Elephant Rocks are huge! Some of them are probably truly as large as elephants.

    Reply
  28. I remember cobblestoned streets from my childhood. The “Sidewalks” were cement but the major street by City Hall and the Court buildings was paved with granite Cobblestones. I am fairly sure that they were cement set; they never wobbled when you crossed them. But crossing them on foot was no fun — even for a grade-school child in grade-school flats!
    As an interesting side note: St. Louis cobblestones were quarried and cut to cobblestone size, from a nearby area called Elephant Rocks. It is now a state park. The granite boulders at Elephant Rocks are huge! Some of them are probably truly as large as elephants.

    Reply
  29. I remember cobblestoned streets from my childhood. The “Sidewalks” were cement but the major street by City Hall and the Court buildings was paved with granite Cobblestones. I am fairly sure that they were cement set; they never wobbled when you crossed them. But crossing them on foot was no fun — even for a grade-school child in grade-school flats!
    As an interesting side note: St. Louis cobblestones were quarried and cut to cobblestone size, from a nearby area called Elephant Rocks. It is now a state park. The granite boulders at Elephant Rocks are huge! Some of them are probably truly as large as elephants.

    Reply
  30. I remember cobblestoned streets from my childhood. The “Sidewalks” were cement but the major street by City Hall and the Court buildings was paved with granite Cobblestones. I am fairly sure that they were cement set; they never wobbled when you crossed them. But crossing them on foot was no fun — even for a grade-school child in grade-school flats!
    As an interesting side note: St. Louis cobblestones were quarried and cut to cobblestone size, from a nearby area called Elephant Rocks. It is now a state park. The granite boulders at Elephant Rocks are huge! Some of them are probably truly as large as elephants.

    Reply
  31. Cobblestones look charming but they are dangerous for persons with weak ankles, such as myself, even in tennis shoes. One of our local towns was several years ago doing a major renovation of streets and decided to require a section of bricks around each intersection. The street bricks have been almost all pulled up because the traffic destroyed them after a pretty short time. The maintenance was too expensive. So they’ve gone back to all concrete. I’m good with that because the bricks added a rough patch to the drive. Maybe that was meant to cause the drivers to slow down as they entered the intersection. It turned out that a red light camera was much more effective in preventing accidents than the bricks. And the extra income from tickets added to the city coffers. (smile)

    Reply
  32. Cobblestones look charming but they are dangerous for persons with weak ankles, such as myself, even in tennis shoes. One of our local towns was several years ago doing a major renovation of streets and decided to require a section of bricks around each intersection. The street bricks have been almost all pulled up because the traffic destroyed them after a pretty short time. The maintenance was too expensive. So they’ve gone back to all concrete. I’m good with that because the bricks added a rough patch to the drive. Maybe that was meant to cause the drivers to slow down as they entered the intersection. It turned out that a red light camera was much more effective in preventing accidents than the bricks. And the extra income from tickets added to the city coffers. (smile)

    Reply
  33. Cobblestones look charming but they are dangerous for persons with weak ankles, such as myself, even in tennis shoes. One of our local towns was several years ago doing a major renovation of streets and decided to require a section of bricks around each intersection. The street bricks have been almost all pulled up because the traffic destroyed them after a pretty short time. The maintenance was too expensive. So they’ve gone back to all concrete. I’m good with that because the bricks added a rough patch to the drive. Maybe that was meant to cause the drivers to slow down as they entered the intersection. It turned out that a red light camera was much more effective in preventing accidents than the bricks. And the extra income from tickets added to the city coffers. (smile)

    Reply
  34. Cobblestones look charming but they are dangerous for persons with weak ankles, such as myself, even in tennis shoes. One of our local towns was several years ago doing a major renovation of streets and decided to require a section of bricks around each intersection. The street bricks have been almost all pulled up because the traffic destroyed them after a pretty short time. The maintenance was too expensive. So they’ve gone back to all concrete. I’m good with that because the bricks added a rough patch to the drive. Maybe that was meant to cause the drivers to slow down as they entered the intersection. It turned out that a red light camera was much more effective in preventing accidents than the bricks. And the extra income from tickets added to the city coffers. (smile)

    Reply
  35. Cobblestones look charming but they are dangerous for persons with weak ankles, such as myself, even in tennis shoes. One of our local towns was several years ago doing a major renovation of streets and decided to require a section of bricks around each intersection. The street bricks have been almost all pulled up because the traffic destroyed them after a pretty short time. The maintenance was too expensive. So they’ve gone back to all concrete. I’m good with that because the bricks added a rough patch to the drive. Maybe that was meant to cause the drivers to slow down as they entered the intersection. It turned out that a red light camera was much more effective in preventing accidents than the bricks. And the extra income from tickets added to the city coffers. (smile)

    Reply
  36. I live in the countryside in Ireland. Our secondary roads are atrocious. There’s never anything done with them until someone has an accident or it’s gone so bad they HAVE to do it. I often wonder what we’re paying taxes for.

    Reply
  37. I live in the countryside in Ireland. Our secondary roads are atrocious. There’s never anything done with them until someone has an accident or it’s gone so bad they HAVE to do it. I often wonder what we’re paying taxes for.

    Reply
  38. I live in the countryside in Ireland. Our secondary roads are atrocious. There’s never anything done with them until someone has an accident or it’s gone so bad they HAVE to do it. I often wonder what we’re paying taxes for.

    Reply
  39. I live in the countryside in Ireland. Our secondary roads are atrocious. There’s never anything done with them until someone has an accident or it’s gone so bad they HAVE to do it. I often wonder what we’re paying taxes for.

    Reply
  40. I live in the countryside in Ireland. Our secondary roads are atrocious. There’s never anything done with them until someone has an accident or it’s gone so bad they HAVE to do it. I often wonder what we’re paying taxes for.

    Reply
  41. In the past few weeks, the city has finally gotten around to scraping and repaving a lot of the roads around here, which hadn’t been fixed in a long, long time, so we have fresh asphalt on the streets and very clear lines for the time being. I think they repaved sections of Queens Boulevard as well (aka The Boulevard of Death), which is essentially a large road that runs through half of Queens–it’s about 8 to 16 lanes wide, depending on where it is.
    Out by my suburban cousins, there are no sidewalks. Being in the city, we have them where I live, but the ones in Manhattan are definitely wider.
    I went to college in Boston, where there were cobblestones and bricks on Beacon Hill’s sidewalks. Charming to look at, not so fun to walk on during winter, or in heels, or while a bit buzzed.

    Reply
  42. In the past few weeks, the city has finally gotten around to scraping and repaving a lot of the roads around here, which hadn’t been fixed in a long, long time, so we have fresh asphalt on the streets and very clear lines for the time being. I think they repaved sections of Queens Boulevard as well (aka The Boulevard of Death), which is essentially a large road that runs through half of Queens–it’s about 8 to 16 lanes wide, depending on where it is.
    Out by my suburban cousins, there are no sidewalks. Being in the city, we have them where I live, but the ones in Manhattan are definitely wider.
    I went to college in Boston, where there were cobblestones and bricks on Beacon Hill’s sidewalks. Charming to look at, not so fun to walk on during winter, or in heels, or while a bit buzzed.

    Reply
  43. In the past few weeks, the city has finally gotten around to scraping and repaving a lot of the roads around here, which hadn’t been fixed in a long, long time, so we have fresh asphalt on the streets and very clear lines for the time being. I think they repaved sections of Queens Boulevard as well (aka The Boulevard of Death), which is essentially a large road that runs through half of Queens–it’s about 8 to 16 lanes wide, depending on where it is.
    Out by my suburban cousins, there are no sidewalks. Being in the city, we have them where I live, but the ones in Manhattan are definitely wider.
    I went to college in Boston, where there were cobblestones and bricks on Beacon Hill’s sidewalks. Charming to look at, not so fun to walk on during winter, or in heels, or while a bit buzzed.

    Reply
  44. In the past few weeks, the city has finally gotten around to scraping and repaving a lot of the roads around here, which hadn’t been fixed in a long, long time, so we have fresh asphalt on the streets and very clear lines for the time being. I think they repaved sections of Queens Boulevard as well (aka The Boulevard of Death), which is essentially a large road that runs through half of Queens–it’s about 8 to 16 lanes wide, depending on where it is.
    Out by my suburban cousins, there are no sidewalks. Being in the city, we have them where I live, but the ones in Manhattan are definitely wider.
    I went to college in Boston, where there were cobblestones and bricks on Beacon Hill’s sidewalks. Charming to look at, not so fun to walk on during winter, or in heels, or while a bit buzzed.

    Reply
  45. In the past few weeks, the city has finally gotten around to scraping and repaving a lot of the roads around here, which hadn’t been fixed in a long, long time, so we have fresh asphalt on the streets and very clear lines for the time being. I think they repaved sections of Queens Boulevard as well (aka The Boulevard of Death), which is essentially a large road that runs through half of Queens–it’s about 8 to 16 lanes wide, depending on where it is.
    Out by my suburban cousins, there are no sidewalks. Being in the city, we have them where I live, but the ones in Manhattan are definitely wider.
    I went to college in Boston, where there were cobblestones and bricks on Beacon Hill’s sidewalks. Charming to look at, not so fun to walk on during winter, or in heels, or while a bit buzzed.

    Reply
  46. I’m told one of the many advantages of cobblestones is that hooves and wheels make an ungodly racket. Means you can hear somebody coming.
    I have still not worked out whether this makes sense or not. I should think a horse would be making noise whatever it was running on, let alone a wagon with wheels and jingly bits.

    Reply
  47. I’m told one of the many advantages of cobblestones is that hooves and wheels make an ungodly racket. Means you can hear somebody coming.
    I have still not worked out whether this makes sense or not. I should think a horse would be making noise whatever it was running on, let alone a wagon with wheels and jingly bits.

    Reply
  48. I’m told one of the many advantages of cobblestones is that hooves and wheels make an ungodly racket. Means you can hear somebody coming.
    I have still not worked out whether this makes sense or not. I should think a horse would be making noise whatever it was running on, let alone a wagon with wheels and jingly bits.

    Reply
  49. I’m told one of the many advantages of cobblestones is that hooves and wheels make an ungodly racket. Means you can hear somebody coming.
    I have still not worked out whether this makes sense or not. I should think a horse would be making noise whatever it was running on, let alone a wagon with wheels and jingly bits.

    Reply
  50. I’m told one of the many advantages of cobblestones is that hooves and wheels make an ungodly racket. Means you can hear somebody coming.
    I have still not worked out whether this makes sense or not. I should think a horse would be making noise whatever it was running on, let alone a wagon with wheels and jingly bits.

    Reply
  51. Yes. I keep seeing Scottish granite and Yorkshire flagstones as furnishing London roads.
    I think it goes back as far as the Regency … but I was having trouble imagining these stone brought all the way down to London.
    It’s possible though, apparently. Seems ‘cobblestones’ and building stones were favorite ballast material in ships. It got a ‘free ride’ essentially down to London because it kept the ship from tipping over. (so useful)
    And according to my half-remembered BBC viewing, Flemish floor tiles could underbid the local British floor tiles in Medieval times for the same reason. (Thank you Time Team.)

    Reply
  52. Yes. I keep seeing Scottish granite and Yorkshire flagstones as furnishing London roads.
    I think it goes back as far as the Regency … but I was having trouble imagining these stone brought all the way down to London.
    It’s possible though, apparently. Seems ‘cobblestones’ and building stones were favorite ballast material in ships. It got a ‘free ride’ essentially down to London because it kept the ship from tipping over. (so useful)
    And according to my half-remembered BBC viewing, Flemish floor tiles could underbid the local British floor tiles in Medieval times for the same reason. (Thank you Time Team.)

    Reply
  53. Yes. I keep seeing Scottish granite and Yorkshire flagstones as furnishing London roads.
    I think it goes back as far as the Regency … but I was having trouble imagining these stone brought all the way down to London.
    It’s possible though, apparently. Seems ‘cobblestones’ and building stones were favorite ballast material in ships. It got a ‘free ride’ essentially down to London because it kept the ship from tipping over. (so useful)
    And according to my half-remembered BBC viewing, Flemish floor tiles could underbid the local British floor tiles in Medieval times for the same reason. (Thank you Time Team.)

    Reply
  54. Yes. I keep seeing Scottish granite and Yorkshire flagstones as furnishing London roads.
    I think it goes back as far as the Regency … but I was having trouble imagining these stone brought all the way down to London.
    It’s possible though, apparently. Seems ‘cobblestones’ and building stones were favorite ballast material in ships. It got a ‘free ride’ essentially down to London because it kept the ship from tipping over. (so useful)
    And according to my half-remembered BBC viewing, Flemish floor tiles could underbid the local British floor tiles in Medieval times for the same reason. (Thank you Time Team.)

    Reply
  55. Yes. I keep seeing Scottish granite and Yorkshire flagstones as furnishing London roads.
    I think it goes back as far as the Regency … but I was having trouble imagining these stone brought all the way down to London.
    It’s possible though, apparently. Seems ‘cobblestones’ and building stones were favorite ballast material in ships. It got a ‘free ride’ essentially down to London because it kept the ship from tipping over. (so useful)
    And according to my half-remembered BBC viewing, Flemish floor tiles could underbid the local British floor tiles in Medieval times for the same reason. (Thank you Time Team.)

    Reply
  56. That is so cool. You’d be able to research everyone who’d ever lived in your house. And your next door neighbors.
    You could sneak out and bury a time capsule in the back yard. *g*

    Reply
  57. That is so cool. You’d be able to research everyone who’d ever lived in your house. And your next door neighbors.
    You could sneak out and bury a time capsule in the back yard. *g*

    Reply
  58. That is so cool. You’d be able to research everyone who’d ever lived in your house. And your next door neighbors.
    You could sneak out and bury a time capsule in the back yard. *g*

    Reply
  59. That is so cool. You’d be able to research everyone who’d ever lived in your house. And your next door neighbors.
    You could sneak out and bury a time capsule in the back yard. *g*

    Reply
  60. That is so cool. You’d be able to research everyone who’d ever lived in your house. And your next door neighbors.
    You could sneak out and bury a time capsule in the back yard. *g*

    Reply
  61. I’ve read that horses prefer brick and cobblestone to smooth pavement and macadam.
    Since I’ve been on a horse, like, twice, I do not have an educated opinion on this.
    I live in a countryside of gravel roads and dirt roads and rocks-sticking-out-of-the-ground roads with ruts in them. This, I think, is more or less the state of the roads of England in 1810.
    I read a novel once where a girl of this era remembered being ‘gently rocked to sleep by the swaying gypsy wagon’ — said wagon being without springs and rolling along roads like my own. Gently rocking is not so much what’s gong on.

    Reply
  62. I’ve read that horses prefer brick and cobblestone to smooth pavement and macadam.
    Since I’ve been on a horse, like, twice, I do not have an educated opinion on this.
    I live in a countryside of gravel roads and dirt roads and rocks-sticking-out-of-the-ground roads with ruts in them. This, I think, is more or less the state of the roads of England in 1810.
    I read a novel once where a girl of this era remembered being ‘gently rocked to sleep by the swaying gypsy wagon’ — said wagon being without springs and rolling along roads like my own. Gently rocking is not so much what’s gong on.

    Reply
  63. I’ve read that horses prefer brick and cobblestone to smooth pavement and macadam.
    Since I’ve been on a horse, like, twice, I do not have an educated opinion on this.
    I live in a countryside of gravel roads and dirt roads and rocks-sticking-out-of-the-ground roads with ruts in them. This, I think, is more or less the state of the roads of England in 1810.
    I read a novel once where a girl of this era remembered being ‘gently rocked to sleep by the swaying gypsy wagon’ — said wagon being without springs and rolling along roads like my own. Gently rocking is not so much what’s gong on.

    Reply
  64. I’ve read that horses prefer brick and cobblestone to smooth pavement and macadam.
    Since I’ve been on a horse, like, twice, I do not have an educated opinion on this.
    I live in a countryside of gravel roads and dirt roads and rocks-sticking-out-of-the-ground roads with ruts in them. This, I think, is more or less the state of the roads of England in 1810.
    I read a novel once where a girl of this era remembered being ‘gently rocked to sleep by the swaying gypsy wagon’ — said wagon being without springs and rolling along roads like my own. Gently rocking is not so much what’s gong on.

    Reply
  65. I’ve read that horses prefer brick and cobblestone to smooth pavement and macadam.
    Since I’ve been on a horse, like, twice, I do not have an educated opinion on this.
    I live in a countryside of gravel roads and dirt roads and rocks-sticking-out-of-the-ground roads with ruts in them. This, I think, is more or less the state of the roads of England in 1810.
    I read a novel once where a girl of this era remembered being ‘gently rocked to sleep by the swaying gypsy wagon’ — said wagon being without springs and rolling along roads like my own. Gently rocking is not so much what’s gong on.

    Reply
  66. Now I’m thinking maybe they named the place that because of big, gray, elephant-sized rocks.
    I have a disturbing picture of workmen carving out stone elephants and they walk away. Downtown.

    Reply
  67. Now I’m thinking maybe they named the place that because of big, gray, elephant-sized rocks.
    I have a disturbing picture of workmen carving out stone elephants and they walk away. Downtown.

    Reply
  68. Now I’m thinking maybe they named the place that because of big, gray, elephant-sized rocks.
    I have a disturbing picture of workmen carving out stone elephants and they walk away. Downtown.

    Reply
  69. Now I’m thinking maybe they named the place that because of big, gray, elephant-sized rocks.
    I have a disturbing picture of workmen carving out stone elephants and they walk away. Downtown.

    Reply
  70. Now I’m thinking maybe they named the place that because of big, gray, elephant-sized rocks.
    I have a disturbing picture of workmen carving out stone elephants and they walk away. Downtown.

    Reply
  71. So many of these lovely old-fashioned things have become old fashioned precisely because they had big areas of impracticality …

    Reply
  72. So many of these lovely old-fashioned things have become old fashioned precisely because they had big areas of impracticality …

    Reply
  73. So many of these lovely old-fashioned things have become old fashioned precisely because they had big areas of impracticality …

    Reply
  74. So many of these lovely old-fashioned things have become old fashioned precisely because they had big areas of impracticality …

    Reply
  75. So many of these lovely old-fashioned things have become old fashioned precisely because they had big areas of impracticality …

    Reply
  76. Waiting till the accident. It’s almost a catch phrase here in the country. Mostly having to do with the installation of stop lights.

    Reply
  77. Waiting till the accident. It’s almost a catch phrase here in the country. Mostly having to do with the installation of stop lights.

    Reply
  78. Waiting till the accident. It’s almost a catch phrase here in the country. Mostly having to do with the installation of stop lights.

    Reply
  79. Waiting till the accident. It’s almost a catch phrase here in the country. Mostly having to do with the installation of stop lights.

    Reply
  80. Waiting till the accident. It’s almost a catch phrase here in the country. Mostly having to do with the installation of stop lights.

    Reply
  81. I have thought about the whole cobblestone/high heels intersection of being and decided It Does Not Work.
    Perhaps cities should establish little kiosks where one can rent tennis shoes …

    Reply
  82. I have thought about the whole cobblestone/high heels intersection of being and decided It Does Not Work.
    Perhaps cities should establish little kiosks where one can rent tennis shoes …

    Reply
  83. I have thought about the whole cobblestone/high heels intersection of being and decided It Does Not Work.
    Perhaps cities should establish little kiosks where one can rent tennis shoes …

    Reply
  84. I have thought about the whole cobblestone/high heels intersection of being and decided It Does Not Work.
    Perhaps cities should establish little kiosks where one can rent tennis shoes …

    Reply
  85. I have thought about the whole cobblestone/high heels intersection of being and decided It Does Not Work.
    Perhaps cities should establish little kiosks where one can rent tennis shoes …

    Reply
  86. There are cobblestones on Fifth Avenue in NYC in front of Central Park. They show up in older streets in lower Manhattan. They’re very difficult to walk on unless you have very thick sneakers or boots.

    Reply
  87. There are cobblestones on Fifth Avenue in NYC in front of Central Park. They show up in older streets in lower Manhattan. They’re very difficult to walk on unless you have very thick sneakers or boots.

    Reply
  88. There are cobblestones on Fifth Avenue in NYC in front of Central Park. They show up in older streets in lower Manhattan. They’re very difficult to walk on unless you have very thick sneakers or boots.

    Reply
  89. There are cobblestones on Fifth Avenue in NYC in front of Central Park. They show up in older streets in lower Manhattan. They’re very difficult to walk on unless you have very thick sneakers or boots.

    Reply
  90. There are cobblestones on Fifth Avenue in NYC in front of Central Park. They show up in older streets in lower Manhattan. They’re very difficult to walk on unless you have very thick sneakers or boots.

    Reply
  91. I spent a couple of years in Virginia living on a dirt road. Being a city/suburban girl myself, I didn’t realize what this was doing to the tires until I got three flats on the same day. That was the end of my rural idyll fantasy.

    Reply
  92. I spent a couple of years in Virginia living on a dirt road. Being a city/suburban girl myself, I didn’t realize what this was doing to the tires until I got three flats on the same day. That was the end of my rural idyll fantasy.

    Reply
  93. I spent a couple of years in Virginia living on a dirt road. Being a city/suburban girl myself, I didn’t realize what this was doing to the tires until I got three flats on the same day. That was the end of my rural idyll fantasy.

    Reply
  94. I spent a couple of years in Virginia living on a dirt road. Being a city/suburban girl myself, I didn’t realize what this was doing to the tires until I got three flats on the same day. That was the end of my rural idyll fantasy.

    Reply
  95. I spent a couple of years in Virginia living on a dirt road. Being a city/suburban girl myself, I didn’t realize what this was doing to the tires until I got three flats on the same day. That was the end of my rural idyll fantasy.

    Reply
  96. I live in a small village in Ohio – USA. My walkway has always been cement; however, the street that runs in front of my house is brick. Being American, my village is not very old (150 years or slightly less) and “my” brick street was laid in the 1920’s. If I close my eyes and listen closely, I can almost hear the sound of horses hooves and iron banded wagon wheels passing in front of my house.

    Reply
  97. I live in a small village in Ohio – USA. My walkway has always been cement; however, the street that runs in front of my house is brick. Being American, my village is not very old (150 years or slightly less) and “my” brick street was laid in the 1920’s. If I close my eyes and listen closely, I can almost hear the sound of horses hooves and iron banded wagon wheels passing in front of my house.

    Reply
  98. I live in a small village in Ohio – USA. My walkway has always been cement; however, the street that runs in front of my house is brick. Being American, my village is not very old (150 years or slightly less) and “my” brick street was laid in the 1920’s. If I close my eyes and listen closely, I can almost hear the sound of horses hooves and iron banded wagon wheels passing in front of my house.

    Reply
  99. I live in a small village in Ohio – USA. My walkway has always been cement; however, the street that runs in front of my house is brick. Being American, my village is not very old (150 years or slightly less) and “my” brick street was laid in the 1920’s. If I close my eyes and listen closely, I can almost hear the sound of horses hooves and iron banded wagon wheels passing in front of my house.

    Reply
  100. I live in a small village in Ohio – USA. My walkway has always been cement; however, the street that runs in front of my house is brick. Being American, my village is not very old (150 years or slightly less) and “my” brick street was laid in the 1920’s. If I close my eyes and listen closely, I can almost hear the sound of horses hooves and iron banded wagon wheels passing in front of my house.

    Reply
  101. I grew up in Idaho with lots of dirt roads, with washboard surface texture and ample pot holes. Now I’m living in an English market town which has closed off its High Street (think Main Street with side alleys) to pedestrian traffic. The surface is the strangest mix of black pavement, cement, cobblestones, and even a small surface of bricks. Most people are in flip-flops or running shoes, but I’ve seen women in high heels strolling along. I guess practice makes perfect. There’s a strange four minute video on YouTube that shows the town center, Town Centre, Huntingdon, Cambridge where if you’re patient you can see all of the surfaces. Sorry I can’t figure out the link.

    Reply
  102. I grew up in Idaho with lots of dirt roads, with washboard surface texture and ample pot holes. Now I’m living in an English market town which has closed off its High Street (think Main Street with side alleys) to pedestrian traffic. The surface is the strangest mix of black pavement, cement, cobblestones, and even a small surface of bricks. Most people are in flip-flops or running shoes, but I’ve seen women in high heels strolling along. I guess practice makes perfect. There’s a strange four minute video on YouTube that shows the town center, Town Centre, Huntingdon, Cambridge where if you’re patient you can see all of the surfaces. Sorry I can’t figure out the link.

    Reply
  103. I grew up in Idaho with lots of dirt roads, with washboard surface texture and ample pot holes. Now I’m living in an English market town which has closed off its High Street (think Main Street with side alleys) to pedestrian traffic. The surface is the strangest mix of black pavement, cement, cobblestones, and even a small surface of bricks. Most people are in flip-flops or running shoes, but I’ve seen women in high heels strolling along. I guess practice makes perfect. There’s a strange four minute video on YouTube that shows the town center, Town Centre, Huntingdon, Cambridge where if you’re patient you can see all of the surfaces. Sorry I can’t figure out the link.

    Reply
  104. I grew up in Idaho with lots of dirt roads, with washboard surface texture and ample pot holes. Now I’m living in an English market town which has closed off its High Street (think Main Street with side alleys) to pedestrian traffic. The surface is the strangest mix of black pavement, cement, cobblestones, and even a small surface of bricks. Most people are in flip-flops or running shoes, but I’ve seen women in high heels strolling along. I guess practice makes perfect. There’s a strange four minute video on YouTube that shows the town center, Town Centre, Huntingdon, Cambridge where if you’re patient you can see all of the surfaces. Sorry I can’t figure out the link.

    Reply
  105. I grew up in Idaho with lots of dirt roads, with washboard surface texture and ample pot holes. Now I’m living in an English market town which has closed off its High Street (think Main Street with side alleys) to pedestrian traffic. The surface is the strangest mix of black pavement, cement, cobblestones, and even a small surface of bricks. Most people are in flip-flops or running shoes, but I’ve seen women in high heels strolling along. I guess practice makes perfect. There’s a strange four minute video on YouTube that shows the town center, Town Centre, Huntingdon, Cambridge where if you’re patient you can see all of the surfaces. Sorry I can’t figure out the link.

    Reply
  106. I live near the New Jersey Shore, which is famous for its wooden boardwalks. Now that they are getting destroyed by hurricanes every decade or so, a few towns have replaced the boards with bricks, laid dry. After they get tossed around by the storm, they can be collected and reused.
    And I agree, cobblestones are tricky to walk on, especially when wet.

    Reply
  107. I live near the New Jersey Shore, which is famous for its wooden boardwalks. Now that they are getting destroyed by hurricanes every decade or so, a few towns have replaced the boards with bricks, laid dry. After they get tossed around by the storm, they can be collected and reused.
    And I agree, cobblestones are tricky to walk on, especially when wet.

    Reply
  108. I live near the New Jersey Shore, which is famous for its wooden boardwalks. Now that they are getting destroyed by hurricanes every decade or so, a few towns have replaced the boards with bricks, laid dry. After they get tossed around by the storm, they can be collected and reused.
    And I agree, cobblestones are tricky to walk on, especially when wet.

    Reply
  109. I live near the New Jersey Shore, which is famous for its wooden boardwalks. Now that they are getting destroyed by hurricanes every decade or so, a few towns have replaced the boards with bricks, laid dry. After they get tossed around by the storm, they can be collected and reused.
    And I agree, cobblestones are tricky to walk on, especially when wet.

    Reply
  110. I live near the New Jersey Shore, which is famous for its wooden boardwalks. Now that they are getting destroyed by hurricanes every decade or so, a few towns have replaced the boards with bricks, laid dry. After they get tossed around by the storm, they can be collected and reused.
    And I agree, cobblestones are tricky to walk on, especially when wet.

    Reply
  111. … see the country girl creeeping down her dirt road, caaaarefully steering around the rocks. See her forming pacts with the neighbors to pay for loads of rocks.
    See her mourning her ravaged tires.

    Reply
  112. … see the country girl creeeping down her dirt road, caaaarefully steering around the rocks. See her forming pacts with the neighbors to pay for loads of rocks.
    See her mourning her ravaged tires.

    Reply
  113. … see the country girl creeeping down her dirt road, caaaarefully steering around the rocks. See her forming pacts with the neighbors to pay for loads of rocks.
    See her mourning her ravaged tires.

    Reply
  114. … see the country girl creeeping down her dirt road, caaaarefully steering around the rocks. See her forming pacts with the neighbors to pay for loads of rocks.
    See her mourning her ravaged tires.

    Reply
  115. … see the country girl creeeping down her dirt road, caaaarefully steering around the rocks. See her forming pacts with the neighbors to pay for loads of rocks.
    See her mourning her ravaged tires.

    Reply
  116. Next time I’m in NYC — may be in April I think — I will keep an eye out for these.
    NYC is a city that remembers its past.

    Reply
  117. Next time I’m in NYC — may be in April I think — I will keep an eye out for these.
    NYC is a city that remembers its past.

    Reply
  118. Next time I’m in NYC — may be in April I think — I will keep an eye out for these.
    NYC is a city that remembers its past.

    Reply
  119. Next time I’m in NYC — may be in April I think — I will keep an eye out for these.
    NYC is a city that remembers its past.

    Reply
  120. Next time I’m in NYC — may be in April I think — I will keep an eye out for these.
    NYC is a city that remembers its past.

    Reply
  121. That is so wonderful. And I admire your 1920s village choosing to put in something — can I call it a throwback?
    In small residential streets this slows the cars down. A good thing, thinks I.
    Now, it might make learning to ride a bike a bit of a challenge.

    Reply
  122. That is so wonderful. And I admire your 1920s village choosing to put in something — can I call it a throwback?
    In small residential streets this slows the cars down. A good thing, thinks I.
    Now, it might make learning to ride a bike a bit of a challenge.

    Reply
  123. That is so wonderful. And I admire your 1920s village choosing to put in something — can I call it a throwback?
    In small residential streets this slows the cars down. A good thing, thinks I.
    Now, it might make learning to ride a bike a bit of a challenge.

    Reply
  124. That is so wonderful. And I admire your 1920s village choosing to put in something — can I call it a throwback?
    In small residential streets this slows the cars down. A good thing, thinks I.
    Now, it might make learning to ride a bike a bit of a challenge.

    Reply
  125. That is so wonderful. And I admire your 1920s village choosing to put in something — can I call it a throwback?
    In small residential streets this slows the cars down. A good thing, thinks I.
    Now, it might make learning to ride a bike a bit of a challenge.

    Reply
  126. I love — in the words of the poet — “whatever is fickle, freckled, who knows how, with swift slow, sweet, sour, adazzle, dim”. I like the nonuniform, the strange, the leftovers from old times, the experimental.
    I see this sixteen-year-old in her high, high heels just striding along, perfectly poised, so proud of herself.
    You go, girl.

    Reply
  127. I love — in the words of the poet — “whatever is fickle, freckled, who knows how, with swift slow, sweet, sour, adazzle, dim”. I like the nonuniform, the strange, the leftovers from old times, the experimental.
    I see this sixteen-year-old in her high, high heels just striding along, perfectly poised, so proud of herself.
    You go, girl.

    Reply
  128. I love — in the words of the poet — “whatever is fickle, freckled, who knows how, with swift slow, sweet, sour, adazzle, dim”. I like the nonuniform, the strange, the leftovers from old times, the experimental.
    I see this sixteen-year-old in her high, high heels just striding along, perfectly poised, so proud of herself.
    You go, girl.

    Reply
  129. I love — in the words of the poet — “whatever is fickle, freckled, who knows how, with swift slow, sweet, sour, adazzle, dim”. I like the nonuniform, the strange, the leftovers from old times, the experimental.
    I see this sixteen-year-old in her high, high heels just striding along, perfectly poised, so proud of herself.
    You go, girl.

    Reply
  130. I love — in the words of the poet — “whatever is fickle, freckled, who knows how, with swift slow, sweet, sour, adazzle, dim”. I like the nonuniform, the strange, the leftovers from old times, the experimental.
    I see this sixteen-year-old in her high, high heels just striding along, perfectly poised, so proud of herself.
    You go, girl.

    Reply
  131. I’m kinda sad to think of the old wood boardwalks being abandoned. Those are so much part of going to the ocean. So many memories for me.
    I also — this is just me — cannot happily picture bricks being tossed around in the storm winds.

    Reply
  132. I’m kinda sad to think of the old wood boardwalks being abandoned. Those are so much part of going to the ocean. So many memories for me.
    I also — this is just me — cannot happily picture bricks being tossed around in the storm winds.

    Reply
  133. I’m kinda sad to think of the old wood boardwalks being abandoned. Those are so much part of going to the ocean. So many memories for me.
    I also — this is just me — cannot happily picture bricks being tossed around in the storm winds.

    Reply
  134. I’m kinda sad to think of the old wood boardwalks being abandoned. Those are so much part of going to the ocean. So many memories for me.
    I also — this is just me — cannot happily picture bricks being tossed around in the storm winds.

    Reply
  135. I’m kinda sad to think of the old wood boardwalks being abandoned. Those are so much part of going to the ocean. So many memories for me.
    I also — this is just me — cannot happily picture bricks being tossed around in the storm winds.

    Reply
  136. Absolutely right. They did NOT call them ‘walkways’ in the regency. That’s me being modern and doing the lick-and-a-promise that is my historical work here at Word Wenches.
    They would have called both the pedestrian way and the street itself the ‘pavement’. The walkway beside the road would have been the footpath. My poor brain isn’t coming up with other terms for it.
    (jo looks around for another cup of coffee.)

    Reply
  137. Absolutely right. They did NOT call them ‘walkways’ in the regency. That’s me being modern and doing the lick-and-a-promise that is my historical work here at Word Wenches.
    They would have called both the pedestrian way and the street itself the ‘pavement’. The walkway beside the road would have been the footpath. My poor brain isn’t coming up with other terms for it.
    (jo looks around for another cup of coffee.)

    Reply
  138. Absolutely right. They did NOT call them ‘walkways’ in the regency. That’s me being modern and doing the lick-and-a-promise that is my historical work here at Word Wenches.
    They would have called both the pedestrian way and the street itself the ‘pavement’. The walkway beside the road would have been the footpath. My poor brain isn’t coming up with other terms for it.
    (jo looks around for another cup of coffee.)

    Reply
  139. Absolutely right. They did NOT call them ‘walkways’ in the regency. That’s me being modern and doing the lick-and-a-promise that is my historical work here at Word Wenches.
    They would have called both the pedestrian way and the street itself the ‘pavement’. The walkway beside the road would have been the footpath. My poor brain isn’t coming up with other terms for it.
    (jo looks around for another cup of coffee.)

    Reply
  140. Absolutely right. They did NOT call them ‘walkways’ in the regency. That’s me being modern and doing the lick-and-a-promise that is my historical work here at Word Wenches.
    They would have called both the pedestrian way and the street itself the ‘pavement’. The walkway beside the road would have been the footpath. My poor brain isn’t coming up with other terms for it.
    (jo looks around for another cup of coffee.)

    Reply
  141. I love the old pictures. I shared them with Nicola on facebook yesterday. 🙂 She seems to be interested in old buildings and their history, the same as I am, and I was inspired by her post.
    The recent pictures, on the other hand, show the development of our town. It’s just a small Moldavian town, but it’s becoming neat, clean, and quite pleasant, with beautiful parks and… even a small medieval royal residence which has been dug up and (partially) rebuilt. (You can see some pictures on my blog.)

    Reply
  142. I love the old pictures. I shared them with Nicola on facebook yesterday. 🙂 She seems to be interested in old buildings and their history, the same as I am, and I was inspired by her post.
    The recent pictures, on the other hand, show the development of our town. It’s just a small Moldavian town, but it’s becoming neat, clean, and quite pleasant, with beautiful parks and… even a small medieval royal residence which has been dug up and (partially) rebuilt. (You can see some pictures on my blog.)

    Reply
  143. I love the old pictures. I shared them with Nicola on facebook yesterday. 🙂 She seems to be interested in old buildings and their history, the same as I am, and I was inspired by her post.
    The recent pictures, on the other hand, show the development of our town. It’s just a small Moldavian town, but it’s becoming neat, clean, and quite pleasant, with beautiful parks and… even a small medieval royal residence which has been dug up and (partially) rebuilt. (You can see some pictures on my blog.)

    Reply
  144. I love the old pictures. I shared them with Nicola on facebook yesterday. 🙂 She seems to be interested in old buildings and their history, the same as I am, and I was inspired by her post.
    The recent pictures, on the other hand, show the development of our town. It’s just a small Moldavian town, but it’s becoming neat, clean, and quite pleasant, with beautiful parks and… even a small medieval royal residence which has been dug up and (partially) rebuilt. (You can see some pictures on my blog.)

    Reply
  145. I love the old pictures. I shared them with Nicola on facebook yesterday. 🙂 She seems to be interested in old buildings and their history, the same as I am, and I was inspired by her post.
    The recent pictures, on the other hand, show the development of our town. It’s just a small Moldavian town, but it’s becoming neat, clean, and quite pleasant, with beautiful parks and… even a small medieval royal residence which has been dug up and (partially) rebuilt. (You can see some pictures on my blog.)

    Reply
  146. What an interesting post!! I think there is a lot of value to understanding how our transportation evolved. Not a fan of driving the car on cobblestone streets. We have some of them in Pittsburgh. They are especially murderous when covered in ice/snow. Macadamized roads are being blamed for flooding in India. Monsoon water slides off the macadamized roads and pools in undesirable places causing flooding. Humans will never be satisfied with our transportation situation. Better systems will be in place in the future. Alas we will not be there to enjoy them!!

    Reply
  147. What an interesting post!! I think there is a lot of value to understanding how our transportation evolved. Not a fan of driving the car on cobblestone streets. We have some of them in Pittsburgh. They are especially murderous when covered in ice/snow. Macadamized roads are being blamed for flooding in India. Monsoon water slides off the macadamized roads and pools in undesirable places causing flooding. Humans will never be satisfied with our transportation situation. Better systems will be in place in the future. Alas we will not be there to enjoy them!!

    Reply
  148. What an interesting post!! I think there is a lot of value to understanding how our transportation evolved. Not a fan of driving the car on cobblestone streets. We have some of them in Pittsburgh. They are especially murderous when covered in ice/snow. Macadamized roads are being blamed for flooding in India. Monsoon water slides off the macadamized roads and pools in undesirable places causing flooding. Humans will never be satisfied with our transportation situation. Better systems will be in place in the future. Alas we will not be there to enjoy them!!

    Reply
  149. What an interesting post!! I think there is a lot of value to understanding how our transportation evolved. Not a fan of driving the car on cobblestone streets. We have some of them in Pittsburgh. They are especially murderous when covered in ice/snow. Macadamized roads are being blamed for flooding in India. Monsoon water slides off the macadamized roads and pools in undesirable places causing flooding. Humans will never be satisfied with our transportation situation. Better systems will be in place in the future. Alas we will not be there to enjoy them!!

    Reply
  150. What an interesting post!! I think there is a lot of value to understanding how our transportation evolved. Not a fan of driving the car on cobblestone streets. We have some of them in Pittsburgh. They are especially murderous when covered in ice/snow. Macadamized roads are being blamed for flooding in India. Monsoon water slides off the macadamized roads and pools in undesirable places causing flooding. Humans will never be satisfied with our transportation situation. Better systems will be in place in the future. Alas we will not be there to enjoy them!!

    Reply
  151. I’m waiting for those air cars. I am soooo ready to settle myself into big comfy chairs and have a robo system fly me through the skies.

    Reply
  152. I’m waiting for those air cars. I am soooo ready to settle myself into big comfy chairs and have a robo system fly me through the skies.

    Reply
  153. I’m waiting for those air cars. I am soooo ready to settle myself into big comfy chairs and have a robo system fly me through the skies.

    Reply
  154. I’m waiting for those air cars. I am soooo ready to settle myself into big comfy chairs and have a robo system fly me through the skies.

    Reply
  155. I’m waiting for those air cars. I am soooo ready to settle myself into big comfy chairs and have a robo system fly me through the skies.

    Reply

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