The Many Delights of What We’re Reading –June

Joanna here with our monthly round up. What have the Word Wenches been reading in June? What wonderful books have we discovered?

We have particularly exciting books this month.Wench glass

First up, Anne.
[Warning: cookbook ahead]

Anne here. As usual, I've read a lot of books in the last month. I've always been a prolific reader and it doesn't matter how busy my life gets, reading is a necessary part of my life. 
 
I caught up on my Louise Penny reading, with GLASS HOUSES, a book I bought a year ago and discovered I hadn't read. Absorbing and entertaining, as always, this is #13  in her Chief Inspector Gamache crime series. 
 
Sharon SWench shinnhinn — Mary Jo put me onto Sharon Shinn's fantasies first, and after her recent post I discovered that some more of Shinn's books were now available to me on kindle. I read and enjoyed the first two in the series — TROUBLED WATERS and ROYAL AIRS then discovered that book 3 and 4 are not available to me on kindle. Sigh. So frustrating to know that they are on kindle but not if you live where I do. I really HATE geographical restrictions.
rump grump grump.
 
Finally I read a biography, which I don't often do. It was Writing at the Kitchen Table: The Authorized Biography of Elizabeth David. She was a food writer,  famous before I was born, but who taught me a lot about cooking when I was a student living in a share house, and using an old penguin paperback of hers, FRENCH PROVINCIAL COOKING. I think it was as much the quality of her lyrical, evocative  prose and the little stories and anecdotes that prefaced some of the recipes that enticed me most. I bought all her books I could find, some from used book stores, and am happy to say they're all back in print.
 
I blogged about Elizabeth David some time back — you can read it here — and I found her biography fascinating, not least for the portrait of the difficult and unconventional woman behind the elegant and evocative writing, but also because of the difficulties she had with her various publishers. 
 

Pat brings us magic and what I'd call a "comfort read."
 
Pat here–I'm desperately seeking escape of any sort and a good getaway is hard to find. But here's a couple I've read in recent months that fit the bill.

Wench libraryTHE LIBRARY, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDER,  Mindy Klasky

Mindy writes fun paranormal chicklit, and one of her best characters is Jane Madison, a librarian who discovers she’s a witch. In Jane’s books, she has a magical warder assigned to keep her from creating magical disasters. David Montrose, that powerful DC warder, has his own series now, and we get to see all the problems he’s facing behind the scenes. Not only are his personal problems mounting, but magical DC is on the brink of warfare because of his best friend’s actions, while Jane’s talent is blossoming. He’s juggling more than fire balls to solve everything at once, without being demoted again. It’s a fun fantasy ride!

THE SEVEN YEAR SWITCH, Claire Cook

Lovely women’s fiction with a protagonist who was deserted by her adventure-seeking husband and left to survive on her own. She buried herself in raising their child, giving up the travel and hope of family she’d always wanted—until her husband comes home and wants back in her life again. She has to learn to live and trust and develop new relationships. There’s a lot of fun travel tidbits since she acts as a home-bound travel agent. I would have liked to see her learn enough to actually achieve some of her goals instead of just a potential new love, but it was a pleasant journey worth taking for the fun.

Mary Jo with what sounds like a fun read.

Mary Jo here. I had a delightful time reading the latest Trisha Ashley book, The House of Hopes and DreamsHer books Wenches house are usually about creative heroines in their thirties who are rebuilding their lives (probably in Lancashire), and in the process they find a great eccentric guy who is just right for them.  In HHD, the heroine, Angelique Arrowsmith, known as Angel, is a passionate and talented stained glass artist whose life has just fallen apart. 

Angel's lifelong best friend is Carey Revells, whose enthusiasm and skills as a home renovator have made him a reality TV star on a cottage makeover show, but he and Angel haven't met much in person since they left art school and she went north to work with her older lover, a famous stained glass artist.  The book begins with Carey recovering from an accident that left him bedridden for months and cost him his TV show and his girlfriend.  Then a solicitor informs him he has inherited a large, historic, and rundown house from an uncle he never knew he had. 

Wenches xmasThe house needs lots of work, and it happens to have a stained glass workshop created by Carey's great-grandmother, a noted glass artist.  So very shortly, Angel is living in the house, helping Carey, fixing up the glass shop, and coping with an alien looking black Chihuahua mix that likes biting male ankles.  Soon the house is flowing with friends, workmen, a film crew–and plenty of hopes and dreams fulfilled as well as an old mystery unraveled.  If you like friends-to-lovers stories, this is for you! 

The House of Hopes and Dreams is right up there with my very favorite Trisha Ashley, The Twelve Days of ChristmasWhich, by happy chance, is only $2.99 in the US Kindle store.  So if you haven't read it, here's your chance for a Christmas in July.  It will make you happy and hungry. <G>

 

Andrea brings us some frank words about a favorite author,
and dives into Sharpe's Rifles. Wench punish

Andrea says:  I’ve been a fan of Elizabeth George’s long-running Thomas Lynley detective series for ages. But after she shook up her readers by killing off a major character, I , like many, had a hard time getting back into it, feeling some of the books that followed lost the the sort of subtle psychological insights and interplay that made the books so interesting. I decided to give the last one a try and was heartened to feel George was getting back her mojo. I recently read her latest one, The Punishment She Deserves, and was happy to feel that George is back in top form. 

The plot begins with the apparent suicide of a well-respected churchman in a sleepy English college town. He ’s been picked on an anonymous tip accusing him of abusing children. Lynley’s sidekick, Barbara Havers is part of the two-person police team from Scotland Yard sent to do a routine investigation as the suspect supposedly hanged himself while in local police custody. Her superior is anxious to do a drive-by check up, but feisty Barbara can’t shake the feeling that something isn’t quite right . . .
 
And so begins a probing to college binge drinking, protective parents and an intricate weaving together of mother-daughter relationships from a variety of backgrounds, probing into parental expectations/yearning for their children’s future, and what a parent will do to protect a child. I found it a complex, nuanced and sensitive story that deal with many modern day issues. Watching Lynley and Havers work through some of Wench waterlootheir own personal issues was also interesting to, as I like them both very much. It’s good to see them back in fine fettle and moving on with their lives! 
 
This month I also re-read Bernard Cornwell’s Waterloo, one of the swashbuckling Richard Sharpe books set in the Napoleonic Wars. My current Lady Arianna WIP is set in Brussels and the battle, and I had read that the book is used in many military colleges because it’s such an accurate description of the battle. Cornell is a masterful storyteller, and the non-stop action is riveting—and heartbreaking because of the carnage. I’ve made some notes for my own story about battle locations and timing (don’t worry—there won’t be so much blood and gore!) and reminded me of how much I enjoyed the entire series. If you haven’t read it yet, get Sharpe’s Tiger, the first book, which is set in India . . . you’ll be in for a rollicking ride! Wench brass
 
As for me, I was reading S.A.Chakraborty's The City of Brass. This is the first in a fantasy trilogy based on a Middle Eastern mythos. It's a road trip through magical lands — unfriendly lands full of demons. Much adventure. If I say Djinns and flying carpets it doesn't come close to describing the intricate worldbuilding.
 
There's Revolution and palace intrigue among the magical. So satisfying.
 
City of Brass is Book One of Three so the ending is problematic It's not quite a cliffhanger, but close. And it's good enough to have me looking forward to Book Two.
 
So that June in the Wench Reading Year.  A good 30 days. How's it been with you?

160 thoughts on “The Many Delights of What We’re Reading –June”

  1. I enjoyed reading all of your choices. As for me ~
    — Thea Harrison’s Planet Dragos: A Novella of the Elder Races. I was eagerly anticipating reading this as it’s the final work concerning characters I really like, but the reality fell short of my expectations. Oh, well.
    — Beauty and the Geek (Gone Geek Book 1) by Sidney Bristol which is a contemporary romance. This dealt with some interesting issues (stereotypes, appearances, harassment), but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll soon re-read.
    — Dead By Midnight: An I-Team Christmas by Pamela Clare (romantic suspense). It’s one in a series, so while it could be read as a stand alone, it features many characters that have been the subject of the author’s earlier books. I found it a pleasant read, but I don’t see myself re-reading it.
    — the graphic novel The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang. This was a pleasant read, but it was quite anachronistic; it was set in Europe in (my guess) the 1800s but the characters all spoke as if they lived today.
    — Dal MacLean’s Object of Desire which I’d describe a mystery with a romantic element even though it does feature a male/male romance. The storyline was involved and kept me guessing; I enjoyed the book (as I did the author’s first) and would like to read her next book.
    — The Family Trade (Merchant Princes Book 1) plus The Hidden Family: Book Two of Merchant Princes both by Charles Stross. These are science fiction/fantasy with a significant amount of economics. I went on to read books three through six: The Clan Corporate, The Merchants’ War, The Revolution Business, and The Trade of Queens.
    — the Australian set male/male historical romance By The Currawong’s Call by Welton B. Marsland; this is a book I plan to re-read.
    — a quick and enjoyable collection of essays: Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces by Michael Chabon
    — the contemporary romance Falling Hard: A Colorado High Country Novel by Pamela Clare. While this is the third book in a series, it stands alone well. I found this a pleasant read and it even made me cry a time or two; I don’t think it’s a book I’ll re-read.
    — Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Making Up (London Celebrities) which I quite enjoyed.
    — re-read Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Act Like It and Pretty Face both of which I enjoyed once again
    — book that my daughter recommended to me several years ago. I’ll recommend it to adults and teens who like fantasy. The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison
    — a re-read of Thea Harrison’s paranormal romance Dragon Bound which I enjoyed once more.
    — for my book group, Kindred by Octavia Butler. It’s just as depressing as I remember from when I read it the first time some years ago.
    — a re-read of Michelle Diener’s science fiction romances Dark Horse, Dark Deeds, and Dark Minds which were fun reads after the sadness of Kindred.
    — an enjoyable anthology of three inclusive historical romance ~ Hamilton’s Battalion: A Trio of Romances by Roser Lerner, Courtney Milan, and Alyssa Cole
    — the short science fiction novella Time Was by Ian McDonald. It was a quick read. Generally I don’t notice writing style, but I read a segment to my husband after describing it as poetic.
    — and most recently, a book I quite enjoyed. I think others here would like it, too. Letters to the Lost: A Novel by Iona Grey
    — Nora Roberts’ Shelter in Place. While I enjoyed the story (if such can be said about a novel revolving around a mass shooting), it’s not one that I see myself re-reading.
    — Fatal Chaos (The Fatal Series) by Marie Force. I’ve enjoyed all of the books in this series that I’ve read. This is the most recent, but it turns out I’ve managed to skip one. Don’t ask me why my library has volumes one, four, and twelve of this series but is missing the rest. This series is best read in order.
    — enjoyed Bru Baker’s contemporary male/male paranormal romance Camp H.O.W.L.
    — Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson and Emily Carroll which proved to be a poignant read.
    –the memoir My Grape Year (Grape Series Book 1) by Laura Bradbury which was a light and pleasant read detailing the author’s year in Burgundy when she was seventeen. If you read this, prepare to be made VERY hungry as much delicious food and wine is consumed. I was inspired to read this book after reading the transcript of an audio interview with the author at the SBTB site.

    Reply
  2. I enjoyed reading all of your choices. As for me ~
    — Thea Harrison’s Planet Dragos: A Novella of the Elder Races. I was eagerly anticipating reading this as it’s the final work concerning characters I really like, but the reality fell short of my expectations. Oh, well.
    — Beauty and the Geek (Gone Geek Book 1) by Sidney Bristol which is a contemporary romance. This dealt with some interesting issues (stereotypes, appearances, harassment), but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll soon re-read.
    — Dead By Midnight: An I-Team Christmas by Pamela Clare (romantic suspense). It’s one in a series, so while it could be read as a stand alone, it features many characters that have been the subject of the author’s earlier books. I found it a pleasant read, but I don’t see myself re-reading it.
    — the graphic novel The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang. This was a pleasant read, but it was quite anachronistic; it was set in Europe in (my guess) the 1800s but the characters all spoke as if they lived today.
    — Dal MacLean’s Object of Desire which I’d describe a mystery with a romantic element even though it does feature a male/male romance. The storyline was involved and kept me guessing; I enjoyed the book (as I did the author’s first) and would like to read her next book.
    — The Family Trade (Merchant Princes Book 1) plus The Hidden Family: Book Two of Merchant Princes both by Charles Stross. These are science fiction/fantasy with a significant amount of economics. I went on to read books three through six: The Clan Corporate, The Merchants’ War, The Revolution Business, and The Trade of Queens.
    — the Australian set male/male historical romance By The Currawong’s Call by Welton B. Marsland; this is a book I plan to re-read.
    — a quick and enjoyable collection of essays: Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces by Michael Chabon
    — the contemporary romance Falling Hard: A Colorado High Country Novel by Pamela Clare. While this is the third book in a series, it stands alone well. I found this a pleasant read and it even made me cry a time or two; I don’t think it’s a book I’ll re-read.
    — Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Making Up (London Celebrities) which I quite enjoyed.
    — re-read Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Act Like It and Pretty Face both of which I enjoyed once again
    — book that my daughter recommended to me several years ago. I’ll recommend it to adults and teens who like fantasy. The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison
    — a re-read of Thea Harrison’s paranormal romance Dragon Bound which I enjoyed once more.
    — for my book group, Kindred by Octavia Butler. It’s just as depressing as I remember from when I read it the first time some years ago.
    — a re-read of Michelle Diener’s science fiction romances Dark Horse, Dark Deeds, and Dark Minds which were fun reads after the sadness of Kindred.
    — an enjoyable anthology of three inclusive historical romance ~ Hamilton’s Battalion: A Trio of Romances by Roser Lerner, Courtney Milan, and Alyssa Cole
    — the short science fiction novella Time Was by Ian McDonald. It was a quick read. Generally I don’t notice writing style, but I read a segment to my husband after describing it as poetic.
    — and most recently, a book I quite enjoyed. I think others here would like it, too. Letters to the Lost: A Novel by Iona Grey
    — Nora Roberts’ Shelter in Place. While I enjoyed the story (if such can be said about a novel revolving around a mass shooting), it’s not one that I see myself re-reading.
    — Fatal Chaos (The Fatal Series) by Marie Force. I’ve enjoyed all of the books in this series that I’ve read. This is the most recent, but it turns out I’ve managed to skip one. Don’t ask me why my library has volumes one, four, and twelve of this series but is missing the rest. This series is best read in order.
    — enjoyed Bru Baker’s contemporary male/male paranormal romance Camp H.O.W.L.
    — Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson and Emily Carroll which proved to be a poignant read.
    –the memoir My Grape Year (Grape Series Book 1) by Laura Bradbury which was a light and pleasant read detailing the author’s year in Burgundy when she was seventeen. If you read this, prepare to be made VERY hungry as much delicious food and wine is consumed. I was inspired to read this book after reading the transcript of an audio interview with the author at the SBTB site.

    Reply
  3. I enjoyed reading all of your choices. As for me ~
    — Thea Harrison’s Planet Dragos: A Novella of the Elder Races. I was eagerly anticipating reading this as it’s the final work concerning characters I really like, but the reality fell short of my expectations. Oh, well.
    — Beauty and the Geek (Gone Geek Book 1) by Sidney Bristol which is a contemporary romance. This dealt with some interesting issues (stereotypes, appearances, harassment), but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll soon re-read.
    — Dead By Midnight: An I-Team Christmas by Pamela Clare (romantic suspense). It’s one in a series, so while it could be read as a stand alone, it features many characters that have been the subject of the author’s earlier books. I found it a pleasant read, but I don’t see myself re-reading it.
    — the graphic novel The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang. This was a pleasant read, but it was quite anachronistic; it was set in Europe in (my guess) the 1800s but the characters all spoke as if they lived today.
    — Dal MacLean’s Object of Desire which I’d describe a mystery with a romantic element even though it does feature a male/male romance. The storyline was involved and kept me guessing; I enjoyed the book (as I did the author’s first) and would like to read her next book.
    — The Family Trade (Merchant Princes Book 1) plus The Hidden Family: Book Two of Merchant Princes both by Charles Stross. These are science fiction/fantasy with a significant amount of economics. I went on to read books three through six: The Clan Corporate, The Merchants’ War, The Revolution Business, and The Trade of Queens.
    — the Australian set male/male historical romance By The Currawong’s Call by Welton B. Marsland; this is a book I plan to re-read.
    — a quick and enjoyable collection of essays: Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces by Michael Chabon
    — the contemporary romance Falling Hard: A Colorado High Country Novel by Pamela Clare. While this is the third book in a series, it stands alone well. I found this a pleasant read and it even made me cry a time or two; I don’t think it’s a book I’ll re-read.
    — Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Making Up (London Celebrities) which I quite enjoyed.
    — re-read Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Act Like It and Pretty Face both of which I enjoyed once again
    — book that my daughter recommended to me several years ago. I’ll recommend it to adults and teens who like fantasy. The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison
    — a re-read of Thea Harrison’s paranormal romance Dragon Bound which I enjoyed once more.
    — for my book group, Kindred by Octavia Butler. It’s just as depressing as I remember from when I read it the first time some years ago.
    — a re-read of Michelle Diener’s science fiction romances Dark Horse, Dark Deeds, and Dark Minds which were fun reads after the sadness of Kindred.
    — an enjoyable anthology of three inclusive historical romance ~ Hamilton’s Battalion: A Trio of Romances by Roser Lerner, Courtney Milan, and Alyssa Cole
    — the short science fiction novella Time Was by Ian McDonald. It was a quick read. Generally I don’t notice writing style, but I read a segment to my husband after describing it as poetic.
    — and most recently, a book I quite enjoyed. I think others here would like it, too. Letters to the Lost: A Novel by Iona Grey
    — Nora Roberts’ Shelter in Place. While I enjoyed the story (if such can be said about a novel revolving around a mass shooting), it’s not one that I see myself re-reading.
    — Fatal Chaos (The Fatal Series) by Marie Force. I’ve enjoyed all of the books in this series that I’ve read. This is the most recent, but it turns out I’ve managed to skip one. Don’t ask me why my library has volumes one, four, and twelve of this series but is missing the rest. This series is best read in order.
    — enjoyed Bru Baker’s contemporary male/male paranormal romance Camp H.O.W.L.
    — Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson and Emily Carroll which proved to be a poignant read.
    –the memoir My Grape Year (Grape Series Book 1) by Laura Bradbury which was a light and pleasant read detailing the author’s year in Burgundy when she was seventeen. If you read this, prepare to be made VERY hungry as much delicious food and wine is consumed. I was inspired to read this book after reading the transcript of an audio interview with the author at the SBTB site.

    Reply
  4. I enjoyed reading all of your choices. As for me ~
    — Thea Harrison’s Planet Dragos: A Novella of the Elder Races. I was eagerly anticipating reading this as it’s the final work concerning characters I really like, but the reality fell short of my expectations. Oh, well.
    — Beauty and the Geek (Gone Geek Book 1) by Sidney Bristol which is a contemporary romance. This dealt with some interesting issues (stereotypes, appearances, harassment), but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll soon re-read.
    — Dead By Midnight: An I-Team Christmas by Pamela Clare (romantic suspense). It’s one in a series, so while it could be read as a stand alone, it features many characters that have been the subject of the author’s earlier books. I found it a pleasant read, but I don’t see myself re-reading it.
    — the graphic novel The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang. This was a pleasant read, but it was quite anachronistic; it was set in Europe in (my guess) the 1800s but the characters all spoke as if they lived today.
    — Dal MacLean’s Object of Desire which I’d describe a mystery with a romantic element even though it does feature a male/male romance. The storyline was involved and kept me guessing; I enjoyed the book (as I did the author’s first) and would like to read her next book.
    — The Family Trade (Merchant Princes Book 1) plus The Hidden Family: Book Two of Merchant Princes both by Charles Stross. These are science fiction/fantasy with a significant amount of economics. I went on to read books three through six: The Clan Corporate, The Merchants’ War, The Revolution Business, and The Trade of Queens.
    — the Australian set male/male historical romance By The Currawong’s Call by Welton B. Marsland; this is a book I plan to re-read.
    — a quick and enjoyable collection of essays: Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces by Michael Chabon
    — the contemporary romance Falling Hard: A Colorado High Country Novel by Pamela Clare. While this is the third book in a series, it stands alone well. I found this a pleasant read and it even made me cry a time or two; I don’t think it’s a book I’ll re-read.
    — Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Making Up (London Celebrities) which I quite enjoyed.
    — re-read Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Act Like It and Pretty Face both of which I enjoyed once again
    — book that my daughter recommended to me several years ago. I’ll recommend it to adults and teens who like fantasy. The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison
    — a re-read of Thea Harrison’s paranormal romance Dragon Bound which I enjoyed once more.
    — for my book group, Kindred by Octavia Butler. It’s just as depressing as I remember from when I read it the first time some years ago.
    — a re-read of Michelle Diener’s science fiction romances Dark Horse, Dark Deeds, and Dark Minds which were fun reads after the sadness of Kindred.
    — an enjoyable anthology of three inclusive historical romance ~ Hamilton’s Battalion: A Trio of Romances by Roser Lerner, Courtney Milan, and Alyssa Cole
    — the short science fiction novella Time Was by Ian McDonald. It was a quick read. Generally I don’t notice writing style, but I read a segment to my husband after describing it as poetic.
    — and most recently, a book I quite enjoyed. I think others here would like it, too. Letters to the Lost: A Novel by Iona Grey
    — Nora Roberts’ Shelter in Place. While I enjoyed the story (if such can be said about a novel revolving around a mass shooting), it’s not one that I see myself re-reading.
    — Fatal Chaos (The Fatal Series) by Marie Force. I’ve enjoyed all of the books in this series that I’ve read. This is the most recent, but it turns out I’ve managed to skip one. Don’t ask me why my library has volumes one, four, and twelve of this series but is missing the rest. This series is best read in order.
    — enjoyed Bru Baker’s contemporary male/male paranormal romance Camp H.O.W.L.
    — Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson and Emily Carroll which proved to be a poignant read.
    –the memoir My Grape Year (Grape Series Book 1) by Laura Bradbury which was a light and pleasant read detailing the author’s year in Burgundy when she was seventeen. If you read this, prepare to be made VERY hungry as much delicious food and wine is consumed. I was inspired to read this book after reading the transcript of an audio interview with the author at the SBTB site.

    Reply
  5. I enjoyed reading all of your choices. As for me ~
    — Thea Harrison’s Planet Dragos: A Novella of the Elder Races. I was eagerly anticipating reading this as it’s the final work concerning characters I really like, but the reality fell short of my expectations. Oh, well.
    — Beauty and the Geek (Gone Geek Book 1) by Sidney Bristol which is a contemporary romance. This dealt with some interesting issues (stereotypes, appearances, harassment), but I don’t think it’s a book I’ll soon re-read.
    — Dead By Midnight: An I-Team Christmas by Pamela Clare (romantic suspense). It’s one in a series, so while it could be read as a stand alone, it features many characters that have been the subject of the author’s earlier books. I found it a pleasant read, but I don’t see myself re-reading it.
    — the graphic novel The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang. This was a pleasant read, but it was quite anachronistic; it was set in Europe in (my guess) the 1800s but the characters all spoke as if they lived today.
    — Dal MacLean’s Object of Desire which I’d describe a mystery with a romantic element even though it does feature a male/male romance. The storyline was involved and kept me guessing; I enjoyed the book (as I did the author’s first) and would like to read her next book.
    — The Family Trade (Merchant Princes Book 1) plus The Hidden Family: Book Two of Merchant Princes both by Charles Stross. These are science fiction/fantasy with a significant amount of economics. I went on to read books three through six: The Clan Corporate, The Merchants’ War, The Revolution Business, and The Trade of Queens.
    — the Australian set male/male historical romance By The Currawong’s Call by Welton B. Marsland; this is a book I plan to re-read.
    — a quick and enjoyable collection of essays: Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces by Michael Chabon
    — the contemporary romance Falling Hard: A Colorado High Country Novel by Pamela Clare. While this is the third book in a series, it stands alone well. I found this a pleasant read and it even made me cry a time or two; I don’t think it’s a book I’ll re-read.
    — Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Making Up (London Celebrities) which I quite enjoyed.
    — re-read Lucy Parker’s contemporary romance Act Like It and Pretty Face both of which I enjoyed once again
    — book that my daughter recommended to me several years ago. I’ll recommend it to adults and teens who like fantasy. The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison
    — a re-read of Thea Harrison’s paranormal romance Dragon Bound which I enjoyed once more.
    — for my book group, Kindred by Octavia Butler. It’s just as depressing as I remember from when I read it the first time some years ago.
    — a re-read of Michelle Diener’s science fiction romances Dark Horse, Dark Deeds, and Dark Minds which were fun reads after the sadness of Kindred.
    — an enjoyable anthology of three inclusive historical romance ~ Hamilton’s Battalion: A Trio of Romances by Roser Lerner, Courtney Milan, and Alyssa Cole
    — the short science fiction novella Time Was by Ian McDonald. It was a quick read. Generally I don’t notice writing style, but I read a segment to my husband after describing it as poetic.
    — and most recently, a book I quite enjoyed. I think others here would like it, too. Letters to the Lost: A Novel by Iona Grey
    — Nora Roberts’ Shelter in Place. While I enjoyed the story (if such can be said about a novel revolving around a mass shooting), it’s not one that I see myself re-reading.
    — Fatal Chaos (The Fatal Series) by Marie Force. I’ve enjoyed all of the books in this series that I’ve read. This is the most recent, but it turns out I’ve managed to skip one. Don’t ask me why my library has volumes one, four, and twelve of this series but is missing the rest. This series is best read in order.
    — enjoyed Bru Baker’s contemporary male/male paranormal romance Camp H.O.W.L.
    — Speak: The Graphic Novel by Laurie Halse Anderson and Emily Carroll which proved to be a poignant read.
    –the memoir My Grape Year (Grape Series Book 1) by Laura Bradbury which was a light and pleasant read detailing the author’s year in Burgundy when she was seventeen. If you read this, prepare to be made VERY hungry as much delicious food and wine is consumed. I was inspired to read this book after reading the transcript of an audio interview with the author at the SBTB site.

    Reply
  6. I haven’t been reading much genre romance lately, except old titles for review (Dear Deceiver, A Choice of Cousins, Lady Jane, Simon’s Waif and The Double Dealers are awaiting posting).
    The only semi-related things I remember much about this month were the latest Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear, To Die But Once; Goodnight from London by Jennifer Robson; The Other Daughter by Lauren Willig; and Keep the Home Fires Burning by Simon Block (a continuation of the Home Fires TV series unjustly cancelled, picking up from the cliffhanger plane crash ending). All were entertaining and worth the time investment.
    Now starting The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah, which I’ve heard good things about.
    My nightime listening is The Lord of the Rings, for the nth time. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  7. I haven’t been reading much genre romance lately, except old titles for review (Dear Deceiver, A Choice of Cousins, Lady Jane, Simon’s Waif and The Double Dealers are awaiting posting).
    The only semi-related things I remember much about this month were the latest Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear, To Die But Once; Goodnight from London by Jennifer Robson; The Other Daughter by Lauren Willig; and Keep the Home Fires Burning by Simon Block (a continuation of the Home Fires TV series unjustly cancelled, picking up from the cliffhanger plane crash ending). All were entertaining and worth the time investment.
    Now starting The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah, which I’ve heard good things about.
    My nightime listening is The Lord of the Rings, for the nth time. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  8. I haven’t been reading much genre romance lately, except old titles for review (Dear Deceiver, A Choice of Cousins, Lady Jane, Simon’s Waif and The Double Dealers are awaiting posting).
    The only semi-related things I remember much about this month were the latest Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear, To Die But Once; Goodnight from London by Jennifer Robson; The Other Daughter by Lauren Willig; and Keep the Home Fires Burning by Simon Block (a continuation of the Home Fires TV series unjustly cancelled, picking up from the cliffhanger plane crash ending). All were entertaining and worth the time investment.
    Now starting The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah, which I’ve heard good things about.
    My nightime listening is The Lord of the Rings, for the nth time. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  9. I haven’t been reading much genre romance lately, except old titles for review (Dear Deceiver, A Choice of Cousins, Lady Jane, Simon’s Waif and The Double Dealers are awaiting posting).
    The only semi-related things I remember much about this month were the latest Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear, To Die But Once; Goodnight from London by Jennifer Robson; The Other Daughter by Lauren Willig; and Keep the Home Fires Burning by Simon Block (a continuation of the Home Fires TV series unjustly cancelled, picking up from the cliffhanger plane crash ending). All were entertaining and worth the time investment.
    Now starting The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah, which I’ve heard good things about.
    My nightime listening is The Lord of the Rings, for the nth time. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  10. I haven’t been reading much genre romance lately, except old titles for review (Dear Deceiver, A Choice of Cousins, Lady Jane, Simon’s Waif and The Double Dealers are awaiting posting).
    The only semi-related things I remember much about this month were the latest Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear, To Die But Once; Goodnight from London by Jennifer Robson; The Other Daughter by Lauren Willig; and Keep the Home Fires Burning by Simon Block (a continuation of the Home Fires TV series unjustly cancelled, picking up from the cliffhanger plane crash ending). All were entertaining and worth the time investment.
    Now starting The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah, which I’ve heard good things about.
    My nightime listening is The Lord of the Rings, for the nth time. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  11. I’ve been reading the Amanda Pepper series by Gillian Roberts, thanks to the pep(per)-talk here. Just finished book 6, In the Dead of Summer, first published in 1995 but depressingly relevant to the summer of 2018 with its racist/misogynist bullies, venal bureaucrats, and doberman-style journalists. Even though its relevance depressed me, I liked the book, and the series, for that matter, and will keep reading.
    However, I’m taking a break to read The President is Missing, the new Clinton/Patterson best-seller. It’ll be a fairly long break, as the book is over 500 substantial pages, but at about 1/4 of the way in, I’m impressed. Reads pretty fast: When I reserved it at the library, I was something like 565th on the Holds list, and that was only two or three weeks ago (but the library has *200* hardcover copies!). It’s very well-written (Patterson) with lots of Presidential detail (Clinton, of course). Worth reading, IMO.

    Reply
  12. I’ve been reading the Amanda Pepper series by Gillian Roberts, thanks to the pep(per)-talk here. Just finished book 6, In the Dead of Summer, first published in 1995 but depressingly relevant to the summer of 2018 with its racist/misogynist bullies, venal bureaucrats, and doberman-style journalists. Even though its relevance depressed me, I liked the book, and the series, for that matter, and will keep reading.
    However, I’m taking a break to read The President is Missing, the new Clinton/Patterson best-seller. It’ll be a fairly long break, as the book is over 500 substantial pages, but at about 1/4 of the way in, I’m impressed. Reads pretty fast: When I reserved it at the library, I was something like 565th on the Holds list, and that was only two or three weeks ago (but the library has *200* hardcover copies!). It’s very well-written (Patterson) with lots of Presidential detail (Clinton, of course). Worth reading, IMO.

    Reply
  13. I’ve been reading the Amanda Pepper series by Gillian Roberts, thanks to the pep(per)-talk here. Just finished book 6, In the Dead of Summer, first published in 1995 but depressingly relevant to the summer of 2018 with its racist/misogynist bullies, venal bureaucrats, and doberman-style journalists. Even though its relevance depressed me, I liked the book, and the series, for that matter, and will keep reading.
    However, I’m taking a break to read The President is Missing, the new Clinton/Patterson best-seller. It’ll be a fairly long break, as the book is over 500 substantial pages, but at about 1/4 of the way in, I’m impressed. Reads pretty fast: When I reserved it at the library, I was something like 565th on the Holds list, and that was only two or three weeks ago (but the library has *200* hardcover copies!). It’s very well-written (Patterson) with lots of Presidential detail (Clinton, of course). Worth reading, IMO.

    Reply
  14. I’ve been reading the Amanda Pepper series by Gillian Roberts, thanks to the pep(per)-talk here. Just finished book 6, In the Dead of Summer, first published in 1995 but depressingly relevant to the summer of 2018 with its racist/misogynist bullies, venal bureaucrats, and doberman-style journalists. Even though its relevance depressed me, I liked the book, and the series, for that matter, and will keep reading.
    However, I’m taking a break to read The President is Missing, the new Clinton/Patterson best-seller. It’ll be a fairly long break, as the book is over 500 substantial pages, but at about 1/4 of the way in, I’m impressed. Reads pretty fast: When I reserved it at the library, I was something like 565th on the Holds list, and that was only two or three weeks ago (but the library has *200* hardcover copies!). It’s very well-written (Patterson) with lots of Presidential detail (Clinton, of course). Worth reading, IMO.

    Reply
  15. I’ve been reading the Amanda Pepper series by Gillian Roberts, thanks to the pep(per)-talk here. Just finished book 6, In the Dead of Summer, first published in 1995 but depressingly relevant to the summer of 2018 with its racist/misogynist bullies, venal bureaucrats, and doberman-style journalists. Even though its relevance depressed me, I liked the book, and the series, for that matter, and will keep reading.
    However, I’m taking a break to read The President is Missing, the new Clinton/Patterson best-seller. It’ll be a fairly long break, as the book is over 500 substantial pages, but at about 1/4 of the way in, I’m impressed. Reads pretty fast: When I reserved it at the library, I was something like 565th on the Holds list, and that was only two or three weeks ago (but the library has *200* hardcover copies!). It’s very well-written (Patterson) with lots of Presidential detail (Clinton, of course). Worth reading, IMO.

    Reply
  16. Cool line-up. I will look into some of these. The Merchant Princes sounds interesting.
    I’m always on the look out for historical folks who do something useful while they’re also adventuring.

    Reply
  17. Cool line-up. I will look into some of these. The Merchant Princes sounds interesting.
    I’m always on the look out for historical folks who do something useful while they’re also adventuring.

    Reply
  18. Cool line-up. I will look into some of these. The Merchant Princes sounds interesting.
    I’m always on the look out for historical folks who do something useful while they’re also adventuring.

    Reply
  19. Cool line-up. I will look into some of these. The Merchant Princes sounds interesting.
    I’m always on the look out for historical folks who do something useful while they’re also adventuring.

    Reply
  20. Cool line-up. I will look into some of these. The Merchant Princes sounds interesting.
    I’m always on the look out for historical folks who do something useful while they’re also adventuring.

    Reply
  21. Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear is a wonderful series. I forget which one of the Wenches mentioned it, but we were chatting back and forth about it.
    As to Lord of the Rings — me too. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  22. Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear is a wonderful series. I forget which one of the Wenches mentioned it, but we were chatting back and forth about it.
    As to Lord of the Rings — me too. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  23. Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear is a wonderful series. I forget which one of the Wenches mentioned it, but we were chatting back and forth about it.
    As to Lord of the Rings — me too. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  24. Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear is a wonderful series. I forget which one of the Wenches mentioned it, but we were chatting back and forth about it.
    As to Lord of the Rings — me too. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  25. Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear is a wonderful series. I forget which one of the Wenches mentioned it, but we were chatting back and forth about it.
    As to Lord of the Rings — me too. I never get tired of it.

    Reply
  26. I’m wary of bestsellers — having been bitten many times in the past — but I’ll keep an eye out for The President is Missing.
    There’s no substitution for personal recommendation when it comes to books

    Reply
  27. I’m wary of bestsellers — having been bitten many times in the past — but I’ll keep an eye out for The President is Missing.
    There’s no substitution for personal recommendation when it comes to books

    Reply
  28. I’m wary of bestsellers — having been bitten many times in the past — but I’ll keep an eye out for The President is Missing.
    There’s no substitution for personal recommendation when it comes to books

    Reply
  29. I’m wary of bestsellers — having been bitten many times in the past — but I’ll keep an eye out for The President is Missing.
    There’s no substitution for personal recommendation when it comes to books

    Reply
  30. I’m wary of bestsellers — having been bitten many times in the past — but I’ll keep an eye out for The President is Missing.
    There’s no substitution for personal recommendation when it comes to books

    Reply
  31. Sort of a reading slump right now. I have been reading – but finding it hard to fall in love with books. I thank y’all for the introductions for new places for me to go.

    Reply
  32. Sort of a reading slump right now. I have been reading – but finding it hard to fall in love with books. I thank y’all for the introductions for new places for me to go.

    Reply
  33. Sort of a reading slump right now. I have been reading – but finding it hard to fall in love with books. I thank y’all for the introductions for new places for me to go.

    Reply
  34. Sort of a reading slump right now. I have been reading – but finding it hard to fall in love with books. I thank y’all for the introductions for new places for me to go.

    Reply
  35. Sort of a reading slump right now. I have been reading – but finding it hard to fall in love with books. I thank y’all for the introductions for new places for me to go.

    Reply
  36. I must have missed the Pepper discussion. I just popped over to Amazon and see lots of bargains and snapped up Book #1 to try.
    I read some reviews on the Clinton book and it sounds as if Clinton sat down on Patterson and his ghostwriters to get it right. Let us know if it holds up!

    Reply
  37. I must have missed the Pepper discussion. I just popped over to Amazon and see lots of bargains and snapped up Book #1 to try.
    I read some reviews on the Clinton book and it sounds as if Clinton sat down on Patterson and his ghostwriters to get it right. Let us know if it holds up!

    Reply
  38. I must have missed the Pepper discussion. I just popped over to Amazon and see lots of bargains and snapped up Book #1 to try.
    I read some reviews on the Clinton book and it sounds as if Clinton sat down on Patterson and his ghostwriters to get it right. Let us know if it holds up!

    Reply
  39. I must have missed the Pepper discussion. I just popped over to Amazon and see lots of bargains and snapped up Book #1 to try.
    I read some reviews on the Clinton book and it sounds as if Clinton sat down on Patterson and his ghostwriters to get it right. Let us know if it holds up!

    Reply
  40. I must have missed the Pepper discussion. I just popped over to Amazon and see lots of bargains and snapped up Book #1 to try.
    I read some reviews on the Clinton book and it sounds as if Clinton sat down on Patterson and his ghostwriters to get it right. Let us know if it holds up!

    Reply
  41. I read many books but apparently only one did I write anything down about. Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson. It was a good thing my chair had arms or I would have fallen on the floor. As it was my sides were aching from laughing so hard. I was also very glad my husband wasn’t home or trying to sleep!
    It is a contemporary set in Scotland. I found it to be a farcical comedy. Especially the research that Josh’s father does (and the actions he takes) to make Josh’s mother fall back in love with him. Josh was pretty crazy as well.
    Totally understand Kareni’s disappointment in a book. I just read one where it could easily have been 100 pages shorter if it didn’t have all the “filler” of back history over and over again. Maybe the next one in the series won’t be quite as full of filler but then again she might feel she has to write tons of filler for new readers. At 400 pages long it felt like a slog since there wasn’t much real action.

    Reply
  42. I read many books but apparently only one did I write anything down about. Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson. It was a good thing my chair had arms or I would have fallen on the floor. As it was my sides were aching from laughing so hard. I was also very glad my husband wasn’t home or trying to sleep!
    It is a contemporary set in Scotland. I found it to be a farcical comedy. Especially the research that Josh’s father does (and the actions he takes) to make Josh’s mother fall back in love with him. Josh was pretty crazy as well.
    Totally understand Kareni’s disappointment in a book. I just read one where it could easily have been 100 pages shorter if it didn’t have all the “filler” of back history over and over again. Maybe the next one in the series won’t be quite as full of filler but then again she might feel she has to write tons of filler for new readers. At 400 pages long it felt like a slog since there wasn’t much real action.

    Reply
  43. I read many books but apparently only one did I write anything down about. Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson. It was a good thing my chair had arms or I would have fallen on the floor. As it was my sides were aching from laughing so hard. I was also very glad my husband wasn’t home or trying to sleep!
    It is a contemporary set in Scotland. I found it to be a farcical comedy. Especially the research that Josh’s father does (and the actions he takes) to make Josh’s mother fall back in love with him. Josh was pretty crazy as well.
    Totally understand Kareni’s disappointment in a book. I just read one where it could easily have been 100 pages shorter if it didn’t have all the “filler” of back history over and over again. Maybe the next one in the series won’t be quite as full of filler but then again she might feel she has to write tons of filler for new readers. At 400 pages long it felt like a slog since there wasn’t much real action.

    Reply
  44. I read many books but apparently only one did I write anything down about. Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson. It was a good thing my chair had arms or I would have fallen on the floor. As it was my sides were aching from laughing so hard. I was also very glad my husband wasn’t home or trying to sleep!
    It is a contemporary set in Scotland. I found it to be a farcical comedy. Especially the research that Josh’s father does (and the actions he takes) to make Josh’s mother fall back in love with him. Josh was pretty crazy as well.
    Totally understand Kareni’s disappointment in a book. I just read one where it could easily have been 100 pages shorter if it didn’t have all the “filler” of back history over and over again. Maybe the next one in the series won’t be quite as full of filler but then again she might feel she has to write tons of filler for new readers. At 400 pages long it felt like a slog since there wasn’t much real action.

    Reply
  45. I read many books but apparently only one did I write anything down about. Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson. It was a good thing my chair had arms or I would have fallen on the floor. As it was my sides were aching from laughing so hard. I was also very glad my husband wasn’t home or trying to sleep!
    It is a contemporary set in Scotland. I found it to be a farcical comedy. Especially the research that Josh’s father does (and the actions he takes) to make Josh’s mother fall back in love with him. Josh was pretty crazy as well.
    Totally understand Kareni’s disappointment in a book. I just read one where it could easily have been 100 pages shorter if it didn’t have all the “filler” of back history over and over again. Maybe the next one in the series won’t be quite as full of filler but then again she might feel she has to write tons of filler for new readers. At 400 pages long it felt like a slog since there wasn’t much real action.

    Reply
  46. It’s been a slow month for me reading wise. I did find a Barbara Metzger that I hadn’t read – LADY SPARROW. It is not as good as my favorite by her (MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT), but I enjoyed it none the less. Sweet story with her signature humor.
    The book I’m reading right now is THE PURPLE DIARIES by Joseph Egan. It is about a custody battle involving Mary Astor in the 1930s. I’m not sure why I find Hollywood in the 1920s and 1930s so interesting – but I always have. I fell in love with movies from that era when I was a teenager, and I still like them even though they are not as technically refined as today’s movies. Only half way through the book, but I’m loving it.

    Reply
  47. It’s been a slow month for me reading wise. I did find a Barbara Metzger that I hadn’t read – LADY SPARROW. It is not as good as my favorite by her (MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT), but I enjoyed it none the less. Sweet story with her signature humor.
    The book I’m reading right now is THE PURPLE DIARIES by Joseph Egan. It is about a custody battle involving Mary Astor in the 1930s. I’m not sure why I find Hollywood in the 1920s and 1930s so interesting – but I always have. I fell in love with movies from that era when I was a teenager, and I still like them even though they are not as technically refined as today’s movies. Only half way through the book, but I’m loving it.

    Reply
  48. It’s been a slow month for me reading wise. I did find a Barbara Metzger that I hadn’t read – LADY SPARROW. It is not as good as my favorite by her (MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT), but I enjoyed it none the less. Sweet story with her signature humor.
    The book I’m reading right now is THE PURPLE DIARIES by Joseph Egan. It is about a custody battle involving Mary Astor in the 1930s. I’m not sure why I find Hollywood in the 1920s and 1930s so interesting – but I always have. I fell in love with movies from that era when I was a teenager, and I still like them even though they are not as technically refined as today’s movies. Only half way through the book, but I’m loving it.

    Reply
  49. It’s been a slow month for me reading wise. I did find a Barbara Metzger that I hadn’t read – LADY SPARROW. It is not as good as my favorite by her (MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT), but I enjoyed it none the less. Sweet story with her signature humor.
    The book I’m reading right now is THE PURPLE DIARIES by Joseph Egan. It is about a custody battle involving Mary Astor in the 1930s. I’m not sure why I find Hollywood in the 1920s and 1930s so interesting – but I always have. I fell in love with movies from that era when I was a teenager, and I still like them even though they are not as technically refined as today’s movies. Only half way through the book, but I’m loving it.

    Reply
  50. It’s been a slow month for me reading wise. I did find a Barbara Metzger that I hadn’t read – LADY SPARROW. It is not as good as my favorite by her (MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT), but I enjoyed it none the less. Sweet story with her signature humor.
    The book I’m reading right now is THE PURPLE DIARIES by Joseph Egan. It is about a custody battle involving Mary Astor in the 1930s. I’m not sure why I find Hollywood in the 1920s and 1930s so interesting – but I always have. I fell in love with movies from that era when I was a teenager, and I still like them even though they are not as technically refined as today’s movies. Only half way through the book, but I’m loving it.

    Reply
  51. I too love movies of the 1930s-1940s black and white era — because they were cheap and forgotten when I was a teen,the local TV channels would run them at night. That’s how I first saw Fred Astaire in his prime. I still love the noir dramas of that era.
    I remember that Mary Astor scandal. The lady kept detailed diaries along the lines of “Dear Diary: Three times last night!” — and when the newspapers got hold of them it almost killed her career. The scandal would make a good movie. I know my mother thought of her as a Bad Woman. I just think she was misguided. You have to pick better guys — romance writing teaches that 🙂

    Reply
  52. I too love movies of the 1930s-1940s black and white era — because they were cheap and forgotten when I was a teen,the local TV channels would run them at night. That’s how I first saw Fred Astaire in his prime. I still love the noir dramas of that era.
    I remember that Mary Astor scandal. The lady kept detailed diaries along the lines of “Dear Diary: Three times last night!” — and when the newspapers got hold of them it almost killed her career. The scandal would make a good movie. I know my mother thought of her as a Bad Woman. I just think she was misguided. You have to pick better guys — romance writing teaches that 🙂

    Reply
  53. I too love movies of the 1930s-1940s black and white era — because they were cheap and forgotten when I was a teen,the local TV channels would run them at night. That’s how I first saw Fred Astaire in his prime. I still love the noir dramas of that era.
    I remember that Mary Astor scandal. The lady kept detailed diaries along the lines of “Dear Diary: Three times last night!” — and when the newspapers got hold of them it almost killed her career. The scandal would make a good movie. I know my mother thought of her as a Bad Woman. I just think she was misguided. You have to pick better guys — romance writing teaches that 🙂

    Reply
  54. I too love movies of the 1930s-1940s black and white era — because they were cheap and forgotten when I was a teen,the local TV channels would run them at night. That’s how I first saw Fred Astaire in his prime. I still love the noir dramas of that era.
    I remember that Mary Astor scandal. The lady kept detailed diaries along the lines of “Dear Diary: Three times last night!” — and when the newspapers got hold of them it almost killed her career. The scandal would make a good movie. I know my mother thought of her as a Bad Woman. I just think she was misguided. You have to pick better guys — romance writing teaches that 🙂

    Reply
  55. I too love movies of the 1930s-1940s black and white era — because they were cheap and forgotten when I was a teen,the local TV channels would run them at night. That’s how I first saw Fred Astaire in his prime. I still love the noir dramas of that era.
    I remember that Mary Astor scandal. The lady kept detailed diaries along the lines of “Dear Diary: Three times last night!” — and when the newspapers got hold of them it almost killed her career. The scandal would make a good movie. I know my mother thought of her as a Bad Woman. I just think she was misguided. You have to pick better guys — romance writing teaches that 🙂

    Reply
  56. I do love Romantic Comedy.
    Two of my favorite authors are Jenny Crusie and Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson.
    Check.
    I like a fairly snappy forward movement in a book. None of that “filler” you speak of. That’s one of the things I particularly like about genre writing. Authors tend to “get on with it.”

    Reply
  57. I do love Romantic Comedy.
    Two of my favorite authors are Jenny Crusie and Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson.
    Check.
    I like a fairly snappy forward movement in a book. None of that “filler” you speak of. That’s one of the things I particularly like about genre writing. Authors tend to “get on with it.”

    Reply
  58. I do love Romantic Comedy.
    Two of my favorite authors are Jenny Crusie and Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson.
    Check.
    I like a fairly snappy forward movement in a book. None of that “filler” you speak of. That’s one of the things I particularly like about genre writing. Authors tend to “get on with it.”

    Reply
  59. I do love Romantic Comedy.
    Two of my favorite authors are Jenny Crusie and Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson.
    Check.
    I like a fairly snappy forward movement in a book. None of that “filler” you speak of. That’s one of the things I particularly like about genre writing. Authors tend to “get on with it.”

    Reply
  60. I do love Romantic Comedy.
    Two of my favorite authors are Jenny Crusie and Susan Elizabeth Phillips
    Goody Two Shoes by Janet Elizabeth Henderson.
    Check.
    I like a fairly snappy forward movement in a book. None of that “filler” you speak of. That’s one of the things I particularly like about genre writing. Authors tend to “get on with it.”

    Reply
  61. I’ve had a lovely reading month with lots of favourite authors releasing new books. I’ve just finished Wicked and The Wallflower by Sarah MacLean, which was just delicious. Before that I realised with delight that I hadn’t read book 10 in ELLY Griffiths detective series, The Dark Angel, which came out earlier this year. I love the main character Ruth , the archeology and the complicated version of modern families she and Nelson play. I would really like things to work out for Ruth and Nelson but I can’t see how. Then, three contemporaries, first Shadow Keeper, book 3 in Christine Feehan’s Shadow Riders series (contemporary paranormal). Some of her series are too dark for me, but I like this one. Love the concept of riding shadows and the good mafia concept. Finally Stand and Delicer by Rhenna Morgan, latest in her Men of Haven series, and Compromising the Billionaire by Ivy Lane which rounds out her Billionaires of Scandal series, sees all the cousins happily married and resolves the mystery that has been plaguing them since childhood. Looking at that list makes me feel happy all over again. 🙂

    Reply
  62. I’ve had a lovely reading month with lots of favourite authors releasing new books. I’ve just finished Wicked and The Wallflower by Sarah MacLean, which was just delicious. Before that I realised with delight that I hadn’t read book 10 in ELLY Griffiths detective series, The Dark Angel, which came out earlier this year. I love the main character Ruth , the archeology and the complicated version of modern families she and Nelson play. I would really like things to work out for Ruth and Nelson but I can’t see how. Then, three contemporaries, first Shadow Keeper, book 3 in Christine Feehan’s Shadow Riders series (contemporary paranormal). Some of her series are too dark for me, but I like this one. Love the concept of riding shadows and the good mafia concept. Finally Stand and Delicer by Rhenna Morgan, latest in her Men of Haven series, and Compromising the Billionaire by Ivy Lane which rounds out her Billionaires of Scandal series, sees all the cousins happily married and resolves the mystery that has been plaguing them since childhood. Looking at that list makes me feel happy all over again. 🙂

    Reply
  63. I’ve had a lovely reading month with lots of favourite authors releasing new books. I’ve just finished Wicked and The Wallflower by Sarah MacLean, which was just delicious. Before that I realised with delight that I hadn’t read book 10 in ELLY Griffiths detective series, The Dark Angel, which came out earlier this year. I love the main character Ruth , the archeology and the complicated version of modern families she and Nelson play. I would really like things to work out for Ruth and Nelson but I can’t see how. Then, three contemporaries, first Shadow Keeper, book 3 in Christine Feehan’s Shadow Riders series (contemporary paranormal). Some of her series are too dark for me, but I like this one. Love the concept of riding shadows and the good mafia concept. Finally Stand and Delicer by Rhenna Morgan, latest in her Men of Haven series, and Compromising the Billionaire by Ivy Lane which rounds out her Billionaires of Scandal series, sees all the cousins happily married and resolves the mystery that has been plaguing them since childhood. Looking at that list makes me feel happy all over again. 🙂

    Reply
  64. I’ve had a lovely reading month with lots of favourite authors releasing new books. I’ve just finished Wicked and The Wallflower by Sarah MacLean, which was just delicious. Before that I realised with delight that I hadn’t read book 10 in ELLY Griffiths detective series, The Dark Angel, which came out earlier this year. I love the main character Ruth , the archeology and the complicated version of modern families she and Nelson play. I would really like things to work out for Ruth and Nelson but I can’t see how. Then, three contemporaries, first Shadow Keeper, book 3 in Christine Feehan’s Shadow Riders series (contemporary paranormal). Some of her series are too dark for me, but I like this one. Love the concept of riding shadows and the good mafia concept. Finally Stand and Delicer by Rhenna Morgan, latest in her Men of Haven series, and Compromising the Billionaire by Ivy Lane which rounds out her Billionaires of Scandal series, sees all the cousins happily married and resolves the mystery that has been plaguing them since childhood. Looking at that list makes me feel happy all over again. 🙂

    Reply
  65. I’ve had a lovely reading month with lots of favourite authors releasing new books. I’ve just finished Wicked and The Wallflower by Sarah MacLean, which was just delicious. Before that I realised with delight that I hadn’t read book 10 in ELLY Griffiths detective series, The Dark Angel, which came out earlier this year. I love the main character Ruth , the archeology and the complicated version of modern families she and Nelson play. I would really like things to work out for Ruth and Nelson but I can’t see how. Then, three contemporaries, first Shadow Keeper, book 3 in Christine Feehan’s Shadow Riders series (contemporary paranormal). Some of her series are too dark for me, but I like this one. Love the concept of riding shadows and the good mafia concept. Finally Stand and Delicer by Rhenna Morgan, latest in her Men of Haven series, and Compromising the Billionaire by Ivy Lane which rounds out her Billionaires of Scandal series, sees all the cousins happily married and resolves the mystery that has been plaguing them since childhood. Looking at that list makes me feel happy all over again. 🙂

    Reply
  66. TV is where I first came to see those movies too Janice. I was sick the summer I turned 14 and had to stay in bed all summer long. If it hadn’t been for my books and those old movies, I would have gone crazy (smile).

    Reply
  67. TV is where I first came to see those movies too Janice. I was sick the summer I turned 14 and had to stay in bed all summer long. If it hadn’t been for my books and those old movies, I would have gone crazy (smile).

    Reply
  68. TV is where I first came to see those movies too Janice. I was sick the summer I turned 14 and had to stay in bed all summer long. If it hadn’t been for my books and those old movies, I would have gone crazy (smile).

    Reply
  69. TV is where I first came to see those movies too Janice. I was sick the summer I turned 14 and had to stay in bed all summer long. If it hadn’t been for my books and those old movies, I would have gone crazy (smile).

    Reply
  70. TV is where I first came to see those movies too Janice. I was sick the summer I turned 14 and had to stay in bed all summer long. If it hadn’t been for my books and those old movies, I would have gone crazy (smile).

    Reply
  71. A blog reviewer I follow recommended a mystery series by G.M. Malliet, so I’m in the middle of the first one, which is called “Wicked Autumn”. It’s a classic British cozy: quaint village full of eccentric characters, check! the person who gets murdered was annoying and disliked by almost everyone, so there are suspects galore, check! The central amateur detective character is the local vicar, who is handsome, single, and was formerly an MI5 agent. I think there will be a love interest for him in the series. So much fun!
    I read an early and very charming Mary Balogh book, “The Double Wager”. It reminded me of a couple of Georgette Heyer books, like “Frederica” or “Arabella”, the heroine is a bit of a madcap and always getting herself into trouble. It definitely is lighter and has a different tone than Balogh’s later books.
    I also read “A Duke in the Night” by Kelly Bowen. I am very impressed by this (fairly)new author, there was some good character development and some of the secondary characters really intrigued me, I’m looking forward to reading their stories in future book.

    Reply
  72. A blog reviewer I follow recommended a mystery series by G.M. Malliet, so I’m in the middle of the first one, which is called “Wicked Autumn”. It’s a classic British cozy: quaint village full of eccentric characters, check! the person who gets murdered was annoying and disliked by almost everyone, so there are suspects galore, check! The central amateur detective character is the local vicar, who is handsome, single, and was formerly an MI5 agent. I think there will be a love interest for him in the series. So much fun!
    I read an early and very charming Mary Balogh book, “The Double Wager”. It reminded me of a couple of Georgette Heyer books, like “Frederica” or “Arabella”, the heroine is a bit of a madcap and always getting herself into trouble. It definitely is lighter and has a different tone than Balogh’s later books.
    I also read “A Duke in the Night” by Kelly Bowen. I am very impressed by this (fairly)new author, there was some good character development and some of the secondary characters really intrigued me, I’m looking forward to reading their stories in future book.

    Reply
  73. A blog reviewer I follow recommended a mystery series by G.M. Malliet, so I’m in the middle of the first one, which is called “Wicked Autumn”. It’s a classic British cozy: quaint village full of eccentric characters, check! the person who gets murdered was annoying and disliked by almost everyone, so there are suspects galore, check! The central amateur detective character is the local vicar, who is handsome, single, and was formerly an MI5 agent. I think there will be a love interest for him in the series. So much fun!
    I read an early and very charming Mary Balogh book, “The Double Wager”. It reminded me of a couple of Georgette Heyer books, like “Frederica” or “Arabella”, the heroine is a bit of a madcap and always getting herself into trouble. It definitely is lighter and has a different tone than Balogh’s later books.
    I also read “A Duke in the Night” by Kelly Bowen. I am very impressed by this (fairly)new author, there was some good character development and some of the secondary characters really intrigued me, I’m looking forward to reading their stories in future book.

    Reply
  74. A blog reviewer I follow recommended a mystery series by G.M. Malliet, so I’m in the middle of the first one, which is called “Wicked Autumn”. It’s a classic British cozy: quaint village full of eccentric characters, check! the person who gets murdered was annoying and disliked by almost everyone, so there are suspects galore, check! The central amateur detective character is the local vicar, who is handsome, single, and was formerly an MI5 agent. I think there will be a love interest for him in the series. So much fun!
    I read an early and very charming Mary Balogh book, “The Double Wager”. It reminded me of a couple of Georgette Heyer books, like “Frederica” or “Arabella”, the heroine is a bit of a madcap and always getting herself into trouble. It definitely is lighter and has a different tone than Balogh’s later books.
    I also read “A Duke in the Night” by Kelly Bowen. I am very impressed by this (fairly)new author, there was some good character development and some of the secondary characters really intrigued me, I’m looking forward to reading their stories in future book.

    Reply
  75. A blog reviewer I follow recommended a mystery series by G.M. Malliet, so I’m in the middle of the first one, which is called “Wicked Autumn”. It’s a classic British cozy: quaint village full of eccentric characters, check! the person who gets murdered was annoying and disliked by almost everyone, so there are suspects galore, check! The central amateur detective character is the local vicar, who is handsome, single, and was formerly an MI5 agent. I think there will be a love interest for him in the series. So much fun!
    I read an early and very charming Mary Balogh book, “The Double Wager”. It reminded me of a couple of Georgette Heyer books, like “Frederica” or “Arabella”, the heroine is a bit of a madcap and always getting herself into trouble. It definitely is lighter and has a different tone than Balogh’s later books.
    I also read “A Duke in the Night” by Kelly Bowen. I am very impressed by this (fairly)new author, there was some good character development and some of the secondary characters really intrigued me, I’m looking forward to reading their stories in future book.

    Reply
  76. I “accicentaled” myself into a comparison of magic. At the beginning of June I was just finishing Mercedes Lackeys Elemental Masters series. I then turned to my Mary Jo Putney list, and the books next in line were her Guardian series. I found the two takes interesting, so I decided I would also visit Patricia Rice’s 4 series on the Malcoms and Ives throughout the generations. I am finishing up on those with Sapphire Nights (my current read), to be followed by Topaz Dream.
    It has been great fun.
    I commented on this on Facebook an Mary Jo suggested Patricia Briggs. The first of those is lined up to follow Topaz Dream.

    Reply
  77. I “accicentaled” myself into a comparison of magic. At the beginning of June I was just finishing Mercedes Lackeys Elemental Masters series. I then turned to my Mary Jo Putney list, and the books next in line were her Guardian series. I found the two takes interesting, so I decided I would also visit Patricia Rice’s 4 series on the Malcoms and Ives throughout the generations. I am finishing up on those with Sapphire Nights (my current read), to be followed by Topaz Dream.
    It has been great fun.
    I commented on this on Facebook an Mary Jo suggested Patricia Briggs. The first of those is lined up to follow Topaz Dream.

    Reply
  78. I “accicentaled” myself into a comparison of magic. At the beginning of June I was just finishing Mercedes Lackeys Elemental Masters series. I then turned to my Mary Jo Putney list, and the books next in line were her Guardian series. I found the two takes interesting, so I decided I would also visit Patricia Rice’s 4 series on the Malcoms and Ives throughout the generations. I am finishing up on those with Sapphire Nights (my current read), to be followed by Topaz Dream.
    It has been great fun.
    I commented on this on Facebook an Mary Jo suggested Patricia Briggs. The first of those is lined up to follow Topaz Dream.

    Reply
  79. I “accicentaled” myself into a comparison of magic. At the beginning of June I was just finishing Mercedes Lackeys Elemental Masters series. I then turned to my Mary Jo Putney list, and the books next in line were her Guardian series. I found the two takes interesting, so I decided I would also visit Patricia Rice’s 4 series on the Malcoms and Ives throughout the generations. I am finishing up on those with Sapphire Nights (my current read), to be followed by Topaz Dream.
    It has been great fun.
    I commented on this on Facebook an Mary Jo suggested Patricia Briggs. The first of those is lined up to follow Topaz Dream.

    Reply
  80. I “accicentaled” myself into a comparison of magic. At the beginning of June I was just finishing Mercedes Lackeys Elemental Masters series. I then turned to my Mary Jo Putney list, and the books next in line were her Guardian series. I found the two takes interesting, so I decided I would also visit Patricia Rice’s 4 series on the Malcoms and Ives throughout the generations. I am finishing up on those with Sapphire Nights (my current read), to be followed by Topaz Dream.
    It has been great fun.
    I commented on this on Facebook an Mary Jo suggested Patricia Briggs. The first of those is lined up to follow Topaz Dream.

    Reply
  81. Interesting looking reads.
    The Sharon Shinn ‘elemental blessings’ books are available in audio and kindle in the UK …. and we are usually the last to get the goodies!
    I have enjoyed some of the inspector Lynley books serialized for TV but haven’t tried the books yet.
    Mary Balogh’s Westcott series is high on my current reading list.The audios read by Rosalyn Landor are superb and Balogh certainly writes enthralling romances.
    By contrast I am also reading Val McDermid’s detective thriller series with Tony Hill and Carol Jordan. This is on the edge of your seat stuff and pretty gruesome in places …. steer clear if you suffer from nightmares. I have reached book 3 and the possibility of a romantic connection between the psychologist profiler Tony and the police detective Carol seems to be developing but I suspect that romantic fireworks will probably have to wait until the end of the series!

    Reply
  82. Interesting looking reads.
    The Sharon Shinn ‘elemental blessings’ books are available in audio and kindle in the UK …. and we are usually the last to get the goodies!
    I have enjoyed some of the inspector Lynley books serialized for TV but haven’t tried the books yet.
    Mary Balogh’s Westcott series is high on my current reading list.The audios read by Rosalyn Landor are superb and Balogh certainly writes enthralling romances.
    By contrast I am also reading Val McDermid’s detective thriller series with Tony Hill and Carol Jordan. This is on the edge of your seat stuff and pretty gruesome in places …. steer clear if you suffer from nightmares. I have reached book 3 and the possibility of a romantic connection between the psychologist profiler Tony and the police detective Carol seems to be developing but I suspect that romantic fireworks will probably have to wait until the end of the series!

    Reply
  83. Interesting looking reads.
    The Sharon Shinn ‘elemental blessings’ books are available in audio and kindle in the UK …. and we are usually the last to get the goodies!
    I have enjoyed some of the inspector Lynley books serialized for TV but haven’t tried the books yet.
    Mary Balogh’s Westcott series is high on my current reading list.The audios read by Rosalyn Landor are superb and Balogh certainly writes enthralling romances.
    By contrast I am also reading Val McDermid’s detective thriller series with Tony Hill and Carol Jordan. This is on the edge of your seat stuff and pretty gruesome in places …. steer clear if you suffer from nightmares. I have reached book 3 and the possibility of a romantic connection between the psychologist profiler Tony and the police detective Carol seems to be developing but I suspect that romantic fireworks will probably have to wait until the end of the series!

    Reply
  84. Interesting looking reads.
    The Sharon Shinn ‘elemental blessings’ books are available in audio and kindle in the UK …. and we are usually the last to get the goodies!
    I have enjoyed some of the inspector Lynley books serialized for TV but haven’t tried the books yet.
    Mary Balogh’s Westcott series is high on my current reading list.The audios read by Rosalyn Landor are superb and Balogh certainly writes enthralling romances.
    By contrast I am also reading Val McDermid’s detective thriller series with Tony Hill and Carol Jordan. This is on the edge of your seat stuff and pretty gruesome in places …. steer clear if you suffer from nightmares. I have reached book 3 and the possibility of a romantic connection between the psychologist profiler Tony and the police detective Carol seems to be developing but I suspect that romantic fireworks will probably have to wait until the end of the series!

    Reply
  85. Interesting looking reads.
    The Sharon Shinn ‘elemental blessings’ books are available in audio and kindle in the UK …. and we are usually the last to get the goodies!
    I have enjoyed some of the inspector Lynley books serialized for TV but haven’t tried the books yet.
    Mary Balogh’s Westcott series is high on my current reading list.The audios read by Rosalyn Landor are superb and Balogh certainly writes enthralling romances.
    By contrast I am also reading Val McDermid’s detective thriller series with Tony Hill and Carol Jordan. This is on the edge of your seat stuff and pretty gruesome in places …. steer clear if you suffer from nightmares. I have reached book 3 and the possibility of a romantic connection between the psychologist profiler Tony and the police detective Carol seems to be developing but I suspect that romantic fireworks will probably have to wait until the end of the series!

    Reply
  86. I’ve found the Inspector Lynley books better on TV than in book form. Happens that way sometimes. It may be that I like the characters’ actions better than their thoughts …

    Reply
  87. I’ve found the Inspector Lynley books better on TV than in book form. Happens that way sometimes. It may be that I like the characters’ actions better than their thoughts …

    Reply
  88. I’ve found the Inspector Lynley books better on TV than in book form. Happens that way sometimes. It may be that I like the characters’ actions better than their thoughts …

    Reply
  89. I’ve found the Inspector Lynley books better on TV than in book form. Happens that way sometimes. It may be that I like the characters’ actions better than their thoughts …

    Reply
  90. I’ve found the Inspector Lynley books better on TV than in book form. Happens that way sometimes. It may be that I like the characters’ actions better than their thoughts …

    Reply
  91. The books feature some characters who can travel between worlds which have developed with different histories but are in the same location. It’s an intriguing concept.

    Reply
  92. The books feature some characters who can travel between worlds which have developed with different histories but are in the same location. It’s an intriguing concept.

    Reply
  93. The books feature some characters who can travel between worlds which have developed with different histories but are in the same location. It’s an intriguing concept.

    Reply
  94. The books feature some characters who can travel between worlds which have developed with different histories but are in the same location. It’s an intriguing concept.

    Reply
  95. The books feature some characters who can travel between worlds which have developed with different histories but are in the same location. It’s an intriguing concept.

    Reply
  96. I prefer the Sharpe books in publishing order, not chronologically. Cornwell wrote Sharpe’s Eagle first and I think it is still the perfect book to start reading the series. Later he added prequels and some in-between-books. Some of his newer Sharpe novels seem more pessimistic and slower-paced to me.

    Reply
  97. I prefer the Sharpe books in publishing order, not chronologically. Cornwell wrote Sharpe’s Eagle first and I think it is still the perfect book to start reading the series. Later he added prequels and some in-between-books. Some of his newer Sharpe novels seem more pessimistic and slower-paced to me.

    Reply
  98. I prefer the Sharpe books in publishing order, not chronologically. Cornwell wrote Sharpe’s Eagle first and I think it is still the perfect book to start reading the series. Later he added prequels and some in-between-books. Some of his newer Sharpe novels seem more pessimistic and slower-paced to me.

    Reply
  99. I prefer the Sharpe books in publishing order, not chronologically. Cornwell wrote Sharpe’s Eagle first and I think it is still the perfect book to start reading the series. Later he added prequels and some in-between-books. Some of his newer Sharpe novels seem more pessimistic and slower-paced to me.

    Reply
  100. I prefer the Sharpe books in publishing order, not chronologically. Cornwell wrote Sharpe’s Eagle first and I think it is still the perfect book to start reading the series. Later he added prequels and some in-between-books. Some of his newer Sharpe novels seem more pessimistic and slower-paced to me.

    Reply
  101. I agree with you — though I didn’t read them in any particular order myself. I’d get to them as I came across them.
    I like that books change over a long series with changes in the protagonist. Within reason, of course.

    Reply
  102. I agree with you — though I didn’t read them in any particular order myself. I’d get to them as I came across them.
    I like that books change over a long series with changes in the protagonist. Within reason, of course.

    Reply
  103. I agree with you — though I didn’t read them in any particular order myself. I’d get to them as I came across them.
    I like that books change over a long series with changes in the protagonist. Within reason, of course.

    Reply
  104. I agree with you — though I didn’t read them in any particular order myself. I’d get to them as I came across them.
    I like that books change over a long series with changes in the protagonist. Within reason, of course.

    Reply
  105. I agree with you — though I didn’t read them in any particular order myself. I’d get to them as I came across them.
    I like that books change over a long series with changes in the protagonist. Within reason, of course.

    Reply

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