What we’ve been reading…

Anne here. Wench Andrea/Cara is still battling the effects of Hurricane Irene, and was without power or internet access until yesterday, so we powered-up wenches have put together a joint blog on what we've been reading lately. I always enjoy these sessions because I come away with a fistful of good reading  recommendations.

Nicola said: At the moment I'm reading four books at once! I don't do this very often because usually I like to concentrate on one thing at once but right now I have a taste for different genres so I'm mixing it up. First up is Westwood by Stella Gibbons, which has just been re-issued as a Vintage Classic. Stella Gibbons has been described as the Jane Austen of the 20th century and I can see why for her sharp wit and brilliant observation. Her book Cold Comfort Farm is one of my favourites and Westwood is set to be just as funny and engaging.  Logseacortez

Next there's John Steinbeck's The Log from the Sea of Cortez, a non-fiction account of Steinbeck's marine biology trip with Ed Ricketts. That sounds a bit dry but I went on a whale-watching holiday in the Sea of Cortez a couple of years ago and I've had a yen to read this book ever since because it was such an amazing trip and a truly extraordinary place. 

What a gentwants I'm also re-reading Dr Zinetti's Snowkissed Bride by Sarah Morgan. I realise it's the wrong season for Christmas books but I am a huge Sarah Morgan fan and am reading my way through all her books at the moment. With a gorgeous Italian alpha male doctor hero, this has to be one of my all time Sarah Morgan favourites. 

And from auto-buys to new-to-me authors. I've recently discovered Caroline Linden's historicals and wonder what took me so long. I love her voice and having just finished reading What A Gentleman Wants I can scarcely wait to glom all the others!

Pat says: I just finished Georgette Heyer’s VENETIA. I wasn’t aware of Heyer until I started writing Regencies so I don’t approach her from the worshipful perspective of an impressionable teen. I adore her humor, and she knows people so well that the characters leap off the page. That said, her page long sentences and dwelling on the boring guy’s boring characteristics do prose on endlessly!  Venetia

Paleimmortal And I’m currently reading Anne Frasier’s (Theresa Weir’s) PALE IMMORTAL which I picked up for free as an e-book. I adore Weir’s romances, but I was wary of her suspense since I have nightmares. But her writing is so compelling that I haven’t been able to put this down, even when they’re torturing the kid. The true story isn’t the murderer because we know who he is by mid-book. The story really is about what is real and what is not. Quite fascinating! I love finding new books for free then following up by reading the rest of the series. An excellent marketing tool. Anthem

Mary Jo says: Having handed in a book, I've been catching up on some favorite mystery authors whose latest books I missed.  First, the most recent Daisy Dalrymple by Honorary Word Wench Carola Dunn.  The books are set in the 1920s and there are running threads about WWI and a society forever changes.  ANTHEM FOR DOOMED YOUTH tracks a crime rooted in WWI.  Daisy and her husband, DCI Alec Fletcher, are separate for most of the book since he's in charge of a high profile triple murder case, but even while visiting her stepdaughter in Saffron Walden for a school games day, Daisy's talent for finding murder victims hasn't deserted her. <G> Her situation and Alec's come together for an interesting and satisfying twist at the end. 

Gamble  I also read the recent Dick Francis mystery, GAMBLE, which is actually the first written entirely by his son Felix, who has transitioned from research assistant to co-writer to authorized heir very well.  Felix is not an identical writer to his father, but the books are certainly similar, and once again, the narrator/hero is a former jockey who has had to find a new life after racing.  The hero, Nicholas Foxton, has become a financial manager, and the story begins when his friend and colleague is murdered right next to him at the Grand National race.  I look forward to Felix having a long and mutually rewarding writing career. <G>  Canyonsnight

Lastly, I'm reading the just released Jayne Ann Krentz book, Canyons of Nights, written under Jayne Castle, her futuristic name.  I really like all of her Arcane books, where the protagonists have varied and interesting psychic abilities.  She came up with the very clever concept of writing trilogies across all three of her writing names: Amanda Quick (Victorian), Jayne Ann Krentz (contemporary), and Jayne Castle, futuristics set on a world with growing psychic abilities and a lot of elements similar to the Pacific Northwest, where JAK lives. <G>  Canyons is last of her Looking Glass trilogy, and features an antiquities dealer and a burned out cop who must deal with some strange new energies manifesting on their island.  As always with JAK, the writing is sleek, fun, and compelling. 

Dark&danger Joanna here.  I'm reading Edith Layton's His Dark and Dangerous Ways.  Not quite through it, but I'm enjoying it so much.

I seem to be on a reading binge of fictional spies, lately.  What is it about secret agents that intrigues and delights us?  Maybe it's because they're 'bad boys' on the side of right and justice.  Not tamed.  No.  Never that.  But the dark elements of their character are well under control.  

Anne here again. I've recently read Loretta Chase's Silk Is For Seduction and I enjoyed it hugely. It's a fun, sexy duel of wit and will between the hero and heroine, and is the start of what promises to be a delightful new series. I can't wait for the next. Silk4Seduction

I also recently read Jennifer Crusie's Maybe This Time, which was a warm, funny and engaging read that kept me smiling all the way through. It's a return to the kind of Crusie novel I like best, and I immediately pressed it on a friend.

Lately I've been taking myself off to my local library to write, and on the way out the other day I picked up Sophie Kinsella's REMEMBER ME?  I never got into her Shopaholic series, but I did enjoy her UNDOMESTIC GODDESS, and I enjoyed this book just as much and read it in one gulp late into the night.

Manloves2hate I also read series books and the two standouts for me in recent weeks have been Kelly Hunter's THE MAN SHE LOVES TO HATE  and Jessica Hart's AN ORDINARY GIRL IN A TIARA. Both are fun reads, if you like short contemporaries, and will leave you with a smile and a happy sigh.

 Now it's your turn. What have you been reading lately? Share, and you'll be in the draw for a book.

140 thoughts on “What we’ve been reading…”

  1. Ah, this reminds me that I keep forgetting to read the latest few Daisy Dalrymple books! I really enjoy that series. The new Loretta Chase book sounds good too…
    I’m currently trying out both the Pink Carnation series by Lauren Willing, and the Compass Club series by Jo Goodman. I’m overly fond of spies.

    Reply
  2. Ah, this reminds me that I keep forgetting to read the latest few Daisy Dalrymple books! I really enjoy that series. The new Loretta Chase book sounds good too…
    I’m currently trying out both the Pink Carnation series by Lauren Willing, and the Compass Club series by Jo Goodman. I’m overly fond of spies.

    Reply
  3. Ah, this reminds me that I keep forgetting to read the latest few Daisy Dalrymple books! I really enjoy that series. The new Loretta Chase book sounds good too…
    I’m currently trying out both the Pink Carnation series by Lauren Willing, and the Compass Club series by Jo Goodman. I’m overly fond of spies.

    Reply
  4. Ah, this reminds me that I keep forgetting to read the latest few Daisy Dalrymple books! I really enjoy that series. The new Loretta Chase book sounds good too…
    I’m currently trying out both the Pink Carnation series by Lauren Willing, and the Compass Club series by Jo Goodman. I’m overly fond of spies.

    Reply
  5. Ah, this reminds me that I keep forgetting to read the latest few Daisy Dalrymple books! I really enjoy that series. The new Loretta Chase book sounds good too…
    I’m currently trying out both the Pink Carnation series by Lauren Willing, and the Compass Club series by Jo Goodman. I’m overly fond of spies.

    Reply
  6. This has been a Summer of sensational reads for me: “Noble Cause”–a superb Civil War romance from Jessica James; “The Soldier’s Wife” by Margaret Leroy–a thoughtful, well-told tale based on the true German occupation of the small Channel Island of Guernsey during World War II; “The Bride Wore Scarlet”, Liz Carlyle’s second entry in her “Fraternitas Trilogy”, hits the ground running and offers great romantic adventure all the way to the last page; In “The Colonel’s Lady”, Laura Frantz again opens wide the American Colonial Frontier, reminding us of the exciting and turbulent world of 1700’s America; Rosie Alison’s “The Very Thought of You”–a shattering, yet spirit-sustaining, glimpse into loss and survivorship in WWII England; In Tara Heavey’s “Winter Bloom”, a long-neglected garden is lovingly and skillfully brought back to life, and so are the lives of the characters revived and renewed. Tara Heavey tells the story of five people who work together toward a common goal and discover much about themselves and each other along the way.

    Reply
  7. This has been a Summer of sensational reads for me: “Noble Cause”–a superb Civil War romance from Jessica James; “The Soldier’s Wife” by Margaret Leroy–a thoughtful, well-told tale based on the true German occupation of the small Channel Island of Guernsey during World War II; “The Bride Wore Scarlet”, Liz Carlyle’s second entry in her “Fraternitas Trilogy”, hits the ground running and offers great romantic adventure all the way to the last page; In “The Colonel’s Lady”, Laura Frantz again opens wide the American Colonial Frontier, reminding us of the exciting and turbulent world of 1700’s America; Rosie Alison’s “The Very Thought of You”–a shattering, yet spirit-sustaining, glimpse into loss and survivorship in WWII England; In Tara Heavey’s “Winter Bloom”, a long-neglected garden is lovingly and skillfully brought back to life, and so are the lives of the characters revived and renewed. Tara Heavey tells the story of five people who work together toward a common goal and discover much about themselves and each other along the way.

    Reply
  8. This has been a Summer of sensational reads for me: “Noble Cause”–a superb Civil War romance from Jessica James; “The Soldier’s Wife” by Margaret Leroy–a thoughtful, well-told tale based on the true German occupation of the small Channel Island of Guernsey during World War II; “The Bride Wore Scarlet”, Liz Carlyle’s second entry in her “Fraternitas Trilogy”, hits the ground running and offers great romantic adventure all the way to the last page; In “The Colonel’s Lady”, Laura Frantz again opens wide the American Colonial Frontier, reminding us of the exciting and turbulent world of 1700’s America; Rosie Alison’s “The Very Thought of You”–a shattering, yet spirit-sustaining, glimpse into loss and survivorship in WWII England; In Tara Heavey’s “Winter Bloom”, a long-neglected garden is lovingly and skillfully brought back to life, and so are the lives of the characters revived and renewed. Tara Heavey tells the story of five people who work together toward a common goal and discover much about themselves and each other along the way.

    Reply
  9. This has been a Summer of sensational reads for me: “Noble Cause”–a superb Civil War romance from Jessica James; “The Soldier’s Wife” by Margaret Leroy–a thoughtful, well-told tale based on the true German occupation of the small Channel Island of Guernsey during World War II; “The Bride Wore Scarlet”, Liz Carlyle’s second entry in her “Fraternitas Trilogy”, hits the ground running and offers great romantic adventure all the way to the last page; In “The Colonel’s Lady”, Laura Frantz again opens wide the American Colonial Frontier, reminding us of the exciting and turbulent world of 1700’s America; Rosie Alison’s “The Very Thought of You”–a shattering, yet spirit-sustaining, glimpse into loss and survivorship in WWII England; In Tara Heavey’s “Winter Bloom”, a long-neglected garden is lovingly and skillfully brought back to life, and so are the lives of the characters revived and renewed. Tara Heavey tells the story of five people who work together toward a common goal and discover much about themselves and each other along the way.

    Reply
  10. This has been a Summer of sensational reads for me: “Noble Cause”–a superb Civil War romance from Jessica James; “The Soldier’s Wife” by Margaret Leroy–a thoughtful, well-told tale based on the true German occupation of the small Channel Island of Guernsey during World War II; “The Bride Wore Scarlet”, Liz Carlyle’s second entry in her “Fraternitas Trilogy”, hits the ground running and offers great romantic adventure all the way to the last page; In “The Colonel’s Lady”, Laura Frantz again opens wide the American Colonial Frontier, reminding us of the exciting and turbulent world of 1700’s America; Rosie Alison’s “The Very Thought of You”–a shattering, yet spirit-sustaining, glimpse into loss and survivorship in WWII England; In Tara Heavey’s “Winter Bloom”, a long-neglected garden is lovingly and skillfully brought back to life, and so are the lives of the characters revived and renewed. Tara Heavey tells the story of five people who work together toward a common goal and discover much about themselves and each other along the way.

    Reply
  11. Thanks, August, I haven’t read a lot of spy books — mainly Joanna Bourne’s.
    Virginia, thank you for the lovely long list of recommendations. Speaking of the Guensey book, have you read the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society? That’s a wonderful book, too. It’s by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows.

    Reply
  12. Thanks, August, I haven’t read a lot of spy books — mainly Joanna Bourne’s.
    Virginia, thank you for the lovely long list of recommendations. Speaking of the Guensey book, have you read the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society? That’s a wonderful book, too. It’s by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows.

    Reply
  13. Thanks, August, I haven’t read a lot of spy books — mainly Joanna Bourne’s.
    Virginia, thank you for the lovely long list of recommendations. Speaking of the Guensey book, have you read the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society? That’s a wonderful book, too. It’s by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows.

    Reply
  14. Thanks, August, I haven’t read a lot of spy books — mainly Joanna Bourne’s.
    Virginia, thank you for the lovely long list of recommendations. Speaking of the Guensey book, have you read the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society? That’s a wonderful book, too. It’s by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows.

    Reply
  15. Thanks, August, I haven’t read a lot of spy books — mainly Joanna Bourne’s.
    Virginia, thank you for the lovely long list of recommendations. Speaking of the Guensey book, have you read the Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society? That’s a wonderful book, too. It’s by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows.

    Reply
  16. Anne, what a luscious basket of reading possibilities from both Wenches and readers! I see some I need to try pronto.
    VENETIA is one of my favorite Heyers, but I do recognize that writing styles have changed. I’m with you on the new Kelly Hunter–delightful as always–and The GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY. Just lovely.
    So many books, so little time…

    Reply
  17. Anne, what a luscious basket of reading possibilities from both Wenches and readers! I see some I need to try pronto.
    VENETIA is one of my favorite Heyers, but I do recognize that writing styles have changed. I’m with you on the new Kelly Hunter–delightful as always–and The GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY. Just lovely.
    So many books, so little time…

    Reply
  18. Anne, what a luscious basket of reading possibilities from both Wenches and readers! I see some I need to try pronto.
    VENETIA is one of my favorite Heyers, but I do recognize that writing styles have changed. I’m with you on the new Kelly Hunter–delightful as always–and The GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY. Just lovely.
    So many books, so little time…

    Reply
  19. Anne, what a luscious basket of reading possibilities from both Wenches and readers! I see some I need to try pronto.
    VENETIA is one of my favorite Heyers, but I do recognize that writing styles have changed. I’m with you on the new Kelly Hunter–delightful as always–and The GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY. Just lovely.
    So many books, so little time…

    Reply
  20. Anne, what a luscious basket of reading possibilities from both Wenches and readers! I see some I need to try pronto.
    VENETIA is one of my favorite Heyers, but I do recognize that writing styles have changed. I’m with you on the new Kelly Hunter–delightful as always–and The GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY. Just lovely.
    So many books, so little time…

    Reply
  21. “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” is definitely on my TBR list. From what I understand, it is a perfect accompaniment to “The Soldier’s Wife”. I would also like to mention two delightful contemporary romances by Kandy Shepherd: “Love is a Four-Legged Word” and “Home is Where the Bark Is”. Sweet & sensual : )

    Reply
  22. “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” is definitely on my TBR list. From what I understand, it is a perfect accompaniment to “The Soldier’s Wife”. I would also like to mention two delightful contemporary romances by Kandy Shepherd: “Love is a Four-Legged Word” and “Home is Where the Bark Is”. Sweet & sensual : )

    Reply
  23. “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” is definitely on my TBR list. From what I understand, it is a perfect accompaniment to “The Soldier’s Wife”. I would also like to mention two delightful contemporary romances by Kandy Shepherd: “Love is a Four-Legged Word” and “Home is Where the Bark Is”. Sweet & sensual : )

    Reply
  24. “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” is definitely on my TBR list. From what I understand, it is a perfect accompaniment to “The Soldier’s Wife”. I would also like to mention two delightful contemporary romances by Kandy Shepherd: “Love is a Four-Legged Word” and “Home is Where the Bark Is”. Sweet & sensual : )

    Reply
  25. “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” is definitely on my TBR list. From what I understand, it is a perfect accompaniment to “The Soldier’s Wife”. I would also like to mention two delightful contemporary romances by Kandy Shepherd: “Love is a Four-Legged Word” and “Home is Where the Bark Is”. Sweet & sensual : )

    Reply
  26. The most recent romances I’ve read are three books by friends, and all of them (friends and books) are extraordinary: A Night to Surrender by Tessa Dare, the first in her Spindle Cove series about a village that serves as a haven for women who for various reasons don’t fit into society’s norm and what happens when a wounded warrior arrives seeking to establish a militia; Mistress by Marriage by Maggie Robinson, the last of her Jane Street Mistress books, a smoking reunion tale of a baron and his rejected wife (a writer of scandalous tales); and Unclaimed by Courtney Milan (book #2 in her Turner series), which features a hero who wrote the book on male chastity (literally) and the courtesan who sets out to seduce him and destroy his reputation. I usually have a mystery going too, and the current one is Louise R. Shaber’s Louise’s War, the story of a widow working at the Office of Strategic Services in Washington, D. C. in 1942. I’m also reading, much more slowly, Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century by Sheila Rowbotham, a fascinating—although nearly overwhelming—history of the British and American activists in women’s issues from the 1890s through the 1920s, including quotations, anecdotes, and excerpts from letters, essays, novels, and pamphlets.

    Reply
  27. The most recent romances I’ve read are three books by friends, and all of them (friends and books) are extraordinary: A Night to Surrender by Tessa Dare, the first in her Spindle Cove series about a village that serves as a haven for women who for various reasons don’t fit into society’s norm and what happens when a wounded warrior arrives seeking to establish a militia; Mistress by Marriage by Maggie Robinson, the last of her Jane Street Mistress books, a smoking reunion tale of a baron and his rejected wife (a writer of scandalous tales); and Unclaimed by Courtney Milan (book #2 in her Turner series), which features a hero who wrote the book on male chastity (literally) and the courtesan who sets out to seduce him and destroy his reputation. I usually have a mystery going too, and the current one is Louise R. Shaber’s Louise’s War, the story of a widow working at the Office of Strategic Services in Washington, D. C. in 1942. I’m also reading, much more slowly, Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century by Sheila Rowbotham, a fascinating—although nearly overwhelming—history of the British and American activists in women’s issues from the 1890s through the 1920s, including quotations, anecdotes, and excerpts from letters, essays, novels, and pamphlets.

    Reply
  28. The most recent romances I’ve read are three books by friends, and all of them (friends and books) are extraordinary: A Night to Surrender by Tessa Dare, the first in her Spindle Cove series about a village that serves as a haven for women who for various reasons don’t fit into society’s norm and what happens when a wounded warrior arrives seeking to establish a militia; Mistress by Marriage by Maggie Robinson, the last of her Jane Street Mistress books, a smoking reunion tale of a baron and his rejected wife (a writer of scandalous tales); and Unclaimed by Courtney Milan (book #2 in her Turner series), which features a hero who wrote the book on male chastity (literally) and the courtesan who sets out to seduce him and destroy his reputation. I usually have a mystery going too, and the current one is Louise R. Shaber’s Louise’s War, the story of a widow working at the Office of Strategic Services in Washington, D. C. in 1942. I’m also reading, much more slowly, Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century by Sheila Rowbotham, a fascinating—although nearly overwhelming—history of the British and American activists in women’s issues from the 1890s through the 1920s, including quotations, anecdotes, and excerpts from letters, essays, novels, and pamphlets.

    Reply
  29. The most recent romances I’ve read are three books by friends, and all of them (friends and books) are extraordinary: A Night to Surrender by Tessa Dare, the first in her Spindle Cove series about a village that serves as a haven for women who for various reasons don’t fit into society’s norm and what happens when a wounded warrior arrives seeking to establish a militia; Mistress by Marriage by Maggie Robinson, the last of her Jane Street Mistress books, a smoking reunion tale of a baron and his rejected wife (a writer of scandalous tales); and Unclaimed by Courtney Milan (book #2 in her Turner series), which features a hero who wrote the book on male chastity (literally) and the courtesan who sets out to seduce him and destroy his reputation. I usually have a mystery going too, and the current one is Louise R. Shaber’s Louise’s War, the story of a widow working at the Office of Strategic Services in Washington, D. C. in 1942. I’m also reading, much more slowly, Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century by Sheila Rowbotham, a fascinating—although nearly overwhelming—history of the British and American activists in women’s issues from the 1890s through the 1920s, including quotations, anecdotes, and excerpts from letters, essays, novels, and pamphlets.

    Reply
  30. The most recent romances I’ve read are three books by friends, and all of them (friends and books) are extraordinary: A Night to Surrender by Tessa Dare, the first in her Spindle Cove series about a village that serves as a haven for women who for various reasons don’t fit into society’s norm and what happens when a wounded warrior arrives seeking to establish a militia; Mistress by Marriage by Maggie Robinson, the last of her Jane Street Mistress books, a smoking reunion tale of a baron and his rejected wife (a writer of scandalous tales); and Unclaimed by Courtney Milan (book #2 in her Turner series), which features a hero who wrote the book on male chastity (literally) and the courtesan who sets out to seduce him and destroy his reputation. I usually have a mystery going too, and the current one is Louise R. Shaber’s Louise’s War, the story of a widow working at the Office of Strategic Services in Washington, D. C. in 1942. I’m also reading, much more slowly, Dreamers of a New Day: Women Who Invented the Twentieth Century by Sheila Rowbotham, a fascinating—although nearly overwhelming—history of the British and American activists in women’s issues from the 1890s through the 1920s, including quotations, anecdotes, and excerpts from letters, essays, novels, and pamphlets.

    Reply
  31. I just finished Elaine Levine’s book Leah and the Bounty Hunter, this is the third book in the series. Not sure what I am going to read next.

    Reply
  32. I just finished Elaine Levine’s book Leah and the Bounty Hunter, this is the third book in the series. Not sure what I am going to read next.

    Reply
  33. I just finished Elaine Levine’s book Leah and the Bounty Hunter, this is the third book in the series. Not sure what I am going to read next.

    Reply
  34. I just finished Elaine Levine’s book Leah and the Bounty Hunter, this is the third book in the series. Not sure what I am going to read next.

    Reply
  35. I just finished Elaine Levine’s book Leah and the Bounty Hunter, this is the third book in the series. Not sure what I am going to read next.

    Reply
  36. I love Carola Dunn, also Rhys Bowen. I was recently introduced to the WW2 novels of Alan Furst and have found them to be quite different – the anti-Bond. And totally addicted to Laurie King’s Mary Russell series.

    Reply
  37. I love Carola Dunn, also Rhys Bowen. I was recently introduced to the WW2 novels of Alan Furst and have found them to be quite different – the anti-Bond. And totally addicted to Laurie King’s Mary Russell series.

    Reply
  38. I love Carola Dunn, also Rhys Bowen. I was recently introduced to the WW2 novels of Alan Furst and have found them to be quite different – the anti-Bond. And totally addicted to Laurie King’s Mary Russell series.

    Reply
  39. I love Carola Dunn, also Rhys Bowen. I was recently introduced to the WW2 novels of Alan Furst and have found them to be quite different – the anti-Bond. And totally addicted to Laurie King’s Mary Russell series.

    Reply
  40. I love Carola Dunn, also Rhys Bowen. I was recently introduced to the WW2 novels of Alan Furst and have found them to be quite different – the anti-Bond. And totally addicted to Laurie King’s Mary Russell series.

    Reply
  41. Sherrie here. I love these occasional “what we’re reading” posts! So many new books to add to my TBR pile!
    Lately, I’ve been into Clive Cussler action/adventure stories. That man can sure keep you reading. His heroes are just so fun–sometimes almost over the top, but you forgive that because the stories are so enjoyable and *interesting*. I mean, what’s not to love about a Jewish private eye from a wealthy New York banking family at the turn of the previous century? There’s intrigue, assassins, the emergence of the moving picture industry (his girlfriend is a movie producer), and all the politics and derring-do leading up to WWI. Cussler’s books are also well-researched, so any of his numerous series books that take place in historical times are rife with fascinating history, and the ultra modern ones often have a basis in factual history.
    I’m also gobbling up Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series. I’m actually listening to them on audiobook, and they translate well into the spoken word. (Same with the Cussler books, which I’m also listening to)
    I just finished listening to The Shack by William P. Young. It’s about a man’s journey to grace and forgiveness after his young daughter is murdered. It’s a talky book, as the man has many philosophical/theological conversations with God (who’s presented as a Black woman who loves to cook!). If you’ve ever wondered how God can “allow” misery and pain in this world, this book offers a surprising response to that question.
    Lastly, I’ve been reading a ton of books on home design, since I’m going through a major remodel. After drooling over the gorgeous pictures of expensive remodeled kitchens, I’ve come to realize that on my budget the best I can hope for is a rock-lined fire-pit and a stick for roasting weenies.

    Reply
  42. Sherrie here. I love these occasional “what we’re reading” posts! So many new books to add to my TBR pile!
    Lately, I’ve been into Clive Cussler action/adventure stories. That man can sure keep you reading. His heroes are just so fun–sometimes almost over the top, but you forgive that because the stories are so enjoyable and *interesting*. I mean, what’s not to love about a Jewish private eye from a wealthy New York banking family at the turn of the previous century? There’s intrigue, assassins, the emergence of the moving picture industry (his girlfriend is a movie producer), and all the politics and derring-do leading up to WWI. Cussler’s books are also well-researched, so any of his numerous series books that take place in historical times are rife with fascinating history, and the ultra modern ones often have a basis in factual history.
    I’m also gobbling up Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series. I’m actually listening to them on audiobook, and they translate well into the spoken word. (Same with the Cussler books, which I’m also listening to)
    I just finished listening to The Shack by William P. Young. It’s about a man’s journey to grace and forgiveness after his young daughter is murdered. It’s a talky book, as the man has many philosophical/theological conversations with God (who’s presented as a Black woman who loves to cook!). If you’ve ever wondered how God can “allow” misery and pain in this world, this book offers a surprising response to that question.
    Lastly, I’ve been reading a ton of books on home design, since I’m going through a major remodel. After drooling over the gorgeous pictures of expensive remodeled kitchens, I’ve come to realize that on my budget the best I can hope for is a rock-lined fire-pit and a stick for roasting weenies.

    Reply
  43. Sherrie here. I love these occasional “what we’re reading” posts! So many new books to add to my TBR pile!
    Lately, I’ve been into Clive Cussler action/adventure stories. That man can sure keep you reading. His heroes are just so fun–sometimes almost over the top, but you forgive that because the stories are so enjoyable and *interesting*. I mean, what’s not to love about a Jewish private eye from a wealthy New York banking family at the turn of the previous century? There’s intrigue, assassins, the emergence of the moving picture industry (his girlfriend is a movie producer), and all the politics and derring-do leading up to WWI. Cussler’s books are also well-researched, so any of his numerous series books that take place in historical times are rife with fascinating history, and the ultra modern ones often have a basis in factual history.
    I’m also gobbling up Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series. I’m actually listening to them on audiobook, and they translate well into the spoken word. (Same with the Cussler books, which I’m also listening to)
    I just finished listening to The Shack by William P. Young. It’s about a man’s journey to grace and forgiveness after his young daughter is murdered. It’s a talky book, as the man has many philosophical/theological conversations with God (who’s presented as a Black woman who loves to cook!). If you’ve ever wondered how God can “allow” misery and pain in this world, this book offers a surprising response to that question.
    Lastly, I’ve been reading a ton of books on home design, since I’m going through a major remodel. After drooling over the gorgeous pictures of expensive remodeled kitchens, I’ve come to realize that on my budget the best I can hope for is a rock-lined fire-pit and a stick for roasting weenies.

    Reply
  44. Sherrie here. I love these occasional “what we’re reading” posts! So many new books to add to my TBR pile!
    Lately, I’ve been into Clive Cussler action/adventure stories. That man can sure keep you reading. His heroes are just so fun–sometimes almost over the top, but you forgive that because the stories are so enjoyable and *interesting*. I mean, what’s not to love about a Jewish private eye from a wealthy New York banking family at the turn of the previous century? There’s intrigue, assassins, the emergence of the moving picture industry (his girlfriend is a movie producer), and all the politics and derring-do leading up to WWI. Cussler’s books are also well-researched, so any of his numerous series books that take place in historical times are rife with fascinating history, and the ultra modern ones often have a basis in factual history.
    I’m also gobbling up Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series. I’m actually listening to them on audiobook, and they translate well into the spoken word. (Same with the Cussler books, which I’m also listening to)
    I just finished listening to The Shack by William P. Young. It’s about a man’s journey to grace and forgiveness after his young daughter is murdered. It’s a talky book, as the man has many philosophical/theological conversations with God (who’s presented as a Black woman who loves to cook!). If you’ve ever wondered how God can “allow” misery and pain in this world, this book offers a surprising response to that question.
    Lastly, I’ve been reading a ton of books on home design, since I’m going through a major remodel. After drooling over the gorgeous pictures of expensive remodeled kitchens, I’ve come to realize that on my budget the best I can hope for is a rock-lined fire-pit and a stick for roasting weenies.

    Reply
  45. Sherrie here. I love these occasional “what we’re reading” posts! So many new books to add to my TBR pile!
    Lately, I’ve been into Clive Cussler action/adventure stories. That man can sure keep you reading. His heroes are just so fun–sometimes almost over the top, but you forgive that because the stories are so enjoyable and *interesting*. I mean, what’s not to love about a Jewish private eye from a wealthy New York banking family at the turn of the previous century? There’s intrigue, assassins, the emergence of the moving picture industry (his girlfriend is a movie producer), and all the politics and derring-do leading up to WWI. Cussler’s books are also well-researched, so any of his numerous series books that take place in historical times are rife with fascinating history, and the ultra modern ones often have a basis in factual history.
    I’m also gobbling up Laurie R. King’s Sherlock Holmes/Mary Russell series. I’m actually listening to them on audiobook, and they translate well into the spoken word. (Same with the Cussler books, which I’m also listening to)
    I just finished listening to The Shack by William P. Young. It’s about a man’s journey to grace and forgiveness after his young daughter is murdered. It’s a talky book, as the man has many philosophical/theological conversations with God (who’s presented as a Black woman who loves to cook!). If you’ve ever wondered how God can “allow” misery and pain in this world, this book offers a surprising response to that question.
    Lastly, I’ve been reading a ton of books on home design, since I’m going through a major remodel. After drooling over the gorgeous pictures of expensive remodeled kitchens, I’ve come to realize that on my budget the best I can hope for is a rock-lined fire-pit and a stick for roasting weenies.

    Reply
  46. In the Summer I don’t get to do as much reading as the other seasons. The heat can get quite distracting and many days are spent in the outdoors. With summer nearing an end I’ve been getting back on track with my readings. I have been reading everything from historical, paranormal to suspense. There are just too many great books out there in so many genres. I recently read The Ideal Man by Julie Garwood, What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty and Haunting Desire by Erin Quinn.

    Reply
  47. In the Summer I don’t get to do as much reading as the other seasons. The heat can get quite distracting and many days are spent in the outdoors. With summer nearing an end I’ve been getting back on track with my readings. I have been reading everything from historical, paranormal to suspense. There are just too many great books out there in so many genres. I recently read The Ideal Man by Julie Garwood, What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty and Haunting Desire by Erin Quinn.

    Reply
  48. In the Summer I don’t get to do as much reading as the other seasons. The heat can get quite distracting and many days are spent in the outdoors. With summer nearing an end I’ve been getting back on track with my readings. I have been reading everything from historical, paranormal to suspense. There are just too many great books out there in so many genres. I recently read The Ideal Man by Julie Garwood, What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty and Haunting Desire by Erin Quinn.

    Reply
  49. In the Summer I don’t get to do as much reading as the other seasons. The heat can get quite distracting and many days are spent in the outdoors. With summer nearing an end I’ve been getting back on track with my readings. I have been reading everything from historical, paranormal to suspense. There are just too many great books out there in so many genres. I recently read The Ideal Man by Julie Garwood, What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty and Haunting Desire by Erin Quinn.

    Reply
  50. In the Summer I don’t get to do as much reading as the other seasons. The heat can get quite distracting and many days are spent in the outdoors. With summer nearing an end I’ve been getting back on track with my readings. I have been reading everything from historical, paranormal to suspense. There are just too many great books out there in so many genres. I recently read The Ideal Man by Julie Garwood, What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty and Haunting Desire by Erin Quinn.

    Reply
  51. I’ve been reading some of my fellow RWAustralia writers lately. Fiona Lowe’s Boomerang Bride which is a fun read set in Wisconsin but with an Aussie bride. Very SEPish. Also Helene Young’s Wings of Fear set in the far North of Queensland and very suspenseful. Now reading Crusie and Mayer’s Wild Ride. This post reminded me I want to read some Carola Dunn so I went of to the Book Depository and got her first one and just had to buy Christina Brooke’s Heiress in Love.

    Reply
  52. I’ve been reading some of my fellow RWAustralia writers lately. Fiona Lowe’s Boomerang Bride which is a fun read set in Wisconsin but with an Aussie bride. Very SEPish. Also Helene Young’s Wings of Fear set in the far North of Queensland and very suspenseful. Now reading Crusie and Mayer’s Wild Ride. This post reminded me I want to read some Carola Dunn so I went of to the Book Depository and got her first one and just had to buy Christina Brooke’s Heiress in Love.

    Reply
  53. I’ve been reading some of my fellow RWAustralia writers lately. Fiona Lowe’s Boomerang Bride which is a fun read set in Wisconsin but with an Aussie bride. Very SEPish. Also Helene Young’s Wings of Fear set in the far North of Queensland and very suspenseful. Now reading Crusie and Mayer’s Wild Ride. This post reminded me I want to read some Carola Dunn so I went of to the Book Depository and got her first one and just had to buy Christina Brooke’s Heiress in Love.

    Reply
  54. I’ve been reading some of my fellow RWAustralia writers lately. Fiona Lowe’s Boomerang Bride which is a fun read set in Wisconsin but with an Aussie bride. Very SEPish. Also Helene Young’s Wings of Fear set in the far North of Queensland and very suspenseful. Now reading Crusie and Mayer’s Wild Ride. This post reminded me I want to read some Carola Dunn so I went of to the Book Depository and got her first one and just had to buy Christina Brooke’s Heiress in Love.

    Reply
  55. I’ve been reading some of my fellow RWAustralia writers lately. Fiona Lowe’s Boomerang Bride which is a fun read set in Wisconsin but with an Aussie bride. Very SEPish. Also Helene Young’s Wings of Fear set in the far North of Queensland and very suspenseful. Now reading Crusie and Mayer’s Wild Ride. This post reminded me I want to read some Carola Dunn so I went of to the Book Depository and got her first one and just had to buy Christina Brooke’s Heiress in Love.

    Reply
  56. I’ve spent the summer reading a number of vintage regencies of varying quality for Regency Retro Reads; Secret Wars by Gordon Thomas, about the history of MIs 5 & 6; Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, Charity Girl and Lady of Quality for the almacks discussion group; Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer (with the next two volumes high up in the TBR); Smokin’ Seventeen by Janet Evanovich; and After America by John Birmingham, the second in the series that began with Without Warning; a Charles Todd mystery; and a couple of eminently forgettable ebooks. Plus some Mary Balogh oldies on my kindle, reminding me how much better I like her earlier books. There’s probably more but that’s what I can remember offhand.

    Reply
  57. I’ve spent the summer reading a number of vintage regencies of varying quality for Regency Retro Reads; Secret Wars by Gordon Thomas, about the history of MIs 5 & 6; Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, Charity Girl and Lady of Quality for the almacks discussion group; Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer (with the next two volumes high up in the TBR); Smokin’ Seventeen by Janet Evanovich; and After America by John Birmingham, the second in the series that began with Without Warning; a Charles Todd mystery; and a couple of eminently forgettable ebooks. Plus some Mary Balogh oldies on my kindle, reminding me how much better I like her earlier books. There’s probably more but that’s what I can remember offhand.

    Reply
  58. I’ve spent the summer reading a number of vintage regencies of varying quality for Regency Retro Reads; Secret Wars by Gordon Thomas, about the history of MIs 5 & 6; Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, Charity Girl and Lady of Quality for the almacks discussion group; Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer (with the next two volumes high up in the TBR); Smokin’ Seventeen by Janet Evanovich; and After America by John Birmingham, the second in the series that began with Without Warning; a Charles Todd mystery; and a couple of eminently forgettable ebooks. Plus some Mary Balogh oldies on my kindle, reminding me how much better I like her earlier books. There’s probably more but that’s what I can remember offhand.

    Reply
  59. I’ve spent the summer reading a number of vintage regencies of varying quality for Regency Retro Reads; Secret Wars by Gordon Thomas, about the history of MIs 5 & 6; Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, Charity Girl and Lady of Quality for the almacks discussion group; Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer (with the next two volumes high up in the TBR); Smokin’ Seventeen by Janet Evanovich; and After America by John Birmingham, the second in the series that began with Without Warning; a Charles Todd mystery; and a couple of eminently forgettable ebooks. Plus some Mary Balogh oldies on my kindle, reminding me how much better I like her earlier books. There’s probably more but that’s what I can remember offhand.

    Reply
  60. I’ve spent the summer reading a number of vintage regencies of varying quality for Regency Retro Reads; Secret Wars by Gordon Thomas, about the history of MIs 5 & 6; Black Sheep, Cousin Kate, Charity Girl and Lady of Quality for the almacks discussion group; Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer (with the next two volumes high up in the TBR); Smokin’ Seventeen by Janet Evanovich; and After America by John Birmingham, the second in the series that began with Without Warning; a Charles Todd mystery; and a couple of eminently forgettable ebooks. Plus some Mary Balogh oldies on my kindle, reminding me how much better I like her earlier books. There’s probably more but that’s what I can remember offhand.

    Reply
  61. Ooh,I just picked up a few titles to add to the monster TBR list. Thanks! I’ve been reading a bit of everything. Have been making my way through Carla Kelly’s backlist, side trip into military history (napoleonic)with Wellington’s Rifles/Man Who Broke Napoleon’s Codes and Heyer’s Spanish Bride. Will be reading Longitude shortly and then onto John Land’s Caitlin Strong Texas Rangers series. Then hopefully the newest Tami Hoag followed by story on the Culinary Institute. Oh, yeah, and the newest Sean Russel Charles Hayden naval story (which has been out for a while but I just recently ran across… boo).

    Reply
  62. Ooh,I just picked up a few titles to add to the monster TBR list. Thanks! I’ve been reading a bit of everything. Have been making my way through Carla Kelly’s backlist, side trip into military history (napoleonic)with Wellington’s Rifles/Man Who Broke Napoleon’s Codes and Heyer’s Spanish Bride. Will be reading Longitude shortly and then onto John Land’s Caitlin Strong Texas Rangers series. Then hopefully the newest Tami Hoag followed by story on the Culinary Institute. Oh, yeah, and the newest Sean Russel Charles Hayden naval story (which has been out for a while but I just recently ran across… boo).

    Reply
  63. Ooh,I just picked up a few titles to add to the monster TBR list. Thanks! I’ve been reading a bit of everything. Have been making my way through Carla Kelly’s backlist, side trip into military history (napoleonic)with Wellington’s Rifles/Man Who Broke Napoleon’s Codes and Heyer’s Spanish Bride. Will be reading Longitude shortly and then onto John Land’s Caitlin Strong Texas Rangers series. Then hopefully the newest Tami Hoag followed by story on the Culinary Institute. Oh, yeah, and the newest Sean Russel Charles Hayden naval story (which has been out for a while but I just recently ran across… boo).

    Reply
  64. Ooh,I just picked up a few titles to add to the monster TBR list. Thanks! I’ve been reading a bit of everything. Have been making my way through Carla Kelly’s backlist, side trip into military history (napoleonic)with Wellington’s Rifles/Man Who Broke Napoleon’s Codes and Heyer’s Spanish Bride. Will be reading Longitude shortly and then onto John Land’s Caitlin Strong Texas Rangers series. Then hopefully the newest Tami Hoag followed by story on the Culinary Institute. Oh, yeah, and the newest Sean Russel Charles Hayden naval story (which has been out for a while but I just recently ran across… boo).

    Reply
  65. Ooh,I just picked up a few titles to add to the monster TBR list. Thanks! I’ve been reading a bit of everything. Have been making my way through Carla Kelly’s backlist, side trip into military history (napoleonic)with Wellington’s Rifles/Man Who Broke Napoleon’s Codes and Heyer’s Spanish Bride. Will be reading Longitude shortly and then onto John Land’s Caitlin Strong Texas Rangers series. Then hopefully the newest Tami Hoag followed by story on the Culinary Institute. Oh, yeah, and the newest Sean Russel Charles Hayden naval story (which has been out for a while but I just recently ran across… boo).

    Reply
  66. I just finished one of the best contemporaries I’ve read all year – Fiona Lowe’s The Boomerang Bride. Led to a lot of sighing and maybe a tissue (but I’m not admitting to anything!) At the moment, I’m in a massive read-through of Zoe Archer’s Blade of the Rose series. I really like the historical settings outside of England, though I must admit I liked the one set in Northern Canada (my home and native land, as it were) least – probably because I already knew all about it so the descriptions and histories were a bit old to me!
    Anne: I loved Silk is for Seduction – what a fantastic heroine. And even though kids in romance tend to grate my teeth(present company excluded!), there’s something about Loretta Chase that makes them enjoyable instead of cloying 🙂

    Reply
  67. I just finished one of the best contemporaries I’ve read all year – Fiona Lowe’s The Boomerang Bride. Led to a lot of sighing and maybe a tissue (but I’m not admitting to anything!) At the moment, I’m in a massive read-through of Zoe Archer’s Blade of the Rose series. I really like the historical settings outside of England, though I must admit I liked the one set in Northern Canada (my home and native land, as it were) least – probably because I already knew all about it so the descriptions and histories were a bit old to me!
    Anne: I loved Silk is for Seduction – what a fantastic heroine. And even though kids in romance tend to grate my teeth(present company excluded!), there’s something about Loretta Chase that makes them enjoyable instead of cloying 🙂

    Reply
  68. I just finished one of the best contemporaries I’ve read all year – Fiona Lowe’s The Boomerang Bride. Led to a lot of sighing and maybe a tissue (but I’m not admitting to anything!) At the moment, I’m in a massive read-through of Zoe Archer’s Blade of the Rose series. I really like the historical settings outside of England, though I must admit I liked the one set in Northern Canada (my home and native land, as it were) least – probably because I already knew all about it so the descriptions and histories were a bit old to me!
    Anne: I loved Silk is for Seduction – what a fantastic heroine. And even though kids in romance tend to grate my teeth(present company excluded!), there’s something about Loretta Chase that makes them enjoyable instead of cloying 🙂

    Reply
  69. I just finished one of the best contemporaries I’ve read all year – Fiona Lowe’s The Boomerang Bride. Led to a lot of sighing and maybe a tissue (but I’m not admitting to anything!) At the moment, I’m in a massive read-through of Zoe Archer’s Blade of the Rose series. I really like the historical settings outside of England, though I must admit I liked the one set in Northern Canada (my home and native land, as it were) least – probably because I already knew all about it so the descriptions and histories were a bit old to me!
    Anne: I loved Silk is for Seduction – what a fantastic heroine. And even though kids in romance tend to grate my teeth(present company excluded!), there’s something about Loretta Chase that makes them enjoyable instead of cloying 🙂

    Reply
  70. I just finished one of the best contemporaries I’ve read all year – Fiona Lowe’s The Boomerang Bride. Led to a lot of sighing and maybe a tissue (but I’m not admitting to anything!) At the moment, I’m in a massive read-through of Zoe Archer’s Blade of the Rose series. I really like the historical settings outside of England, though I must admit I liked the one set in Northern Canada (my home and native land, as it were) least – probably because I already knew all about it so the descriptions and histories were a bit old to me!
    Anne: I loved Silk is for Seduction – what a fantastic heroine. And even though kids in romance tend to grate my teeth(present company excluded!), there’s something about Loretta Chase that makes them enjoyable instead of cloying 🙂

    Reply
  71. I’m loving all these recommendations.
    I actually slept in late today because I was up half the night reading another Sophie Kinsella book, 20’s GIRL.
    When I started it, I thought it was going to be a light, funny ghost story, and it was, but the second half was so warm and with real heart. And such a satisfying ending. It was a library book, but I’ve just bought my own copy on line because I know I’ll want to read it again.
    Kate, I agree with you about the little girl in Chase’s Silk is for Seduction book. When she first appeared I half expected to find her irritating, but she wasn’t too precocious, and she was such a little devil, with such single-minded determination, I really liked her.

    Reply
  72. I’m loving all these recommendations.
    I actually slept in late today because I was up half the night reading another Sophie Kinsella book, 20’s GIRL.
    When I started it, I thought it was going to be a light, funny ghost story, and it was, but the second half was so warm and with real heart. And such a satisfying ending. It was a library book, but I’ve just bought my own copy on line because I know I’ll want to read it again.
    Kate, I agree with you about the little girl in Chase’s Silk is for Seduction book. When she first appeared I half expected to find her irritating, but she wasn’t too precocious, and she was such a little devil, with such single-minded determination, I really liked her.

    Reply
  73. I’m loving all these recommendations.
    I actually slept in late today because I was up half the night reading another Sophie Kinsella book, 20’s GIRL.
    When I started it, I thought it was going to be a light, funny ghost story, and it was, but the second half was so warm and with real heart. And such a satisfying ending. It was a library book, but I’ve just bought my own copy on line because I know I’ll want to read it again.
    Kate, I agree with you about the little girl in Chase’s Silk is for Seduction book. When she first appeared I half expected to find her irritating, but she wasn’t too precocious, and she was such a little devil, with such single-minded determination, I really liked her.

    Reply
  74. I’m loving all these recommendations.
    I actually slept in late today because I was up half the night reading another Sophie Kinsella book, 20’s GIRL.
    When I started it, I thought it was going to be a light, funny ghost story, and it was, but the second half was so warm and with real heart. And such a satisfying ending. It was a library book, but I’ve just bought my own copy on line because I know I’ll want to read it again.
    Kate, I agree with you about the little girl in Chase’s Silk is for Seduction book. When she first appeared I half expected to find her irritating, but she wasn’t too precocious, and she was such a little devil, with such single-minded determination, I really liked her.

    Reply
  75. I’m loving all these recommendations.
    I actually slept in late today because I was up half the night reading another Sophie Kinsella book, 20’s GIRL.
    When I started it, I thought it was going to be a light, funny ghost story, and it was, but the second half was so warm and with real heart. And such a satisfying ending. It was a library book, but I’ve just bought my own copy on line because I know I’ll want to read it again.
    Kate, I agree with you about the little girl in Chase’s Silk is for Seduction book. When she first appeared I half expected to find her irritating, but she wasn’t too precocious, and she was such a little devil, with such single-minded determination, I really liked her.

    Reply
  76. I’m not in the running for a book but I did want to mention two FABULOUS reads I finished over the weekend. The first was Madeline Hunter’s Dangerous in Diamonds book 4 of her Rarest Blooms series. That woman knows how to torment and tantalize her readers with a love scene. The build ups are so well done. Each book is a stand alone but seriously you don’t want to miss a one.
    And, I also finished Penny Warner’s How to Survive a Killer Seance, book 3 of her Killer parties series. Again, these are all stand alones that take place in San Francisco bay area. I’ve lived her for most of my life and still enjoy her views of parts of the city. She also selects a disease or disability that becomes part of the story – but not in an obvious or blatant way — it’s woven into the story, shedding light on it for those who haven’t dealt with it and supporting those who have. She’s funny, innovative and I’m eagerly looking forward to book 4.
    And then I’m about half way through Jude Deveraux Heartwishes and I have to say this is the first time in awhile I’ve read three books in a row that I could not choose the best if I had to. They are all wonderful. I think Heartwishes is the best of her Edilean series.

    Reply
  77. I’m not in the running for a book but I did want to mention two FABULOUS reads I finished over the weekend. The first was Madeline Hunter’s Dangerous in Diamonds book 4 of her Rarest Blooms series. That woman knows how to torment and tantalize her readers with a love scene. The build ups are so well done. Each book is a stand alone but seriously you don’t want to miss a one.
    And, I also finished Penny Warner’s How to Survive a Killer Seance, book 3 of her Killer parties series. Again, these are all stand alones that take place in San Francisco bay area. I’ve lived her for most of my life and still enjoy her views of parts of the city. She also selects a disease or disability that becomes part of the story – but not in an obvious or blatant way — it’s woven into the story, shedding light on it for those who haven’t dealt with it and supporting those who have. She’s funny, innovative and I’m eagerly looking forward to book 4.
    And then I’m about half way through Jude Deveraux Heartwishes and I have to say this is the first time in awhile I’ve read three books in a row that I could not choose the best if I had to. They are all wonderful. I think Heartwishes is the best of her Edilean series.

    Reply
  78. I’m not in the running for a book but I did want to mention two FABULOUS reads I finished over the weekend. The first was Madeline Hunter’s Dangerous in Diamonds book 4 of her Rarest Blooms series. That woman knows how to torment and tantalize her readers with a love scene. The build ups are so well done. Each book is a stand alone but seriously you don’t want to miss a one.
    And, I also finished Penny Warner’s How to Survive a Killer Seance, book 3 of her Killer parties series. Again, these are all stand alones that take place in San Francisco bay area. I’ve lived her for most of my life and still enjoy her views of parts of the city. She also selects a disease or disability that becomes part of the story – but not in an obvious or blatant way — it’s woven into the story, shedding light on it for those who haven’t dealt with it and supporting those who have. She’s funny, innovative and I’m eagerly looking forward to book 4.
    And then I’m about half way through Jude Deveraux Heartwishes and I have to say this is the first time in awhile I’ve read three books in a row that I could not choose the best if I had to. They are all wonderful. I think Heartwishes is the best of her Edilean series.

    Reply
  79. I’m not in the running for a book but I did want to mention two FABULOUS reads I finished over the weekend. The first was Madeline Hunter’s Dangerous in Diamonds book 4 of her Rarest Blooms series. That woman knows how to torment and tantalize her readers with a love scene. The build ups are so well done. Each book is a stand alone but seriously you don’t want to miss a one.
    And, I also finished Penny Warner’s How to Survive a Killer Seance, book 3 of her Killer parties series. Again, these are all stand alones that take place in San Francisco bay area. I’ve lived her for most of my life and still enjoy her views of parts of the city. She also selects a disease or disability that becomes part of the story – but not in an obvious or blatant way — it’s woven into the story, shedding light on it for those who haven’t dealt with it and supporting those who have. She’s funny, innovative and I’m eagerly looking forward to book 4.
    And then I’m about half way through Jude Deveraux Heartwishes and I have to say this is the first time in awhile I’ve read three books in a row that I could not choose the best if I had to. They are all wonderful. I think Heartwishes is the best of her Edilean series.

    Reply
  80. I’m not in the running for a book but I did want to mention two FABULOUS reads I finished over the weekend. The first was Madeline Hunter’s Dangerous in Diamonds book 4 of her Rarest Blooms series. That woman knows how to torment and tantalize her readers with a love scene. The build ups are so well done. Each book is a stand alone but seriously you don’t want to miss a one.
    And, I also finished Penny Warner’s How to Survive a Killer Seance, book 3 of her Killer parties series. Again, these are all stand alones that take place in San Francisco bay area. I’ve lived her for most of my life and still enjoy her views of parts of the city. She also selects a disease or disability that becomes part of the story – but not in an obvious or blatant way — it’s woven into the story, shedding light on it for those who haven’t dealt with it and supporting those who have. She’s funny, innovative and I’m eagerly looking forward to book 4.
    And then I’m about half way through Jude Deveraux Heartwishes and I have to say this is the first time in awhile I’ve read three books in a row that I could not choose the best if I had to. They are all wonderful. I think Heartwishes is the best of her Edilean series.

    Reply
  81. I have been reading a lot lately. Recently I finished Smokin’ Seventeen be Janet Evanovich, the first two in Sarah Maclean’s series Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake & Ten Ways to be Adored When Landing a Lord. Patricia Rice’s The Devilish Montague(can’t wait to read The Wicked Wyckerly). I highly recommend all of them. At the moment I am reading Suddenly by Candace Camp, The Confession by Grisham and the recently released Annotated Pride and Prejudice. I am really enjoying each of them. Now I have to go and add several to my reading list!

    Reply
  82. I have been reading a lot lately. Recently I finished Smokin’ Seventeen be Janet Evanovich, the first two in Sarah Maclean’s series Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake & Ten Ways to be Adored When Landing a Lord. Patricia Rice’s The Devilish Montague(can’t wait to read The Wicked Wyckerly). I highly recommend all of them. At the moment I am reading Suddenly by Candace Camp, The Confession by Grisham and the recently released Annotated Pride and Prejudice. I am really enjoying each of them. Now I have to go and add several to my reading list!

    Reply
  83. I have been reading a lot lately. Recently I finished Smokin’ Seventeen be Janet Evanovich, the first two in Sarah Maclean’s series Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake & Ten Ways to be Adored When Landing a Lord. Patricia Rice’s The Devilish Montague(can’t wait to read The Wicked Wyckerly). I highly recommend all of them. At the moment I am reading Suddenly by Candace Camp, The Confession by Grisham and the recently released Annotated Pride and Prejudice. I am really enjoying each of them. Now I have to go and add several to my reading list!

    Reply
  84. I have been reading a lot lately. Recently I finished Smokin’ Seventeen be Janet Evanovich, the first two in Sarah Maclean’s series Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake & Ten Ways to be Adored When Landing a Lord. Patricia Rice’s The Devilish Montague(can’t wait to read The Wicked Wyckerly). I highly recommend all of them. At the moment I am reading Suddenly by Candace Camp, The Confession by Grisham and the recently released Annotated Pride and Prejudice. I am really enjoying each of them. Now I have to go and add several to my reading list!

    Reply
  85. I have been reading a lot lately. Recently I finished Smokin’ Seventeen be Janet Evanovich, the first two in Sarah Maclean’s series Nine Rules to Break When Romancing a Rake & Ten Ways to be Adored When Landing a Lord. Patricia Rice’s The Devilish Montague(can’t wait to read The Wicked Wyckerly). I highly recommend all of them. At the moment I am reading Suddenly by Candace Camp, The Confession by Grisham and the recently released Annotated Pride and Prejudice. I am really enjoying each of them. Now I have to go and add several to my reading list!

    Reply
  86. I’ve just devoured NZ writer Sophia James, RBY wining book “One Unashamed Night” and its precursor “High Seas to High Society”. Fabulous reads with terrific, wounded heroes to die for. I’m hanging out for the 3rd book in the series.
    For those who like bad boy historical spies and would like to play in a different period of history, I am going for a bit of blatant self promotion here and recommend my English Civil War spy novel, THE KING’S MAN which is closely based on the real spy intrigues of Cromwell’s interregnum. You can find it on Amazon/Kindle or go to my website http://www.alisonstuart.com for more details.

    Reply
  87. I’ve just devoured NZ writer Sophia James, RBY wining book “One Unashamed Night” and its precursor “High Seas to High Society”. Fabulous reads with terrific, wounded heroes to die for. I’m hanging out for the 3rd book in the series.
    For those who like bad boy historical spies and would like to play in a different period of history, I am going for a bit of blatant self promotion here and recommend my English Civil War spy novel, THE KING’S MAN which is closely based on the real spy intrigues of Cromwell’s interregnum. You can find it on Amazon/Kindle or go to my website http://www.alisonstuart.com for more details.

    Reply
  88. I’ve just devoured NZ writer Sophia James, RBY wining book “One Unashamed Night” and its precursor “High Seas to High Society”. Fabulous reads with terrific, wounded heroes to die for. I’m hanging out for the 3rd book in the series.
    For those who like bad boy historical spies and would like to play in a different period of history, I am going for a bit of blatant self promotion here and recommend my English Civil War spy novel, THE KING’S MAN which is closely based on the real spy intrigues of Cromwell’s interregnum. You can find it on Amazon/Kindle or go to my website http://www.alisonstuart.com for more details.

    Reply
  89. I’ve just devoured NZ writer Sophia James, RBY wining book “One Unashamed Night” and its precursor “High Seas to High Society”. Fabulous reads with terrific, wounded heroes to die for. I’m hanging out for the 3rd book in the series.
    For those who like bad boy historical spies and would like to play in a different period of history, I am going for a bit of blatant self promotion here and recommend my English Civil War spy novel, THE KING’S MAN which is closely based on the real spy intrigues of Cromwell’s interregnum. You can find it on Amazon/Kindle or go to my website http://www.alisonstuart.com for more details.

    Reply
  90. I’ve just devoured NZ writer Sophia James, RBY wining book “One Unashamed Night” and its precursor “High Seas to High Society”. Fabulous reads with terrific, wounded heroes to die for. I’m hanging out for the 3rd book in the series.
    For those who like bad boy historical spies and would like to play in a different period of history, I am going for a bit of blatant self promotion here and recommend my English Civil War spy novel, THE KING’S MAN which is closely based on the real spy intrigues of Cromwell’s interregnum. You can find it on Amazon/Kindle or go to my website http://www.alisonstuart.com for more details.

    Reply
  91. Anne, I adored Loretta’s ‘Silk is For Seduction’ too! I’m so looking forward to the next book. I’ve read two other fabulous books recently, Christina Brooke’s ‘Heiress in Love’, and Patricia’s ‘The Devilish Montague’. All of these books kept me up reading late into the night. I’ve just started Karleen Koen’s ‘Before Versailles’ and loving it.

    Reply
  92. Anne, I adored Loretta’s ‘Silk is For Seduction’ too! I’m so looking forward to the next book. I’ve read two other fabulous books recently, Christina Brooke’s ‘Heiress in Love’, and Patricia’s ‘The Devilish Montague’. All of these books kept me up reading late into the night. I’ve just started Karleen Koen’s ‘Before Versailles’ and loving it.

    Reply
  93. Anne, I adored Loretta’s ‘Silk is For Seduction’ too! I’m so looking forward to the next book. I’ve read two other fabulous books recently, Christina Brooke’s ‘Heiress in Love’, and Patricia’s ‘The Devilish Montague’. All of these books kept me up reading late into the night. I’ve just started Karleen Koen’s ‘Before Versailles’ and loving it.

    Reply
  94. Anne, I adored Loretta’s ‘Silk is For Seduction’ too! I’m so looking forward to the next book. I’ve read two other fabulous books recently, Christina Brooke’s ‘Heiress in Love’, and Patricia’s ‘The Devilish Montague’. All of these books kept me up reading late into the night. I’ve just started Karleen Koen’s ‘Before Versailles’ and loving it.

    Reply
  95. Anne, I adored Loretta’s ‘Silk is For Seduction’ too! I’m so looking forward to the next book. I’ve read two other fabulous books recently, Christina Brooke’s ‘Heiress in Love’, and Patricia’s ‘The Devilish Montague’. All of these books kept me up reading late into the night. I’ve just started Karleen Koen’s ‘Before Versailles’ and loving it.

    Reply
  96. I have just finished a paranormal feast of Ilona Andrews’ Edge and Kate Daniels books and several of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling books. Yesterday I finished Singh’s Angel Blood. Then I needed a change of pace so I started Liz Carlyle’s The Bride Wore Scarlet and already know I will be reading the next books in this series too. My TBR stack never seems to get smaller!

    Reply
  97. I have just finished a paranormal feast of Ilona Andrews’ Edge and Kate Daniels books and several of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling books. Yesterday I finished Singh’s Angel Blood. Then I needed a change of pace so I started Liz Carlyle’s The Bride Wore Scarlet and already know I will be reading the next books in this series too. My TBR stack never seems to get smaller!

    Reply
  98. I have just finished a paranormal feast of Ilona Andrews’ Edge and Kate Daniels books and several of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling books. Yesterday I finished Singh’s Angel Blood. Then I needed a change of pace so I started Liz Carlyle’s The Bride Wore Scarlet and already know I will be reading the next books in this series too. My TBR stack never seems to get smaller!

    Reply
  99. I have just finished a paranormal feast of Ilona Andrews’ Edge and Kate Daniels books and several of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling books. Yesterday I finished Singh’s Angel Blood. Then I needed a change of pace so I started Liz Carlyle’s The Bride Wore Scarlet and already know I will be reading the next books in this series too. My TBR stack never seems to get smaller!

    Reply
  100. I have just finished a paranormal feast of Ilona Andrews’ Edge and Kate Daniels books and several of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling books. Yesterday I finished Singh’s Angel Blood. Then I needed a change of pace so I started Liz Carlyle’s The Bride Wore Scarlet and already know I will be reading the next books in this series too. My TBR stack never seems to get smaller!

    Reply
  101. I’ve just finished Nora Roberts Bride Quartet series and didn’t want it to end. I always wonder what happens next. Now I’m reading Karen Ranney’s Autumn in Scotland. Not sure yet what I’ll pick up next.

    Reply
  102. I’ve just finished Nora Roberts Bride Quartet series and didn’t want it to end. I always wonder what happens next. Now I’m reading Karen Ranney’s Autumn in Scotland. Not sure yet what I’ll pick up next.

    Reply
  103. I’ve just finished Nora Roberts Bride Quartet series and didn’t want it to end. I always wonder what happens next. Now I’m reading Karen Ranney’s Autumn in Scotland. Not sure yet what I’ll pick up next.

    Reply
  104. I’ve just finished Nora Roberts Bride Quartet series and didn’t want it to end. I always wonder what happens next. Now I’m reading Karen Ranney’s Autumn in Scotland. Not sure yet what I’ll pick up next.

    Reply
  105. I’ve just finished Nora Roberts Bride Quartet series and didn’t want it to end. I always wonder what happens next. Now I’m reading Karen Ranney’s Autumn in Scotland. Not sure yet what I’ll pick up next.

    Reply
  106. I’ve been out running around all weekend and haven’t had time to visit the blog, but thank all of you who are trying my Montague! I did get a chance to start Grace Burrowes THE SOLDIER. She writes intensely emotional books with lovely characters. The kid in this one is fantastic.
    And since we were stuck for nine hours on a slow train, I finished YOURS TO KEEP by Shannon Stacey, a very impressive contemporary romance from Carina Press. I don’t generally enjoy short category books but she kept me completely engaged.
    I’m almost afraid to start a TBR list from all these wonderful suggestions!

    Reply
  107. I’ve been out running around all weekend and haven’t had time to visit the blog, but thank all of you who are trying my Montague! I did get a chance to start Grace Burrowes THE SOLDIER. She writes intensely emotional books with lovely characters. The kid in this one is fantastic.
    And since we were stuck for nine hours on a slow train, I finished YOURS TO KEEP by Shannon Stacey, a very impressive contemporary romance from Carina Press. I don’t generally enjoy short category books but she kept me completely engaged.
    I’m almost afraid to start a TBR list from all these wonderful suggestions!

    Reply
  108. I’ve been out running around all weekend and haven’t had time to visit the blog, but thank all of you who are trying my Montague! I did get a chance to start Grace Burrowes THE SOLDIER. She writes intensely emotional books with lovely characters. The kid in this one is fantastic.
    And since we were stuck for nine hours on a slow train, I finished YOURS TO KEEP by Shannon Stacey, a very impressive contemporary romance from Carina Press. I don’t generally enjoy short category books but she kept me completely engaged.
    I’m almost afraid to start a TBR list from all these wonderful suggestions!

    Reply
  109. I’ve been out running around all weekend and haven’t had time to visit the blog, but thank all of you who are trying my Montague! I did get a chance to start Grace Burrowes THE SOLDIER. She writes intensely emotional books with lovely characters. The kid in this one is fantastic.
    And since we were stuck for nine hours on a slow train, I finished YOURS TO KEEP by Shannon Stacey, a very impressive contemporary romance from Carina Press. I don’t generally enjoy short category books but she kept me completely engaged.
    I’m almost afraid to start a TBR list from all these wonderful suggestions!

    Reply
  110. I’ve been out running around all weekend and haven’t had time to visit the blog, but thank all of you who are trying my Montague! I did get a chance to start Grace Burrowes THE SOLDIER. She writes intensely emotional books with lovely characters. The kid in this one is fantastic.
    And since we were stuck for nine hours on a slow train, I finished YOURS TO KEEP by Shannon Stacey, a very impressive contemporary romance from Carina Press. I don’t generally enjoy short category books but she kept me completely engaged.
    I’m almost afraid to start a TBR list from all these wonderful suggestions!

    Reply
  111. I recently read Georgette Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMAN after years away from her. I loved it. A nice guy hero, and he’s blond, too, and a mystery in it. I don’t care for GH’s nasty heroes.
    But what I like best is the language. All those glorious Regency words. We don’t get language like that nowadays. I miss it. Regencies used to have more of it than they do now. I wish they had more.
    I’ve heard people complain about the language. One even said the regency language threw her out of the story. This in a story, in my opinion, didn’t have enough Regency language in it.

    Reply
  112. I recently read Georgette Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMAN after years away from her. I loved it. A nice guy hero, and he’s blond, too, and a mystery in it. I don’t care for GH’s nasty heroes.
    But what I like best is the language. All those glorious Regency words. We don’t get language like that nowadays. I miss it. Regencies used to have more of it than they do now. I wish they had more.
    I’ve heard people complain about the language. One even said the regency language threw her out of the story. This in a story, in my opinion, didn’t have enough Regency language in it.

    Reply
  113. I recently read Georgette Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMAN after years away from her. I loved it. A nice guy hero, and he’s blond, too, and a mystery in it. I don’t care for GH’s nasty heroes.
    But what I like best is the language. All those glorious Regency words. We don’t get language like that nowadays. I miss it. Regencies used to have more of it than they do now. I wish they had more.
    I’ve heard people complain about the language. One even said the regency language threw her out of the story. This in a story, in my opinion, didn’t have enough Regency language in it.

    Reply
  114. I recently read Georgette Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMAN after years away from her. I loved it. A nice guy hero, and he’s blond, too, and a mystery in it. I don’t care for GH’s nasty heroes.
    But what I like best is the language. All those glorious Regency words. We don’t get language like that nowadays. I miss it. Regencies used to have more of it than they do now. I wish they had more.
    I’ve heard people complain about the language. One even said the regency language threw her out of the story. This in a story, in my opinion, didn’t have enough Regency language in it.

    Reply
  115. I recently read Georgette Heyer’s THE QUIET GENTLEMAN after years away from her. I loved it. A nice guy hero, and he’s blond, too, and a mystery in it. I don’t care for GH’s nasty heroes.
    But what I like best is the language. All those glorious Regency words. We don’t get language like that nowadays. I miss it. Regencies used to have more of it than they do now. I wish they had more.
    I’ve heard people complain about the language. One even said the regency language threw her out of the story. This in a story, in my opinion, didn’t have enough Regency language in it.

    Reply
  116. I’m currently reading Donna MacMeans’ Romancing the Rogue and it is so good! I also finished over the week-end, Susan Gee Heino’s Temptress in Training, which was excellent!
    lvsgund at gmail.com

    Reply
  117. I’m currently reading Donna MacMeans’ Romancing the Rogue and it is so good! I also finished over the week-end, Susan Gee Heino’s Temptress in Training, which was excellent!
    lvsgund at gmail.com

    Reply
  118. I’m currently reading Donna MacMeans’ Romancing the Rogue and it is so good! I also finished over the week-end, Susan Gee Heino’s Temptress in Training, which was excellent!
    lvsgund at gmail.com

    Reply
  119. I’m currently reading Donna MacMeans’ Romancing the Rogue and it is so good! I also finished over the week-end, Susan Gee Heino’s Temptress in Training, which was excellent!
    lvsgund at gmail.com

    Reply
  120. I’m currently reading Donna MacMeans’ Romancing the Rogue and it is so good! I also finished over the week-end, Susan Gee Heino’s Temptress in Training, which was excellent!
    lvsgund at gmail.com

    Reply
  121. A recent read was Barbara Samuel’s re-released Lucien’s Fall. Lucien is a rake. Not one of the playboy types who falls the minute the ‘right woman’ takes him in hand. He’s bad, really bad, which makes his fall so much so thrilling.

    Reply
  122. A recent read was Barbara Samuel’s re-released Lucien’s Fall. Lucien is a rake. Not one of the playboy types who falls the minute the ‘right woman’ takes him in hand. He’s bad, really bad, which makes his fall so much so thrilling.

    Reply
  123. A recent read was Barbara Samuel’s re-released Lucien’s Fall. Lucien is a rake. Not one of the playboy types who falls the minute the ‘right woman’ takes him in hand. He’s bad, really bad, which makes his fall so much so thrilling.

    Reply
  124. A recent read was Barbara Samuel’s re-released Lucien’s Fall. Lucien is a rake. Not one of the playboy types who falls the minute the ‘right woman’ takes him in hand. He’s bad, really bad, which makes his fall so much so thrilling.

    Reply
  125. A recent read was Barbara Samuel’s re-released Lucien’s Fall. Lucien is a rake. Not one of the playboy types who falls the minute the ‘right woman’ takes him in hand. He’s bad, really bad, which makes his fall so much so thrilling.

    Reply
  126. Jumping in to wave to Liz Fielding, one of my favorite writers of short contemporary series romance.
    And Linda B, I also like the Regency language and slang — it helps to plunge me into that world. I’m always bewildered when people say it confuses them. I always thought the meanings were pretty clear from the context, and I like finding new-to-me and interesting expressions.
    BTW, next week I’ve got an interview with Jennifer Kloester, the author of the new Heyer biography, coming out on October 6th. Stay tuned.

    Reply
  127. Jumping in to wave to Liz Fielding, one of my favorite writers of short contemporary series romance.
    And Linda B, I also like the Regency language and slang — it helps to plunge me into that world. I’m always bewildered when people say it confuses them. I always thought the meanings were pretty clear from the context, and I like finding new-to-me and interesting expressions.
    BTW, next week I’ve got an interview with Jennifer Kloester, the author of the new Heyer biography, coming out on October 6th. Stay tuned.

    Reply
  128. Jumping in to wave to Liz Fielding, one of my favorite writers of short contemporary series romance.
    And Linda B, I also like the Regency language and slang — it helps to plunge me into that world. I’m always bewildered when people say it confuses them. I always thought the meanings were pretty clear from the context, and I like finding new-to-me and interesting expressions.
    BTW, next week I’ve got an interview with Jennifer Kloester, the author of the new Heyer biography, coming out on October 6th. Stay tuned.

    Reply
  129. Jumping in to wave to Liz Fielding, one of my favorite writers of short contemporary series romance.
    And Linda B, I also like the Regency language and slang — it helps to plunge me into that world. I’m always bewildered when people say it confuses them. I always thought the meanings were pretty clear from the context, and I like finding new-to-me and interesting expressions.
    BTW, next week I’ve got an interview with Jennifer Kloester, the author of the new Heyer biography, coming out on October 6th. Stay tuned.

    Reply
  130. Jumping in to wave to Liz Fielding, one of my favorite writers of short contemporary series romance.
    And Linda B, I also like the Regency language and slang — it helps to plunge me into that world. I’m always bewildered when people say it confuses them. I always thought the meanings were pretty clear from the context, and I like finding new-to-me and interesting expressions.
    BTW, next week I’ve got an interview with Jennifer Kloester, the author of the new Heyer biography, coming out on October 6th. Stay tuned.

    Reply
  131. Having just finished the last of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling series, I changed back to my favorite genre, historial romance, and finished Anne’s The Accidental Wedding. Liked it just as much as the others in that series and can’t wait to get Luke’s story. Followed that with Canyons in the Night(Castle).Book in hand right now is Taming the Night by Paula D. Riggs, another change of pace for me.

    Reply
  132. Having just finished the last of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling series, I changed back to my favorite genre, historial romance, and finished Anne’s The Accidental Wedding. Liked it just as much as the others in that series and can’t wait to get Luke’s story. Followed that with Canyons in the Night(Castle).Book in hand right now is Taming the Night by Paula D. Riggs, another change of pace for me.

    Reply
  133. Having just finished the last of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling series, I changed back to my favorite genre, historial romance, and finished Anne’s The Accidental Wedding. Liked it just as much as the others in that series and can’t wait to get Luke’s story. Followed that with Canyons in the Night(Castle).Book in hand right now is Taming the Night by Paula D. Riggs, another change of pace for me.

    Reply
  134. Having just finished the last of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling series, I changed back to my favorite genre, historial romance, and finished Anne’s The Accidental Wedding. Liked it just as much as the others in that series and can’t wait to get Luke’s story. Followed that with Canyons in the Night(Castle).Book in hand right now is Taming the Night by Paula D. Riggs, another change of pace for me.

    Reply
  135. Having just finished the last of the Nalini Singh Psy/changeling series, I changed back to my favorite genre, historial romance, and finished Anne’s The Accidental Wedding. Liked it just as much as the others in that series and can’t wait to get Luke’s story. Followed that with Canyons in the Night(Castle).Book in hand right now is Taming the Night by Paula D. Riggs, another change of pace for me.

    Reply

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