What we’ve been reading in April

Wordwenchesbaloghby Mary Jo

As usual, we're reading quite a range of books! 

From Joanna Bourne:

I’m always happy to read Mary Balogh. This one is Only a Kiss. Very fine. The slow development of the relationship delights me. As always, the romance comes to us in growing trust and understanding between the two protagonists. This one is about letting go of past pain and guilt and finding new love. It’s a gently joyful book for all that as these two find each other.



And next up — Beautiful writing in this one by Susanna Kearsley. Named of the Dragon. Just utterly scrumptious. We’ve got a contemporary set in Wales on the coastline and Wordwenchkearsleythe Welsh countryside is almost a character in the book. I seem to be reading stories of overcoming old wounds this month. This is another one.

Prophetic dreams and ancient myths of Merlin parallel a mystery in the modern world. What’s real and what isn’t? This is Women’s Fiction more than Romance, but there’s still a satisfying love story inside.  And Kearsley is always so lyrical. I will follow her anywhere for the beauty of the language.

Pat says:

I've only read one book that I've finished this month, aside from one recommended last month, so this is it:

Cuckoo'sCallingCall me slow, but I just got around to reading Robert Galbraith's (aka JK Rowling) mystery The Cuckoo's Calling, the first in the Cormoran Strike series. I was so horribly disappointed by her first mystery, The Casual Vacancy, that I didn't have a lot of incentive to try again. But Cormoran sounded like my kind of hero, so I borrowed it from the library. I may have to break down and buy the next in the series (there are already two more, and they're big hunkers!) because I quite enjoyed it.

Cormoran is flawed in so many ways it's hard to keep track. He's a military vet who had his leg blown off. He has a long term love affair with a wealthy model who has just cheated on him–again. He's homeless and living in the hovel of a detective agency he's just started instead of staying in the service, and his business is about to go belly-up. And his flaws are the reason he's in this shape.

The book offers fairly flawless clues, except this is a psychological mystery and the reader needs Cormoran's understanding of human nature to put the pieces together–with the help of his trusty girl Friday. The temp he hires doesn't play a vital role, but their interaction is so good that, even though she's engaged, we see hope for the future. Maybe. Give it a try!

Andrea/Cara here:

I’ve been reading something a little different this month—a very quirky little novel LoveInLowerCasecalled Love In Lowercase. Samuel, a brainy professor of literature, is an introvert who, by his admission, lives a very mundane, boring life, rarely straying from the familiar comforts of his apartment except to see the occasional art film at the local cinema.

Then on New Year’s Day, a strange sound on his front door compels him to open it and in strolls a stray cat. This unexpected intrusion on his set routine can’t be tolerated. But the cat has other ideas. And before Samuel quite realizes what’s happening, the little intruder triggers a string of unexpected events that suddenly has Samuel interacting with the outside world—with zany and hilarious results. From his upstairs neighbor who needs help in writing a philosophy book on the magic of everyday life, to a sexy veterinarian, to a wacky writer who is "nostalgic for the future”—and ultimately to a chance reconnection with a girl he fell in love with when he was eight years old, it’s a delightful journey of self-discovery interspersed with musing on language, particle physics, the nature of reality, and classical music.

And of course love!  The subtitle sums up its essence rather nicely: sometimes love is hiding in the smallest characters. It may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but I found it delightfully charming.

EligibleCurtisSittenfeldNicola now:

Recently I’ve been catching up with some of the books that were recommended as part of our recent Overlooked Treasures blog. First I read Again by Kathleen Gilles Seidel. I thought it was a beautiful read. There was such depth to this book and the characters felt very real. I was in awe. Then I moved on to The Diary of Isobelle by Mary Lide, another writer whose stories are both sensual and beautifully written. I had a wonderful time with both these “retro reads”!

After that I had a glom on Ruth Rendell’s Wexford crime series and I’m currently working my way through them all. Her observations on human nature are very sharp and her descriptions so elegant. Alongside this I’m also reading Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld. Eligible is part of the Austen Project, where contemporary authors re-write Jane Austen’s novels for a modern audience. I’ve read some of the other novels in the project: Sense and Sensibility by Joanna Trollope and Val McDermid’s version of Northanger Abbey but this is my favourite so far. It cleverly updates Pride and Prejudice with a light touch and modern nuance,  and it's very clever and entertaining.

Act Like ItAnne's choice:

I recently read a debut book by Lucy Parker called Act Like It, a delightful romantic comedy set in the London theatre scene. A few laughs, some good romance and a few lump-in-throat moments. I'm looking forward to her second book.

From Mary Jo:

Act Like It is also my choice for the month!  This is not a coincidence since I discovered the book on Anne's blog.  <G> I immediately went to Amazon, read a couple of pages, and clicked "BUY!"  A debut book by New Zealander Lucy Parker, as Anne said it's set in London's West End theatre district. The story features cheerful actress Lainie Graham, who is starring in a Restoration drama with her recently-ex-boyfriend, Will, and the amazingly irritating and arrogant Richard Troy, who plays the villain.

Richard's temper is causing such bad publicity that the theater management twists Lainie's arm to fake-date Richard to improve his reputation. She reluctantly agrees–and slowly starts to find that there is quite a bit to like about Richard. In his turn, Richard discovers that the curvy redhead he vaguely thought of as Jessica Rabbit has a sharp wit and a personality, and that he feels oddly happier when she's around…

I found parts of it laugh out loud funny, like Jennifer Crusie. I really liked the romance and setting as well as the fact that they both tended to act like adults when things got tough. Lucy Parker is definitely a writer to watch.  

ViscountNeedsAWifeI've been reading other books as well.  One is the Overlooked Treasure, The Dear Colleague,by Frances Murray, a witty marriage of convenience.  Hard to find, but fun.  I also greatly enjoyed our Jo Beverley's The Viscount Needs a Wife. Written with her usual style and intelligence, it touches on some issues I've not seen in other Regencies. 

 

So what have you been reading?  What was fun and worthy of note?  Please share!

Mary Jo

295 thoughts on “What we’ve been reading in April”

  1. I’ve reread Waheenee An Indian Girl’s Story again and Brotherhood in Death By J.D. Robb. I’ve also been reading Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge. I mentioned the book quite a while back. I’ve been following some of the instructions in the book and it works! I’ve only had one lucid dream so far, but it works! I can hardly wait for another one.

    Reply
  2. I’ve reread Waheenee An Indian Girl’s Story again and Brotherhood in Death By J.D. Robb. I’ve also been reading Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge. I mentioned the book quite a while back. I’ve been following some of the instructions in the book and it works! I’ve only had one lucid dream so far, but it works! I can hardly wait for another one.

    Reply
  3. I’ve reread Waheenee An Indian Girl’s Story again and Brotherhood in Death By J.D. Robb. I’ve also been reading Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge. I mentioned the book quite a while back. I’ve been following some of the instructions in the book and it works! I’ve only had one lucid dream so far, but it works! I can hardly wait for another one.

    Reply
  4. I’ve reread Waheenee An Indian Girl’s Story again and Brotherhood in Death By J.D. Robb. I’ve also been reading Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge. I mentioned the book quite a while back. I’ve been following some of the instructions in the book and it works! I’ve only had one lucid dream so far, but it works! I can hardly wait for another one.

    Reply
  5. I’ve reread Waheenee An Indian Girl’s Story again and Brotherhood in Death By J.D. Robb. I’ve also been reading Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge. I mentioned the book quite a while back. I’ve been following some of the instructions in the book and it works! I’ve only had one lucid dream so far, but it works! I can hardly wait for another one.

    Reply
  6. Recently I’ve read the Fall of Poppies anthology; Moonlight in Paris by Jennifer Robson; Lost Among the Living by Simone St. James; The Gilded Knight by Donna Simpson (a reread); The First Wave by James R. Benn (Billy Boyle #2); Miss Dower’s Paragon by Gayle Buck and A Very Proper Widow by Laura Matthews (also rereads). Plus some others that have slipped my mind and some titles that would be of little interest here. In addition I looked at 30 or so Kindle samples without finding anything worth buying. Now reading Americans In Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation by Charles Glass, which has some fascinating stories in it.

    Reply
  7. Recently I’ve read the Fall of Poppies anthology; Moonlight in Paris by Jennifer Robson; Lost Among the Living by Simone St. James; The Gilded Knight by Donna Simpson (a reread); The First Wave by James R. Benn (Billy Boyle #2); Miss Dower’s Paragon by Gayle Buck and A Very Proper Widow by Laura Matthews (also rereads). Plus some others that have slipped my mind and some titles that would be of little interest here. In addition I looked at 30 or so Kindle samples without finding anything worth buying. Now reading Americans In Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation by Charles Glass, which has some fascinating stories in it.

    Reply
  8. Recently I’ve read the Fall of Poppies anthology; Moonlight in Paris by Jennifer Robson; Lost Among the Living by Simone St. James; The Gilded Knight by Donna Simpson (a reread); The First Wave by James R. Benn (Billy Boyle #2); Miss Dower’s Paragon by Gayle Buck and A Very Proper Widow by Laura Matthews (also rereads). Plus some others that have slipped my mind and some titles that would be of little interest here. In addition I looked at 30 or so Kindle samples without finding anything worth buying. Now reading Americans In Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation by Charles Glass, which has some fascinating stories in it.

    Reply
  9. Recently I’ve read the Fall of Poppies anthology; Moonlight in Paris by Jennifer Robson; Lost Among the Living by Simone St. James; The Gilded Knight by Donna Simpson (a reread); The First Wave by James R. Benn (Billy Boyle #2); Miss Dower’s Paragon by Gayle Buck and A Very Proper Widow by Laura Matthews (also rereads). Plus some others that have slipped my mind and some titles that would be of little interest here. In addition I looked at 30 or so Kindle samples without finding anything worth buying. Now reading Americans In Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation by Charles Glass, which has some fascinating stories in it.

    Reply
  10. Recently I’ve read the Fall of Poppies anthology; Moonlight in Paris by Jennifer Robson; Lost Among the Living by Simone St. James; The Gilded Knight by Donna Simpson (a reread); The First Wave by James R. Benn (Billy Boyle #2); Miss Dower’s Paragon by Gayle Buck and A Very Proper Widow by Laura Matthews (also rereads). Plus some others that have slipped my mind and some titles that would be of little interest here. In addition I looked at 30 or so Kindle samples without finding anything worth buying. Now reading Americans In Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation by Charles Glass, which has some fascinating stories in it.

    Reply
  11. I’m reading Act Like It on the recommendation of Anne and Mary Jo, and I am loving it. There are some great laugh out loud moments and I love the sparky writing. We wenches do tend to enjoy similar books – The Cuckoo’s Calling was also a favourite of mine whilst Susanna Kearsley’s books are all auto-buys for me. Minna, Lucid Dreaming sounds very interesting. I’m going to take a look at that. Thanks!

    Reply
  12. I’m reading Act Like It on the recommendation of Anne and Mary Jo, and I am loving it. There are some great laugh out loud moments and I love the sparky writing. We wenches do tend to enjoy similar books – The Cuckoo’s Calling was also a favourite of mine whilst Susanna Kearsley’s books are all auto-buys for me. Minna, Lucid Dreaming sounds very interesting. I’m going to take a look at that. Thanks!

    Reply
  13. I’m reading Act Like It on the recommendation of Anne and Mary Jo, and I am loving it. There are some great laugh out loud moments and I love the sparky writing. We wenches do tend to enjoy similar books – The Cuckoo’s Calling was also a favourite of mine whilst Susanna Kearsley’s books are all auto-buys for me. Minna, Lucid Dreaming sounds very interesting. I’m going to take a look at that. Thanks!

    Reply
  14. I’m reading Act Like It on the recommendation of Anne and Mary Jo, and I am loving it. There are some great laugh out loud moments and I love the sparky writing. We wenches do tend to enjoy similar books – The Cuckoo’s Calling was also a favourite of mine whilst Susanna Kearsley’s books are all auto-buys for me. Minna, Lucid Dreaming sounds very interesting. I’m going to take a look at that. Thanks!

    Reply
  15. I’m reading Act Like It on the recommendation of Anne and Mary Jo, and I am loving it. There are some great laugh out loud moments and I love the sparky writing. We wenches do tend to enjoy similar books – The Cuckoo’s Calling was also a favourite of mine whilst Susanna Kearsley’s books are all auto-buys for me. Minna, Lucid Dreaming sounds very interesting. I’m going to take a look at that. Thanks!

    Reply
  16. Recently finished reading PRECIOUS BANE by Mary Webb, which I think I first heard of in this blog. Though I loved it was a bit heavy and I felt the need for something lighter afterward. So I re-read a couple of my Barbara Metzger books.
    Just finished MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT which is my all time favorite by her. In this book, the heroine, her widowed mother and her great aunt eke out a living by conducting séances for wealthy clients who wish to commune with loved ones who have “gone aloft.” The heroine has also developed a reputation for finding things – which has more to do with clever deduction than hints from the great beyond. The hero, the Earl of Hyatt is brought to one of the séances by his friend and future father-in-law the Duke of Mondale who is trying to find his daughter who has disappeared. The heroine sees the hero as a self indulgent rake and he sees her and her entire household as minions of devil. It’s fun and funny to watch the love story develop.
    Next on my agenda is another re-read. This one by Mary Balogh – ONLY ENCHANTING which is where the heroine of her next book ONLY BELOVED is first introduced. ONLY BELOVED is being released next week – can’t wait.

    Reply
  17. Recently finished reading PRECIOUS BANE by Mary Webb, which I think I first heard of in this blog. Though I loved it was a bit heavy and I felt the need for something lighter afterward. So I re-read a couple of my Barbara Metzger books.
    Just finished MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT which is my all time favorite by her. In this book, the heroine, her widowed mother and her great aunt eke out a living by conducting séances for wealthy clients who wish to commune with loved ones who have “gone aloft.” The heroine has also developed a reputation for finding things – which has more to do with clever deduction than hints from the great beyond. The hero, the Earl of Hyatt is brought to one of the séances by his friend and future father-in-law the Duke of Mondale who is trying to find his daughter who has disappeared. The heroine sees the hero as a self indulgent rake and he sees her and her entire household as minions of devil. It’s fun and funny to watch the love story develop.
    Next on my agenda is another re-read. This one by Mary Balogh – ONLY ENCHANTING which is where the heroine of her next book ONLY BELOVED is first introduced. ONLY BELOVED is being released next week – can’t wait.

    Reply
  18. Recently finished reading PRECIOUS BANE by Mary Webb, which I think I first heard of in this blog. Though I loved it was a bit heavy and I felt the need for something lighter afterward. So I re-read a couple of my Barbara Metzger books.
    Just finished MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT which is my all time favorite by her. In this book, the heroine, her widowed mother and her great aunt eke out a living by conducting séances for wealthy clients who wish to commune with loved ones who have “gone aloft.” The heroine has also developed a reputation for finding things – which has more to do with clever deduction than hints from the great beyond. The hero, the Earl of Hyatt is brought to one of the séances by his friend and future father-in-law the Duke of Mondale who is trying to find his daughter who has disappeared. The heroine sees the hero as a self indulgent rake and he sees her and her entire household as minions of devil. It’s fun and funny to watch the love story develop.
    Next on my agenda is another re-read. This one by Mary Balogh – ONLY ENCHANTING which is where the heroine of her next book ONLY BELOVED is first introduced. ONLY BELOVED is being released next week – can’t wait.

    Reply
  19. Recently finished reading PRECIOUS BANE by Mary Webb, which I think I first heard of in this blog. Though I loved it was a bit heavy and I felt the need for something lighter afterward. So I re-read a couple of my Barbara Metzger books.
    Just finished MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT which is my all time favorite by her. In this book, the heroine, her widowed mother and her great aunt eke out a living by conducting séances for wealthy clients who wish to commune with loved ones who have “gone aloft.” The heroine has also developed a reputation for finding things – which has more to do with clever deduction than hints from the great beyond. The hero, the Earl of Hyatt is brought to one of the séances by his friend and future father-in-law the Duke of Mondale who is trying to find his daughter who has disappeared. The heroine sees the hero as a self indulgent rake and he sees her and her entire household as minions of devil. It’s fun and funny to watch the love story develop.
    Next on my agenda is another re-read. This one by Mary Balogh – ONLY ENCHANTING which is where the heroine of her next book ONLY BELOVED is first introduced. ONLY BELOVED is being released next week – can’t wait.

    Reply
  20. Recently finished reading PRECIOUS BANE by Mary Webb, which I think I first heard of in this blog. Though I loved it was a bit heavy and I felt the need for something lighter afterward. So I re-read a couple of my Barbara Metzger books.
    Just finished MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT which is my all time favorite by her. In this book, the heroine, her widowed mother and her great aunt eke out a living by conducting séances for wealthy clients who wish to commune with loved ones who have “gone aloft.” The heroine has also developed a reputation for finding things – which has more to do with clever deduction than hints from the great beyond. The hero, the Earl of Hyatt is brought to one of the séances by his friend and future father-in-law the Duke of Mondale who is trying to find his daughter who has disappeared. The heroine sees the hero as a self indulgent rake and he sees her and her entire household as minions of devil. It’s fun and funny to watch the love story develop.
    Next on my agenda is another re-read. This one by Mary Balogh – ONLY ENCHANTING which is where the heroine of her next book ONLY BELOVED is first introduced. ONLY BELOVED is being released next week – can’t wait.

    Reply
  21. Oh, and right now I’m reading Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives by Terry Jones and Alan Ereira. I liked watching the documentary series I found on Youtube as well.

    Reply
  22. Oh, and right now I’m reading Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives by Terry Jones and Alan Ereira. I liked watching the documentary series I found on Youtube as well.

    Reply
  23. Oh, and right now I’m reading Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives by Terry Jones and Alan Ereira. I liked watching the documentary series I found on Youtube as well.

    Reply
  24. Oh, and right now I’m reading Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives by Terry Jones and Alan Ereira. I liked watching the documentary series I found on Youtube as well.

    Reply
  25. Oh, and right now I’m reading Terry Jones’ Medieval Lives by Terry Jones and Alan Ereira. I liked watching the documentary series I found on Youtube as well.

    Reply
  26. Okay, after all the recommendations I’ve just bought Act Like It, but I have to admit to frustration. I really don’t enjoy reading ebooks, and that’s the only way it’s available. I hate when publishers do that.

    Reply
  27. Okay, after all the recommendations I’ve just bought Act Like It, but I have to admit to frustration. I really don’t enjoy reading ebooks, and that’s the only way it’s available. I hate when publishers do that.

    Reply
  28. Okay, after all the recommendations I’ve just bought Act Like It, but I have to admit to frustration. I really don’t enjoy reading ebooks, and that’s the only way it’s available. I hate when publishers do that.

    Reply
  29. Okay, after all the recommendations I’ve just bought Act Like It, but I have to admit to frustration. I really don’t enjoy reading ebooks, and that’s the only way it’s available. I hate when publishers do that.

    Reply
  30. Okay, after all the recommendations I’ve just bought Act Like It, but I have to admit to frustration. I really don’t enjoy reading ebooks, and that’s the only way it’s available. I hate when publishers do that.

    Reply
  31. Lillian, I agree that it’s a whole lot nicer to have a choice between print and e-books. But you know the changing economics of publishing, and e-original lines like Carina do give great new voices like Lucy Parker a chance. I hope you enjoy the book enough to overcome the irritation of the format.

    Reply
  32. Lillian, I agree that it’s a whole lot nicer to have a choice between print and e-books. But you know the changing economics of publishing, and e-original lines like Carina do give great new voices like Lucy Parker a chance. I hope you enjoy the book enough to overcome the irritation of the format.

    Reply
  33. Lillian, I agree that it’s a whole lot nicer to have a choice between print and e-books. But you know the changing economics of publishing, and e-original lines like Carina do give great new voices like Lucy Parker a chance. I hope you enjoy the book enough to overcome the irritation of the format.

    Reply
  34. Lillian, I agree that it’s a whole lot nicer to have a choice between print and e-books. But you know the changing economics of publishing, and e-original lines like Carina do give great new voices like Lucy Parker a chance. I hope you enjoy the book enough to overcome the irritation of the format.

    Reply
  35. Lillian, I agree that it’s a whole lot nicer to have a choice between print and e-books. But you know the changing economics of publishing, and e-original lines like Carina do give great new voices like Lucy Parker a chance. I hope you enjoy the book enough to overcome the irritation of the format.

    Reply
  36. Three new books on my “watch list” came out this April: “Always a Rancher” by Linda Lael Miller, the already mentioned “The Viscount Needs a Wife” by Jo Beverley, and the second novel of Stephanie Laurens’ Adventurers Quartet. “Buccaneer at Heart.” All were very satisfactory reads. The final “rating” of Laurens will wait until the fourth novel is out and the “over-story” is finished; at this date it looks very promising. My husband has been recommending the Rowling mysteries to me.
    I also reread Anne McCaffrey’s Talents stories, with my usual enjoyment.
    And I had missed hearing about Susan’s Kearsley’s book. It it going on my buy list right now! So thank you Wenches for the heads up.

    Reply
  37. Three new books on my “watch list” came out this April: “Always a Rancher” by Linda Lael Miller, the already mentioned “The Viscount Needs a Wife” by Jo Beverley, and the second novel of Stephanie Laurens’ Adventurers Quartet. “Buccaneer at Heart.” All were very satisfactory reads. The final “rating” of Laurens will wait until the fourth novel is out and the “over-story” is finished; at this date it looks very promising. My husband has been recommending the Rowling mysteries to me.
    I also reread Anne McCaffrey’s Talents stories, with my usual enjoyment.
    And I had missed hearing about Susan’s Kearsley’s book. It it going on my buy list right now! So thank you Wenches for the heads up.

    Reply
  38. Three new books on my “watch list” came out this April: “Always a Rancher” by Linda Lael Miller, the already mentioned “The Viscount Needs a Wife” by Jo Beverley, and the second novel of Stephanie Laurens’ Adventurers Quartet. “Buccaneer at Heart.” All were very satisfactory reads. The final “rating” of Laurens will wait until the fourth novel is out and the “over-story” is finished; at this date it looks very promising. My husband has been recommending the Rowling mysteries to me.
    I also reread Anne McCaffrey’s Talents stories, with my usual enjoyment.
    And I had missed hearing about Susan’s Kearsley’s book. It it going on my buy list right now! So thank you Wenches for the heads up.

    Reply
  39. Three new books on my “watch list” came out this April: “Always a Rancher” by Linda Lael Miller, the already mentioned “The Viscount Needs a Wife” by Jo Beverley, and the second novel of Stephanie Laurens’ Adventurers Quartet. “Buccaneer at Heart.” All were very satisfactory reads. The final “rating” of Laurens will wait until the fourth novel is out and the “over-story” is finished; at this date it looks very promising. My husband has been recommending the Rowling mysteries to me.
    I also reread Anne McCaffrey’s Talents stories, with my usual enjoyment.
    And I had missed hearing about Susan’s Kearsley’s book. It it going on my buy list right now! So thank you Wenches for the heads up.

    Reply
  40. Three new books on my “watch list” came out this April: “Always a Rancher” by Linda Lael Miller, the already mentioned “The Viscount Needs a Wife” by Jo Beverley, and the second novel of Stephanie Laurens’ Adventurers Quartet. “Buccaneer at Heart.” All were very satisfactory reads. The final “rating” of Laurens will wait until the fourth novel is out and the “over-story” is finished; at this date it looks very promising. My husband has been recommending the Rowling mysteries to me.
    I also reread Anne McCaffrey’s Talents stories, with my usual enjoyment.
    And I had missed hearing about Susan’s Kearsley’s book. It it going on my buy list right now! So thank you Wenches for the heads up.

    Reply
  41. Jo, LOVE your description of Named of the Dragon, one of my all-time favorite books, which I found in a used bookstore a couple of decades ago. Scrumptious is a spot on description!! Also true about it being more women’s fiction, but I found the romance very compelling, the scratchy, prickly hero fascinating, and the atmosphere simply magical.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  42. Jo, LOVE your description of Named of the Dragon, one of my all-time favorite books, which I found in a used bookstore a couple of decades ago. Scrumptious is a spot on description!! Also true about it being more women’s fiction, but I found the romance very compelling, the scratchy, prickly hero fascinating, and the atmosphere simply magical.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  43. Jo, LOVE your description of Named of the Dragon, one of my all-time favorite books, which I found in a used bookstore a couple of decades ago. Scrumptious is a spot on description!! Also true about it being more women’s fiction, but I found the romance very compelling, the scratchy, prickly hero fascinating, and the atmosphere simply magical.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  44. Jo, LOVE your description of Named of the Dragon, one of my all-time favorite books, which I found in a used bookstore a couple of decades ago. Scrumptious is a spot on description!! Also true about it being more women’s fiction, but I found the romance very compelling, the scratchy, prickly hero fascinating, and the atmosphere simply magical.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  45. Jo, LOVE your description of Named of the Dragon, one of my all-time favorite books, which I found in a used bookstore a couple of decades ago. Scrumptious is a spot on description!! Also true about it being more women’s fiction, but I found the romance very compelling, the scratchy, prickly hero fascinating, and the atmosphere simply magical.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  46. I read all of the Lexi Carmimichael mysteries by Julie Moffett. I read the first one as a free download on iBooks (often a disappointing experience) and fell in love with Lexi and her group of misfit friends. I loved how her character developed and few with each book. I can’t wait for the next one in July!

    Reply
  47. I read all of the Lexi Carmimichael mysteries by Julie Moffett. I read the first one as a free download on iBooks (often a disappointing experience) and fell in love with Lexi and her group of misfit friends. I loved how her character developed and few with each book. I can’t wait for the next one in July!

    Reply
  48. I read all of the Lexi Carmimichael mysteries by Julie Moffett. I read the first one as a free download on iBooks (often a disappointing experience) and fell in love with Lexi and her group of misfit friends. I loved how her character developed and few with each book. I can’t wait for the next one in July!

    Reply
  49. I read all of the Lexi Carmimichael mysteries by Julie Moffett. I read the first one as a free download on iBooks (often a disappointing experience) and fell in love with Lexi and her group of misfit friends. I loved how her character developed and few with each book. I can’t wait for the next one in July!

    Reply
  50. I read all of the Lexi Carmimichael mysteries by Julie Moffett. I read the first one as a free download on iBooks (often a disappointing experience) and fell in love with Lexi and her group of misfit friends. I loved how her character developed and few with each book. I can’t wait for the next one in July!

    Reply
  51. A book I really enjoyed this month was “The Summer Before the War” by Helen Simonson. Also the latest Charles Todd “No Shred of Evidence.”
    With so few new historical romances on the shelf this month (and a couple I’ve yet to find) I’ve been reading more historical mysteries – a number of them set in Ireland. Conor Brady’s “The Eloquence of the Dead” was a very good follow-up to “A June of Ordinary Murders.” Also, the new Quirk novel by Benjamin Black, “Even the Dead.”
    I too am waiting impatiently for “Only Beloved” to start my May booklist, and have been re-reading the earlier Survivors’ Club books.

    Reply
  52. A book I really enjoyed this month was “The Summer Before the War” by Helen Simonson. Also the latest Charles Todd “No Shred of Evidence.”
    With so few new historical romances on the shelf this month (and a couple I’ve yet to find) I’ve been reading more historical mysteries – a number of them set in Ireland. Conor Brady’s “The Eloquence of the Dead” was a very good follow-up to “A June of Ordinary Murders.” Also, the new Quirk novel by Benjamin Black, “Even the Dead.”
    I too am waiting impatiently for “Only Beloved” to start my May booklist, and have been re-reading the earlier Survivors’ Club books.

    Reply
  53. A book I really enjoyed this month was “The Summer Before the War” by Helen Simonson. Also the latest Charles Todd “No Shred of Evidence.”
    With so few new historical romances on the shelf this month (and a couple I’ve yet to find) I’ve been reading more historical mysteries – a number of them set in Ireland. Conor Brady’s “The Eloquence of the Dead” was a very good follow-up to “A June of Ordinary Murders.” Also, the new Quirk novel by Benjamin Black, “Even the Dead.”
    I too am waiting impatiently for “Only Beloved” to start my May booklist, and have been re-reading the earlier Survivors’ Club books.

    Reply
  54. A book I really enjoyed this month was “The Summer Before the War” by Helen Simonson. Also the latest Charles Todd “No Shred of Evidence.”
    With so few new historical romances on the shelf this month (and a couple I’ve yet to find) I’ve been reading more historical mysteries – a number of them set in Ireland. Conor Brady’s “The Eloquence of the Dead” was a very good follow-up to “A June of Ordinary Murders.” Also, the new Quirk novel by Benjamin Black, “Even the Dead.”
    I too am waiting impatiently for “Only Beloved” to start my May booklist, and have been re-reading the earlier Survivors’ Club books.

    Reply
  55. A book I really enjoyed this month was “The Summer Before the War” by Helen Simonson. Also the latest Charles Todd “No Shred of Evidence.”
    With so few new historical romances on the shelf this month (and a couple I’ve yet to find) I’ve been reading more historical mysteries – a number of them set in Ireland. Conor Brady’s “The Eloquence of the Dead” was a very good follow-up to “A June of Ordinary Murders.” Also, the new Quirk novel by Benjamin Black, “Even the Dead.”
    I too am waiting impatiently for “Only Beloved” to start my May booklist, and have been re-reading the earlier Survivors’ Club books.

    Reply
  56. While Act Like It is the author’s debut work under the name Lucy Parker, the author had previously published Artistic License under the name Elle Pierson; I enjoyed them both. The latter is currently 99 cents for Kindle readers.

    Reply
  57. While Act Like It is the author’s debut work under the name Lucy Parker, the author had previously published Artistic License under the name Elle Pierson; I enjoyed them both. The latter is currently 99 cents for Kindle readers.

    Reply
  58. While Act Like It is the author’s debut work under the name Lucy Parker, the author had previously published Artistic License under the name Elle Pierson; I enjoyed them both. The latter is currently 99 cents for Kindle readers.

    Reply
  59. While Act Like It is the author’s debut work under the name Lucy Parker, the author had previously published Artistic License under the name Elle Pierson; I enjoyed them both. The latter is currently 99 cents for Kindle readers.

    Reply
  60. While Act Like It is the author’s debut work under the name Lucy Parker, the author had previously published Artistic License under the name Elle Pierson; I enjoyed them both. The latter is currently 99 cents for Kindle readers.

    Reply
  61. I recently re-read Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady, The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie by Jennifer Ashley, and Patricia Briggs’ Dead Heat– all are big favorites of mine.
    Dreaming Death: A Palace of Dreams Novel by J. Kathleen Cheney was a very enjoyable fantasy.
    Fever at Dawn by Péter Gárdos and translated by Elizabeth Szász; it was a quick read and also a poignant one as it’s a novel based on letters the author’s parents wrote after the Holocaust.
    I’ve read a couple of fantasies that are new to me — two volumes of Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels trilogy and Lois McMaster Bujold’s Beguilement. Neither spoke to me overmuch; I prefer Anne Bishop’s more current The Others series.
    For my book group, the historical novel The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani; it was set in medieval Persia which is a time and place I don’t typically read about.
    A couple of male/male romances that I recently read with pleasure include the historical The Road to Silver Plume by Tamara Allen which is set in the latter 1800s in the US and deals with counterfeiting/forgery and the secret service. I also enjoyed Motel. Pool. by Kim Fielding.

    Reply
  62. I recently re-read Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady, The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie by Jennifer Ashley, and Patricia Briggs’ Dead Heat– all are big favorites of mine.
    Dreaming Death: A Palace of Dreams Novel by J. Kathleen Cheney was a very enjoyable fantasy.
    Fever at Dawn by Péter Gárdos and translated by Elizabeth Szász; it was a quick read and also a poignant one as it’s a novel based on letters the author’s parents wrote after the Holocaust.
    I’ve read a couple of fantasies that are new to me — two volumes of Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels trilogy and Lois McMaster Bujold’s Beguilement. Neither spoke to me overmuch; I prefer Anne Bishop’s more current The Others series.
    For my book group, the historical novel The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani; it was set in medieval Persia which is a time and place I don’t typically read about.
    A couple of male/male romances that I recently read with pleasure include the historical The Road to Silver Plume by Tamara Allen which is set in the latter 1800s in the US and deals with counterfeiting/forgery and the secret service. I also enjoyed Motel. Pool. by Kim Fielding.

    Reply
  63. I recently re-read Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady, The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie by Jennifer Ashley, and Patricia Briggs’ Dead Heat– all are big favorites of mine.
    Dreaming Death: A Palace of Dreams Novel by J. Kathleen Cheney was a very enjoyable fantasy.
    Fever at Dawn by Péter Gárdos and translated by Elizabeth Szász; it was a quick read and also a poignant one as it’s a novel based on letters the author’s parents wrote after the Holocaust.
    I’ve read a couple of fantasies that are new to me — two volumes of Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels trilogy and Lois McMaster Bujold’s Beguilement. Neither spoke to me overmuch; I prefer Anne Bishop’s more current The Others series.
    For my book group, the historical novel The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani; it was set in medieval Persia which is a time and place I don’t typically read about.
    A couple of male/male romances that I recently read with pleasure include the historical The Road to Silver Plume by Tamara Allen which is set in the latter 1800s in the US and deals with counterfeiting/forgery and the secret service. I also enjoyed Motel. Pool. by Kim Fielding.

    Reply
  64. I recently re-read Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady, The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie by Jennifer Ashley, and Patricia Briggs’ Dead Heat– all are big favorites of mine.
    Dreaming Death: A Palace of Dreams Novel by J. Kathleen Cheney was a very enjoyable fantasy.
    Fever at Dawn by Péter Gárdos and translated by Elizabeth Szász; it was a quick read and also a poignant one as it’s a novel based on letters the author’s parents wrote after the Holocaust.
    I’ve read a couple of fantasies that are new to me — two volumes of Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels trilogy and Lois McMaster Bujold’s Beguilement. Neither spoke to me overmuch; I prefer Anne Bishop’s more current The Others series.
    For my book group, the historical novel The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani; it was set in medieval Persia which is a time and place I don’t typically read about.
    A couple of male/male romances that I recently read with pleasure include the historical The Road to Silver Plume by Tamara Allen which is set in the latter 1800s in the US and deals with counterfeiting/forgery and the secret service. I also enjoyed Motel. Pool. by Kim Fielding.

    Reply
  65. I recently re-read Joanna Bourne’s The Spymaster’s Lady, The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie by Jennifer Ashley, and Patricia Briggs’ Dead Heat– all are big favorites of mine.
    Dreaming Death: A Palace of Dreams Novel by J. Kathleen Cheney was a very enjoyable fantasy.
    Fever at Dawn by Péter Gárdos and translated by Elizabeth Szász; it was a quick read and also a poignant one as it’s a novel based on letters the author’s parents wrote after the Holocaust.
    I’ve read a couple of fantasies that are new to me — two volumes of Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels trilogy and Lois McMaster Bujold’s Beguilement. Neither spoke to me overmuch; I prefer Anne Bishop’s more current The Others series.
    For my book group, the historical novel The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani; it was set in medieval Persia which is a time and place I don’t typically read about.
    A couple of male/male romances that I recently read with pleasure include the historical The Road to Silver Plume by Tamara Allen which is set in the latter 1800s in the US and deals with counterfeiting/forgery and the secret service. I also enjoyed Motel. Pool. by Kim Fielding.

    Reply
  66. Thanks to an earlier blog and a recommendation from yourself I’ve just discovered Alice Chetwynd Lee. I’m on my third one and really enjoying them.Susanna Kearsley is a pre-order for me too. Love her books. I just wish I had more time to read. I look after my daughter who’s been ill for a few years now and I seem to be constantly driving to different appointments. Oh well!! Some day.

    Reply
  67. Thanks to an earlier blog and a recommendation from yourself I’ve just discovered Alice Chetwynd Lee. I’m on my third one and really enjoying them.Susanna Kearsley is a pre-order for me too. Love her books. I just wish I had more time to read. I look after my daughter who’s been ill for a few years now and I seem to be constantly driving to different appointments. Oh well!! Some day.

    Reply
  68. Thanks to an earlier blog and a recommendation from yourself I’ve just discovered Alice Chetwynd Lee. I’m on my third one and really enjoying them.Susanna Kearsley is a pre-order for me too. Love her books. I just wish I had more time to read. I look after my daughter who’s been ill for a few years now and I seem to be constantly driving to different appointments. Oh well!! Some day.

    Reply
  69. Thanks to an earlier blog and a recommendation from yourself I’ve just discovered Alice Chetwynd Lee. I’m on my third one and really enjoying them.Susanna Kearsley is a pre-order for me too. Love her books. I just wish I had more time to read. I look after my daughter who’s been ill for a few years now and I seem to be constantly driving to different appointments. Oh well!! Some day.

    Reply
  70. Thanks to an earlier blog and a recommendation from yourself I’ve just discovered Alice Chetwynd Lee. I’m on my third one and really enjoying them.Susanna Kearsley is a pre-order for me too. Love her books. I just wish I had more time to read. I look after my daughter who’s been ill for a few years now and I seem to be constantly driving to different appointments. Oh well!! Some day.

    Reply
  71. I’m reading The Summer Before The War as well. Finding it a bit hard to get in to which is strange as it’s definitely my kind of thing. Won’t get much reading done this weekend. My Uncle is home from England for his birthday party. He is 100 years old. He is a lovely, lovely man and we’re looking forward to the celebrations.

    Reply
  72. I’m reading The Summer Before The War as well. Finding it a bit hard to get in to which is strange as it’s definitely my kind of thing. Won’t get much reading done this weekend. My Uncle is home from England for his birthday party. He is 100 years old. He is a lovely, lovely man and we’re looking forward to the celebrations.

    Reply
  73. I’m reading The Summer Before The War as well. Finding it a bit hard to get in to which is strange as it’s definitely my kind of thing. Won’t get much reading done this weekend. My Uncle is home from England for his birthday party. He is 100 years old. He is a lovely, lovely man and we’re looking forward to the celebrations.

    Reply
  74. I’m reading The Summer Before The War as well. Finding it a bit hard to get in to which is strange as it’s definitely my kind of thing. Won’t get much reading done this weekend. My Uncle is home from England for his birthday party. He is 100 years old. He is a lovely, lovely man and we’re looking forward to the celebrations.

    Reply
  75. I’m reading The Summer Before The War as well. Finding it a bit hard to get in to which is strange as it’s definitely my kind of thing. Won’t get much reading done this weekend. My Uncle is home from England for his birthday party. He is 100 years old. He is a lovely, lovely man and we’re looking forward to the celebrations.

    Reply
  76. I read too many books through the month to list them all. (Long daily bus rides…) So I have a tendency to think in terms of series instead. I’ve been reading as many of the Bishop Special Crimes Unit from Kay Hooper. Very gripping and a lot of metaphysical psychics. Then I was also reading so Lindsey McKenna’s. Her Morgan’s Mercenaries andd Jackson Hole series. We have a huge Rotary Used Booksale every six months and I stock up as they’re so cheap. I couldn’t find any ones of yours I don’t already have, Mary Jo – I went back twice to be sure! 🙂 I also had a list of other Wenches books to look for but obviously people were hoarding them! I did find one of Pat Rice’s that I had in ebook and I was able to get it in hard-copy. But I was hoping for others in the series. The hunt continues. 🙂

    Reply
  77. I read too many books through the month to list them all. (Long daily bus rides…) So I have a tendency to think in terms of series instead. I’ve been reading as many of the Bishop Special Crimes Unit from Kay Hooper. Very gripping and a lot of metaphysical psychics. Then I was also reading so Lindsey McKenna’s. Her Morgan’s Mercenaries andd Jackson Hole series. We have a huge Rotary Used Booksale every six months and I stock up as they’re so cheap. I couldn’t find any ones of yours I don’t already have, Mary Jo – I went back twice to be sure! 🙂 I also had a list of other Wenches books to look for but obviously people were hoarding them! I did find one of Pat Rice’s that I had in ebook and I was able to get it in hard-copy. But I was hoping for others in the series. The hunt continues. 🙂

    Reply
  78. I read too many books through the month to list them all. (Long daily bus rides…) So I have a tendency to think in terms of series instead. I’ve been reading as many of the Bishop Special Crimes Unit from Kay Hooper. Very gripping and a lot of metaphysical psychics. Then I was also reading so Lindsey McKenna’s. Her Morgan’s Mercenaries andd Jackson Hole series. We have a huge Rotary Used Booksale every six months and I stock up as they’re so cheap. I couldn’t find any ones of yours I don’t already have, Mary Jo – I went back twice to be sure! 🙂 I also had a list of other Wenches books to look for but obviously people were hoarding them! I did find one of Pat Rice’s that I had in ebook and I was able to get it in hard-copy. But I was hoping for others in the series. The hunt continues. 🙂

    Reply
  79. I read too many books through the month to list them all. (Long daily bus rides…) So I have a tendency to think in terms of series instead. I’ve been reading as many of the Bishop Special Crimes Unit from Kay Hooper. Very gripping and a lot of metaphysical psychics. Then I was also reading so Lindsey McKenna’s. Her Morgan’s Mercenaries andd Jackson Hole series. We have a huge Rotary Used Booksale every six months and I stock up as they’re so cheap. I couldn’t find any ones of yours I don’t already have, Mary Jo – I went back twice to be sure! 🙂 I also had a list of other Wenches books to look for but obviously people were hoarding them! I did find one of Pat Rice’s that I had in ebook and I was able to get it in hard-copy. But I was hoping for others in the series. The hunt continues. 🙂

    Reply
  80. I read too many books through the month to list them all. (Long daily bus rides…) So I have a tendency to think in terms of series instead. I’ve been reading as many of the Bishop Special Crimes Unit from Kay Hooper. Very gripping and a lot of metaphysical psychics. Then I was also reading so Lindsey McKenna’s. Her Morgan’s Mercenaries andd Jackson Hole series. We have a huge Rotary Used Booksale every six months and I stock up as they’re so cheap. I couldn’t find any ones of yours I don’t already have, Mary Jo – I went back twice to be sure! 🙂 I also had a list of other Wenches books to look for but obviously people were hoarding them! I did find one of Pat Rice’s that I had in ebook and I was able to get it in hard-copy. But I was hoping for others in the series. The hunt continues. 🙂

    Reply
  81. I think someone here recommended Julia Ross, so I promptly got “Night of Sin” and the sequel “Games of Pleasure”. Really enjoyed the first one and looking forward to the second. I am way behind on lots of historical series by authors that I follow, but I did read Jennifer Haymore’s “The Scoundrel’s Seduction”. It’s got a British spy/assassin hero, and a French emigree heroine. I thoroughly enjoy spy stories, and this one has lots of close escapes and derring-do, so I loved it! I do think it’s better appreciated if you read the previous 2 books in her Scoundrels series first. I also read an old Regency by Patricia Oliver, “Lord Gresham’s Lady” and up next is “Heir to the Duke” by Jane Ashford. If Jane Ashford had been writing a couple of decades ago, her books probably would have been published by Signet Regency-so if you like those, you’ll enjoy her writing. The first one I read was “The Bargain”, it was so charming and funny.

    Reply
  82. I think someone here recommended Julia Ross, so I promptly got “Night of Sin” and the sequel “Games of Pleasure”. Really enjoyed the first one and looking forward to the second. I am way behind on lots of historical series by authors that I follow, but I did read Jennifer Haymore’s “The Scoundrel’s Seduction”. It’s got a British spy/assassin hero, and a French emigree heroine. I thoroughly enjoy spy stories, and this one has lots of close escapes and derring-do, so I loved it! I do think it’s better appreciated if you read the previous 2 books in her Scoundrels series first. I also read an old Regency by Patricia Oliver, “Lord Gresham’s Lady” and up next is “Heir to the Duke” by Jane Ashford. If Jane Ashford had been writing a couple of decades ago, her books probably would have been published by Signet Regency-so if you like those, you’ll enjoy her writing. The first one I read was “The Bargain”, it was so charming and funny.

    Reply
  83. I think someone here recommended Julia Ross, so I promptly got “Night of Sin” and the sequel “Games of Pleasure”. Really enjoyed the first one and looking forward to the second. I am way behind on lots of historical series by authors that I follow, but I did read Jennifer Haymore’s “The Scoundrel’s Seduction”. It’s got a British spy/assassin hero, and a French emigree heroine. I thoroughly enjoy spy stories, and this one has lots of close escapes and derring-do, so I loved it! I do think it’s better appreciated if you read the previous 2 books in her Scoundrels series first. I also read an old Regency by Patricia Oliver, “Lord Gresham’s Lady” and up next is “Heir to the Duke” by Jane Ashford. If Jane Ashford had been writing a couple of decades ago, her books probably would have been published by Signet Regency-so if you like those, you’ll enjoy her writing. The first one I read was “The Bargain”, it was so charming and funny.

    Reply
  84. I think someone here recommended Julia Ross, so I promptly got “Night of Sin” and the sequel “Games of Pleasure”. Really enjoyed the first one and looking forward to the second. I am way behind on lots of historical series by authors that I follow, but I did read Jennifer Haymore’s “The Scoundrel’s Seduction”. It’s got a British spy/assassin hero, and a French emigree heroine. I thoroughly enjoy spy stories, and this one has lots of close escapes and derring-do, so I loved it! I do think it’s better appreciated if you read the previous 2 books in her Scoundrels series first. I also read an old Regency by Patricia Oliver, “Lord Gresham’s Lady” and up next is “Heir to the Duke” by Jane Ashford. If Jane Ashford had been writing a couple of decades ago, her books probably would have been published by Signet Regency-so if you like those, you’ll enjoy her writing. The first one I read was “The Bargain”, it was so charming and funny.

    Reply
  85. I think someone here recommended Julia Ross, so I promptly got “Night of Sin” and the sequel “Games of Pleasure”. Really enjoyed the first one and looking forward to the second. I am way behind on lots of historical series by authors that I follow, but I did read Jennifer Haymore’s “The Scoundrel’s Seduction”. It’s got a British spy/assassin hero, and a French emigree heroine. I thoroughly enjoy spy stories, and this one has lots of close escapes and derring-do, so I loved it! I do think it’s better appreciated if you read the previous 2 books in her Scoundrels series first. I also read an old Regency by Patricia Oliver, “Lord Gresham’s Lady” and up next is “Heir to the Duke” by Jane Ashford. If Jane Ashford had been writing a couple of decades ago, her books probably would have been published by Signet Regency-so if you like those, you’ll enjoy her writing. The first one I read was “The Bargain”, it was so charming and funny.

    Reply
  86. Kareni, lots of good books there! I adore Patricia Briggs–for my money, she’s the best urban fantasy writer out there because of her brilliant characterization.
    I love Lois McMaster Bujold also. She’s best known for her science fiction Vorkosigan books. She’s done less fantasy and I’m not overfond of her Beguilement series, either, but her fantasy CURSE OF CHALION is one of my all time favorite books.

    Reply
  87. Kareni, lots of good books there! I adore Patricia Briggs–for my money, she’s the best urban fantasy writer out there because of her brilliant characterization.
    I love Lois McMaster Bujold also. She’s best known for her science fiction Vorkosigan books. She’s done less fantasy and I’m not overfond of her Beguilement series, either, but her fantasy CURSE OF CHALION is one of my all time favorite books.

    Reply
  88. Kareni, lots of good books there! I adore Patricia Briggs–for my money, she’s the best urban fantasy writer out there because of her brilliant characterization.
    I love Lois McMaster Bujold also. She’s best known for her science fiction Vorkosigan books. She’s done less fantasy and I’m not overfond of her Beguilement series, either, but her fantasy CURSE OF CHALION is one of my all time favorite books.

    Reply
  89. Kareni, lots of good books there! I adore Patricia Briggs–for my money, she’s the best urban fantasy writer out there because of her brilliant characterization.
    I love Lois McMaster Bujold also. She’s best known for her science fiction Vorkosigan books. She’s done less fantasy and I’m not overfond of her Beguilement series, either, but her fantasy CURSE OF CHALION is one of my all time favorite books.

    Reply
  90. Kareni, lots of good books there! I adore Patricia Briggs–for my money, she’s the best urban fantasy writer out there because of her brilliant characterization.
    I love Lois McMaster Bujold also. She’s best known for her science fiction Vorkosigan books. She’s done less fantasy and I’m not overfond of her Beguilement series, either, but her fantasy CURSE OF CHALION is one of my all time favorite books.

    Reply
  91. Karin, I’m so glad you liked THE BARGAIN. The Signet Regencies really were a lovely line. I see Janice has already given you Jane Ashford’s history–she’s a writer with a long and honorable track record. Nice that some of her older books are being reissued.

    Reply
  92. Karin, I’m so glad you liked THE BARGAIN. The Signet Regencies really were a lovely line. I see Janice has already given you Jane Ashford’s history–she’s a writer with a long and honorable track record. Nice that some of her older books are being reissued.

    Reply
  93. Karin, I’m so glad you liked THE BARGAIN. The Signet Regencies really were a lovely line. I see Janice has already given you Jane Ashford’s history–she’s a writer with a long and honorable track record. Nice that some of her older books are being reissued.

    Reply
  94. Karin, I’m so glad you liked THE BARGAIN. The Signet Regencies really were a lovely line. I see Janice has already given you Jane Ashford’s history–she’s a writer with a long and honorable track record. Nice that some of her older books are being reissued.

    Reply
  95. Karin, I’m so glad you liked THE BARGAIN. The Signet Regencies really were a lovely line. I see Janice has already given you Jane Ashford’s history–she’s a writer with a long and honorable track record. Nice that some of her older books are being reissued.

    Reply
  96. I’ve heard excellent things about Curse of Chalion, Ms. Putney. That or one of the Vorkosigan books will be next on my list of Bujold’s books to try.
    Are there other urban fantasy authors you’d suggest in addition to Patricia Briggs? I’m always happy to get another recommendation!

    Reply
  97. I’ve heard excellent things about Curse of Chalion, Ms. Putney. That or one of the Vorkosigan books will be next on my list of Bujold’s books to try.
    Are there other urban fantasy authors you’d suggest in addition to Patricia Briggs? I’m always happy to get another recommendation!

    Reply
  98. I’ve heard excellent things about Curse of Chalion, Ms. Putney. That or one of the Vorkosigan books will be next on my list of Bujold’s books to try.
    Are there other urban fantasy authors you’d suggest in addition to Patricia Briggs? I’m always happy to get another recommendation!

    Reply
  99. I’ve heard excellent things about Curse of Chalion, Ms. Putney. That or one of the Vorkosigan books will be next on my list of Bujold’s books to try.
    Are there other urban fantasy authors you’d suggest in addition to Patricia Briggs? I’m always happy to get another recommendation!

    Reply
  100. I’ve heard excellent things about Curse of Chalion, Ms. Putney. That or one of the Vorkosigan books will be next on my list of Bujold’s books to try.
    Are there other urban fantasy authors you’d suggest in addition to Patricia Briggs? I’m always happy to get another recommendation!

    Reply
  101. I watched Gone With the Wind – all 3 hours and 40 minutes, or whatever it is – on the plane from Australia to Hong Kong the other week, so now I am finally attempting the book!!

    Reply
  102. I watched Gone With the Wind – all 3 hours and 40 minutes, or whatever it is – on the plane from Australia to Hong Kong the other week, so now I am finally attempting the book!!

    Reply
  103. I watched Gone With the Wind – all 3 hours and 40 minutes, or whatever it is – on the plane from Australia to Hong Kong the other week, so now I am finally attempting the book!!

    Reply
  104. I watched Gone With the Wind – all 3 hours and 40 minutes, or whatever it is – on the plane from Australia to Hong Kong the other week, so now I am finally attempting the book!!

    Reply
  105. I watched Gone With the Wind – all 3 hours and 40 minutes, or whatever it is – on the plane from Australia to Hong Kong the other week, so now I am finally attempting the book!!

    Reply
  106. Kareni, there are several other urban fantasy author I followed for several books, then lost interest. It’s really hard to keep a series interesting over the long haul. I followed Carrie Vaughn’s Kitty Norville series for half a dozen books. (http://carrievaughn.com/) But I often read fantasy like Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses books, or her series that starts with ARCHANGEL. http://sharonshinn.net/ Or Jayne Ann Krentz’s Arcane novels, which are always fun.

    Reply
  107. Kareni, there are several other urban fantasy author I followed for several books, then lost interest. It’s really hard to keep a series interesting over the long haul. I followed Carrie Vaughn’s Kitty Norville series for half a dozen books. (http://carrievaughn.com/) But I often read fantasy like Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses books, or her series that starts with ARCHANGEL. http://sharonshinn.net/ Or Jayne Ann Krentz’s Arcane novels, which are always fun.

    Reply
  108. Kareni, there are several other urban fantasy author I followed for several books, then lost interest. It’s really hard to keep a series interesting over the long haul. I followed Carrie Vaughn’s Kitty Norville series for half a dozen books. (http://carrievaughn.com/) But I often read fantasy like Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses books, or her series that starts with ARCHANGEL. http://sharonshinn.net/ Or Jayne Ann Krentz’s Arcane novels, which are always fun.

    Reply
  109. Kareni, there are several other urban fantasy author I followed for several books, then lost interest. It’s really hard to keep a series interesting over the long haul. I followed Carrie Vaughn’s Kitty Norville series for half a dozen books. (http://carrievaughn.com/) But I often read fantasy like Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses books, or her series that starts with ARCHANGEL. http://sharonshinn.net/ Or Jayne Ann Krentz’s Arcane novels, which are always fun.

    Reply
  110. Kareni, there are several other urban fantasy author I followed for several books, then lost interest. It’s really hard to keep a series interesting over the long haul. I followed Carrie Vaughn’s Kitty Norville series for half a dozen books. (http://carrievaughn.com/) But I often read fantasy like Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses books, or her series that starts with ARCHANGEL. http://sharonshinn.net/ Or Jayne Ann Krentz’s Arcane novels, which are always fun.

    Reply
  111. I know what you mean about losing interest as a series progresses. I have a poor memory and sometimes I’m disinclined to re-read prior books before reading a new release. It’s easier if I stumble on an already existing series which I can then read through.
    I do like the Arcane novels, and I may give Sharon Shinn another try at some point.
    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Reply
  112. I know what you mean about losing interest as a series progresses. I have a poor memory and sometimes I’m disinclined to re-read prior books before reading a new release. It’s easier if I stumble on an already existing series which I can then read through.
    I do like the Arcane novels, and I may give Sharon Shinn another try at some point.
    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Reply
  113. I know what you mean about losing interest as a series progresses. I have a poor memory and sometimes I’m disinclined to re-read prior books before reading a new release. It’s easier if I stumble on an already existing series which I can then read through.
    I do like the Arcane novels, and I may give Sharon Shinn another try at some point.
    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Reply
  114. I know what you mean about losing interest as a series progresses. I have a poor memory and sometimes I’m disinclined to re-read prior books before reading a new release. It’s easier if I stumble on an already existing series which I can then read through.
    I do like the Arcane novels, and I may give Sharon Shinn another try at some point.
    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Reply
  115. I know what you mean about losing interest as a series progresses. I have a poor memory and sometimes I’m disinclined to re-read prior books before reading a new release. It’s easier if I stumble on an already existing series which I can then read through.
    I do like the Arcane novels, and I may give Sharon Shinn another try at some point.
    Thanks for your suggestions.

    Reply
  116. I haven’t made much progress yet. I think jetlag made me insane when I made the decision to start it! Nobody will know if I never finish…
    We are Catholic (I am not a very good Catholic!), but also celebrate today. I am in a small town for the holiday, and there are celebrations everywhere. It is a really big deal here.

    Reply
  117. I haven’t made much progress yet. I think jetlag made me insane when I made the decision to start it! Nobody will know if I never finish…
    We are Catholic (I am not a very good Catholic!), but also celebrate today. I am in a small town for the holiday, and there are celebrations everywhere. It is a really big deal here.

    Reply
  118. I haven’t made much progress yet. I think jetlag made me insane when I made the decision to start it! Nobody will know if I never finish…
    We are Catholic (I am not a very good Catholic!), but also celebrate today. I am in a small town for the holiday, and there are celebrations everywhere. It is a really big deal here.

    Reply
  119. I haven’t made much progress yet. I think jetlag made me insane when I made the decision to start it! Nobody will know if I never finish…
    We are Catholic (I am not a very good Catholic!), but also celebrate today. I am in a small town for the holiday, and there are celebrations everywhere. It is a really big deal here.

    Reply
  120. I haven’t made much progress yet. I think jetlag made me insane when I made the decision to start it! Nobody will know if I never finish…
    We are Catholic (I am not a very good Catholic!), but also celebrate today. I am in a small town for the holiday, and there are celebrations everywhere. It is a really big deal here.

    Reply
  121. I’m very sorry to hear about your daughter, Teresa. Sometimes it’s difficult to do as much reading as we want- it does get squeezed by other things. I’m glad you’re enjoying the Alice Chetwynd Ley trad regencies though. As for Susanna’s books where they are on my “special” shelf along with Mary Stewart and few other choice authors. Absolutely lovely.

    Reply
  122. I’m very sorry to hear about your daughter, Teresa. Sometimes it’s difficult to do as much reading as we want- it does get squeezed by other things. I’m glad you’re enjoying the Alice Chetwynd Ley trad regencies though. As for Susanna’s books where they are on my “special” shelf along with Mary Stewart and few other choice authors. Absolutely lovely.

    Reply
  123. I’m very sorry to hear about your daughter, Teresa. Sometimes it’s difficult to do as much reading as we want- it does get squeezed by other things. I’m glad you’re enjoying the Alice Chetwynd Ley trad regencies though. As for Susanna’s books where they are on my “special” shelf along with Mary Stewart and few other choice authors. Absolutely lovely.

    Reply
  124. I’m very sorry to hear about your daughter, Teresa. Sometimes it’s difficult to do as much reading as we want- it does get squeezed by other things. I’m glad you’re enjoying the Alice Chetwynd Ley trad regencies though. As for Susanna’s books where they are on my “special” shelf along with Mary Stewart and few other choice authors. Absolutely lovely.

    Reply
  125. I’m very sorry to hear about your daughter, Teresa. Sometimes it’s difficult to do as much reading as we want- it does get squeezed by other things. I’m glad you’re enjoying the Alice Chetwynd Ley trad regencies though. As for Susanna’s books where they are on my “special” shelf along with Mary Stewart and few other choice authors. Absolutely lovely.

    Reply
  126. That’s great news! I think I’ll buy a paperback copy when it comes out even though I’ve just finished the e-book. I absolutely LOVED it. One of my top books of 2016 so far.

    Reply
  127. That’s great news! I think I’ll buy a paperback copy when it comes out even though I’ve just finished the e-book. I absolutely LOVED it. One of my top books of 2016 so far.

    Reply
  128. That’s great news! I think I’ll buy a paperback copy when it comes out even though I’ve just finished the e-book. I absolutely LOVED it. One of my top books of 2016 so far.

    Reply
  129. That’s great news! I think I’ll buy a paperback copy when it comes out even though I’ve just finished the e-book. I absolutely LOVED it. One of my top books of 2016 so far.

    Reply
  130. That’s great news! I think I’ll buy a paperback copy when it comes out even though I’ve just finished the e-book. I absolutely LOVED it. One of my top books of 2016 so far.

    Reply
  131. Thank you for sharing these wonderful recommendations with us. I read ‘Act Like It’ a few months ago and loved it.

    Reply
  132. Thank you for sharing these wonderful recommendations with us. I read ‘Act Like It’ a few months ago and loved it.

    Reply
  133. Thank you for sharing these wonderful recommendations with us. I read ‘Act Like It’ a few months ago and loved it.

    Reply
  134. Thank you for sharing these wonderful recommendations with us. I read ‘Act Like It’ a few months ago and loved it.

    Reply
  135. Thank you for sharing these wonderful recommendations with us. I read ‘Act Like It’ a few months ago and loved it.

    Reply
  136. I wondered if Nicola would put her review of the Diary of Isobelle on Amazon? The book has no reviews there as yet.

    Reply
  137. I wondered if Nicola would put her review of the Diary of Isobelle on Amazon? The book has no reviews there as yet.

    Reply
  138. I wondered if Nicola would put her review of the Diary of Isobelle on Amazon? The book has no reviews there as yet.

    Reply
  139. I wondered if Nicola would put her review of the Diary of Isobelle on Amazon? The book has no reviews there as yet.

    Reply
  140. I wondered if Nicola would put her review of the Diary of Isobelle on Amazon? The book has no reviews there as yet.

    Reply
  141. Hi Jeannette! Thank you – I’d love to write a review of The Diary of Isobelle but can only do it for Amazon UK as that was where I bought it. US won’t let me post up from here!

    Reply
  142. Hi Jeannette! Thank you – I’d love to write a review of The Diary of Isobelle but can only do it for Amazon UK as that was where I bought it. US won’t let me post up from here!

    Reply
  143. Hi Jeannette! Thank you – I’d love to write a review of The Diary of Isobelle but can only do it for Amazon UK as that was where I bought it. US won’t let me post up from here!

    Reply
  144. Hi Jeannette! Thank you – I’d love to write a review of The Diary of Isobelle but can only do it for Amazon UK as that was where I bought it. US won’t let me post up from here!

    Reply
  145. Hi Jeannette! Thank you – I’d love to write a review of The Diary of Isobelle but can only do it for Amazon UK as that was where I bought it. US won’t let me post up from here!

    Reply
  146. It was probably the tenth or twelfth reading, in fact. Every time I read it, I’m impressed anew at the reveal that takes place at about page 70. I’m definitely looking forward to the next book in the series. Happy writing!

    Reply
  147. It was probably the tenth or twelfth reading, in fact. Every time I read it, I’m impressed anew at the reveal that takes place at about page 70. I’m definitely looking forward to the next book in the series. Happy writing!

    Reply
  148. It was probably the tenth or twelfth reading, in fact. Every time I read it, I’m impressed anew at the reveal that takes place at about page 70. I’m definitely looking forward to the next book in the series. Happy writing!

    Reply
  149. It was probably the tenth or twelfth reading, in fact. Every time I read it, I’m impressed anew at the reveal that takes place at about page 70. I’m definitely looking forward to the next book in the series. Happy writing!

    Reply
  150. It was probably the tenth or twelfth reading, in fact. Every time I read it, I’m impressed anew at the reveal that takes place at about page 70. I’m definitely looking forward to the next book in the series. Happy writing!

    Reply
  151. Kareni–
    Part if my issues with urban fantasy series is that often they have to keep kicking up the violence in each book, and at some point I lose interest. It’s tricky to maintain the balance that maintains interest without becoming repetitive or too violent. Patricia Briggs does it with her superb characterization.

    Reply
  152. Kareni–
    Part if my issues with urban fantasy series is that often they have to keep kicking up the violence in each book, and at some point I lose interest. It’s tricky to maintain the balance that maintains interest without becoming repetitive or too violent. Patricia Briggs does it with her superb characterization.

    Reply
  153. Kareni–
    Part if my issues with urban fantasy series is that often they have to keep kicking up the violence in each book, and at some point I lose interest. It’s tricky to maintain the balance that maintains interest without becoming repetitive or too violent. Patricia Briggs does it with her superb characterization.

    Reply
  154. Kareni–
    Part if my issues with urban fantasy series is that often they have to keep kicking up the violence in each book, and at some point I lose interest. It’s tricky to maintain the balance that maintains interest without becoming repetitive or too violent. Patricia Briggs does it with her superb characterization.

    Reply
  155. Kareni–
    Part if my issues with urban fantasy series is that often they have to keep kicking up the violence in each book, and at some point I lose interest. It’s tricky to maintain the balance that maintains interest without becoming repetitive or too violent. Patricia Briggs does it with her superb characterization.

    Reply
  156. Thanks for sharing these additional thoughts, Mary Jo; I’ll take a closer look at the Twelve House series and the Archangel books.

    Reply
  157. Thanks for sharing these additional thoughts, Mary Jo; I’ll take a closer look at the Twelve House series and the Archangel books.

    Reply
  158. Thanks for sharing these additional thoughts, Mary Jo; I’ll take a closer look at the Twelve House series and the Archangel books.

    Reply
  159. Thanks for sharing these additional thoughts, Mary Jo; I’ll take a closer look at the Twelve House series and the Archangel books.

    Reply
  160. Thanks for sharing these additional thoughts, Mary Jo; I’ll take a closer look at the Twelve House series and the Archangel books.

    Reply

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