What We’re Reading: Overlooked Treasures

From Mary Jo:

For a change of pace this month, we're going to talk about good books that we've loved, but which might have fallen from view for one reason or another.  This is not exactly the same as comfort reads, though there is some overlap.  So here are some overlooked books that we enjoy, and maybe you will, too!

AgainI was inspired to suggest this topic to the other Wenches when I saw that Again  by Kathleen Gilles Seidel is now available as an e-book.  A two time RITA winner, Kathy writes books that are subtle, intelligent, deeply observed, and dryly funny. Again is probably my favorite.  The heroine, Jenny Cotton, is head writer for a historical soap opera set in the Regency, and the show's Brooklyn studio and earnest young actors are home and family to her.  The Canadian hero, Alec Cameron, is a star of daytime television who was the lead in a soap series that bombed big time, so he's happy when Jenny casts him as a cranky duke.  

Pretty soon Alec is falling for Jenny, who is way too loyal to her long time boyfriend, who is also in the cast.  And she has a bad habit of working out her emotional issues through the characters on her show.  Unfortunately, Alec's character is given all the traits she doesn't like in her boyfriend, while the boyfriend's part is sounding more and more like Alec–and Jenny won't admit it.  <G>  In some ways, the book is dated–no cell phones and daytime television has changed enormously, among other things–but the book is still marvelous–smart and funny and wise, and very satisfying.  I enjoyed the story this time as much as when I first read it in the early '90s.  You might want to take a look–Again didn't win a RITA for best single title contemporary romance by accident. <G>



Jo here. 

The books that popped into my mind were a few by Frances Murray, who wrote mostly in the 1970s, but my favourites seem to be out of print. I have my original paperbacks still.

The Burning Lamp is a Western and The Dear Colleague is a Victorian story about The Burning Lampan arranged marriage to a diplomat, and is mostly told in letters.

Both are quiet, thoughtful books about thoroughly decent people, and that may be why I value them.

Jo

From Nicola:

It’s always fun to visit my keeper shelf and rediscover the forgotten treasures that live there. Not only do I remember how much I loved a book in the first place but I also have the pleasure of re-reading and savouring those wonderful moments all over again. My treasures are the books where it doesn’t matter a jot that I know exactly what is going to happen; they still makes me laugh or cry, I root for the characters and long for the happy ending.

My first forgotten treasure is by Mary Stewart. She’s not exactly forgotten as a writer – far from it – but I seldom hear anyone talking about this particular story: The Wind off the Small Isles. It’s short, almost a novella, but it’s classic Mary Stewart: the exotic location brought to vivid life, a practical and very likeable heroine, a gorgeous hero and a very moving and emotional background. I love it.  (Note from MJP: The Wind Off the Small Isles was a novella written for a British magazine and never published in the US, but a US edition will be released this September.) 

Moonraker'sBrideRecently I also re-discovered Moonraker’s Bride by Madeleine Brent. I hadn’t read any Brent books since I was in my twenties and did wonder whether it might strike me as dated. However, I loved the unusual background of China during the period of the Boxer rebellion, and the heroine, Lucy, is a strong character who can stand comparison with any modern day heroine. Put that together with a dashing hero and a beautifully written story and it’s a lot of fun! 

Nicola

From Anne:

A book  that I've loved in the past but which has almost dropped from sight is Precious Bane 1Precious Bane by Mary Webb. It's a story about Prue Sarn, a girl born with a hare lip — "hare-shotten" they call it — and who believes (along with most people) that she's unworthy therefore of love and marriage. She cares for her ailing mother, works unceasingly hard for her skinflint brother, and loves the weaver, Kester Woodseaves, from afar. . .   Set after the Napoleonic wars, in Shropshire, England, it's unashamedly a rural story, with no hint of the Regency that most readers know and love. It's very much the other side of the coin from Almacks. And the writing is spellbinding.

Precious Bane was published in 1924 and won the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse. It's twice been made into a BBC television drama, though I've never seen either production. My copies (I have two) are old and battered 1928 editions, bought second-hand many years ago, but Precious Bane is still in print and amazingly, it's available on Amazon (though with a most unappealing cover IMO.)
There's more information about it here.

WenchesbeagleHi, Joanna here.

I’m going to talk about a writer I’ve praised many times before, Peter S. Beagle. Usually I’m going all enthusiastic over The Last Unicorn which is one of the great Fantasy classics, a work of formidable imagination and fiercely beautiful prose.

But before there was The Last Unicorn, there was I See By My Outfit. This is the mostly biographical account of a cross-country trip in 1963. A young, thoughtful-but-still-naïve Beagle and a friend see the world from motorcycle back. His great lyric prose is yet to come, but we get a glimpse of that quirky and original mind.

Readalikes — I love road books — are On the Road (Kerouac), Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (Pirsig), and, of course, Travels with Charlie (Steinbeck).

From Pat:

I have dozens of authors whose books I look back on with great fondness, and it feels like a betrayal to pick only one. Just looking at the favorites that made the cut in my big move West—Maggie Osborne, LaVyrle Spencer, Jennifer Crusie, Laura Kinsale, Kathleen Korbel (Eileen Dreyer), my favorite Edith Laytons, all of the Wenches, actually… and bunches more from the last few decades. If you want me to go back to the library books I read before that… I could list the same ones the other Wenches are talking about.

Unfortunately, my damaged memory remembers the joy of reading those books but does not allow me to actually recall the books. I have so many books I want to read, I can’t make myself re-read often, so those lovely  books languish there. I’m afraid if I open them, it will diminish the joy I remember. So I pat them nicely every so often and promise one of these days I’ll come home, but I still have more traveling to do!

TheFrenchLieutenant'sWomanAndrea/Cara here:

I always have a pile of new titles on my TBR pile—a daunting pile. But there are times when I think of a treasure that’s been hiding on the shelves, and take great pleasure in rekindling a romance with an dear old friend. And talk about romance! The French Lieutenant’s Woman by John Fowles is one of those books that I read early on and really struck a chord. The aura of mystery (along with the touch of Victorian melodrama!), the complex nature of love and individuality, and the lushness of the writing still resonates. It’s a classic that I think is far less well known today, and deserves to win a whole new generation of readers.

 And here's Susan!

Of all the books that have been particularly special to me, the books I reread every Annofcambray_lide few years (including the elegant and incomparable Mary Stewart), there is one I especially treasure–Ann of Cambray by Mary Lide. I even remember the moment I first picked up the book: standing in line at the grocery store with a toddler in the cart and me very pregnant, and here was this glorious cover promising just the sort of luscious, passionate, intelligent medieval I needed. I grabbed it and read it that weekend, I think.  

It was a turning point read for me. I was a grad student writing a dissertation in medieval art history, about to start maternity leave again and secretly yearning to write fiction myself someday. Set in 12th c. England, the novel is the story of a strong, determined young woman who falls in love with her liege lord and yet has good cause to hate him, too–and the sparks and circumstances between them are exquisitely portrayed. It's a good cut above most medievals–rich prose, authentic voice, accurate history. Lide's writing is breathtaking, her characters passionate and powerful, the story sweeping yet focused. Lide's other novels are beautifully written and strongly romantic, and I've found and read each one. But for me there was, and still is, true magic in Ann of Cambray. A few years later, I met Mary Lide through a local writer's chapter and had a long phone conversation with her; her encouragement helped convince me to try my own hand at writing my first medieval.

MJP again: Now it's your turn!  What favorite books would you classify as Overlooked Treasures?  I'd love to see more books added to the list above!

435 thoughts on “What We’re Reading: Overlooked Treasures”

  1. I just started reading THE JEWELLED SNUFF BOX by Alice Chetwynd Ley. She is an author that I remembered from years ago. I had read several of her books back in the day, but I had not read this one. There are several of her books available in e-book form on Amazon.
    I’m enjoying this one as much as I did the ones I read when I was a sweet young thing.

    Reply
  2. I just started reading THE JEWELLED SNUFF BOX by Alice Chetwynd Ley. She is an author that I remembered from years ago. I had read several of her books back in the day, but I had not read this one. There are several of her books available in e-book form on Amazon.
    I’m enjoying this one as much as I did the ones I read when I was a sweet young thing.

    Reply
  3. I just started reading THE JEWELLED SNUFF BOX by Alice Chetwynd Ley. She is an author that I remembered from years ago. I had read several of her books back in the day, but I had not read this one. There are several of her books available in e-book form on Amazon.
    I’m enjoying this one as much as I did the ones I read when I was a sweet young thing.

    Reply
  4. I just started reading THE JEWELLED SNUFF BOX by Alice Chetwynd Ley. She is an author that I remembered from years ago. I had read several of her books back in the day, but I had not read this one. There are several of her books available in e-book form on Amazon.
    I’m enjoying this one as much as I did the ones I read when I was a sweet young thing.

    Reply
  5. I just started reading THE JEWELLED SNUFF BOX by Alice Chetwynd Ley. She is an author that I remembered from years ago. I had read several of her books back in the day, but I had not read this one. There are several of her books available in e-book form on Amazon.
    I’m enjoying this one as much as I did the ones I read when I was a sweet young thing.

    Reply
  6. I’ve just been trying to choose between various books by Julia Ross, so I can recommend one, but it’s almost impossible. I think I’ll choose Clandestine, although one really should read Night of Sin and Games of Pleasure before it. I think her books are marvellous, but I never see them mentioned. She also wrote as Jean Ross Ewing.

    Reply
  7. I’ve just been trying to choose between various books by Julia Ross, so I can recommend one, but it’s almost impossible. I think I’ll choose Clandestine, although one really should read Night of Sin and Games of Pleasure before it. I think her books are marvellous, but I never see them mentioned. She also wrote as Jean Ross Ewing.

    Reply
  8. I’ve just been trying to choose between various books by Julia Ross, so I can recommend one, but it’s almost impossible. I think I’ll choose Clandestine, although one really should read Night of Sin and Games of Pleasure before it. I think her books are marvellous, but I never see them mentioned. She also wrote as Jean Ross Ewing.

    Reply
  9. I’ve just been trying to choose between various books by Julia Ross, so I can recommend one, but it’s almost impossible. I think I’ll choose Clandestine, although one really should read Night of Sin and Games of Pleasure before it. I think her books are marvellous, but I never see them mentioned. She also wrote as Jean Ross Ewing.

    Reply
  10. I’ve just been trying to choose between various books by Julia Ross, so I can recommend one, but it’s almost impossible. I think I’ll choose Clandestine, although one really should read Night of Sin and Games of Pleasure before it. I think her books are marvellous, but I never see them mentioned. She also wrote as Jean Ross Ewing.

    Reply
  11. Anne, I remember Precious Bane—I read it in high school and adored it. It’s still vivid in my memory, but we will pass over in silence how many years ago that was.
    One book that seems to have disappeared over the years is H.F.M. Prescott’s Man on a Donkey. It’s a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace during the reign of Henry VIII, not a romance, though it is romantic. One of the best historical novels I have ever read.

    Reply
  12. Anne, I remember Precious Bane—I read it in high school and adored it. It’s still vivid in my memory, but we will pass over in silence how many years ago that was.
    One book that seems to have disappeared over the years is H.F.M. Prescott’s Man on a Donkey. It’s a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace during the reign of Henry VIII, not a romance, though it is romantic. One of the best historical novels I have ever read.

    Reply
  13. Anne, I remember Precious Bane—I read it in high school and adored it. It’s still vivid in my memory, but we will pass over in silence how many years ago that was.
    One book that seems to have disappeared over the years is H.F.M. Prescott’s Man on a Donkey. It’s a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace during the reign of Henry VIII, not a romance, though it is romantic. One of the best historical novels I have ever read.

    Reply
  14. Anne, I remember Precious Bane—I read it in high school and adored it. It’s still vivid in my memory, but we will pass over in silence how many years ago that was.
    One book that seems to have disappeared over the years is H.F.M. Prescott’s Man on a Donkey. It’s a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace during the reign of Henry VIII, not a romance, though it is romantic. One of the best historical novels I have ever read.

    Reply
  15. Anne, I remember Precious Bane—I read it in high school and adored it. It’s still vivid in my memory, but we will pass over in silence how many years ago that was.
    One book that seems to have disappeared over the years is H.F.M. Prescott’s Man on a Donkey. It’s a historical novel about the Pilgrimage of Grace during the reign of Henry VIII, not a romance, though it is romantic. One of the best historical novels I have ever read.

    Reply
  16. Oh, I love that book, Mary! Alice Chetwynd Ley is such a favourite of mine. I’ve read almost all of her Regencies. I second that recommendation and am so thrilled you’re enjoying it!

    Reply
  17. Oh, I love that book, Mary! Alice Chetwynd Ley is such a favourite of mine. I’ve read almost all of her Regencies. I second that recommendation and am so thrilled you’re enjoying it!

    Reply
  18. Oh, I love that book, Mary! Alice Chetwynd Ley is such a favourite of mine. I’ve read almost all of her Regencies. I second that recommendation and am so thrilled you’re enjoying it!

    Reply
  19. Oh, I love that book, Mary! Alice Chetwynd Ley is such a favourite of mine. I’ve read almost all of her Regencies. I second that recommendation and am so thrilled you’re enjoying it!

    Reply
  20. Oh, I love that book, Mary! Alice Chetwynd Ley is such a favourite of mine. I’ve read almost all of her Regencies. I second that recommendation and am so thrilled you’re enjoying it!

    Reply
  21. Lillian Marek, I’ve never even heard of Man on a Donkey, so it really did disappear. It sounds interesting, though. Maybe a bit like some of Thomas Costain’s books. (Another name we seldom see these days, but I loved his fiction and history both.)

    Reply
  22. Lillian Marek, I’ve never even heard of Man on a Donkey, so it really did disappear. It sounds interesting, though. Maybe a bit like some of Thomas Costain’s books. (Another name we seldom see these days, but I loved his fiction and history both.)

    Reply
  23. Lillian Marek, I’ve never even heard of Man on a Donkey, so it really did disappear. It sounds interesting, though. Maybe a bit like some of Thomas Costain’s books. (Another name we seldom see these days, but I loved his fiction and history both.)

    Reply
  24. Lillian Marek, I’ve never even heard of Man on a Donkey, so it really did disappear. It sounds interesting, though. Maybe a bit like some of Thomas Costain’s books. (Another name we seldom see these days, but I loved his fiction and history both.)

    Reply
  25. Lillian Marek, I’ve never even heard of Man on a Donkey, so it really did disappear. It sounds interesting, though. Maybe a bit like some of Thomas Costain’s books. (Another name we seldom see these days, but I loved his fiction and history both.)

    Reply
  26. A few of Roberta Gellis’s books have been reprinted, but most are out of print. She wrote wonderful historical romances, some mysteries – mostly medieval but also some regencies. Very detailed on historical politics, war, etc.

    Reply
  27. A few of Roberta Gellis’s books have been reprinted, but most are out of print. She wrote wonderful historical romances, some mysteries – mostly medieval but also some regencies. Very detailed on historical politics, war, etc.

    Reply
  28. A few of Roberta Gellis’s books have been reprinted, but most are out of print. She wrote wonderful historical romances, some mysteries – mostly medieval but also some regencies. Very detailed on historical politics, war, etc.

    Reply
  29. A few of Roberta Gellis’s books have been reprinted, but most are out of print. She wrote wonderful historical romances, some mysteries – mostly medieval but also some regencies. Very detailed on historical politics, war, etc.

    Reply
  30. A few of Roberta Gellis’s books have been reprinted, but most are out of print. She wrote wonderful historical romances, some mysteries – mostly medieval but also some regencies. Very detailed on historical politics, war, etc.

    Reply
  31. The one I search for endlessly is Zemindar, by Valerie Fitzgerald, and winner of the Georgette Heyer Historical Novel Prize.
    Every time I get on Amazon I’ve voted to get that one in Kindle (I’m allergic to paper)…and yippeeeee!…when I went to double check her last name just now, I saw that a Kindle version was actually listed. Not available yet, but listed, so fingers crossed, everyone, please.
    This story still makes my heart go pitty-pat. Takes place in India during the Sepoy rebellion, is far more romantic and gritty and involving than Far Pavilions, IMHO.
    It’s the story of a shallow, spoiled young woman who travels to India with friends, meets a wealthy, powerful man, a Zemindar (of British and Indian heritage)…and that man absolutely makes the book. Subtle, short-tempered, but obviously passionate, attractive in a craggy, somewhat harsh way, and commanding, intelligent and compassionate at surprising moments.
    I’m babbling. I hopehopehope I can get it in digital soon; I’ve literally been waiting for more than a decade for it…
    Next thing I know, The Lost Queen of Egypt by Lucille Morrison will be available in Kindle.
    This was such a fun discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  32. The one I search for endlessly is Zemindar, by Valerie Fitzgerald, and winner of the Georgette Heyer Historical Novel Prize.
    Every time I get on Amazon I’ve voted to get that one in Kindle (I’m allergic to paper)…and yippeeeee!…when I went to double check her last name just now, I saw that a Kindle version was actually listed. Not available yet, but listed, so fingers crossed, everyone, please.
    This story still makes my heart go pitty-pat. Takes place in India during the Sepoy rebellion, is far more romantic and gritty and involving than Far Pavilions, IMHO.
    It’s the story of a shallow, spoiled young woman who travels to India with friends, meets a wealthy, powerful man, a Zemindar (of British and Indian heritage)…and that man absolutely makes the book. Subtle, short-tempered, but obviously passionate, attractive in a craggy, somewhat harsh way, and commanding, intelligent and compassionate at surprising moments.
    I’m babbling. I hopehopehope I can get it in digital soon; I’ve literally been waiting for more than a decade for it…
    Next thing I know, The Lost Queen of Egypt by Lucille Morrison will be available in Kindle.
    This was such a fun discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  33. The one I search for endlessly is Zemindar, by Valerie Fitzgerald, and winner of the Georgette Heyer Historical Novel Prize.
    Every time I get on Amazon I’ve voted to get that one in Kindle (I’m allergic to paper)…and yippeeeee!…when I went to double check her last name just now, I saw that a Kindle version was actually listed. Not available yet, but listed, so fingers crossed, everyone, please.
    This story still makes my heart go pitty-pat. Takes place in India during the Sepoy rebellion, is far more romantic and gritty and involving than Far Pavilions, IMHO.
    It’s the story of a shallow, spoiled young woman who travels to India with friends, meets a wealthy, powerful man, a Zemindar (of British and Indian heritage)…and that man absolutely makes the book. Subtle, short-tempered, but obviously passionate, attractive in a craggy, somewhat harsh way, and commanding, intelligent and compassionate at surprising moments.
    I’m babbling. I hopehopehope I can get it in digital soon; I’ve literally been waiting for more than a decade for it…
    Next thing I know, The Lost Queen of Egypt by Lucille Morrison will be available in Kindle.
    This was such a fun discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  34. The one I search for endlessly is Zemindar, by Valerie Fitzgerald, and winner of the Georgette Heyer Historical Novel Prize.
    Every time I get on Amazon I’ve voted to get that one in Kindle (I’m allergic to paper)…and yippeeeee!…when I went to double check her last name just now, I saw that a Kindle version was actually listed. Not available yet, but listed, so fingers crossed, everyone, please.
    This story still makes my heart go pitty-pat. Takes place in India during the Sepoy rebellion, is far more romantic and gritty and involving than Far Pavilions, IMHO.
    It’s the story of a shallow, spoiled young woman who travels to India with friends, meets a wealthy, powerful man, a Zemindar (of British and Indian heritage)…and that man absolutely makes the book. Subtle, short-tempered, but obviously passionate, attractive in a craggy, somewhat harsh way, and commanding, intelligent and compassionate at surprising moments.
    I’m babbling. I hopehopehope I can get it in digital soon; I’ve literally been waiting for more than a decade for it…
    Next thing I know, The Lost Queen of Egypt by Lucille Morrison will be available in Kindle.
    This was such a fun discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  35. The one I search for endlessly is Zemindar, by Valerie Fitzgerald, and winner of the Georgette Heyer Historical Novel Prize.
    Every time I get on Amazon I’ve voted to get that one in Kindle (I’m allergic to paper)…and yippeeeee!…when I went to double check her last name just now, I saw that a Kindle version was actually listed. Not available yet, but listed, so fingers crossed, everyone, please.
    This story still makes my heart go pitty-pat. Takes place in India during the Sepoy rebellion, is far more romantic and gritty and involving than Far Pavilions, IMHO.
    It’s the story of a shallow, spoiled young woman who travels to India with friends, meets a wealthy, powerful man, a Zemindar (of British and Indian heritage)…and that man absolutely makes the book. Subtle, short-tempered, but obviously passionate, attractive in a craggy, somewhat harsh way, and commanding, intelligent and compassionate at surprising moments.
    I’m babbling. I hopehopehope I can get it in digital soon; I’ve literally been waiting for more than a decade for it…
    Next thing I know, The Lost Queen of Egypt by Lucille Morrison will be available in Kindle.
    This was such a fun discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  36. Robert Neill’s Mist Over Pendle sprang immediately to mind. It’s a fictional account of the events surrounding the Pendle witch trials. It has mystery, murder, romance, a fabulous heroine who is born into a strict puritan family, & who is truly a square peg in a round hole. It also has the wonderful Roger Nowell, and quite possibly the best description of the feasting around the twelve days of Christmas I’ve ever read(apart from Jenny Overtones magical The Thirteen Days of Christmas).

    Reply
  37. Robert Neill’s Mist Over Pendle sprang immediately to mind. It’s a fictional account of the events surrounding the Pendle witch trials. It has mystery, murder, romance, a fabulous heroine who is born into a strict puritan family, & who is truly a square peg in a round hole. It also has the wonderful Roger Nowell, and quite possibly the best description of the feasting around the twelve days of Christmas I’ve ever read(apart from Jenny Overtones magical The Thirteen Days of Christmas).

    Reply
  38. Robert Neill’s Mist Over Pendle sprang immediately to mind. It’s a fictional account of the events surrounding the Pendle witch trials. It has mystery, murder, romance, a fabulous heroine who is born into a strict puritan family, & who is truly a square peg in a round hole. It also has the wonderful Roger Nowell, and quite possibly the best description of the feasting around the twelve days of Christmas I’ve ever read(apart from Jenny Overtones magical The Thirteen Days of Christmas).

    Reply
  39. Robert Neill’s Mist Over Pendle sprang immediately to mind. It’s a fictional account of the events surrounding the Pendle witch trials. It has mystery, murder, romance, a fabulous heroine who is born into a strict puritan family, & who is truly a square peg in a round hole. It also has the wonderful Roger Nowell, and quite possibly the best description of the feasting around the twelve days of Christmas I’ve ever read(apart from Jenny Overtones magical The Thirteen Days of Christmas).

    Reply
  40. Robert Neill’s Mist Over Pendle sprang immediately to mind. It’s a fictional account of the events surrounding the Pendle witch trials. It has mystery, murder, romance, a fabulous heroine who is born into a strict puritan family, & who is truly a square peg in a round hole. It also has the wonderful Roger Nowell, and quite possibly the best description of the feasting around the twelve days of Christmas I’ve ever read(apart from Jenny Overtones magical The Thirteen Days of Christmas).

    Reply
  41. Really love this post. Some titles I don’t know and shall have much fun tracking down, whether on ebooks or not.
    I’ve got two:
    1) I re-read this one a few years ago and was as caught up by it as before, though I can see that it is far wholly satisfying, as a story: Margaret Irwin’s 1924 time-slip mystery romance And Still She Wished for Company. Beautifully written and truly creepy.
    2) Richard Llewellyn (of How Green Was My Valley) wrote an 18th century smuggling romance with a neat political point about Welsh independence interwoven. It was called Sweet Witch and when I was twelve I thought it was the last word in breathless romance. Very exciting and a couple of cracking scenes. Can’t find a single review of it anywhere on the Net – but there is a published cover, so I didn’t imagine it!
    AND a little bit of trivia – as current custodian of the Romantic Novelists’ Association’ Romantic Novels of the Year, I’m proudly shelving copies of both Reminder and The Burning Lamp, which both won the Award in their respective publication years.
    best
    Jenny/Sophie

    Reply
  42. Really love this post. Some titles I don’t know and shall have much fun tracking down, whether on ebooks or not.
    I’ve got two:
    1) I re-read this one a few years ago and was as caught up by it as before, though I can see that it is far wholly satisfying, as a story: Margaret Irwin’s 1924 time-slip mystery romance And Still She Wished for Company. Beautifully written and truly creepy.
    2) Richard Llewellyn (of How Green Was My Valley) wrote an 18th century smuggling romance with a neat political point about Welsh independence interwoven. It was called Sweet Witch and when I was twelve I thought it was the last word in breathless romance. Very exciting and a couple of cracking scenes. Can’t find a single review of it anywhere on the Net – but there is a published cover, so I didn’t imagine it!
    AND a little bit of trivia – as current custodian of the Romantic Novelists’ Association’ Romantic Novels of the Year, I’m proudly shelving copies of both Reminder and The Burning Lamp, which both won the Award in their respective publication years.
    best
    Jenny/Sophie

    Reply
  43. Really love this post. Some titles I don’t know and shall have much fun tracking down, whether on ebooks or not.
    I’ve got two:
    1) I re-read this one a few years ago and was as caught up by it as before, though I can see that it is far wholly satisfying, as a story: Margaret Irwin’s 1924 time-slip mystery romance And Still She Wished for Company. Beautifully written and truly creepy.
    2) Richard Llewellyn (of How Green Was My Valley) wrote an 18th century smuggling romance with a neat political point about Welsh independence interwoven. It was called Sweet Witch and when I was twelve I thought it was the last word in breathless romance. Very exciting and a couple of cracking scenes. Can’t find a single review of it anywhere on the Net – but there is a published cover, so I didn’t imagine it!
    AND a little bit of trivia – as current custodian of the Romantic Novelists’ Association’ Romantic Novels of the Year, I’m proudly shelving copies of both Reminder and The Burning Lamp, which both won the Award in their respective publication years.
    best
    Jenny/Sophie

    Reply
  44. Really love this post. Some titles I don’t know and shall have much fun tracking down, whether on ebooks or not.
    I’ve got two:
    1) I re-read this one a few years ago and was as caught up by it as before, though I can see that it is far wholly satisfying, as a story: Margaret Irwin’s 1924 time-slip mystery romance And Still She Wished for Company. Beautifully written and truly creepy.
    2) Richard Llewellyn (of How Green Was My Valley) wrote an 18th century smuggling romance with a neat political point about Welsh independence interwoven. It was called Sweet Witch and when I was twelve I thought it was the last word in breathless romance. Very exciting and a couple of cracking scenes. Can’t find a single review of it anywhere on the Net – but there is a published cover, so I didn’t imagine it!
    AND a little bit of trivia – as current custodian of the Romantic Novelists’ Association’ Romantic Novels of the Year, I’m proudly shelving copies of both Reminder and The Burning Lamp, which both won the Award in their respective publication years.
    best
    Jenny/Sophie

    Reply
  45. Really love this post. Some titles I don’t know and shall have much fun tracking down, whether on ebooks or not.
    I’ve got two:
    1) I re-read this one a few years ago and was as caught up by it as before, though I can see that it is far wholly satisfying, as a story: Margaret Irwin’s 1924 time-slip mystery romance And Still She Wished for Company. Beautifully written and truly creepy.
    2) Richard Llewellyn (of How Green Was My Valley) wrote an 18th century smuggling romance with a neat political point about Welsh independence interwoven. It was called Sweet Witch and when I was twelve I thought it was the last word in breathless romance. Very exciting and a couple of cracking scenes. Can’t find a single review of it anywhere on the Net – but there is a published cover, so I didn’t imagine it!
    AND a little bit of trivia – as current custodian of the Romantic Novelists’ Association’ Romantic Novels of the Year, I’m proudly shelving copies of both Reminder and The Burning Lamp, which both won the Award in their respective publication years.
    best
    Jenny/Sophie

    Reply
  46. AAARGH Sodding Auto-correct, curses on your busy little skeletal digits.
    It is of course Z E M I N D A R which I am warehousing as a former Romantic Novel of the Year in the UK.
    Exit stage left, muttering . . .

    Reply
  47. AAARGH Sodding Auto-correct, curses on your busy little skeletal digits.
    It is of course Z E M I N D A R which I am warehousing as a former Romantic Novel of the Year in the UK.
    Exit stage left, muttering . . .

    Reply
  48. AAARGH Sodding Auto-correct, curses on your busy little skeletal digits.
    It is of course Z E M I N D A R which I am warehousing as a former Romantic Novel of the Year in the UK.
    Exit stage left, muttering . . .

    Reply
  49. AAARGH Sodding Auto-correct, curses on your busy little skeletal digits.
    It is of course Z E M I N D A R which I am warehousing as a former Romantic Novel of the Year in the UK.
    Exit stage left, muttering . . .

    Reply
  50. AAARGH Sodding Auto-correct, curses on your busy little skeletal digits.
    It is of course Z E M I N D A R which I am warehousing as a former Romantic Novel of the Year in the UK.
    Exit stage left, muttering . . .

    Reply
  51. Yes! Yes~! Yes! Mist over Pendle is one of my all time favourite books. Such a rich and atmospheric story but also a wonderful romance and a great heroine! Thanks so much for mentioning it, Cate. Did he write anything else, I wonder?

    Reply
  52. Yes! Yes~! Yes! Mist over Pendle is one of my all time favourite books. Such a rich and atmospheric story but also a wonderful romance and a great heroine! Thanks so much for mentioning it, Cate. Did he write anything else, I wonder?

    Reply
  53. Yes! Yes~! Yes! Mist over Pendle is one of my all time favourite books. Such a rich and atmospheric story but also a wonderful romance and a great heroine! Thanks so much for mentioning it, Cate. Did he write anything else, I wonder?

    Reply
  54. Yes! Yes~! Yes! Mist over Pendle is one of my all time favourite books. Such a rich and atmospheric story but also a wonderful romance and a great heroine! Thanks so much for mentioning it, Cate. Did he write anything else, I wonder?

    Reply
  55. Yes! Yes~! Yes! Mist over Pendle is one of my all time favourite books. Such a rich and atmospheric story but also a wonderful romance and a great heroine! Thanks so much for mentioning it, Cate. Did he write anything else, I wonder?

    Reply
  56. Love the sound of the smuggling romance, Jenny. I will track that down. Does anyone remember a TV programme called Hawkmoor about a Welsh “Robin Hood” type character? There was a book of the series that I adored.

    Reply
  57. Love the sound of the smuggling romance, Jenny. I will track that down. Does anyone remember a TV programme called Hawkmoor about a Welsh “Robin Hood” type character? There was a book of the series that I adored.

    Reply
  58. Love the sound of the smuggling romance, Jenny. I will track that down. Does anyone remember a TV programme called Hawkmoor about a Welsh “Robin Hood” type character? There was a book of the series that I adored.

    Reply
  59. Love the sound of the smuggling romance, Jenny. I will track that down. Does anyone remember a TV programme called Hawkmoor about a Welsh “Robin Hood” type character? There was a book of the series that I adored.

    Reply
  60. Love the sound of the smuggling romance, Jenny. I will track that down. Does anyone remember a TV programme called Hawkmoor about a Welsh “Robin Hood” type character? There was a book of the series that I adored.

    Reply
  61. @Nicola Cornick .. Yes, he did. I spent quite a bit of time hunting down his other novels during my teens & my twenties, but apart from Lillibulero (which takes place in the reign of Queen Anne I think), none of them had the impact of Mist Over Pendle ….
    And I still have my (hardback !!) copy of My Lady’s Crusade.
    Also …does anyone else remember The Silver Devil by Theresa Denys ? Now that book ripped bodices, & then some 😊 !

    Reply
  62. @Nicola Cornick .. Yes, he did. I spent quite a bit of time hunting down his other novels during my teens & my twenties, but apart from Lillibulero (which takes place in the reign of Queen Anne I think), none of them had the impact of Mist Over Pendle ….
    And I still have my (hardback !!) copy of My Lady’s Crusade.
    Also …does anyone else remember The Silver Devil by Theresa Denys ? Now that book ripped bodices, & then some 😊 !

    Reply
  63. @Nicola Cornick .. Yes, he did. I spent quite a bit of time hunting down his other novels during my teens & my twenties, but apart from Lillibulero (which takes place in the reign of Queen Anne I think), none of them had the impact of Mist Over Pendle ….
    And I still have my (hardback !!) copy of My Lady’s Crusade.
    Also …does anyone else remember The Silver Devil by Theresa Denys ? Now that book ripped bodices, & then some 😊 !

    Reply
  64. @Nicola Cornick .. Yes, he did. I spent quite a bit of time hunting down his other novels during my teens & my twenties, but apart from Lillibulero (which takes place in the reign of Queen Anne I think), none of them had the impact of Mist Over Pendle ….
    And I still have my (hardback !!) copy of My Lady’s Crusade.
    Also …does anyone else remember The Silver Devil by Theresa Denys ? Now that book ripped bodices, & then some 😊 !

    Reply
  65. @Nicola Cornick .. Yes, he did. I spent quite a bit of time hunting down his other novels during my teens & my twenties, but apart from Lillibulero (which takes place in the reign of Queen Anne I think), none of them had the impact of Mist Over Pendle ….
    And I still have my (hardback !!) copy of My Lady’s Crusade.
    Also …does anyone else remember The Silver Devil by Theresa Denys ? Now that book ripped bodices, & then some 😊 !

    Reply
  66. I remember Hawkmoor.The adventures of Twm Sion Cati. If you liked that, try Rebecca’s Daughters by Dylan Thomas. It covers the Rebecca riots in Wales … Just fab ..I’m still waiting for some distribution company to release a DVD of the film, if only to see the great rugby legend Ray Gravell in 19th century women’s clothing.

    Reply
  67. I remember Hawkmoor.The adventures of Twm Sion Cati. If you liked that, try Rebecca’s Daughters by Dylan Thomas. It covers the Rebecca riots in Wales … Just fab ..I’m still waiting for some distribution company to release a DVD of the film, if only to see the great rugby legend Ray Gravell in 19th century women’s clothing.

    Reply
  68. I remember Hawkmoor.The adventures of Twm Sion Cati. If you liked that, try Rebecca’s Daughters by Dylan Thomas. It covers the Rebecca riots in Wales … Just fab ..I’m still waiting for some distribution company to release a DVD of the film, if only to see the great rugby legend Ray Gravell in 19th century women’s clothing.

    Reply
  69. I remember Hawkmoor.The adventures of Twm Sion Cati. If you liked that, try Rebecca’s Daughters by Dylan Thomas. It covers the Rebecca riots in Wales … Just fab ..I’m still waiting for some distribution company to release a DVD of the film, if only to see the great rugby legend Ray Gravell in 19th century women’s clothing.

    Reply
  70. I remember Hawkmoor.The adventures of Twm Sion Cati. If you liked that, try Rebecca’s Daughters by Dylan Thomas. It covers the Rebecca riots in Wales … Just fab ..I’m still waiting for some distribution company to release a DVD of the film, if only to see the great rugby legend Ray Gravell in 19th century women’s clothing.

    Reply
  71. Nicola mentioned “…books where it doesn’t matter a jot that I know exactly what is going to happen; they still makes me laugh or cry…”; I Immediately thought of “Little Women” (not exactly a lost treasure) because I ALWAYS cry when Beth dies. And I, too, treasure “Precious Bane.”
    My choice for forgotten treasure is “Wingarden” by Elsie Lee (and her other novels also). Yes many are somewhat dated, because they were in modern settings and were very much up to date as they were being written. But I was alive and experiencing those years, so I revisit my past when I revisit her books. Her books are still listed on Amazon to be obtained from third-party sellers.

    Reply
  72. Nicola mentioned “…books where it doesn’t matter a jot that I know exactly what is going to happen; they still makes me laugh or cry…”; I Immediately thought of “Little Women” (not exactly a lost treasure) because I ALWAYS cry when Beth dies. And I, too, treasure “Precious Bane.”
    My choice for forgotten treasure is “Wingarden” by Elsie Lee (and her other novels also). Yes many are somewhat dated, because they were in modern settings and were very much up to date as they were being written. But I was alive and experiencing those years, so I revisit my past when I revisit her books. Her books are still listed on Amazon to be obtained from third-party sellers.

    Reply
  73. Nicola mentioned “…books where it doesn’t matter a jot that I know exactly what is going to happen; they still makes me laugh or cry…”; I Immediately thought of “Little Women” (not exactly a lost treasure) because I ALWAYS cry when Beth dies. And I, too, treasure “Precious Bane.”
    My choice for forgotten treasure is “Wingarden” by Elsie Lee (and her other novels also). Yes many are somewhat dated, because they were in modern settings and were very much up to date as they were being written. But I was alive and experiencing those years, so I revisit my past when I revisit her books. Her books are still listed on Amazon to be obtained from third-party sellers.

    Reply
  74. Nicola mentioned “…books where it doesn’t matter a jot that I know exactly what is going to happen; they still makes me laugh or cry…”; I Immediately thought of “Little Women” (not exactly a lost treasure) because I ALWAYS cry when Beth dies. And I, too, treasure “Precious Bane.”
    My choice for forgotten treasure is “Wingarden” by Elsie Lee (and her other novels also). Yes many are somewhat dated, because they were in modern settings and were very much up to date as they were being written. But I was alive and experiencing those years, so I revisit my past when I revisit her books. Her books are still listed on Amazon to be obtained from third-party sellers.

    Reply
  75. Nicola mentioned “…books where it doesn’t matter a jot that I know exactly what is going to happen; they still makes me laugh or cry…”; I Immediately thought of “Little Women” (not exactly a lost treasure) because I ALWAYS cry when Beth dies. And I, too, treasure “Precious Bane.”
    My choice for forgotten treasure is “Wingarden” by Elsie Lee (and her other novels also). Yes many are somewhat dated, because they were in modern settings and were very much up to date as they were being written. But I was alive and experiencing those years, so I revisit my past when I revisit her books. Her books are still listed on Amazon to be obtained from third-party sellers.

    Reply
  76. I might have to come visit and borrow it, Nicola. My copy (as pretty much all my books, sob) stayed behind in the big transatlatic move of 2015.

    Reply
  77. I might have to come visit and borrow it, Nicola. My copy (as pretty much all my books, sob) stayed behind in the big transatlatic move of 2015.

    Reply
  78. I might have to come visit and borrow it, Nicola. My copy (as pretty much all my books, sob) stayed behind in the big transatlatic move of 2015.

    Reply
  79. I might have to come visit and borrow it, Nicola. My copy (as pretty much all my books, sob) stayed behind in the big transatlatic move of 2015.

    Reply
  80. I might have to come visit and borrow it, Nicola. My copy (as pretty much all my books, sob) stayed behind in the big transatlatic move of 2015.

    Reply
  81. I loved The Juniper Bush by Audrey Howard which was the book that inspired me to start writing again. It is on my keeper shelf and gets taken off every now and again to be reread

    Reply
  82. I loved The Juniper Bush by Audrey Howard which was the book that inspired me to start writing again. It is on my keeper shelf and gets taken off every now and again to be reread

    Reply
  83. I loved The Juniper Bush by Audrey Howard which was the book that inspired me to start writing again. It is on my keeper shelf and gets taken off every now and again to be reread

    Reply
  84. I loved The Juniper Bush by Audrey Howard which was the book that inspired me to start writing again. It is on my keeper shelf and gets taken off every now and again to be reread

    Reply
  85. I loved The Juniper Bush by Audrey Howard which was the book that inspired me to start writing again. It is on my keeper shelf and gets taken off every now and again to be reread

    Reply
  86. All four books by Mary Elgin, including ‘A Man From The Mist’ or ‘Visibility Nill’ in the UK, are some of my forgotten favorites. I treasure my copies.

    Reply
  87. All four books by Mary Elgin, including ‘A Man From The Mist’ or ‘Visibility Nill’ in the UK, are some of my forgotten favorites. I treasure my copies.

    Reply
  88. All four books by Mary Elgin, including ‘A Man From The Mist’ or ‘Visibility Nill’ in the UK, are some of my forgotten favorites. I treasure my copies.

    Reply
  89. All four books by Mary Elgin, including ‘A Man From The Mist’ or ‘Visibility Nill’ in the UK, are some of my forgotten favorites. I treasure my copies.

    Reply
  90. All four books by Mary Elgin, including ‘A Man From The Mist’ or ‘Visibility Nill’ in the UK, are some of my forgotten favorites. I treasure my copies.

    Reply
  91. On a recommendation of yours Nicola in an earlier blog I bought and read The Beau and The Bluestocking by Alice Chetwynd Ley. I’d never heard of her before that. I LOVED it!! And I’m looking forward to reading more of her books.

    Reply
  92. On a recommendation of yours Nicola in an earlier blog I bought and read The Beau and The Bluestocking by Alice Chetwynd Ley. I’d never heard of her before that. I LOVED it!! And I’m looking forward to reading more of her books.

    Reply
  93. On a recommendation of yours Nicola in an earlier blog I bought and read The Beau and The Bluestocking by Alice Chetwynd Ley. I’d never heard of her before that. I LOVED it!! And I’m looking forward to reading more of her books.

    Reply
  94. On a recommendation of yours Nicola in an earlier blog I bought and read The Beau and The Bluestocking by Alice Chetwynd Ley. I’d never heard of her before that. I LOVED it!! And I’m looking forward to reading more of her books.

    Reply
  95. On a recommendation of yours Nicola in an earlier blog I bought and read The Beau and The Bluestocking by Alice Chetwynd Ley. I’d never heard of her before that. I LOVED it!! And I’m looking forward to reading more of her books.

    Reply
  96. Though not a forgotten book, I absolutely love Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine. It’s a fantastic story. I’ve read most of her books but this one still stands out for me.
    I also love books by Mary Nichols. She writes Regency for Mills and Boon among others. My very favourite one is Marrying Miss Hemingford. I adored it and have read it many times.
    Fantastic recommendations here today. I’ve just purchased Precious Bane and wish listed I don’t know how many more. Really, really, enjoyed this post as I’m discovering author’s I had never heard of.

    Reply
  97. Though not a forgotten book, I absolutely love Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine. It’s a fantastic story. I’ve read most of her books but this one still stands out for me.
    I also love books by Mary Nichols. She writes Regency for Mills and Boon among others. My very favourite one is Marrying Miss Hemingford. I adored it and have read it many times.
    Fantastic recommendations here today. I’ve just purchased Precious Bane and wish listed I don’t know how many more. Really, really, enjoyed this post as I’m discovering author’s I had never heard of.

    Reply
  98. Though not a forgotten book, I absolutely love Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine. It’s a fantastic story. I’ve read most of her books but this one still stands out for me.
    I also love books by Mary Nichols. She writes Regency for Mills and Boon among others. My very favourite one is Marrying Miss Hemingford. I adored it and have read it many times.
    Fantastic recommendations here today. I’ve just purchased Precious Bane and wish listed I don’t know how many more. Really, really, enjoyed this post as I’m discovering author’s I had never heard of.

    Reply
  99. Though not a forgotten book, I absolutely love Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine. It’s a fantastic story. I’ve read most of her books but this one still stands out for me.
    I also love books by Mary Nichols. She writes Regency for Mills and Boon among others. My very favourite one is Marrying Miss Hemingford. I adored it and have read it many times.
    Fantastic recommendations here today. I’ve just purchased Precious Bane and wish listed I don’t know how many more. Really, really, enjoyed this post as I’m discovering author’s I had never heard of.

    Reply
  100. Though not a forgotten book, I absolutely love Lady of Hay by Barbara Erskine. It’s a fantastic story. I’ve read most of her books but this one still stands out for me.
    I also love books by Mary Nichols. She writes Regency for Mills and Boon among others. My very favourite one is Marrying Miss Hemingford. I adored it and have read it many times.
    Fantastic recommendations here today. I’ve just purchased Precious Bane and wish listed I don’t know how many more. Really, really, enjoyed this post as I’m discovering author’s I had never heard of.

    Reply
  101. I’m in my 70’s so these would be dated now, but they saved my sanity when we lived abroad and my husband traveled half the time. Some of my favorites were Iris Bromige and Anne Worboys who also had other pen names. Recently, in a thrift shop I found a paperback copy of Worboys’ “Every Man a King,” one of my favorites. You can find books by both on Amazon – just not as ebooks. There are also romantic suspense authors Victoria Holt, Phyllis Whitney, and Elsie Lee who entertained me for many hours. And as a southerner, one of my favorites “The View from Pompey’s Head” by Hamilton Basso. One of my best quotes comes from the wife of a southern born character who says to him “You southerners are just like the Japanese, you eat rice and worship your ancestors!”

    Reply
  102. I’m in my 70’s so these would be dated now, but they saved my sanity when we lived abroad and my husband traveled half the time. Some of my favorites were Iris Bromige and Anne Worboys who also had other pen names. Recently, in a thrift shop I found a paperback copy of Worboys’ “Every Man a King,” one of my favorites. You can find books by both on Amazon – just not as ebooks. There are also romantic suspense authors Victoria Holt, Phyllis Whitney, and Elsie Lee who entertained me for many hours. And as a southerner, one of my favorites “The View from Pompey’s Head” by Hamilton Basso. One of my best quotes comes from the wife of a southern born character who says to him “You southerners are just like the Japanese, you eat rice and worship your ancestors!”

    Reply
  103. I’m in my 70’s so these would be dated now, but they saved my sanity when we lived abroad and my husband traveled half the time. Some of my favorites were Iris Bromige and Anne Worboys who also had other pen names. Recently, in a thrift shop I found a paperback copy of Worboys’ “Every Man a King,” one of my favorites. You can find books by both on Amazon – just not as ebooks. There are also romantic suspense authors Victoria Holt, Phyllis Whitney, and Elsie Lee who entertained me for many hours. And as a southerner, one of my favorites “The View from Pompey’s Head” by Hamilton Basso. One of my best quotes comes from the wife of a southern born character who says to him “You southerners are just like the Japanese, you eat rice and worship your ancestors!”

    Reply
  104. I’m in my 70’s so these would be dated now, but they saved my sanity when we lived abroad and my husband traveled half the time. Some of my favorites were Iris Bromige and Anne Worboys who also had other pen names. Recently, in a thrift shop I found a paperback copy of Worboys’ “Every Man a King,” one of my favorites. You can find books by both on Amazon – just not as ebooks. There are also romantic suspense authors Victoria Holt, Phyllis Whitney, and Elsie Lee who entertained me for many hours. And as a southerner, one of my favorites “The View from Pompey’s Head” by Hamilton Basso. One of my best quotes comes from the wife of a southern born character who says to him “You southerners are just like the Japanese, you eat rice and worship your ancestors!”

    Reply
  105. I’m in my 70’s so these would be dated now, but they saved my sanity when we lived abroad and my husband traveled half the time. Some of my favorites were Iris Bromige and Anne Worboys who also had other pen names. Recently, in a thrift shop I found a paperback copy of Worboys’ “Every Man a King,” one of my favorites. You can find books by both on Amazon – just not as ebooks. There are also romantic suspense authors Victoria Holt, Phyllis Whitney, and Elsie Lee who entertained me for many hours. And as a southerner, one of my favorites “The View from Pompey’s Head” by Hamilton Basso. One of my best quotes comes from the wife of a southern born character who says to him “You southerners are just like the Japanese, you eat rice and worship your ancestors!”

    Reply
  106. Oh, I second that! I moved and had to make decisions and unfortunately, Ms. Ross was one to go to the used book store. Maybe someone will pick her up and enjoy them as much as I did.

    Reply
  107. Oh, I second that! I moved and had to make decisions and unfortunately, Ms. Ross was one to go to the used book store. Maybe someone will pick her up and enjoy them as much as I did.

    Reply
  108. Oh, I second that! I moved and had to make decisions and unfortunately, Ms. Ross was one to go to the used book store. Maybe someone will pick her up and enjoy them as much as I did.

    Reply
  109. Oh, I second that! I moved and had to make decisions and unfortunately, Ms. Ross was one to go to the used book store. Maybe someone will pick her up and enjoy them as much as I did.

    Reply
  110. Oh, I second that! I moved and had to make decisions and unfortunately, Ms. Ross was one to go to the used book store. Maybe someone will pick her up and enjoy them as much as I did.

    Reply
  111. Thomas Costain! I haven’t heard his name in decades. I loved all of his books. Also remembered reading R.F. Delderfield’s Swann Family Saga.

    Reply
  112. Thomas Costain! I haven’t heard his name in decades. I loved all of his books. Also remembered reading R.F. Delderfield’s Swann Family Saga.

    Reply
  113. Thomas Costain! I haven’t heard his name in decades. I loved all of his books. Also remembered reading R.F. Delderfield’s Swann Family Saga.

    Reply
  114. Thomas Costain! I haven’t heard his name in decades. I loved all of his books. Also remembered reading R.F. Delderfield’s Swann Family Saga.

    Reply
  115. Thomas Costain! I haven’t heard his name in decades. I loved all of his books. Also remembered reading R.F. Delderfield’s Swann Family Saga.

    Reply
  116. I know I read that, but I no longer remember any details. My problem with older books is that I not only rarely read print these days, but I have trouble with older paper books. They have a musty spell that some people love, but that sometimes gives me a headache.

    Reply
  117. I know I read that, but I no longer remember any details. My problem with older books is that I not only rarely read print these days, but I have trouble with older paper books. They have a musty spell that some people love, but that sometimes gives me a headache.

    Reply
  118. I know I read that, but I no longer remember any details. My problem with older books is that I not only rarely read print these days, but I have trouble with older paper books. They have a musty spell that some people love, but that sometimes gives me a headache.

    Reply
  119. I know I read that, but I no longer remember any details. My problem with older books is that I not only rarely read print these days, but I have trouble with older paper books. They have a musty spell that some people love, but that sometimes gives me a headache.

    Reply
  120. I know I read that, but I no longer remember any details. My problem with older books is that I not only rarely read print these days, but I have trouble with older paper books. They have a musty spell that some people love, but that sometimes gives me a headache.

    Reply
  121. I remember reading one or two of Margaret Irwin’s books on Queen Elizabeth. I wish I’d stumbled on that time-slip novel back then!

    Reply
  122. I remember reading one or two of Margaret Irwin’s books on Queen Elizabeth. I wish I’d stumbled on that time-slip novel back then!

    Reply
  123. I remember reading one or two of Margaret Irwin’s books on Queen Elizabeth. I wish I’d stumbled on that time-slip novel back then!

    Reply
  124. I remember reading one or two of Margaret Irwin’s books on Queen Elizabeth. I wish I’d stumbled on that time-slip novel back then!

    Reply
  125. I remember reading one or two of Margaret Irwin’s books on Queen Elizabeth. I wish I’d stumbled on that time-slip novel back then!

    Reply
  126. I remember Mary Lide. I read Ann of Cambray, and tracked down some of her other books because I liked her writing. (I think she was a poet.) Not sure if it’s still on my shelves somewhere, but I do have a few of her other books.
    I liked Elizabeth Stuart, who wrote a few historical (mostly medieval) romances (Heartstorm, Where Love Dwells, Without Honor, and Bride of the Lion) before she was sidelined by life (family, I think). She wrote in the late 1980s to mid-1990s. What I remember most is discovering her books at a time when it seemed that historical romances were losing their sense of history. Fewer books were being published around historical events (by US romance publishers).

    Reply
  127. I remember Mary Lide. I read Ann of Cambray, and tracked down some of her other books because I liked her writing. (I think she was a poet.) Not sure if it’s still on my shelves somewhere, but I do have a few of her other books.
    I liked Elizabeth Stuart, who wrote a few historical (mostly medieval) romances (Heartstorm, Where Love Dwells, Without Honor, and Bride of the Lion) before she was sidelined by life (family, I think). She wrote in the late 1980s to mid-1990s. What I remember most is discovering her books at a time when it seemed that historical romances were losing their sense of history. Fewer books were being published around historical events (by US romance publishers).

    Reply
  128. I remember Mary Lide. I read Ann of Cambray, and tracked down some of her other books because I liked her writing. (I think she was a poet.) Not sure if it’s still on my shelves somewhere, but I do have a few of her other books.
    I liked Elizabeth Stuart, who wrote a few historical (mostly medieval) romances (Heartstorm, Where Love Dwells, Without Honor, and Bride of the Lion) before she was sidelined by life (family, I think). She wrote in the late 1980s to mid-1990s. What I remember most is discovering her books at a time when it seemed that historical romances were losing their sense of history. Fewer books were being published around historical events (by US romance publishers).

    Reply
  129. I remember Mary Lide. I read Ann of Cambray, and tracked down some of her other books because I liked her writing. (I think she was a poet.) Not sure if it’s still on my shelves somewhere, but I do have a few of her other books.
    I liked Elizabeth Stuart, who wrote a few historical (mostly medieval) romances (Heartstorm, Where Love Dwells, Without Honor, and Bride of the Lion) before she was sidelined by life (family, I think). She wrote in the late 1980s to mid-1990s. What I remember most is discovering her books at a time when it seemed that historical romances were losing their sense of history. Fewer books were being published around historical events (by US romance publishers).

    Reply
  130. I remember Mary Lide. I read Ann of Cambray, and tracked down some of her other books because I liked her writing. (I think she was a poet.) Not sure if it’s still on my shelves somewhere, but I do have a few of her other books.
    I liked Elizabeth Stuart, who wrote a few historical (mostly medieval) romances (Heartstorm, Where Love Dwells, Without Honor, and Bride of the Lion) before she was sidelined by life (family, I think). She wrote in the late 1980s to mid-1990s. What I remember most is discovering her books at a time when it seemed that historical romances were losing their sense of history. Fewer books were being published around historical events (by US romance publishers).

    Reply
  131. I have always loved tales of Ancient Egypt, so two of my favorites are Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Shadow Hawk by Andre Norton. Both very colorful and true to what was known about the ancient Egyptians when they were written.

    Reply
  132. I have always loved tales of Ancient Egypt, so two of my favorites are Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Shadow Hawk by Andre Norton. Both very colorful and true to what was known about the ancient Egyptians when they were written.

    Reply
  133. I have always loved tales of Ancient Egypt, so two of my favorites are Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Shadow Hawk by Andre Norton. Both very colorful and true to what was known about the ancient Egyptians when they were written.

    Reply
  134. I have always loved tales of Ancient Egypt, so two of my favorites are Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Shadow Hawk by Andre Norton. Both very colorful and true to what was known about the ancient Egyptians when they were written.

    Reply
  135. I have always loved tales of Ancient Egypt, so two of my favorites are Mara, Daughter of the Nile by Eloise Jarvis McGraw and Shadow Hawk by Andre Norton. Both very colorful and true to what was known about the ancient Egyptians when they were written.

    Reply
  136. Lilian, I’ve never heard of this book, either. Will try to chase it up. Oh, I do love this end of the month book-fest — though my credit card probably doesn’t. 😉

    Reply
  137. Lilian, I’ve never heard of this book, either. Will try to chase it up. Oh, I do love this end of the month book-fest — though my credit card probably doesn’t. 😉

    Reply
  138. Lilian, I’ve never heard of this book, either. Will try to chase it up. Oh, I do love this end of the month book-fest — though my credit card probably doesn’t. 😉

    Reply
  139. Lilian, I’ve never heard of this book, either. Will try to chase it up. Oh, I do love this end of the month book-fest — though my credit card probably doesn’t. 😉

    Reply
  140. Lilian, I’ve never heard of this book, either. Will try to chase it up. Oh, I do love this end of the month book-fest — though my credit card probably doesn’t. 😉

    Reply
  141. Oh, I loved Phyllis Whitney’s books! When my boys were young (thirty-odd years ago!), I read every one of them I could find in my small-town library and kept haunting her shelf hoping to find one I’d somehow missed.

    Reply
  142. Oh, I loved Phyllis Whitney’s books! When my boys were young (thirty-odd years ago!), I read every one of them I could find in my small-town library and kept haunting her shelf hoping to find one I’d somehow missed.

    Reply
  143. Oh, I loved Phyllis Whitney’s books! When my boys were young (thirty-odd years ago!), I read every one of them I could find in my small-town library and kept haunting her shelf hoping to find one I’d somehow missed.

    Reply
  144. Oh, I loved Phyllis Whitney’s books! When my boys were young (thirty-odd years ago!), I read every one of them I could find in my small-town library and kept haunting her shelf hoping to find one I’d somehow missed.

    Reply
  145. Oh, I loved Phyllis Whitney’s books! When my boys were young (thirty-odd years ago!), I read every one of them I could find in my small-town library and kept haunting her shelf hoping to find one I’d somehow missed.

    Reply
  146. May I sneak in here with a couple of books set in the US — first, The Rainbow Season, by Lisa Gregory (aka Candace Camp and Kristin James) which is one of my all-time favorites. Such a great hero in Luke Turner who is not just wounded, but tortured, by his past. He has just been released from prison, convicted of a crime he did not commit. But beyond that experience, he hasn’t known love or esteem or respect in his entire life. If ever a man was entitled to lose hope, it would be Luke. And when he meets Sarah, she is everything he could ever hope to want — and is sure he’s not worthy of. Sarah, for her part, has her own brand of hopelessness. She loves the man who married her sister.
    What Luke and Sarah bring to each other, how they forge first a friendship, then a life of respect and undying love, is one of the best I’ve ever read. It has lingered for years.
    The other book is a contemporary, also set in the West, called The Loves of Ruby Dee by Curtiss Ann Matlock. Ruby is something of a free spirit who takes on caring for elderly hard-headed stubborn, opinionated rancher, Hardy Starr. That would be tricky enough, but she’s also got to deal with his here-today-gone-tomorrow rodeo cowboy younger son, Lonnie, who is hell on wheels most of the time, and his hard-headed, stubborn, responsible, generally-irritated-with-his-father who can’t leave him alone to get things done older son, Will (did you notice a similarity of adjectives between Will and Hardy?).
    The three men can’t get along with each other to save their lives (but they’d die for each other because they’re family; they’d just probably kill each other in the process). And, each in his own way, is in love with Ruby. And Ruby, for her part, loves each of them. Not the same way, of course. But the telling makes a great story. Curtiss Ann does justice to them all. When I read it the first time (and I’ve read it several), I wrote her a note and said, “I know these men. They’re my family.”

    Reply
  147. May I sneak in here with a couple of books set in the US — first, The Rainbow Season, by Lisa Gregory (aka Candace Camp and Kristin James) which is one of my all-time favorites. Such a great hero in Luke Turner who is not just wounded, but tortured, by his past. He has just been released from prison, convicted of a crime he did not commit. But beyond that experience, he hasn’t known love or esteem or respect in his entire life. If ever a man was entitled to lose hope, it would be Luke. And when he meets Sarah, she is everything he could ever hope to want — and is sure he’s not worthy of. Sarah, for her part, has her own brand of hopelessness. She loves the man who married her sister.
    What Luke and Sarah bring to each other, how they forge first a friendship, then a life of respect and undying love, is one of the best I’ve ever read. It has lingered for years.
    The other book is a contemporary, also set in the West, called The Loves of Ruby Dee by Curtiss Ann Matlock. Ruby is something of a free spirit who takes on caring for elderly hard-headed stubborn, opinionated rancher, Hardy Starr. That would be tricky enough, but she’s also got to deal with his here-today-gone-tomorrow rodeo cowboy younger son, Lonnie, who is hell on wheels most of the time, and his hard-headed, stubborn, responsible, generally-irritated-with-his-father who can’t leave him alone to get things done older son, Will (did you notice a similarity of adjectives between Will and Hardy?).
    The three men can’t get along with each other to save their lives (but they’d die for each other because they’re family; they’d just probably kill each other in the process). And, each in his own way, is in love with Ruby. And Ruby, for her part, loves each of them. Not the same way, of course. But the telling makes a great story. Curtiss Ann does justice to them all. When I read it the first time (and I’ve read it several), I wrote her a note and said, “I know these men. They’re my family.”

    Reply
  148. May I sneak in here with a couple of books set in the US — first, The Rainbow Season, by Lisa Gregory (aka Candace Camp and Kristin James) which is one of my all-time favorites. Such a great hero in Luke Turner who is not just wounded, but tortured, by his past. He has just been released from prison, convicted of a crime he did not commit. But beyond that experience, he hasn’t known love or esteem or respect in his entire life. If ever a man was entitled to lose hope, it would be Luke. And when he meets Sarah, she is everything he could ever hope to want — and is sure he’s not worthy of. Sarah, for her part, has her own brand of hopelessness. She loves the man who married her sister.
    What Luke and Sarah bring to each other, how they forge first a friendship, then a life of respect and undying love, is one of the best I’ve ever read. It has lingered for years.
    The other book is a contemporary, also set in the West, called The Loves of Ruby Dee by Curtiss Ann Matlock. Ruby is something of a free spirit who takes on caring for elderly hard-headed stubborn, opinionated rancher, Hardy Starr. That would be tricky enough, but she’s also got to deal with his here-today-gone-tomorrow rodeo cowboy younger son, Lonnie, who is hell on wheels most of the time, and his hard-headed, stubborn, responsible, generally-irritated-with-his-father who can’t leave him alone to get things done older son, Will (did you notice a similarity of adjectives between Will and Hardy?).
    The three men can’t get along with each other to save their lives (but they’d die for each other because they’re family; they’d just probably kill each other in the process). And, each in his own way, is in love with Ruby. And Ruby, for her part, loves each of them. Not the same way, of course. But the telling makes a great story. Curtiss Ann does justice to them all. When I read it the first time (and I’ve read it several), I wrote her a note and said, “I know these men. They’re my family.”

    Reply
  149. May I sneak in here with a couple of books set in the US — first, The Rainbow Season, by Lisa Gregory (aka Candace Camp and Kristin James) which is one of my all-time favorites. Such a great hero in Luke Turner who is not just wounded, but tortured, by his past. He has just been released from prison, convicted of a crime he did not commit. But beyond that experience, he hasn’t known love or esteem or respect in his entire life. If ever a man was entitled to lose hope, it would be Luke. And when he meets Sarah, she is everything he could ever hope to want — and is sure he’s not worthy of. Sarah, for her part, has her own brand of hopelessness. She loves the man who married her sister.
    What Luke and Sarah bring to each other, how they forge first a friendship, then a life of respect and undying love, is one of the best I’ve ever read. It has lingered for years.
    The other book is a contemporary, also set in the West, called The Loves of Ruby Dee by Curtiss Ann Matlock. Ruby is something of a free spirit who takes on caring for elderly hard-headed stubborn, opinionated rancher, Hardy Starr. That would be tricky enough, but she’s also got to deal with his here-today-gone-tomorrow rodeo cowboy younger son, Lonnie, who is hell on wheels most of the time, and his hard-headed, stubborn, responsible, generally-irritated-with-his-father who can’t leave him alone to get things done older son, Will (did you notice a similarity of adjectives between Will and Hardy?).
    The three men can’t get along with each other to save their lives (but they’d die for each other because they’re family; they’d just probably kill each other in the process). And, each in his own way, is in love with Ruby. And Ruby, for her part, loves each of them. Not the same way, of course. But the telling makes a great story. Curtiss Ann does justice to them all. When I read it the first time (and I’ve read it several), I wrote her a note and said, “I know these men. They’re my family.”

    Reply
  150. May I sneak in here with a couple of books set in the US — first, The Rainbow Season, by Lisa Gregory (aka Candace Camp and Kristin James) which is one of my all-time favorites. Such a great hero in Luke Turner who is not just wounded, but tortured, by his past. He has just been released from prison, convicted of a crime he did not commit. But beyond that experience, he hasn’t known love or esteem or respect in his entire life. If ever a man was entitled to lose hope, it would be Luke. And when he meets Sarah, she is everything he could ever hope to want — and is sure he’s not worthy of. Sarah, for her part, has her own brand of hopelessness. She loves the man who married her sister.
    What Luke and Sarah bring to each other, how they forge first a friendship, then a life of respect and undying love, is one of the best I’ve ever read. It has lingered for years.
    The other book is a contemporary, also set in the West, called The Loves of Ruby Dee by Curtiss Ann Matlock. Ruby is something of a free spirit who takes on caring for elderly hard-headed stubborn, opinionated rancher, Hardy Starr. That would be tricky enough, but she’s also got to deal with his here-today-gone-tomorrow rodeo cowboy younger son, Lonnie, who is hell on wheels most of the time, and his hard-headed, stubborn, responsible, generally-irritated-with-his-father who can’t leave him alone to get things done older son, Will (did you notice a similarity of adjectives between Will and Hardy?).
    The three men can’t get along with each other to save their lives (but they’d die for each other because they’re family; they’d just probably kill each other in the process). And, each in his own way, is in love with Ruby. And Ruby, for her part, loves each of them. Not the same way, of course. But the telling makes a great story. Curtiss Ann does justice to them all. When I read it the first time (and I’ve read it several), I wrote her a note and said, “I know these men. They’re my family.”

    Reply
  151. Oh, I thought I was the only one who remembered Mary Elgin! I thought she only wrote three books — A Man from the Mist (Visibility Nil), Highland Masquerade (Return to Glenshael), and The Wood and the Trees. My paperbacks were all from the 60s and fell apart about 10 years ago, so I hunted down hardbacks on Abebooks.
    Such a talented writer. I went in search of more books and discovered that she died before the third book was ever published.
    If there is a fourth book (hard to tell with the changes in title between the UK and the US), please let me know!

    Reply
  152. Oh, I thought I was the only one who remembered Mary Elgin! I thought she only wrote three books — A Man from the Mist (Visibility Nil), Highland Masquerade (Return to Glenshael), and The Wood and the Trees. My paperbacks were all from the 60s and fell apart about 10 years ago, so I hunted down hardbacks on Abebooks.
    Such a talented writer. I went in search of more books and discovered that she died before the third book was ever published.
    If there is a fourth book (hard to tell with the changes in title between the UK and the US), please let me know!

    Reply
  153. Oh, I thought I was the only one who remembered Mary Elgin! I thought she only wrote three books — A Man from the Mist (Visibility Nil), Highland Masquerade (Return to Glenshael), and The Wood and the Trees. My paperbacks were all from the 60s and fell apart about 10 years ago, so I hunted down hardbacks on Abebooks.
    Such a talented writer. I went in search of more books and discovered that she died before the third book was ever published.
    If there is a fourth book (hard to tell with the changes in title between the UK and the US), please let me know!

    Reply
  154. Oh, I thought I was the only one who remembered Mary Elgin! I thought she only wrote three books — A Man from the Mist (Visibility Nil), Highland Masquerade (Return to Glenshael), and The Wood and the Trees. My paperbacks were all from the 60s and fell apart about 10 years ago, so I hunted down hardbacks on Abebooks.
    Such a talented writer. I went in search of more books and discovered that she died before the third book was ever published.
    If there is a fourth book (hard to tell with the changes in title between the UK and the US), please let me know!

    Reply
  155. Oh, I thought I was the only one who remembered Mary Elgin! I thought she only wrote three books — A Man from the Mist (Visibility Nil), Highland Masquerade (Return to Glenshael), and The Wood and the Trees. My paperbacks were all from the 60s and fell apart about 10 years ago, so I hunted down hardbacks on Abebooks.
    Such a talented writer. I went in search of more books and discovered that she died before the third book was ever published.
    If there is a fourth book (hard to tell with the changes in title between the UK and the US), please let me know!

    Reply
  156. Oh this sparked a few people’s lights of joy! Great topic! I love Roberta Gellis’s books. I collected as many as I could find and some I had to replace from being “loved” too much! One of hers that I particularly liked was “Dazzling Brightness”. A whole new take on the Hades/Persephone story. Like a good romance writer, she turned it into a lovely love story. I’ve had a soft spot for Hades ever since! 🙂
    Her Rosalynd Chronicles got me started reading Historicals. My mother had a bookstore when I was in high school and when she sold it, I grabbed all 4 (all there was at the time) of her books in the series. It also started me on my Series Addiction! 🙂
    She’s a lovely lady too who was the first author to reply to a letter I wrote her. (snail mail was all that was available at the time!)
    Thanks for this great topic! Now I have to dig back through my books again and find more ‘forgotten’ treasures and check for some of the authors mentioned here too! 🙂

    Reply
  157. Oh this sparked a few people’s lights of joy! Great topic! I love Roberta Gellis’s books. I collected as many as I could find and some I had to replace from being “loved” too much! One of hers that I particularly liked was “Dazzling Brightness”. A whole new take on the Hades/Persephone story. Like a good romance writer, she turned it into a lovely love story. I’ve had a soft spot for Hades ever since! 🙂
    Her Rosalynd Chronicles got me started reading Historicals. My mother had a bookstore when I was in high school and when she sold it, I grabbed all 4 (all there was at the time) of her books in the series. It also started me on my Series Addiction! 🙂
    She’s a lovely lady too who was the first author to reply to a letter I wrote her. (snail mail was all that was available at the time!)
    Thanks for this great topic! Now I have to dig back through my books again and find more ‘forgotten’ treasures and check for some of the authors mentioned here too! 🙂

    Reply
  158. Oh this sparked a few people’s lights of joy! Great topic! I love Roberta Gellis’s books. I collected as many as I could find and some I had to replace from being “loved” too much! One of hers that I particularly liked was “Dazzling Brightness”. A whole new take on the Hades/Persephone story. Like a good romance writer, she turned it into a lovely love story. I’ve had a soft spot for Hades ever since! 🙂
    Her Rosalynd Chronicles got me started reading Historicals. My mother had a bookstore when I was in high school and when she sold it, I grabbed all 4 (all there was at the time) of her books in the series. It also started me on my Series Addiction! 🙂
    She’s a lovely lady too who was the first author to reply to a letter I wrote her. (snail mail was all that was available at the time!)
    Thanks for this great topic! Now I have to dig back through my books again and find more ‘forgotten’ treasures and check for some of the authors mentioned here too! 🙂

    Reply
  159. Oh this sparked a few people’s lights of joy! Great topic! I love Roberta Gellis’s books. I collected as many as I could find and some I had to replace from being “loved” too much! One of hers that I particularly liked was “Dazzling Brightness”. A whole new take on the Hades/Persephone story. Like a good romance writer, she turned it into a lovely love story. I’ve had a soft spot for Hades ever since! 🙂
    Her Rosalynd Chronicles got me started reading Historicals. My mother had a bookstore when I was in high school and when she sold it, I grabbed all 4 (all there was at the time) of her books in the series. It also started me on my Series Addiction! 🙂
    She’s a lovely lady too who was the first author to reply to a letter I wrote her. (snail mail was all that was available at the time!)
    Thanks for this great topic! Now I have to dig back through my books again and find more ‘forgotten’ treasures and check for some of the authors mentioned here too! 🙂

    Reply
  160. Oh this sparked a few people’s lights of joy! Great topic! I love Roberta Gellis’s books. I collected as many as I could find and some I had to replace from being “loved” too much! One of hers that I particularly liked was “Dazzling Brightness”. A whole new take on the Hades/Persephone story. Like a good romance writer, she turned it into a lovely love story. I’ve had a soft spot for Hades ever since! 🙂
    Her Rosalynd Chronicles got me started reading Historicals. My mother had a bookstore when I was in high school and when she sold it, I grabbed all 4 (all there was at the time) of her books in the series. It also started me on my Series Addiction! 🙂
    She’s a lovely lady too who was the first author to reply to a letter I wrote her. (snail mail was all that was available at the time!)
    Thanks for this great topic! Now I have to dig back through my books again and find more ‘forgotten’ treasures and check for some of the authors mentioned here too! 🙂

    Reply
  161. Have you heard from her lately? I know she had health issues a few years back. No updates since then. 🙁 If anybody is in touch, please tell her we think about her.

    Reply
  162. Have you heard from her lately? I know she had health issues a few years back. No updates since then. 🙁 If anybody is in touch, please tell her we think about her.

    Reply
  163. Have you heard from her lately? I know she had health issues a few years back. No updates since then. 🙁 If anybody is in touch, please tell her we think about her.

    Reply
  164. Have you heard from her lately? I know she had health issues a few years back. No updates since then. 🙁 If anybody is in touch, please tell her we think about her.

    Reply
  165. Have you heard from her lately? I know she had health issues a few years back. No updates since then. 🙁 If anybody is in touch, please tell her we think about her.

    Reply
  166. Thanks, Cate. I had forgotten Lillibulero but I did read it way back. Mist over Pendle was the one that made the lasting impression on me too. I must track down the others and see what I make of them now.

    Reply
  167. Thanks, Cate. I had forgotten Lillibulero but I did read it way back. Mist over Pendle was the one that made the lasting impression on me too. I must track down the others and see what I make of them now.

    Reply
  168. Thanks, Cate. I had forgotten Lillibulero but I did read it way back. Mist over Pendle was the one that made the lasting impression on me too. I must track down the others and see what I make of them now.

    Reply
  169. Thanks, Cate. I had forgotten Lillibulero but I did read it way back. Mist over Pendle was the one that made the lasting impression on me too. I must track down the others and see what I make of them now.

    Reply
  170. Thanks, Cate. I had forgotten Lillibulero but I did read it way back. Mist over Pendle was the one that made the lasting impression on me too. I must track down the others and see what I make of them now.

    Reply
  171. I also loved Mary Elgin. I remember a fourth book, but have not been able to find the name of it! Do I remember it correctly? Is it the story of the founder of the employment agency that springboards the other three books?

    Reply
  172. I also loved Mary Elgin. I remember a fourth book, but have not been able to find the name of it! Do I remember it correctly? Is it the story of the founder of the employment agency that springboards the other three books?

    Reply
  173. I also loved Mary Elgin. I remember a fourth book, but have not been able to find the name of it! Do I remember it correctly? Is it the story of the founder of the employment agency that springboards the other three books?

    Reply
  174. I also loved Mary Elgin. I remember a fourth book, but have not been able to find the name of it! Do I remember it correctly? Is it the story of the founder of the employment agency that springboards the other three books?

    Reply
  175. I also loved Mary Elgin. I remember a fourth book, but have not been able to find the name of it! Do I remember it correctly? Is it the story of the founder of the employment agency that springboards the other three books?

    Reply
  176. The Wenches and the commenters here are once again sending me off in search of out-of-print books! It was here that I first heard about the Regency spy romances of Nita Abrams(she published 4, and then vanished into the mist). And I’m sure it was here that I heard about “A Town Like Alice” by Nevil Shute, and “Sleep in the Woods” by Dorothy Eden, which led me to another Eden novel, “The American Heiress”, and “Red Adam’s Lady”, a wonderful medieval by Grace Ingram. “Zemindar” rings a bell, I’m sure I read it several decades ago. Precious Bane is a favorite that I reread every so often. Another author I love is Paula Marshall, especially her Dilhorne dynasty books. “Hester Waring’s Marriage” is the first and best in that series, but “An Unconventional Heiress”, “The Dollar Prince’s Wife”, “Prince of Secrets” and “An Improper Duenna” are all good. Most of them feature a Cinderella type heroine who comes into her own. And I guess enough time has passed that Rosamund Pilcher is due to be rediscovered. “The Shell Seekers” is her most famous book, but my favorite is “Coming Home” which is set during during World War 2.

    Reply
  177. The Wenches and the commenters here are once again sending me off in search of out-of-print books! It was here that I first heard about the Regency spy romances of Nita Abrams(she published 4, and then vanished into the mist). And I’m sure it was here that I heard about “A Town Like Alice” by Nevil Shute, and “Sleep in the Woods” by Dorothy Eden, which led me to another Eden novel, “The American Heiress”, and “Red Adam’s Lady”, a wonderful medieval by Grace Ingram. “Zemindar” rings a bell, I’m sure I read it several decades ago. Precious Bane is a favorite that I reread every so often. Another author I love is Paula Marshall, especially her Dilhorne dynasty books. “Hester Waring’s Marriage” is the first and best in that series, but “An Unconventional Heiress”, “The Dollar Prince’s Wife”, “Prince of Secrets” and “An Improper Duenna” are all good. Most of them feature a Cinderella type heroine who comes into her own. And I guess enough time has passed that Rosamund Pilcher is due to be rediscovered. “The Shell Seekers” is her most famous book, but my favorite is “Coming Home” which is set during during World War 2.

    Reply
  178. The Wenches and the commenters here are once again sending me off in search of out-of-print books! It was here that I first heard about the Regency spy romances of Nita Abrams(she published 4, and then vanished into the mist). And I’m sure it was here that I heard about “A Town Like Alice” by Nevil Shute, and “Sleep in the Woods” by Dorothy Eden, which led me to another Eden novel, “The American Heiress”, and “Red Adam’s Lady”, a wonderful medieval by Grace Ingram. “Zemindar” rings a bell, I’m sure I read it several decades ago. Precious Bane is a favorite that I reread every so often. Another author I love is Paula Marshall, especially her Dilhorne dynasty books. “Hester Waring’s Marriage” is the first and best in that series, but “An Unconventional Heiress”, “The Dollar Prince’s Wife”, “Prince of Secrets” and “An Improper Duenna” are all good. Most of them feature a Cinderella type heroine who comes into her own. And I guess enough time has passed that Rosamund Pilcher is due to be rediscovered. “The Shell Seekers” is her most famous book, but my favorite is “Coming Home” which is set during during World War 2.

    Reply
  179. The Wenches and the commenters here are once again sending me off in search of out-of-print books! It was here that I first heard about the Regency spy romances of Nita Abrams(she published 4, and then vanished into the mist). And I’m sure it was here that I heard about “A Town Like Alice” by Nevil Shute, and “Sleep in the Woods” by Dorothy Eden, which led me to another Eden novel, “The American Heiress”, and “Red Adam’s Lady”, a wonderful medieval by Grace Ingram. “Zemindar” rings a bell, I’m sure I read it several decades ago. Precious Bane is a favorite that I reread every so often. Another author I love is Paula Marshall, especially her Dilhorne dynasty books. “Hester Waring’s Marriage” is the first and best in that series, but “An Unconventional Heiress”, “The Dollar Prince’s Wife”, “Prince of Secrets” and “An Improper Duenna” are all good. Most of them feature a Cinderella type heroine who comes into her own. And I guess enough time has passed that Rosamund Pilcher is due to be rediscovered. “The Shell Seekers” is her most famous book, but my favorite is “Coming Home” which is set during during World War 2.

    Reply
  180. The Wenches and the commenters here are once again sending me off in search of out-of-print books! It was here that I first heard about the Regency spy romances of Nita Abrams(she published 4, and then vanished into the mist). And I’m sure it was here that I heard about “A Town Like Alice” by Nevil Shute, and “Sleep in the Woods” by Dorothy Eden, which led me to another Eden novel, “The American Heiress”, and “Red Adam’s Lady”, a wonderful medieval by Grace Ingram. “Zemindar” rings a bell, I’m sure I read it several decades ago. Precious Bane is a favorite that I reread every so often. Another author I love is Paula Marshall, especially her Dilhorne dynasty books. “Hester Waring’s Marriage” is the first and best in that series, but “An Unconventional Heiress”, “The Dollar Prince’s Wife”, “Prince of Secrets” and “An Improper Duenna” are all good. Most of them feature a Cinderella type heroine who comes into her own. And I guess enough time has passed that Rosamund Pilcher is due to be rediscovered. “The Shell Seekers” is her most famous book, but my favorite is “Coming Home” which is set during during World War 2.

    Reply
  181. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  182. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  183. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  184. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  185. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  186. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  187. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  188. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  189. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  190. Oh, I’m so glad! That publisher has done a fabulous, classy job with the reissues I’ve seen. And, guess what?
    Thanks to everyone who crossed their fingers for me, because some lovely, lovely person sent me a .mobi/Kindle version via email this morning.
    I am SO happy you started this discussion.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  191. For anyone interested in Lost Queen of Egypt,I exchanged a number of emails yesterday with the very classy reissue publisher of Zemindar, and mentioned Lost Queen of Egypt. Appears they’re going to look into that one, too, which also was the author/archaeologist/artist’s only book.

    Reply
  192. For anyone interested in Lost Queen of Egypt,I exchanged a number of emails yesterday with the very classy reissue publisher of Zemindar, and mentioned Lost Queen of Egypt. Appears they’re going to look into that one, too, which also was the author/archaeologist/artist’s only book.

    Reply
  193. For anyone interested in Lost Queen of Egypt,I exchanged a number of emails yesterday with the very classy reissue publisher of Zemindar, and mentioned Lost Queen of Egypt. Appears they’re going to look into that one, too, which also was the author/archaeologist/artist’s only book.

    Reply
  194. For anyone interested in Lost Queen of Egypt,I exchanged a number of emails yesterday with the very classy reissue publisher of Zemindar, and mentioned Lost Queen of Egypt. Appears they’re going to look into that one, too, which also was the author/archaeologist/artist’s only book.

    Reply
  195. For anyone interested in Lost Queen of Egypt,I exchanged a number of emails yesterday with the very classy reissue publisher of Zemindar, and mentioned Lost Queen of Egypt. Appears they’re going to look into that one, too, which also was the author/archaeologist/artist’s only book.

    Reply
  196. A good thing my tax refund will be coming soon because I just did serious damage to my Amazon account with all of these wonderful recommendations! Anyone else out there remember Diana by R.F. Delderfield fondly? It would take me a while to find my old copy, but I treasured it for years, so I know it’s in a box downstairs somewhere.

    Reply
  197. A good thing my tax refund will be coming soon because I just did serious damage to my Amazon account with all of these wonderful recommendations! Anyone else out there remember Diana by R.F. Delderfield fondly? It would take me a while to find my old copy, but I treasured it for years, so I know it’s in a box downstairs somewhere.

    Reply
  198. A good thing my tax refund will be coming soon because I just did serious damage to my Amazon account with all of these wonderful recommendations! Anyone else out there remember Diana by R.F. Delderfield fondly? It would take me a while to find my old copy, but I treasured it for years, so I know it’s in a box downstairs somewhere.

    Reply
  199. A good thing my tax refund will be coming soon because I just did serious damage to my Amazon account with all of these wonderful recommendations! Anyone else out there remember Diana by R.F. Delderfield fondly? It would take me a while to find my old copy, but I treasured it for years, so I know it’s in a box downstairs somewhere.

    Reply
  200. A good thing my tax refund will be coming soon because I just did serious damage to my Amazon account with all of these wonderful recommendations! Anyone else out there remember Diana by R.F. Delderfield fondly? It would take me a while to find my old copy, but I treasured it for years, so I know it’s in a box downstairs somewhere.

    Reply
  201. Margaret, I read all the Delderfield I could get my hands on. I remember DIANA (and the field of purple and gold.) Powerful, and to be honest, not a happy enough ending for me. But I sure remember it!

    Reply
  202. Margaret, I read all the Delderfield I could get my hands on. I remember DIANA (and the field of purple and gold.) Powerful, and to be honest, not a happy enough ending for me. But I sure remember it!

    Reply
  203. Margaret, I read all the Delderfield I could get my hands on. I remember DIANA (and the field of purple and gold.) Powerful, and to be honest, not a happy enough ending for me. But I sure remember it!

    Reply
  204. Margaret, I read all the Delderfield I could get my hands on. I remember DIANA (and the field of purple and gold.) Powerful, and to be honest, not a happy enough ending for me. But I sure remember it!

    Reply
  205. Margaret, I read all the Delderfield I could get my hands on. I remember DIANA (and the field of purple and gold.) Powerful, and to be honest, not a happy enough ending for me. But I sure remember it!

    Reply
  206. Thanks Nicola for putting this up on FB. I haven’t had time to open the Wenches newsletter but now while drinking a glass of red wine I am checking out all the suggestions.
    I live in a small town where the main languages are German, Afrikaans and Zulu. Very little English is spoken, plus I live on a farm, so books are very good friends for me.

    Reply
  207. Thanks Nicola for putting this up on FB. I haven’t had time to open the Wenches newsletter but now while drinking a glass of red wine I am checking out all the suggestions.
    I live in a small town where the main languages are German, Afrikaans and Zulu. Very little English is spoken, plus I live on a farm, so books are very good friends for me.

    Reply
  208. Thanks Nicola for putting this up on FB. I haven’t had time to open the Wenches newsletter but now while drinking a glass of red wine I am checking out all the suggestions.
    I live in a small town where the main languages are German, Afrikaans and Zulu. Very little English is spoken, plus I live on a farm, so books are very good friends for me.

    Reply
  209. Thanks Nicola for putting this up on FB. I haven’t had time to open the Wenches newsletter but now while drinking a glass of red wine I am checking out all the suggestions.
    I live in a small town where the main languages are German, Afrikaans and Zulu. Very little English is spoken, plus I live on a farm, so books are very good friends for me.

    Reply
  210. Thanks Nicola for putting this up on FB. I haven’t had time to open the Wenches newsletter but now while drinking a glass of red wine I am checking out all the suggestions.
    I live in a small town where the main languages are German, Afrikaans and Zulu. Very little English is spoken, plus I live on a farm, so books are very good friends for me.

    Reply
  211. OH MY GOODNESS. The ‘Book Lust’ that I experience after reading these favorite recurring posts from The Wenches blog cannot be described. At least not in one sentence. My wish lists are reaching epic proportions. The books listed by the Wenches and the responses sound SO good!
    I have none to contribute, I was a very rare ‘re-reader’ until the past decade or so. The books I reread in years past were of the genres I was into at the time and I changed favorite genres multiple times over the (cough) too many years to mention of my reading life. 🙂

    Reply
  212. OH MY GOODNESS. The ‘Book Lust’ that I experience after reading these favorite recurring posts from The Wenches blog cannot be described. At least not in one sentence. My wish lists are reaching epic proportions. The books listed by the Wenches and the responses sound SO good!
    I have none to contribute, I was a very rare ‘re-reader’ until the past decade or so. The books I reread in years past were of the genres I was into at the time and I changed favorite genres multiple times over the (cough) too many years to mention of my reading life. 🙂

    Reply
  213. OH MY GOODNESS. The ‘Book Lust’ that I experience after reading these favorite recurring posts from The Wenches blog cannot be described. At least not in one sentence. My wish lists are reaching epic proportions. The books listed by the Wenches and the responses sound SO good!
    I have none to contribute, I was a very rare ‘re-reader’ until the past decade or so. The books I reread in years past were of the genres I was into at the time and I changed favorite genres multiple times over the (cough) too many years to mention of my reading life. 🙂

    Reply
  214. OH MY GOODNESS. The ‘Book Lust’ that I experience after reading these favorite recurring posts from The Wenches blog cannot be described. At least not in one sentence. My wish lists are reaching epic proportions. The books listed by the Wenches and the responses sound SO good!
    I have none to contribute, I was a very rare ‘re-reader’ until the past decade or so. The books I reread in years past were of the genres I was into at the time and I changed favorite genres multiple times over the (cough) too many years to mention of my reading life. 🙂

    Reply
  215. OH MY GOODNESS. The ‘Book Lust’ that I experience after reading these favorite recurring posts from The Wenches blog cannot be described. At least not in one sentence. My wish lists are reaching epic proportions. The books listed by the Wenches and the responses sound SO good!
    I have none to contribute, I was a very rare ‘re-reader’ until the past decade or so. The books I reread in years past were of the genres I was into at the time and I changed favorite genres multiple times over the (cough) too many years to mention of my reading life. 🙂

    Reply
  216. I too am amazed how many of my most favorite keepers were “one offs”. I sincerely mourn the stories that were never written by those very clever writers.
    Definitely vote for Elsie Lee. I’ve been looking for new copies of several of her books. Well, copies that aren’t falling apart from being read so much.
    Elswyth Thane – her Williamsburg series. Finally found copies of all of them.
    D.E. Stevenson – very hard to find. I watch for her at the library book sales and nothing comes through.
    Nevil Shute wrote another one I really like – Trustee in the Toolroom. I was excited when I finally found my own copy of it. Made my husband buy it off eBay for me for Christmas. He said, do you want it now. I said no…it is for Christmas. After all, I was getting the book, I could wait 6 weeks to read it. Grin.
    Several “old” Regency writers were Maragret Sebastion, Claire Darcy, Joan Smith, Joan Wolf, Catherine Coulter. Funny how the last three changed their genre but I didn’t go on with them. But loved what they wrote as Regencies.
    Some authors I like in multiple genres, others…not so much.
    Lastly, Jane Aiken Hodge. I kept a few of hers around – The Adventurers, Savannah Purchase, etc.

    Reply
  217. I too am amazed how many of my most favorite keepers were “one offs”. I sincerely mourn the stories that were never written by those very clever writers.
    Definitely vote for Elsie Lee. I’ve been looking for new copies of several of her books. Well, copies that aren’t falling apart from being read so much.
    Elswyth Thane – her Williamsburg series. Finally found copies of all of them.
    D.E. Stevenson – very hard to find. I watch for her at the library book sales and nothing comes through.
    Nevil Shute wrote another one I really like – Trustee in the Toolroom. I was excited when I finally found my own copy of it. Made my husband buy it off eBay for me for Christmas. He said, do you want it now. I said no…it is for Christmas. After all, I was getting the book, I could wait 6 weeks to read it. Grin.
    Several “old” Regency writers were Maragret Sebastion, Claire Darcy, Joan Smith, Joan Wolf, Catherine Coulter. Funny how the last three changed their genre but I didn’t go on with them. But loved what they wrote as Regencies.
    Some authors I like in multiple genres, others…not so much.
    Lastly, Jane Aiken Hodge. I kept a few of hers around – The Adventurers, Savannah Purchase, etc.

    Reply
  218. I too am amazed how many of my most favorite keepers were “one offs”. I sincerely mourn the stories that were never written by those very clever writers.
    Definitely vote for Elsie Lee. I’ve been looking for new copies of several of her books. Well, copies that aren’t falling apart from being read so much.
    Elswyth Thane – her Williamsburg series. Finally found copies of all of them.
    D.E. Stevenson – very hard to find. I watch for her at the library book sales and nothing comes through.
    Nevil Shute wrote another one I really like – Trustee in the Toolroom. I was excited when I finally found my own copy of it. Made my husband buy it off eBay for me for Christmas. He said, do you want it now. I said no…it is for Christmas. After all, I was getting the book, I could wait 6 weeks to read it. Grin.
    Several “old” Regency writers were Maragret Sebastion, Claire Darcy, Joan Smith, Joan Wolf, Catherine Coulter. Funny how the last three changed their genre but I didn’t go on with them. But loved what they wrote as Regencies.
    Some authors I like in multiple genres, others…not so much.
    Lastly, Jane Aiken Hodge. I kept a few of hers around – The Adventurers, Savannah Purchase, etc.

    Reply
  219. I too am amazed how many of my most favorite keepers were “one offs”. I sincerely mourn the stories that were never written by those very clever writers.
    Definitely vote for Elsie Lee. I’ve been looking for new copies of several of her books. Well, copies that aren’t falling apart from being read so much.
    Elswyth Thane – her Williamsburg series. Finally found copies of all of them.
    D.E. Stevenson – very hard to find. I watch for her at the library book sales and nothing comes through.
    Nevil Shute wrote another one I really like – Trustee in the Toolroom. I was excited when I finally found my own copy of it. Made my husband buy it off eBay for me for Christmas. He said, do you want it now. I said no…it is for Christmas. After all, I was getting the book, I could wait 6 weeks to read it. Grin.
    Several “old” Regency writers were Maragret Sebastion, Claire Darcy, Joan Smith, Joan Wolf, Catherine Coulter. Funny how the last three changed their genre but I didn’t go on with them. But loved what they wrote as Regencies.
    Some authors I like in multiple genres, others…not so much.
    Lastly, Jane Aiken Hodge. I kept a few of hers around – The Adventurers, Savannah Purchase, etc.

    Reply
  220. I too am amazed how many of my most favorite keepers were “one offs”. I sincerely mourn the stories that were never written by those very clever writers.
    Definitely vote for Elsie Lee. I’ve been looking for new copies of several of her books. Well, copies that aren’t falling apart from being read so much.
    Elswyth Thane – her Williamsburg series. Finally found copies of all of them.
    D.E. Stevenson – very hard to find. I watch for her at the library book sales and nothing comes through.
    Nevil Shute wrote another one I really like – Trustee in the Toolroom. I was excited when I finally found my own copy of it. Made my husband buy it off eBay for me for Christmas. He said, do you want it now. I said no…it is for Christmas. After all, I was getting the book, I could wait 6 weeks to read it. Grin.
    Several “old” Regency writers were Maragret Sebastion, Claire Darcy, Joan Smith, Joan Wolf, Catherine Coulter. Funny how the last three changed their genre but I didn’t go on with them. But loved what they wrote as Regencies.
    Some authors I like in multiple genres, others…not so much.
    Lastly, Jane Aiken Hodge. I kept a few of hers around – The Adventurers, Savannah Purchase, etc.

    Reply
  221. Jane Aiken Hodge’s “One Way to Venice was a greatromantic suspense in a modern setting. Some of her historicals are available as ebooks

    Reply
  222. Jane Aiken Hodge’s “One Way to Venice was a greatromantic suspense in a modern setting. Some of her historicals are available as ebooks

    Reply
  223. Jane Aiken Hodge’s “One Way to Venice was a greatromantic suspense in a modern setting. Some of her historicals are available as ebooks

    Reply
  224. Jane Aiken Hodge’s “One Way to Venice was a greatromantic suspense in a modern setting. Some of her historicals are available as ebooks

    Reply
  225. Jane Aiken Hodge’s “One Way to Venice was a greatromantic suspense in a modern setting. Some of her historicals are available as ebooks

    Reply
  226. Coming into this late but, I am in the process of “cleansing” my closets of all by boxes of books. Thousands of them. I finally had a talk with myself and had to ask “why are you saving these?” In the process I’ve stumbled across some really old treasures. The ones I have fond memories of are staying. Anyone remember Dorothy Mack? I’m saving my copy of her “The Raven Sisters.” Also in the saved pile – Grace Ingram’s “Red Adams Lady” and Claudette Williams “Sassy.”

    Reply
  227. Coming into this late but, I am in the process of “cleansing” my closets of all by boxes of books. Thousands of them. I finally had a talk with myself and had to ask “why are you saving these?” In the process I’ve stumbled across some really old treasures. The ones I have fond memories of are staying. Anyone remember Dorothy Mack? I’m saving my copy of her “The Raven Sisters.” Also in the saved pile – Grace Ingram’s “Red Adams Lady” and Claudette Williams “Sassy.”

    Reply
  228. Coming into this late but, I am in the process of “cleansing” my closets of all by boxes of books. Thousands of them. I finally had a talk with myself and had to ask “why are you saving these?” In the process I’ve stumbled across some really old treasures. The ones I have fond memories of are staying. Anyone remember Dorothy Mack? I’m saving my copy of her “The Raven Sisters.” Also in the saved pile – Grace Ingram’s “Red Adams Lady” and Claudette Williams “Sassy.”

    Reply
  229. Coming into this late but, I am in the process of “cleansing” my closets of all by boxes of books. Thousands of them. I finally had a talk with myself and had to ask “why are you saving these?” In the process I’ve stumbled across some really old treasures. The ones I have fond memories of are staying. Anyone remember Dorothy Mack? I’m saving my copy of her “The Raven Sisters.” Also in the saved pile – Grace Ingram’s “Red Adams Lady” and Claudette Williams “Sassy.”

    Reply
  230. Coming into this late but, I am in the process of “cleansing” my closets of all by boxes of books. Thousands of them. I finally had a talk with myself and had to ask “why are you saving these?” In the process I’ve stumbled across some really old treasures. The ones I have fond memories of are staying. Anyone remember Dorothy Mack? I’m saving my copy of her “The Raven Sisters.” Also in the saved pile – Grace Ingram’s “Red Adams Lady” and Claudette Williams “Sassy.”

    Reply
  231. i also am late Claudette williams Blades of passion Sheila walsh Madalena also by c williams Cassandra sheila bishop loved Alice Chetwynd Ley read all here books joanna makepeace love’s raging fires

    Reply
  232. i also am late Claudette williams Blades of passion Sheila walsh Madalena also by c williams Cassandra sheila bishop loved Alice Chetwynd Ley read all here books joanna makepeace love’s raging fires

    Reply
  233. i also am late Claudette williams Blades of passion Sheila walsh Madalena also by c williams Cassandra sheila bishop loved Alice Chetwynd Ley read all here books joanna makepeace love’s raging fires

    Reply
  234. i also am late Claudette williams Blades of passion Sheila walsh Madalena also by c williams Cassandra sheila bishop loved Alice Chetwynd Ley read all here books joanna makepeace love’s raging fires

    Reply
  235. i also am late Claudette williams Blades of passion Sheila walsh Madalena also by c williams Cassandra sheila bishop loved Alice Chetwynd Ley read all here books joanna makepeace love’s raging fires

    Reply
  236. I had totally forgotten about Sheila Walsh. I’ll have to find a copy of Sassy by Claudette Williams. It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  237. I had totally forgotten about Sheila Walsh. I’ll have to find a copy of Sassy by Claudette Williams. It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  238. I had totally forgotten about Sheila Walsh. I’ll have to find a copy of Sassy by Claudette Williams. It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  239. I had totally forgotten about Sheila Walsh. I’ll have to find a copy of Sassy by Claudette Williams. It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  240. I had totally forgotten about Sheila Walsh. I’ll have to find a copy of Sassy by Claudette Williams. It sounds intriguing.

    Reply
  241. I adored Coming Home. Do you know they made a dvd of it and it was very very good. It’s some time since I read it. I’ll have to dig it out again. LOVING all these recommendations. Would be good to do this every couple of months. Wenches???!!

    Reply
  242. I adored Coming Home. Do you know they made a dvd of it and it was very very good. It’s some time since I read it. I’ll have to dig it out again. LOVING all these recommendations. Would be good to do this every couple of months. Wenches???!!

    Reply
  243. I adored Coming Home. Do you know they made a dvd of it and it was very very good. It’s some time since I read it. I’ll have to dig it out again. LOVING all these recommendations. Would be good to do this every couple of months. Wenches???!!

    Reply
  244. I adored Coming Home. Do you know they made a dvd of it and it was very very good. It’s some time since I read it. I’ll have to dig it out again. LOVING all these recommendations. Would be good to do this every couple of months. Wenches???!!

    Reply
  245. I adored Coming Home. Do you know they made a dvd of it and it was very very good. It’s some time since I read it. I’ll have to dig it out again. LOVING all these recommendations. Would be good to do this every couple of months. Wenches???!!

    Reply
  246. Sheila Walsh has some hits and some misses for me. I adore “A Highly Respectable Marriage” and “The Sargeant Major’s Daughter” is almost as good. They remind me a bit of Carla Kelly’s books that featured heroines who followed the drum.

    Reply
  247. Sheila Walsh has some hits and some misses for me. I adore “A Highly Respectable Marriage” and “The Sargeant Major’s Daughter” is almost as good. They remind me a bit of Carla Kelly’s books that featured heroines who followed the drum.

    Reply
  248. Sheila Walsh has some hits and some misses for me. I adore “A Highly Respectable Marriage” and “The Sargeant Major’s Daughter” is almost as good. They remind me a bit of Carla Kelly’s books that featured heroines who followed the drum.

    Reply
  249. Sheila Walsh has some hits and some misses for me. I adore “A Highly Respectable Marriage” and “The Sargeant Major’s Daughter” is almost as good. They remind me a bit of Carla Kelly’s books that featured heroines who followed the drum.

    Reply
  250. Sheila Walsh has some hits and some misses for me. I adore “A Highly Respectable Marriage” and “The Sargeant Major’s Daughter” is almost as good. They remind me a bit of Carla Kelly’s books that featured heroines who followed the drum.

    Reply
  251. Daughter of Fortune by Carla Kelly (1985) Set in th 1600 in what is now New Mexico, Carla tells a riviting and passionate story of the times then and a historical romance like no other. I found a copy in the university library by chance. Now I read her work by choice. A definite keeper.

    Reply
  252. Daughter of Fortune by Carla Kelly (1985) Set in th 1600 in what is now New Mexico, Carla tells a riviting and passionate story of the times then and a historical romance like no other. I found a copy in the university library by chance. Now I read her work by choice. A definite keeper.

    Reply
  253. Daughter of Fortune by Carla Kelly (1985) Set in th 1600 in what is now New Mexico, Carla tells a riviting and passionate story of the times then and a historical romance like no other. I found a copy in the university library by chance. Now I read her work by choice. A definite keeper.

    Reply
  254. Daughter of Fortune by Carla Kelly (1985) Set in th 1600 in what is now New Mexico, Carla tells a riviting and passionate story of the times then and a historical romance like no other. I found a copy in the university library by chance. Now I read her work by choice. A definite keeper.

    Reply
  255. Daughter of Fortune by Carla Kelly (1985) Set in th 1600 in what is now New Mexico, Carla tells a riviting and passionate story of the times then and a historical romance like no other. I found a copy in the university library by chance. Now I read her work by choice. A definite keeper.

    Reply

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