What We’re Reading – May

Traitor's KnotNicola here, introducing this month's feature on our Wenchly reading. After what felt like a long reading slump I’ve had an amazing month of good books. I was lucky enough to be a judge for the RNA Debut Novel award and really enjoyed the experience; there was a huge range of books in contention this year, ranging from an 18th century historical set in Ireland that was based on a riveting true story – Heart of Stone by John Jackson – to a laugh out loud romantic comedy – Perfect Match by Zoe May – with a load of other great books as well. You can find the whole list here if you would like to see what else is on there and if you enjoy the 17th century I can really recommend Traitor’s Knot by Cryssa Basos, a brilliantly-written, fast-paced and romantic historical adventure set during the English Civil War.

As if that wasn’t enough, I read Island in the East by Jenny Ashcroft which is one of the richest My Lady Thief and most exotic romantic historicals I’ve read in a long time. It reminded me of MM Kaye in the vivid drawing of the characters, the complex emotional relationships, the beautiful writing and the way that the location was a vivid character in itself.  The story is set in a dual time frame, Singapore in the Second World War and a parallel story forty years earlier.  In 1897, identical twins Harriet and Mae Grafton are sent to Singapore by their wealthy benefactor and their sibling love and support is fractured by rivalry and betrayal. In 1941, Ivy Harcourt, already suffering from wartime trauma, is posted to Singapore where she uncovers secrets from her grandmother Mae's past and experiences a romantic love of her own. I particularly loved Ivy and her hero Kit and were rooting for them all the way through.

 In between I also found the opportunity to glom on more of Emily Larkin’s Regency historicals (thank you, Anne, for the original recommendation!) and found what I think is my favourite so far, My Lady Thief. I loved everything about this book; the admirably confident heroine who had been made all the stronger by her traumatic past, the uptight hero who was utterly gorgeous underneath his stuffy exterior, and the beautiful way in which their relationship developed.

Dark AngelAnne writes: I finished Sebastien de Castell's four book swashbuckling series, "The Greatcoats", and found it a most satisfying read. If you're interested, start with Traitor's Blade.

Next I read Elly Griffiths, Dark Angel.  It's book #10 in her Dr. Ruth Galloway series, and I recommend you start at the beginning, not because each mystery can't be read on its own, but because the development of various characters through the series is a big part of the pleasure in reading these books. Elly Griffiths' narrator, Ruth has a dry, ironic humor that gently infuses her observations. Well worth reading.

I also read an advanced copy of Lucy Parker's new book, Making Up, which I loved. Lucy Parker wowed the Making up wenches with her debut, Act Like It, and the follow-up, Pretty Face, and I felt very smug that I scored an early read of her third book in her "London Celebrities" series. I'm interviewing Lucy Parker on Friday. Stay tuned.

Mary Jo here:

Amanda Quick is the historical pseudonym of Jayne Ann Krentz, and she's made an interesting progression over the years: The Quick books started with Regencies, moved to Victorians, and in her new Burning Cove series, the setting is the 1930s in a glitzy California seaside resort with links to Hollywood.  The first book of the series, The Girl Who Knew Too Much, came out last year and the second, The Other Lady Vanishes, is a new release. 

The other lady vanishesThe book begins with heroine Adelaide escaping from a horrible private asylum where she has been illegally held captive.  Once free, she heads to Burning Cove and a quiet life working in a tea shop.  But the past reaches out to ensnare her, a hot guy named Jake is in town in theory to help his nerves (which are actually made of steel <G>) and the action is on.  I like the 1930s setting, which is both familiar and distant, and there are hints of a world building toward war, though the focus is on Adelaide and Jake.  A rousing good read.

I also noticed that the first books in two series by Sharon Shinn, one of my favorite fantasy authors, are now Archangelonly $2.99 in e-editions. Shinn is a master of world building, and Archangel is set in a world where human-but-winged angels are overseers for the rest of the population.  Gabriel, who is slated to become the next Archangel, a post that is held for 20 years, needs to find his god-designated wife, but she has disappeared–and when he finds her, she is not keen on the program!  Don't be put off by the dark cover, it's a great read with a powerful romance.

The other series is the Elemental Blessings and the first book is Troubled Waters. Again, there is great world building and a fine romance.  Happy reading!

Andrea: 

Still lifeThis past month I’ve been delving into the far-too-mountainous TBR pile, trying to catch up with all the recommendations I’ve been meaning to read. I heard Louise Penny speak at the Malice Domestic mystery conference last month, so was determined to finally start her Chief Inspector Gamache contemporary mystery series, set in Quebec, Canada. Am I glad I did! The first book, Still Life, follows the traditional cozy trope of a murder—this one of a 70 yr old woman in a small, isolated town, who seemed to have no enemies. But as the Inspector begins delving into the lives of the inhabitants, the peaceful tranquility is not what it seems. Penny writes wonderfully complex and vulnerable characters, and has a sharp eye for the nuances of family dynamics and marital relations. Inspector Gamache is a very interesting protagonist, too, and I’n really looking forward to continuing the series.

I also finally  read Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand, by Helen Simonsson, a delightfully charming book about a Major Pettigrewwidowed retired English officer—a seemingly ordinary, by-the-book pillar of the community who strikes up a friendship with the Pakistani widow of the local convenience store . . . and suddenly begins to question what’s really important in life. There are laugh aloud scenes as the “new” major deals with his ambitious status-conscious son and his long-time friends at the golf club who think he’s gone off the rails. It’s a sly, witty commentary on modern life, but also a sweetly poignat celebration of "second acts” in life.

From Pat:

Heirs of GraceI've been in a reading slump lately, so perversely, I decided to clean out my TBR stack. You know how a TBR stack goes–the ones you just don't feel like reading right now drift to the bottom. It's probably a totally unfair means of choosing a book and predictably, I haven't finished a book in weeks. Nothing made me happy except a few old comfort reads I'd bought because they were on sale.

But back before my slump, I read HEIRS OF GRACE by Tim Pratt. Okay, I bought this because I'm a sucker for the fantasy of inheriting a big old mysterious house. In this case, the protagonist is an impoverished art student from Chicago who oddly inherits a derelict hoarder’s mansion in the mountains of NC. She knows she’s an orphan and assumes the person who left her the house was a relative—and quite a relative he was. The story is basically fantasy with Rebekah Lull learning about her magical family and having adventures and learning the morality of being almost all-powerful. There’s a witty boyfriend for the romance plot. I really wanted more on the personal side, but the story was a fun fantasy ride, and I happily followed it to the conclusion. If inheriting old houses and magic is your thing, this one’s for you!

 So, what are you reading  that delights, surprises, moves or intrigues you?

165 thoughts on “What We’re Reading – May”

  1. Thanks for the recommendations. I am with Andrea; I have too much in my TBR pile!
    To Andrea:
    I love Louise Penny. I liked her first book, but as the series goes the characters become so rich. You can really see the progression of her writing. You will love the rest of the series (a new one coming out this year). I saw her when she came to town to promote the last book. She is a wonderful speaker, also. One of my favorites of the series is The Beautiful Mystery.

    Reply
  2. Thanks for the recommendations. I am with Andrea; I have too much in my TBR pile!
    To Andrea:
    I love Louise Penny. I liked her first book, but as the series goes the characters become so rich. You can really see the progression of her writing. You will love the rest of the series (a new one coming out this year). I saw her when she came to town to promote the last book. She is a wonderful speaker, also. One of my favorites of the series is The Beautiful Mystery.

    Reply
  3. Thanks for the recommendations. I am with Andrea; I have too much in my TBR pile!
    To Andrea:
    I love Louise Penny. I liked her first book, but as the series goes the characters become so rich. You can really see the progression of her writing. You will love the rest of the series (a new one coming out this year). I saw her when she came to town to promote the last book. She is a wonderful speaker, also. One of my favorites of the series is The Beautiful Mystery.

    Reply
  4. Thanks for the recommendations. I am with Andrea; I have too much in my TBR pile!
    To Andrea:
    I love Louise Penny. I liked her first book, but as the series goes the characters become so rich. You can really see the progression of her writing. You will love the rest of the series (a new one coming out this year). I saw her when she came to town to promote the last book. She is a wonderful speaker, also. One of my favorites of the series is The Beautiful Mystery.

    Reply
  5. Thanks for the recommendations. I am with Andrea; I have too much in my TBR pile!
    To Andrea:
    I love Louise Penny. I liked her first book, but as the series goes the characters become so rich. You can really see the progression of her writing. You will love the rest of the series (a new one coming out this year). I saw her when she came to town to promote the last book. She is a wonderful speaker, also. One of my favorites of the series is The Beautiful Mystery.

    Reply
  6. I have been doing some re-reads this month and a few new reads that were on my kindle. The new reads were only so-so except for Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO CARE. This book may not be the best in this series (IMO) but she never disappoints. I liked that the heroine is a more mature woman (early 40s ?) who is a even a grandmother. Ms. Balogh is so good at writing characters. I’m glad that she has added a few more mature heroes and heroines to her repertoire. Wouldn’t want a steady diet of it, but it is refreshing now and them.

    Reply
  7. I have been doing some re-reads this month and a few new reads that were on my kindle. The new reads were only so-so except for Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO CARE. This book may not be the best in this series (IMO) but she never disappoints. I liked that the heroine is a more mature woman (early 40s ?) who is a even a grandmother. Ms. Balogh is so good at writing characters. I’m glad that she has added a few more mature heroes and heroines to her repertoire. Wouldn’t want a steady diet of it, but it is refreshing now and them.

    Reply
  8. I have been doing some re-reads this month and a few new reads that were on my kindle. The new reads were only so-so except for Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO CARE. This book may not be the best in this series (IMO) but she never disappoints. I liked that the heroine is a more mature woman (early 40s ?) who is a even a grandmother. Ms. Balogh is so good at writing characters. I’m glad that she has added a few more mature heroes and heroines to her repertoire. Wouldn’t want a steady diet of it, but it is refreshing now and them.

    Reply
  9. I have been doing some re-reads this month and a few new reads that were on my kindle. The new reads were only so-so except for Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO CARE. This book may not be the best in this series (IMO) but she never disappoints. I liked that the heroine is a more mature woman (early 40s ?) who is a even a grandmother. Ms. Balogh is so good at writing characters. I’m glad that she has added a few more mature heroes and heroines to her repertoire. Wouldn’t want a steady diet of it, but it is refreshing now and them.

    Reply
  10. I have been doing some re-reads this month and a few new reads that were on my kindle. The new reads were only so-so except for Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO CARE. This book may not be the best in this series (IMO) but she never disappoints. I liked that the heroine is a more mature woman (early 40s ?) who is a even a grandmother. Ms. Balogh is so good at writing characters. I’m glad that she has added a few more mature heroes and heroines to her repertoire. Wouldn’t want a steady diet of it, but it is refreshing now and them.

    Reply
  11. I have a HUGE TBR pile and don’t seem to be getting anywhere with it. I can’t see that changing any time soon as having read Nicola’s section above I immediately went to Amazon and purchased Heart of Stone. I LOVE historical stories set in Ireland. I’ve just finished reading The Darkling Bride and it was a fantastic read. I also added to my Amazon wish list Traitor’s Knot and subscribed to the writers blog. Thanks Nicola!!!! I’ll never get to my TBR at this rate:-)
    A great post from everyone.

    Reply
  12. I have a HUGE TBR pile and don’t seem to be getting anywhere with it. I can’t see that changing any time soon as having read Nicola’s section above I immediately went to Amazon and purchased Heart of Stone. I LOVE historical stories set in Ireland. I’ve just finished reading The Darkling Bride and it was a fantastic read. I also added to my Amazon wish list Traitor’s Knot and subscribed to the writers blog. Thanks Nicola!!!! I’ll never get to my TBR at this rate:-)
    A great post from everyone.

    Reply
  13. I have a HUGE TBR pile and don’t seem to be getting anywhere with it. I can’t see that changing any time soon as having read Nicola’s section above I immediately went to Amazon and purchased Heart of Stone. I LOVE historical stories set in Ireland. I’ve just finished reading The Darkling Bride and it was a fantastic read. I also added to my Amazon wish list Traitor’s Knot and subscribed to the writers blog. Thanks Nicola!!!! I’ll never get to my TBR at this rate:-)
    A great post from everyone.

    Reply
  14. I have a HUGE TBR pile and don’t seem to be getting anywhere with it. I can’t see that changing any time soon as having read Nicola’s section above I immediately went to Amazon and purchased Heart of Stone. I LOVE historical stories set in Ireland. I’ve just finished reading The Darkling Bride and it was a fantastic read. I also added to my Amazon wish list Traitor’s Knot and subscribed to the writers blog. Thanks Nicola!!!! I’ll never get to my TBR at this rate:-)
    A great post from everyone.

    Reply
  15. I have a HUGE TBR pile and don’t seem to be getting anywhere with it. I can’t see that changing any time soon as having read Nicola’s section above I immediately went to Amazon and purchased Heart of Stone. I LOVE historical stories set in Ireland. I’ve just finished reading The Darkling Bride and it was a fantastic read. I also added to my Amazon wish list Traitor’s Knot and subscribed to the writers blog. Thanks Nicola!!!! I’ll never get to my TBR at this rate:-)
    A great post from everyone.

    Reply
  16. Very interesting and I too have a huge TBR pile I will never to the bottom of, Nicola I too loved Jenny Ashcroft’s Island in the East fabulous story 🙂
    What have I been reading The Paris Seamstress Natasha Lester a fabulous time slip I couldn’t put this one down and Bloodtree River and awesome romantic suspense set in the Tasmanian mountains so many fabulous books never enough hours in the day 🙂
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  17. Very interesting and I too have a huge TBR pile I will never to the bottom of, Nicola I too loved Jenny Ashcroft’s Island in the East fabulous story 🙂
    What have I been reading The Paris Seamstress Natasha Lester a fabulous time slip I couldn’t put this one down and Bloodtree River and awesome romantic suspense set in the Tasmanian mountains so many fabulous books never enough hours in the day 🙂
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  18. Very interesting and I too have a huge TBR pile I will never to the bottom of, Nicola I too loved Jenny Ashcroft’s Island in the East fabulous story 🙂
    What have I been reading The Paris Seamstress Natasha Lester a fabulous time slip I couldn’t put this one down and Bloodtree River and awesome romantic suspense set in the Tasmanian mountains so many fabulous books never enough hours in the day 🙂
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  19. Very interesting and I too have a huge TBR pile I will never to the bottom of, Nicola I too loved Jenny Ashcroft’s Island in the East fabulous story 🙂
    What have I been reading The Paris Seamstress Natasha Lester a fabulous time slip I couldn’t put this one down and Bloodtree River and awesome romantic suspense set in the Tasmanian mountains so many fabulous books never enough hours in the day 🙂
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  20. Very interesting and I too have a huge TBR pile I will never to the bottom of, Nicola I too loved Jenny Ashcroft’s Island in the East fabulous story 🙂
    What have I been reading The Paris Seamstress Natasha Lester a fabulous time slip I couldn’t put this one down and Bloodtree River and awesome romantic suspense set in the Tasmanian mountains so many fabulous books never enough hours in the day 🙂
    have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  21. I’m a huge Louise Penny fan, and I’ve been reading JAK in her various guises for many years. I confess that I have not yet read The Other Lady Vanishes, but it is on my Kindle. As usual, I’ve been reading lots if ARCs. Among those that I found particularly rewarding are Susan Wiggs’s Between You and Me, a compelling, emotional Amish-modern world culture clash; Amy Doan Mason’s debut novel, The Summer List, a richly layered double reunion tale that restores a female friendship and a romance as it unravels a couple of mystery threads; Manda Collins’s One for the Rogue, the fourth Studies in Scandal book, in which a geologist heroine and a fossil-hunting hero work together to track down scientific-minded thieves; and Barbara O’Neal’s The Art of Inheriting Secrets, a story that combines a woman’s journey of self-discovery with mystery and romance, adds a setting that is practically a character, and tops it off with O’Neal’s beautiful prose. My current romance read is not an ARC but one of the two AAR top ten that I had not read, The Wall of Winnipeg and Me by Mariana Zapata. I’m enjoing it, although I seriously doubt that it will make my all-time top ten.
    I’ve also been slowly reading Conversations on Writing by Ursala Le Guin and David Naimon. I found the discussion of genre especially interesting and mentally applauded Le Guin’s assertion that “Judgement by genre is just wrong–stupid, wasteful.” Another slow read is Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a collection of poetry by Ross Gay. It was the title that captured me, but I am loving these long poems with their rare joy and discursive mindfulness. The title poem is one I know that I will reread often. I love the intimacy the poet creates with the reader in lines like these:
    I can’t stop
    my gratitude, which includes, dear reader,
    you, for staying here with me,
    for moving your lips just so as I speak.
    Here is a cup of tea. I have spooned honey into it.

    Reply
  22. I’m a huge Louise Penny fan, and I’ve been reading JAK in her various guises for many years. I confess that I have not yet read The Other Lady Vanishes, but it is on my Kindle. As usual, I’ve been reading lots if ARCs. Among those that I found particularly rewarding are Susan Wiggs’s Between You and Me, a compelling, emotional Amish-modern world culture clash; Amy Doan Mason’s debut novel, The Summer List, a richly layered double reunion tale that restores a female friendship and a romance as it unravels a couple of mystery threads; Manda Collins’s One for the Rogue, the fourth Studies in Scandal book, in which a geologist heroine and a fossil-hunting hero work together to track down scientific-minded thieves; and Barbara O’Neal’s The Art of Inheriting Secrets, a story that combines a woman’s journey of self-discovery with mystery and romance, adds a setting that is practically a character, and tops it off with O’Neal’s beautiful prose. My current romance read is not an ARC but one of the two AAR top ten that I had not read, The Wall of Winnipeg and Me by Mariana Zapata. I’m enjoing it, although I seriously doubt that it will make my all-time top ten.
    I’ve also been slowly reading Conversations on Writing by Ursala Le Guin and David Naimon. I found the discussion of genre especially interesting and mentally applauded Le Guin’s assertion that “Judgement by genre is just wrong–stupid, wasteful.” Another slow read is Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a collection of poetry by Ross Gay. It was the title that captured me, but I am loving these long poems with their rare joy and discursive mindfulness. The title poem is one I know that I will reread often. I love the intimacy the poet creates with the reader in lines like these:
    I can’t stop
    my gratitude, which includes, dear reader,
    you, for staying here with me,
    for moving your lips just so as I speak.
    Here is a cup of tea. I have spooned honey into it.

    Reply
  23. I’m a huge Louise Penny fan, and I’ve been reading JAK in her various guises for many years. I confess that I have not yet read The Other Lady Vanishes, but it is on my Kindle. As usual, I’ve been reading lots if ARCs. Among those that I found particularly rewarding are Susan Wiggs’s Between You and Me, a compelling, emotional Amish-modern world culture clash; Amy Doan Mason’s debut novel, The Summer List, a richly layered double reunion tale that restores a female friendship and a romance as it unravels a couple of mystery threads; Manda Collins’s One for the Rogue, the fourth Studies in Scandal book, in which a geologist heroine and a fossil-hunting hero work together to track down scientific-minded thieves; and Barbara O’Neal’s The Art of Inheriting Secrets, a story that combines a woman’s journey of self-discovery with mystery and romance, adds a setting that is practically a character, and tops it off with O’Neal’s beautiful prose. My current romance read is not an ARC but one of the two AAR top ten that I had not read, The Wall of Winnipeg and Me by Mariana Zapata. I’m enjoing it, although I seriously doubt that it will make my all-time top ten.
    I’ve also been slowly reading Conversations on Writing by Ursala Le Guin and David Naimon. I found the discussion of genre especially interesting and mentally applauded Le Guin’s assertion that “Judgement by genre is just wrong–stupid, wasteful.” Another slow read is Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a collection of poetry by Ross Gay. It was the title that captured me, but I am loving these long poems with their rare joy and discursive mindfulness. The title poem is one I know that I will reread often. I love the intimacy the poet creates with the reader in lines like these:
    I can’t stop
    my gratitude, which includes, dear reader,
    you, for staying here with me,
    for moving your lips just so as I speak.
    Here is a cup of tea. I have spooned honey into it.

    Reply
  24. I’m a huge Louise Penny fan, and I’ve been reading JAK in her various guises for many years. I confess that I have not yet read The Other Lady Vanishes, but it is on my Kindle. As usual, I’ve been reading lots if ARCs. Among those that I found particularly rewarding are Susan Wiggs’s Between You and Me, a compelling, emotional Amish-modern world culture clash; Amy Doan Mason’s debut novel, The Summer List, a richly layered double reunion tale that restores a female friendship and a romance as it unravels a couple of mystery threads; Manda Collins’s One for the Rogue, the fourth Studies in Scandal book, in which a geologist heroine and a fossil-hunting hero work together to track down scientific-minded thieves; and Barbara O’Neal’s The Art of Inheriting Secrets, a story that combines a woman’s journey of self-discovery with mystery and romance, adds a setting that is practically a character, and tops it off with O’Neal’s beautiful prose. My current romance read is not an ARC but one of the two AAR top ten that I had not read, The Wall of Winnipeg and Me by Mariana Zapata. I’m enjoing it, although I seriously doubt that it will make my all-time top ten.
    I’ve also been slowly reading Conversations on Writing by Ursala Le Guin and David Naimon. I found the discussion of genre especially interesting and mentally applauded Le Guin’s assertion that “Judgement by genre is just wrong–stupid, wasteful.” Another slow read is Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a collection of poetry by Ross Gay. It was the title that captured me, but I am loving these long poems with their rare joy and discursive mindfulness. The title poem is one I know that I will reread often. I love the intimacy the poet creates with the reader in lines like these:
    I can’t stop
    my gratitude, which includes, dear reader,
    you, for staying here with me,
    for moving your lips just so as I speak.
    Here is a cup of tea. I have spooned honey into it.

    Reply
  25. I’m a huge Louise Penny fan, and I’ve been reading JAK in her various guises for many years. I confess that I have not yet read The Other Lady Vanishes, but it is on my Kindle. As usual, I’ve been reading lots if ARCs. Among those that I found particularly rewarding are Susan Wiggs’s Between You and Me, a compelling, emotional Amish-modern world culture clash; Amy Doan Mason’s debut novel, The Summer List, a richly layered double reunion tale that restores a female friendship and a romance as it unravels a couple of mystery threads; Manda Collins’s One for the Rogue, the fourth Studies in Scandal book, in which a geologist heroine and a fossil-hunting hero work together to track down scientific-minded thieves; and Barbara O’Neal’s The Art of Inheriting Secrets, a story that combines a woman’s journey of self-discovery with mystery and romance, adds a setting that is practically a character, and tops it off with O’Neal’s beautiful prose. My current romance read is not an ARC but one of the two AAR top ten that I had not read, The Wall of Winnipeg and Me by Mariana Zapata. I’m enjoing it, although I seriously doubt that it will make my all-time top ten.
    I’ve also been slowly reading Conversations on Writing by Ursala Le Guin and David Naimon. I found the discussion of genre especially interesting and mentally applauded Le Guin’s assertion that “Judgement by genre is just wrong–stupid, wasteful.” Another slow read is Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, a collection of poetry by Ross Gay. It was the title that captured me, but I am loving these long poems with their rare joy and discursive mindfulness. The title poem is one I know that I will reread often. I love the intimacy the poet creates with the reader in lines like these:
    I can’t stop
    my gratitude, which includes, dear reader,
    you, for staying here with me,
    for moving your lips just so as I speak.
    Here is a cup of tea. I have spooned honey into it.

    Reply
  26. Oh lovely Helen, I’ve just added the Paris Seamstress to my TBR:o!! Just as well I’ve decided to spend the Summer reading!!

    Reply
  27. Oh lovely Helen, I’ve just added the Paris Seamstress to my TBR:o!! Just as well I’ve decided to spend the Summer reading!!

    Reply
  28. Oh lovely Helen, I’ve just added the Paris Seamstress to my TBR:o!! Just as well I’ve decided to spend the Summer reading!!

    Reply
  29. Oh lovely Helen, I’ve just added the Paris Seamstress to my TBR:o!! Just as well I’ve decided to spend the Summer reading!!

    Reply
  30. Oh lovely Helen, I’ve just added the Paris Seamstress to my TBR:o!! Just as well I’ve decided to spend the Summer reading!!

    Reply
  31. Oh …groan…..my TBR mountain has now acquired 5 more books and not many people have added their reads for the month! So many wonderful sounding books with rave reviews this month
    My books have been diverse…I went on a Janet Chapman re-read kick. Then I went on are-read kick of Robin D. Owen’s Celta series after I read her newest book, Heart Sight (Vinni & Avellana finally become a “real” couple!). It has been interesting watching them grow through the series from very young children to mature adults. It is sci-fi fantasy .
    From the library I got Amanda Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes. I like the new world but there were an awful lot of deaths in it! Maybe I need to check it out and read it again because it felt more adventure with just a dusting of romance.
    Re-read Red Adam’s Lady by Grace Ingram. Always enjoy that book. A medieval, forced marriage (no violence or disrespect towards women) where the h/H learn to be friends, like and then love each other. With a bit of invasion of the Galloway Scots. I hadn’t read it in 5 years so it felt really fresh and new.
    Anne McCaffrey – A Gift of Dragons. A book of 4 short stories/novellas about Pern. I hadn’t read them so it was fun.
    FDR’s Funeral Train: A Betrayed widow, A Soviet Spy, and A Presidency in the Balance by Robert Klara. It was published in 2010 That was a truly fascinating book. I’ve always been fascinated by FDR so have read a number of books about him.
    This book covers the very short climatic/traumatic time period of the train taking FDR’s body from Warm Springs, GA Washington DC and then to Hyde Park, NY for burial. Eleanor Roosevelt was in one train car, FDR’s body in another. In Washington President Truman joined the train (as well as most of the US Govt).
    Because I’ve been to the Little White House (in Warm Springs GA) so many times, as well as Warm Springs and the surrounding area, it felt even more immediate and real.
    When you read it and think about how everything was done by hand, telegraph and a little bit of telephoning it is astonishing. There were also very few people taking planes at that time either. They managed a huge undertaking with only a few minor snafus and no real guidelines since there had never been a president who died so far from Washington DC before.
    As you can tell, I really liked that book (grin).
    Also read more Western romances, other re-reads, a few mehs…

    Reply
  32. Oh …groan…..my TBR mountain has now acquired 5 more books and not many people have added their reads for the month! So many wonderful sounding books with rave reviews this month
    My books have been diverse…I went on a Janet Chapman re-read kick. Then I went on are-read kick of Robin D. Owen’s Celta series after I read her newest book, Heart Sight (Vinni & Avellana finally become a “real” couple!). It has been interesting watching them grow through the series from very young children to mature adults. It is sci-fi fantasy .
    From the library I got Amanda Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes. I like the new world but there were an awful lot of deaths in it! Maybe I need to check it out and read it again because it felt more adventure with just a dusting of romance.
    Re-read Red Adam’s Lady by Grace Ingram. Always enjoy that book. A medieval, forced marriage (no violence or disrespect towards women) where the h/H learn to be friends, like and then love each other. With a bit of invasion of the Galloway Scots. I hadn’t read it in 5 years so it felt really fresh and new.
    Anne McCaffrey – A Gift of Dragons. A book of 4 short stories/novellas about Pern. I hadn’t read them so it was fun.
    FDR’s Funeral Train: A Betrayed widow, A Soviet Spy, and A Presidency in the Balance by Robert Klara. It was published in 2010 That was a truly fascinating book. I’ve always been fascinated by FDR so have read a number of books about him.
    This book covers the very short climatic/traumatic time period of the train taking FDR’s body from Warm Springs, GA Washington DC and then to Hyde Park, NY for burial. Eleanor Roosevelt was in one train car, FDR’s body in another. In Washington President Truman joined the train (as well as most of the US Govt).
    Because I’ve been to the Little White House (in Warm Springs GA) so many times, as well as Warm Springs and the surrounding area, it felt even more immediate and real.
    When you read it and think about how everything was done by hand, telegraph and a little bit of telephoning it is astonishing. There were also very few people taking planes at that time either. They managed a huge undertaking with only a few minor snafus and no real guidelines since there had never been a president who died so far from Washington DC before.
    As you can tell, I really liked that book (grin).
    Also read more Western romances, other re-reads, a few mehs…

    Reply
  33. Oh …groan…..my TBR mountain has now acquired 5 more books and not many people have added their reads for the month! So many wonderful sounding books with rave reviews this month
    My books have been diverse…I went on a Janet Chapman re-read kick. Then I went on are-read kick of Robin D. Owen’s Celta series after I read her newest book, Heart Sight (Vinni & Avellana finally become a “real” couple!). It has been interesting watching them grow through the series from very young children to mature adults. It is sci-fi fantasy .
    From the library I got Amanda Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes. I like the new world but there were an awful lot of deaths in it! Maybe I need to check it out and read it again because it felt more adventure with just a dusting of romance.
    Re-read Red Adam’s Lady by Grace Ingram. Always enjoy that book. A medieval, forced marriage (no violence or disrespect towards women) where the h/H learn to be friends, like and then love each other. With a bit of invasion of the Galloway Scots. I hadn’t read it in 5 years so it felt really fresh and new.
    Anne McCaffrey – A Gift of Dragons. A book of 4 short stories/novellas about Pern. I hadn’t read them so it was fun.
    FDR’s Funeral Train: A Betrayed widow, A Soviet Spy, and A Presidency in the Balance by Robert Klara. It was published in 2010 That was a truly fascinating book. I’ve always been fascinated by FDR so have read a number of books about him.
    This book covers the very short climatic/traumatic time period of the train taking FDR’s body from Warm Springs, GA Washington DC and then to Hyde Park, NY for burial. Eleanor Roosevelt was in one train car, FDR’s body in another. In Washington President Truman joined the train (as well as most of the US Govt).
    Because I’ve been to the Little White House (in Warm Springs GA) so many times, as well as Warm Springs and the surrounding area, it felt even more immediate and real.
    When you read it and think about how everything was done by hand, telegraph and a little bit of telephoning it is astonishing. There were also very few people taking planes at that time either. They managed a huge undertaking with only a few minor snafus and no real guidelines since there had never been a president who died so far from Washington DC before.
    As you can tell, I really liked that book (grin).
    Also read more Western romances, other re-reads, a few mehs…

    Reply
  34. Oh …groan…..my TBR mountain has now acquired 5 more books and not many people have added their reads for the month! So many wonderful sounding books with rave reviews this month
    My books have been diverse…I went on a Janet Chapman re-read kick. Then I went on are-read kick of Robin D. Owen’s Celta series after I read her newest book, Heart Sight (Vinni & Avellana finally become a “real” couple!). It has been interesting watching them grow through the series from very young children to mature adults. It is sci-fi fantasy .
    From the library I got Amanda Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes. I like the new world but there were an awful lot of deaths in it! Maybe I need to check it out and read it again because it felt more adventure with just a dusting of romance.
    Re-read Red Adam’s Lady by Grace Ingram. Always enjoy that book. A medieval, forced marriage (no violence or disrespect towards women) where the h/H learn to be friends, like and then love each other. With a bit of invasion of the Galloway Scots. I hadn’t read it in 5 years so it felt really fresh and new.
    Anne McCaffrey – A Gift of Dragons. A book of 4 short stories/novellas about Pern. I hadn’t read them so it was fun.
    FDR’s Funeral Train: A Betrayed widow, A Soviet Spy, and A Presidency in the Balance by Robert Klara. It was published in 2010 That was a truly fascinating book. I’ve always been fascinated by FDR so have read a number of books about him.
    This book covers the very short climatic/traumatic time period of the train taking FDR’s body from Warm Springs, GA Washington DC and then to Hyde Park, NY for burial. Eleanor Roosevelt was in one train car, FDR’s body in another. In Washington President Truman joined the train (as well as most of the US Govt).
    Because I’ve been to the Little White House (in Warm Springs GA) so many times, as well as Warm Springs and the surrounding area, it felt even more immediate and real.
    When you read it and think about how everything was done by hand, telegraph and a little bit of telephoning it is astonishing. There were also very few people taking planes at that time either. They managed a huge undertaking with only a few minor snafus and no real guidelines since there had never been a president who died so far from Washington DC before.
    As you can tell, I really liked that book (grin).
    Also read more Western romances, other re-reads, a few mehs…

    Reply
  35. Oh …groan…..my TBR mountain has now acquired 5 more books and not many people have added their reads for the month! So many wonderful sounding books with rave reviews this month
    My books have been diverse…I went on a Janet Chapman re-read kick. Then I went on are-read kick of Robin D. Owen’s Celta series after I read her newest book, Heart Sight (Vinni & Avellana finally become a “real” couple!). It has been interesting watching them grow through the series from very young children to mature adults. It is sci-fi fantasy .
    From the library I got Amanda Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes. I like the new world but there were an awful lot of deaths in it! Maybe I need to check it out and read it again because it felt more adventure with just a dusting of romance.
    Re-read Red Adam’s Lady by Grace Ingram. Always enjoy that book. A medieval, forced marriage (no violence or disrespect towards women) where the h/H learn to be friends, like and then love each other. With a bit of invasion of the Galloway Scots. I hadn’t read it in 5 years so it felt really fresh and new.
    Anne McCaffrey – A Gift of Dragons. A book of 4 short stories/novellas about Pern. I hadn’t read them so it was fun.
    FDR’s Funeral Train: A Betrayed widow, A Soviet Spy, and A Presidency in the Balance by Robert Klara. It was published in 2010 That was a truly fascinating book. I’ve always been fascinated by FDR so have read a number of books about him.
    This book covers the very short climatic/traumatic time period of the train taking FDR’s body from Warm Springs, GA Washington DC and then to Hyde Park, NY for burial. Eleanor Roosevelt was in one train car, FDR’s body in another. In Washington President Truman joined the train (as well as most of the US Govt).
    Because I’ve been to the Little White House (in Warm Springs GA) so many times, as well as Warm Springs and the surrounding area, it felt even more immediate and real.
    When you read it and think about how everything was done by hand, telegraph and a little bit of telephoning it is astonishing. There were also very few people taking planes at that time either. They managed a huge undertaking with only a few minor snafus and no real guidelines since there had never been a president who died so far from Washington DC before.
    As you can tell, I really liked that book (grin).
    Also read more Western romances, other re-reads, a few mehs…

    Reply
  36. I’m another with a Mount TBR that is reaching epic proportions and that’s not even counting the e-Mount version.
    Read in May ~
    — Andy Weir’s The Martian seemed like the perfect comfort read early in the month when I was sick. This was probably my fifth re-read and I enjoyed it yet again.
    — The Thought Readers by Dima Zales which is currently free to Kindle readers. The premise was interesting, but I didn’t care overmuch for the lead character.
    — First Touch: A Paranormal Suspense Story by Teyla Branton which is currently free to Kindle readers. I enjoyed it and would read on.
    — Driven to Temptation: A Romantic Comedy by Melia Alexander; this was a fun read.
    — The Omega’s Bodyguard by Dessa Lux. This had lots of adult content and too little story; I’d have preferred the reverse.
    — the graphic novel Mercy Thompson: Hopcross Jilly by Patricia Briggs and Rik Hoskin. I’m not sorry to have read this, but it’s not what I’d call an uplifting story.
    — the contemporary romance The Ones Who Got Away by Roni Loren which is the first book in a series that takes place twelve years after a high school shooting. I’ve read comments that critique the shooting scenario, but this did not seem in poor taste. I’ll happily read on in the series.
    — the historical romance Summer Campaign by Carla Kelly.
    – the portal fantasy Namesake by Kate Stradling; I suspect I’ll re-read this at some point.
    – M.L. Buchman’s currently free Daniel’s Christmas (The Night Stalkers Book 3).
    – quite enjoyed Keira Andrew’s historical male/male romance Semper Fi; I’ll definitely be revisiting this book.
    – enjoyed the slightly futuristic male/male romance Evolved by N.R. Walker which features a man and an android.
    – re-read with pleasure Cut & Run by Madeleine Urban and Abigail Roux; this is a male/male mystery romance and the first of a series.
    — For my book group, The Alienist by Caleb Carr. The book was lengthy, interesting, and dismal since it dealt with a serial killer. It came across as incredibly well researched. It’s not a book that I see myself re-reading.
    — Betsy James’ fantasy Roadsouls which was very different from the book above. This came to me via inter-library loan. I have absolutely no idea why I requested it, but I’m glad I did.
    — a graphic novel that had me chuckling at times: Big Mushy Happy Lump: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen
    — Elizabeth Moon’s Once A Hero which I quite enjoyed. According to Amazon, this falls into the category of military science fiction.
    — Katharine Ashe’s historical romance The Prince: A Devil’s Duke Novel; this featured a prince in hiding and a young woman, in disguise, studying to be a surgeon. Both characters had issues (he was missing part of his leg, she had what I think we’d now describe as anxiety and OCD). It was an enjoyable read.
    — re-read Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Assimilation, Love, and Other Human Oddities; and Affiliations, Aliens, and Other Profitable Pursuits. These are male/male romances that feature an alien as one of the main characters. They are favorites.
    — also re-read Cooper West’s male/male romances The Protector; Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is currently free to Kindle readers); Parker’s Sanctuary; and Second Chances (a short).

    Reply
  37. I’m another with a Mount TBR that is reaching epic proportions and that’s not even counting the e-Mount version.
    Read in May ~
    — Andy Weir’s The Martian seemed like the perfect comfort read early in the month when I was sick. This was probably my fifth re-read and I enjoyed it yet again.
    — The Thought Readers by Dima Zales which is currently free to Kindle readers. The premise was interesting, but I didn’t care overmuch for the lead character.
    — First Touch: A Paranormal Suspense Story by Teyla Branton which is currently free to Kindle readers. I enjoyed it and would read on.
    — Driven to Temptation: A Romantic Comedy by Melia Alexander; this was a fun read.
    — The Omega’s Bodyguard by Dessa Lux. This had lots of adult content and too little story; I’d have preferred the reverse.
    — the graphic novel Mercy Thompson: Hopcross Jilly by Patricia Briggs and Rik Hoskin. I’m not sorry to have read this, but it’s not what I’d call an uplifting story.
    — the contemporary romance The Ones Who Got Away by Roni Loren which is the first book in a series that takes place twelve years after a high school shooting. I’ve read comments that critique the shooting scenario, but this did not seem in poor taste. I’ll happily read on in the series.
    — the historical romance Summer Campaign by Carla Kelly.
    – the portal fantasy Namesake by Kate Stradling; I suspect I’ll re-read this at some point.
    – M.L. Buchman’s currently free Daniel’s Christmas (The Night Stalkers Book 3).
    – quite enjoyed Keira Andrew’s historical male/male romance Semper Fi; I’ll definitely be revisiting this book.
    – enjoyed the slightly futuristic male/male romance Evolved by N.R. Walker which features a man and an android.
    – re-read with pleasure Cut & Run by Madeleine Urban and Abigail Roux; this is a male/male mystery romance and the first of a series.
    — For my book group, The Alienist by Caleb Carr. The book was lengthy, interesting, and dismal since it dealt with a serial killer. It came across as incredibly well researched. It’s not a book that I see myself re-reading.
    — Betsy James’ fantasy Roadsouls which was very different from the book above. This came to me via inter-library loan. I have absolutely no idea why I requested it, but I’m glad I did.
    — a graphic novel that had me chuckling at times: Big Mushy Happy Lump: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen
    — Elizabeth Moon’s Once A Hero which I quite enjoyed. According to Amazon, this falls into the category of military science fiction.
    — Katharine Ashe’s historical romance The Prince: A Devil’s Duke Novel; this featured a prince in hiding and a young woman, in disguise, studying to be a surgeon. Both characters had issues (he was missing part of his leg, she had what I think we’d now describe as anxiety and OCD). It was an enjoyable read.
    — re-read Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Assimilation, Love, and Other Human Oddities; and Affiliations, Aliens, and Other Profitable Pursuits. These are male/male romances that feature an alien as one of the main characters. They are favorites.
    — also re-read Cooper West’s male/male romances The Protector; Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is currently free to Kindle readers); Parker’s Sanctuary; and Second Chances (a short).

    Reply
  38. I’m another with a Mount TBR that is reaching epic proportions and that’s not even counting the e-Mount version.
    Read in May ~
    — Andy Weir’s The Martian seemed like the perfect comfort read early in the month when I was sick. This was probably my fifth re-read and I enjoyed it yet again.
    — The Thought Readers by Dima Zales which is currently free to Kindle readers. The premise was interesting, but I didn’t care overmuch for the lead character.
    — First Touch: A Paranormal Suspense Story by Teyla Branton which is currently free to Kindle readers. I enjoyed it and would read on.
    — Driven to Temptation: A Romantic Comedy by Melia Alexander; this was a fun read.
    — The Omega’s Bodyguard by Dessa Lux. This had lots of adult content and too little story; I’d have preferred the reverse.
    — the graphic novel Mercy Thompson: Hopcross Jilly by Patricia Briggs and Rik Hoskin. I’m not sorry to have read this, but it’s not what I’d call an uplifting story.
    — the contemporary romance The Ones Who Got Away by Roni Loren which is the first book in a series that takes place twelve years after a high school shooting. I’ve read comments that critique the shooting scenario, but this did not seem in poor taste. I’ll happily read on in the series.
    — the historical romance Summer Campaign by Carla Kelly.
    – the portal fantasy Namesake by Kate Stradling; I suspect I’ll re-read this at some point.
    – M.L. Buchman’s currently free Daniel’s Christmas (The Night Stalkers Book 3).
    – quite enjoyed Keira Andrew’s historical male/male romance Semper Fi; I’ll definitely be revisiting this book.
    – enjoyed the slightly futuristic male/male romance Evolved by N.R. Walker which features a man and an android.
    – re-read with pleasure Cut & Run by Madeleine Urban and Abigail Roux; this is a male/male mystery romance and the first of a series.
    — For my book group, The Alienist by Caleb Carr. The book was lengthy, interesting, and dismal since it dealt with a serial killer. It came across as incredibly well researched. It’s not a book that I see myself re-reading.
    — Betsy James’ fantasy Roadsouls which was very different from the book above. This came to me via inter-library loan. I have absolutely no idea why I requested it, but I’m glad I did.
    — a graphic novel that had me chuckling at times: Big Mushy Happy Lump: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen
    — Elizabeth Moon’s Once A Hero which I quite enjoyed. According to Amazon, this falls into the category of military science fiction.
    — Katharine Ashe’s historical romance The Prince: A Devil’s Duke Novel; this featured a prince in hiding and a young woman, in disguise, studying to be a surgeon. Both characters had issues (he was missing part of his leg, she had what I think we’d now describe as anxiety and OCD). It was an enjoyable read.
    — re-read Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Assimilation, Love, and Other Human Oddities; and Affiliations, Aliens, and Other Profitable Pursuits. These are male/male romances that feature an alien as one of the main characters. They are favorites.
    — also re-read Cooper West’s male/male romances The Protector; Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is currently free to Kindle readers); Parker’s Sanctuary; and Second Chances (a short).

    Reply
  39. I’m another with a Mount TBR that is reaching epic proportions and that’s not even counting the e-Mount version.
    Read in May ~
    — Andy Weir’s The Martian seemed like the perfect comfort read early in the month when I was sick. This was probably my fifth re-read and I enjoyed it yet again.
    — The Thought Readers by Dima Zales which is currently free to Kindle readers. The premise was interesting, but I didn’t care overmuch for the lead character.
    — First Touch: A Paranormal Suspense Story by Teyla Branton which is currently free to Kindle readers. I enjoyed it and would read on.
    — Driven to Temptation: A Romantic Comedy by Melia Alexander; this was a fun read.
    — The Omega’s Bodyguard by Dessa Lux. This had lots of adult content and too little story; I’d have preferred the reverse.
    — the graphic novel Mercy Thompson: Hopcross Jilly by Patricia Briggs and Rik Hoskin. I’m not sorry to have read this, but it’s not what I’d call an uplifting story.
    — the contemporary romance The Ones Who Got Away by Roni Loren which is the first book in a series that takes place twelve years after a high school shooting. I’ve read comments that critique the shooting scenario, but this did not seem in poor taste. I’ll happily read on in the series.
    — the historical romance Summer Campaign by Carla Kelly.
    – the portal fantasy Namesake by Kate Stradling; I suspect I’ll re-read this at some point.
    – M.L. Buchman’s currently free Daniel’s Christmas (The Night Stalkers Book 3).
    – quite enjoyed Keira Andrew’s historical male/male romance Semper Fi; I’ll definitely be revisiting this book.
    – enjoyed the slightly futuristic male/male romance Evolved by N.R. Walker which features a man and an android.
    – re-read with pleasure Cut & Run by Madeleine Urban and Abigail Roux; this is a male/male mystery romance and the first of a series.
    — For my book group, The Alienist by Caleb Carr. The book was lengthy, interesting, and dismal since it dealt with a serial killer. It came across as incredibly well researched. It’s not a book that I see myself re-reading.
    — Betsy James’ fantasy Roadsouls which was very different from the book above. This came to me via inter-library loan. I have absolutely no idea why I requested it, but I’m glad I did.
    — a graphic novel that had me chuckling at times: Big Mushy Happy Lump: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen
    — Elizabeth Moon’s Once A Hero which I quite enjoyed. According to Amazon, this falls into the category of military science fiction.
    — Katharine Ashe’s historical romance The Prince: A Devil’s Duke Novel; this featured a prince in hiding and a young woman, in disguise, studying to be a surgeon. Both characters had issues (he was missing part of his leg, she had what I think we’d now describe as anxiety and OCD). It was an enjoyable read.
    — re-read Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Assimilation, Love, and Other Human Oddities; and Affiliations, Aliens, and Other Profitable Pursuits. These are male/male romances that feature an alien as one of the main characters. They are favorites.
    — also re-read Cooper West’s male/male romances The Protector; Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is currently free to Kindle readers); Parker’s Sanctuary; and Second Chances (a short).

    Reply
  40. I’m another with a Mount TBR that is reaching epic proportions and that’s not even counting the e-Mount version.
    Read in May ~
    — Andy Weir’s The Martian seemed like the perfect comfort read early in the month when I was sick. This was probably my fifth re-read and I enjoyed it yet again.
    — The Thought Readers by Dima Zales which is currently free to Kindle readers. The premise was interesting, but I didn’t care overmuch for the lead character.
    — First Touch: A Paranormal Suspense Story by Teyla Branton which is currently free to Kindle readers. I enjoyed it and would read on.
    — Driven to Temptation: A Romantic Comedy by Melia Alexander; this was a fun read.
    — The Omega’s Bodyguard by Dessa Lux. This had lots of adult content and too little story; I’d have preferred the reverse.
    — the graphic novel Mercy Thompson: Hopcross Jilly by Patricia Briggs and Rik Hoskin. I’m not sorry to have read this, but it’s not what I’d call an uplifting story.
    — the contemporary romance The Ones Who Got Away by Roni Loren which is the first book in a series that takes place twelve years after a high school shooting. I’ve read comments that critique the shooting scenario, but this did not seem in poor taste. I’ll happily read on in the series.
    — the historical romance Summer Campaign by Carla Kelly.
    – the portal fantasy Namesake by Kate Stradling; I suspect I’ll re-read this at some point.
    – M.L. Buchman’s currently free Daniel’s Christmas (The Night Stalkers Book 3).
    – quite enjoyed Keira Andrew’s historical male/male romance Semper Fi; I’ll definitely be revisiting this book.
    – enjoyed the slightly futuristic male/male romance Evolved by N.R. Walker which features a man and an android.
    – re-read with pleasure Cut & Run by Madeleine Urban and Abigail Roux; this is a male/male mystery romance and the first of a series.
    — For my book group, The Alienist by Caleb Carr. The book was lengthy, interesting, and dismal since it dealt with a serial killer. It came across as incredibly well researched. It’s not a book that I see myself re-reading.
    — Betsy James’ fantasy Roadsouls which was very different from the book above. This came to me via inter-library loan. I have absolutely no idea why I requested it, but I’m glad I did.
    — a graphic novel that had me chuckling at times: Big Mushy Happy Lump: A Sarah’s Scribbles Collection by Sarah Andersen
    — Elizabeth Moon’s Once A Hero which I quite enjoyed. According to Amazon, this falls into the category of military science fiction.
    — Katharine Ashe’s historical romance The Prince: A Devil’s Duke Novel; this featured a prince in hiding and a young woman, in disguise, studying to be a surgeon. Both characters had issues (he was missing part of his leg, she had what I think we’d now describe as anxiety and OCD). It was an enjoyable read.
    — re-read Lyn Gala’s Prelude to Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Claimings, Tails, and Other Alien Artifacts; Assimilation, Love, and Other Human Oddities; and Affiliations, Aliens, and Other Profitable Pursuits. These are male/male romances that feature an alien as one of the main characters. They are favorites.
    — also re-read Cooper West’s male/male romances The Protector; Rescued: A “Parker’s Sanctuary” Story (this is currently free to Kindle readers); Parker’s Sanctuary; and Second Chances (a short).

    Reply
  41. Mary, I totally agree with you re Mary Balogh. I loved that she wrote this book — I so wanted a hero for her, because I think the disaster of her husband’s bigamy was toughest on Viola. After years of being the Countess of Riverdale, and bearing three children, now adults, to have to go back to being called Miss Kingsley — just awful. Especially since it hadn’t been a happy marriage. I loved Someone To Care — the whole series, in fact.

    Reply
  42. Mary, I totally agree with you re Mary Balogh. I loved that she wrote this book — I so wanted a hero for her, because I think the disaster of her husband’s bigamy was toughest on Viola. After years of being the Countess of Riverdale, and bearing three children, now adults, to have to go back to being called Miss Kingsley — just awful. Especially since it hadn’t been a happy marriage. I loved Someone To Care — the whole series, in fact.

    Reply
  43. Mary, I totally agree with you re Mary Balogh. I loved that she wrote this book — I so wanted a hero for her, because I think the disaster of her husband’s bigamy was toughest on Viola. After years of being the Countess of Riverdale, and bearing three children, now adults, to have to go back to being called Miss Kingsley — just awful. Especially since it hadn’t been a happy marriage. I loved Someone To Care — the whole series, in fact.

    Reply
  44. Mary, I totally agree with you re Mary Balogh. I loved that she wrote this book — I so wanted a hero for her, because I think the disaster of her husband’s bigamy was toughest on Viola. After years of being the Countess of Riverdale, and bearing three children, now adults, to have to go back to being called Miss Kingsley — just awful. Especially since it hadn’t been a happy marriage. I loved Someone To Care — the whole series, in fact.

    Reply
  45. Mary, I totally agree with you re Mary Balogh. I loved that she wrote this book — I so wanted a hero for her, because I think the disaster of her husband’s bigamy was toughest on Viola. After years of being the Countess of Riverdale, and bearing three children, now adults, to have to go back to being called Miss Kingsley — just awful. Especially since it hadn’t been a happy marriage. I loved Someone To Care — the whole series, in fact.

    Reply
  46. Janga, I’d read all but three of the AAR top ten and I’m currently reading Beard Science. How romance has changed. I remember when it was held to be author suicide to have a bearded hero, and if an author was reckless enough to have one, the publishers made sure the hero on the cover was clean-shaven.
    As for the AAR top 10, I loved Lisa Kleypas’s Devil In Winter, so it’s nice to see it at the top. LOS and Flowers From the Storm have been in that top 10 for decades. Flowers From the Storm is still a huge fave of mine, and I’d squeeze it in above LOS .
    For those who haven’t seen the list it’s here: https://allaboutromance.com/the-aar-top-ten-romances-with-a-new-number-one/

    Reply
  47. Janga, I’d read all but three of the AAR top ten and I’m currently reading Beard Science. How romance has changed. I remember when it was held to be author suicide to have a bearded hero, and if an author was reckless enough to have one, the publishers made sure the hero on the cover was clean-shaven.
    As for the AAR top 10, I loved Lisa Kleypas’s Devil In Winter, so it’s nice to see it at the top. LOS and Flowers From the Storm have been in that top 10 for decades. Flowers From the Storm is still a huge fave of mine, and I’d squeeze it in above LOS .
    For those who haven’t seen the list it’s here: https://allaboutromance.com/the-aar-top-ten-romances-with-a-new-number-one/

    Reply
  48. Janga, I’d read all but three of the AAR top ten and I’m currently reading Beard Science. How romance has changed. I remember when it was held to be author suicide to have a bearded hero, and if an author was reckless enough to have one, the publishers made sure the hero on the cover was clean-shaven.
    As for the AAR top 10, I loved Lisa Kleypas’s Devil In Winter, so it’s nice to see it at the top. LOS and Flowers From the Storm have been in that top 10 for decades. Flowers From the Storm is still a huge fave of mine, and I’d squeeze it in above LOS .
    For those who haven’t seen the list it’s here: https://allaboutromance.com/the-aar-top-ten-romances-with-a-new-number-one/

    Reply
  49. Janga, I’d read all but three of the AAR top ten and I’m currently reading Beard Science. How romance has changed. I remember when it was held to be author suicide to have a bearded hero, and if an author was reckless enough to have one, the publishers made sure the hero on the cover was clean-shaven.
    As for the AAR top 10, I loved Lisa Kleypas’s Devil In Winter, so it’s nice to see it at the top. LOS and Flowers From the Storm have been in that top 10 for decades. Flowers From the Storm is still a huge fave of mine, and I’d squeeze it in above LOS .
    For those who haven’t seen the list it’s here: https://allaboutromance.com/the-aar-top-ten-romances-with-a-new-number-one/

    Reply
  50. Janga, I’d read all but three of the AAR top ten and I’m currently reading Beard Science. How romance has changed. I remember when it was held to be author suicide to have a bearded hero, and if an author was reckless enough to have one, the publishers made sure the hero on the cover was clean-shaven.
    As for the AAR top 10, I loved Lisa Kleypas’s Devil In Winter, so it’s nice to see it at the top. LOS and Flowers From the Storm have been in that top 10 for decades. Flowers From the Storm is still a huge fave of mine, and I’d squeeze it in above LOS .
    For those who haven’t seen the list it’s here: https://allaboutromance.com/the-aar-top-ten-romances-with-a-new-number-one/

    Reply
  51. Someone to Care is actually my favourite in the series. It is the most bittersweet, and there’s so much emotion beneath the characters’ façades.
    I LOVED the older heroine.

    Reply
  52. Someone to Care is actually my favourite in the series. It is the most bittersweet, and there’s so much emotion beneath the characters’ façades.
    I LOVED the older heroine.

    Reply
  53. Someone to Care is actually my favourite in the series. It is the most bittersweet, and there’s so much emotion beneath the characters’ façades.
    I LOVED the older heroine.

    Reply
  54. Someone to Care is actually my favourite in the series. It is the most bittersweet, and there’s so much emotion beneath the characters’ façades.
    I LOVED the older heroine.

    Reply
  55. Someone to Care is actually my favourite in the series. It is the most bittersweet, and there’s so much emotion beneath the characters’ façades.
    I LOVED the older heroine.

    Reply
  56. Thanks, Teresa, I’m so glad you found it helpful to your TBR pile!!! I love historicals set in Ireland too and always snap them up because there never seem to be enough of them. This one is extra-intriguing as it’s based on the author’s own family history. And I loved the Cryssa Bazos book very much. Fabulous characters and a great story line.

    Reply
  57. Thanks, Teresa, I’m so glad you found it helpful to your TBR pile!!! I love historicals set in Ireland too and always snap them up because there never seem to be enough of them. This one is extra-intriguing as it’s based on the author’s own family history. And I loved the Cryssa Bazos book very much. Fabulous characters and a great story line.

    Reply
  58. Thanks, Teresa, I’m so glad you found it helpful to your TBR pile!!! I love historicals set in Ireland too and always snap them up because there never seem to be enough of them. This one is extra-intriguing as it’s based on the author’s own family history. And I loved the Cryssa Bazos book very much. Fabulous characters and a great story line.

    Reply
  59. Thanks, Teresa, I’m so glad you found it helpful to your TBR pile!!! I love historicals set in Ireland too and always snap them up because there never seem to be enough of them. This one is extra-intriguing as it’s based on the author’s own family history. And I loved the Cryssa Bazos book very much. Fabulous characters and a great story line.

    Reply
  60. Thanks, Teresa, I’m so glad you found it helpful to your TBR pile!!! I love historicals set in Ireland too and always snap them up because there never seem to be enough of them. This one is extra-intriguing as it’s based on the author’s own family history. And I loved the Cryssa Bazos book very much. Fabulous characters and a great story line.

    Reply
  61. Hi Helen, I’m so glad you loved Island in the East too! It was one of those stories that was in my mind for so long after I finished it. Then I saw the words “time slip” in your comment and I’ve snapped that up too! I love the WWR!

    Reply
  62. Hi Helen, I’m so glad you loved Island in the East too! It was one of those stories that was in my mind for so long after I finished it. Then I saw the words “time slip” in your comment and I’ve snapped that up too! I love the WWR!

    Reply
  63. Hi Helen, I’m so glad you loved Island in the East too! It was one of those stories that was in my mind for so long after I finished it. Then I saw the words “time slip” in your comment and I’ve snapped that up too! I love the WWR!

    Reply
  64. Hi Helen, I’m so glad you loved Island in the East too! It was one of those stories that was in my mind for so long after I finished it. Then I saw the words “time slip” in your comment and I’ve snapped that up too! I love the WWR!

    Reply
  65. Hi Helen, I’m so glad you loved Island in the East too! It was one of those stories that was in my mind for so long after I finished it. Then I saw the words “time slip” in your comment and I’ve snapped that up too! I love the WWR!

    Reply
  66. Thank you, Kareni! You always have such an interesting and eclectic set of recommendations. I like the sound of the Katharine Ashe book – and I didn’t realise that military science fiction was a category of its own now!

    Reply
  67. Thank you, Kareni! You always have such an interesting and eclectic set of recommendations. I like the sound of the Katharine Ashe book – and I didn’t realise that military science fiction was a category of its own now!

    Reply
  68. Thank you, Kareni! You always have such an interesting and eclectic set of recommendations. I like the sound of the Katharine Ashe book – and I didn’t realise that military science fiction was a category of its own now!

    Reply
  69. Thank you, Kareni! You always have such an interesting and eclectic set of recommendations. I like the sound of the Katharine Ashe book – and I didn’t realise that military science fiction was a category of its own now!

    Reply
  70. Thank you, Kareni! You always have such an interesting and eclectic set of recommendations. I like the sound of the Katharine Ashe book – and I didn’t realise that military science fiction was a category of its own now!

    Reply
  71. I can second several of the Wenches recommendations. I read “Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand” a few years ago, and Simonson’s next book, “The Summer Before The War” is on my TBR list.
    I also loved “My Lady Thief”, and good news, Emily Larkin has another Baleful Godmother book coming out very soon!
    I’ve read both of the JAK books set in the 1930’s, it was good lightweight enjoyment.
    I read “A Rogue of Her Own” by Grace Burrowes. I’m not always in the mood for her books, because the pace is leisurely and they are quite long, without a lot of action. But when you are in the mood for some lovely prose and subtle humor, they really hit the spot. This one was about a newlywed couple adjusting to their marriage, which I always enjoy.
    But the real hit for me this month was “Scandal in the Night” by Elizabeth Essex. I’ve been intermittently reading her Reckless Brides series, and all of them are excellent, but this one really knocked me out, a 5-star read. The hero and heroine meet again in England after a separation of several years, and most of the book is told as flashbacks to their earlier meeting and relationship, which took place in India. But at the time the hero was a spy, and going under a different name. And when they meet again, the heroine is the one living under a false identity! Incredible storytelling. The Indian setting had shades of Mary Jo’s Silk trilogy, and Meredith Duran, and the spy plot and double identities and complexity of the characters reminded me a bit of Joanna’s books. Yes, it was that good!

    Reply
  72. I can second several of the Wenches recommendations. I read “Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand” a few years ago, and Simonson’s next book, “The Summer Before The War” is on my TBR list.
    I also loved “My Lady Thief”, and good news, Emily Larkin has another Baleful Godmother book coming out very soon!
    I’ve read both of the JAK books set in the 1930’s, it was good lightweight enjoyment.
    I read “A Rogue of Her Own” by Grace Burrowes. I’m not always in the mood for her books, because the pace is leisurely and they are quite long, without a lot of action. But when you are in the mood for some lovely prose and subtle humor, they really hit the spot. This one was about a newlywed couple adjusting to their marriage, which I always enjoy.
    But the real hit for me this month was “Scandal in the Night” by Elizabeth Essex. I’ve been intermittently reading her Reckless Brides series, and all of them are excellent, but this one really knocked me out, a 5-star read. The hero and heroine meet again in England after a separation of several years, and most of the book is told as flashbacks to their earlier meeting and relationship, which took place in India. But at the time the hero was a spy, and going under a different name. And when they meet again, the heroine is the one living under a false identity! Incredible storytelling. The Indian setting had shades of Mary Jo’s Silk trilogy, and Meredith Duran, and the spy plot and double identities and complexity of the characters reminded me a bit of Joanna’s books. Yes, it was that good!

    Reply
  73. I can second several of the Wenches recommendations. I read “Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand” a few years ago, and Simonson’s next book, “The Summer Before The War” is on my TBR list.
    I also loved “My Lady Thief”, and good news, Emily Larkin has another Baleful Godmother book coming out very soon!
    I’ve read both of the JAK books set in the 1930’s, it was good lightweight enjoyment.
    I read “A Rogue of Her Own” by Grace Burrowes. I’m not always in the mood for her books, because the pace is leisurely and they are quite long, without a lot of action. But when you are in the mood for some lovely prose and subtle humor, they really hit the spot. This one was about a newlywed couple adjusting to their marriage, which I always enjoy.
    But the real hit for me this month was “Scandal in the Night” by Elizabeth Essex. I’ve been intermittently reading her Reckless Brides series, and all of them are excellent, but this one really knocked me out, a 5-star read. The hero and heroine meet again in England after a separation of several years, and most of the book is told as flashbacks to their earlier meeting and relationship, which took place in India. But at the time the hero was a spy, and going under a different name. And when they meet again, the heroine is the one living under a false identity! Incredible storytelling. The Indian setting had shades of Mary Jo’s Silk trilogy, and Meredith Duran, and the spy plot and double identities and complexity of the characters reminded me a bit of Joanna’s books. Yes, it was that good!

    Reply
  74. I can second several of the Wenches recommendations. I read “Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand” a few years ago, and Simonson’s next book, “The Summer Before The War” is on my TBR list.
    I also loved “My Lady Thief”, and good news, Emily Larkin has another Baleful Godmother book coming out very soon!
    I’ve read both of the JAK books set in the 1930’s, it was good lightweight enjoyment.
    I read “A Rogue of Her Own” by Grace Burrowes. I’m not always in the mood for her books, because the pace is leisurely and they are quite long, without a lot of action. But when you are in the mood for some lovely prose and subtle humor, they really hit the spot. This one was about a newlywed couple adjusting to their marriage, which I always enjoy.
    But the real hit for me this month was “Scandal in the Night” by Elizabeth Essex. I’ve been intermittently reading her Reckless Brides series, and all of them are excellent, but this one really knocked me out, a 5-star read. The hero and heroine meet again in England after a separation of several years, and most of the book is told as flashbacks to their earlier meeting and relationship, which took place in India. But at the time the hero was a spy, and going under a different name. And when they meet again, the heroine is the one living under a false identity! Incredible storytelling. The Indian setting had shades of Mary Jo’s Silk trilogy, and Meredith Duran, and the spy plot and double identities and complexity of the characters reminded me a bit of Joanna’s books. Yes, it was that good!

    Reply
  75. I can second several of the Wenches recommendations. I read “Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand” a few years ago, and Simonson’s next book, “The Summer Before The War” is on my TBR list.
    I also loved “My Lady Thief”, and good news, Emily Larkin has another Baleful Godmother book coming out very soon!
    I’ve read both of the JAK books set in the 1930’s, it was good lightweight enjoyment.
    I read “A Rogue of Her Own” by Grace Burrowes. I’m not always in the mood for her books, because the pace is leisurely and they are quite long, without a lot of action. But when you are in the mood for some lovely prose and subtle humor, they really hit the spot. This one was about a newlywed couple adjusting to their marriage, which I always enjoy.
    But the real hit for me this month was “Scandal in the Night” by Elizabeth Essex. I’ve been intermittently reading her Reckless Brides series, and all of them are excellent, but this one really knocked me out, a 5-star read. The hero and heroine meet again in England after a separation of several years, and most of the book is told as flashbacks to their earlier meeting and relationship, which took place in India. But at the time the hero was a spy, and going under a different name. And when they meet again, the heroine is the one living under a false identity! Incredible storytelling. The Indian setting had shades of Mary Jo’s Silk trilogy, and Meredith Duran, and the spy plot and double identities and complexity of the characters reminded me a bit of Joanna’s books. Yes, it was that good!

    Reply
  76. The only warning I would offer to someone reading any book in this series is to begin at the beginning because of the large number of characters involved. There is a helpful family tree at the beginning of each book, but it is so small on my kindle it was hard to read. If there was a way of enlarging it – I was never able to figure it out. However, if you go on Ms. Balogh’s web site marybalogh.com and click on books, there is a very readable family tree in each book.

    Reply
  77. The only warning I would offer to someone reading any book in this series is to begin at the beginning because of the large number of characters involved. There is a helpful family tree at the beginning of each book, but it is so small on my kindle it was hard to read. If there was a way of enlarging it – I was never able to figure it out. However, if you go on Ms. Balogh’s web site marybalogh.com and click on books, there is a very readable family tree in each book.

    Reply
  78. The only warning I would offer to someone reading any book in this series is to begin at the beginning because of the large number of characters involved. There is a helpful family tree at the beginning of each book, but it is so small on my kindle it was hard to read. If there was a way of enlarging it – I was never able to figure it out. However, if you go on Ms. Balogh’s web site marybalogh.com and click on books, there is a very readable family tree in each book.

    Reply
  79. The only warning I would offer to someone reading any book in this series is to begin at the beginning because of the large number of characters involved. There is a helpful family tree at the beginning of each book, but it is so small on my kindle it was hard to read. If there was a way of enlarging it – I was never able to figure it out. However, if you go on Ms. Balogh’s web site marybalogh.com and click on books, there is a very readable family tree in each book.

    Reply
  80. The only warning I would offer to someone reading any book in this series is to begin at the beginning because of the large number of characters involved. There is a helpful family tree at the beginning of each book, but it is so small on my kindle it was hard to read. If there was a way of enlarging it – I was never able to figure it out. However, if you go on Ms. Balogh’s web site marybalogh.com and click on books, there is a very readable family tree in each book.

    Reply
  81. I love/hate this mostly column so much!! How frustrating that I’ll have to wait for my copy of The Paris Seamstress, and my paper copy of Island in the East; they both sound like something I’ll love. Hope they do an audio version of The Paris Seamstress. My Lady Thief sounds wonderful, too, so that’s one more on the wish list. And thank you, Janga; my husband adores poetry (and reads it aloud to me at bedtime), so Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude went right into my basket. I discovered a new-to-me contemporary author this month: Lauren Layne. Her books are fun, engaging, and well-written, and I’ve zipped through several of them in audio. And amidst many not-particularly memorable quick reads, Jojo Moyes latest, Sill Me, was a poignant and well-done conclusion to the tale that began with Me Before You. Now back to my piles!

    Reply
  82. I love/hate this mostly column so much!! How frustrating that I’ll have to wait for my copy of The Paris Seamstress, and my paper copy of Island in the East; they both sound like something I’ll love. Hope they do an audio version of The Paris Seamstress. My Lady Thief sounds wonderful, too, so that’s one more on the wish list. And thank you, Janga; my husband adores poetry (and reads it aloud to me at bedtime), so Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude went right into my basket. I discovered a new-to-me contemporary author this month: Lauren Layne. Her books are fun, engaging, and well-written, and I’ve zipped through several of them in audio. And amidst many not-particularly memorable quick reads, Jojo Moyes latest, Sill Me, was a poignant and well-done conclusion to the tale that began with Me Before You. Now back to my piles!

    Reply
  83. I love/hate this mostly column so much!! How frustrating that I’ll have to wait for my copy of The Paris Seamstress, and my paper copy of Island in the East; they both sound like something I’ll love. Hope they do an audio version of The Paris Seamstress. My Lady Thief sounds wonderful, too, so that’s one more on the wish list. And thank you, Janga; my husband adores poetry (and reads it aloud to me at bedtime), so Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude went right into my basket. I discovered a new-to-me contemporary author this month: Lauren Layne. Her books are fun, engaging, and well-written, and I’ve zipped through several of them in audio. And amidst many not-particularly memorable quick reads, Jojo Moyes latest, Sill Me, was a poignant and well-done conclusion to the tale that began with Me Before You. Now back to my piles!

    Reply
  84. I love/hate this mostly column so much!! How frustrating that I’ll have to wait for my copy of The Paris Seamstress, and my paper copy of Island in the East; they both sound like something I’ll love. Hope they do an audio version of The Paris Seamstress. My Lady Thief sounds wonderful, too, so that’s one more on the wish list. And thank you, Janga; my husband adores poetry (and reads it aloud to me at bedtime), so Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude went right into my basket. I discovered a new-to-me contemporary author this month: Lauren Layne. Her books are fun, engaging, and well-written, and I’ve zipped through several of them in audio. And amidst many not-particularly memorable quick reads, Jojo Moyes latest, Sill Me, was a poignant and well-done conclusion to the tale that began with Me Before You. Now back to my piles!

    Reply
  85. I love/hate this mostly column so much!! How frustrating that I’ll have to wait for my copy of The Paris Seamstress, and my paper copy of Island in the East; they both sound like something I’ll love. Hope they do an audio version of The Paris Seamstress. My Lady Thief sounds wonderful, too, so that’s one more on the wish list. And thank you, Janga; my husband adores poetry (and reads it aloud to me at bedtime), so Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude went right into my basket. I discovered a new-to-me contemporary author this month: Lauren Layne. Her books are fun, engaging, and well-written, and I’ve zipped through several of them in audio. And amidst many not-particularly memorable quick reads, Jojo Moyes latest, Sill Me, was a poignant and well-done conclusion to the tale that began with Me Before You. Now back to my piles!

    Reply
  86. To Mary T and Ms Gracie – Amen. I have loved other series by Ms Balogh, and this series has become one of my favorites. This book made me smile because neither the heroine nor hero expected anything and they got so very much.

    Reply
  87. To Mary T and Ms Gracie – Amen. I have loved other series by Ms Balogh, and this series has become one of my favorites. This book made me smile because neither the heroine nor hero expected anything and they got so very much.

    Reply
  88. To Mary T and Ms Gracie – Amen. I have loved other series by Ms Balogh, and this series has become one of my favorites. This book made me smile because neither the heroine nor hero expected anything and they got so very much.

    Reply
  89. To Mary T and Ms Gracie – Amen. I have loved other series by Ms Balogh, and this series has become one of my favorites. This book made me smile because neither the heroine nor hero expected anything and they got so very much.

    Reply
  90. To Mary T and Ms Gracie – Amen. I have loved other series by Ms Balogh, and this series has become one of my favorites. This book made me smile because neither the heroine nor hero expected anything and they got so very much.

    Reply
  91. Well darn…I bet that title was in the used bookstore I went to yesterday! I saw several books by her but didn’t pause and look! Guess I either need to go back or just put it on my paper wish list for “next time”.

    Reply
  92. Well darn…I bet that title was in the used bookstore I went to yesterday! I saw several books by her but didn’t pause and look! Guess I either need to go back or just put it on my paper wish list for “next time”.

    Reply
  93. Well darn…I bet that title was in the used bookstore I went to yesterday! I saw several books by her but didn’t pause and look! Guess I either need to go back or just put it on my paper wish list for “next time”.

    Reply
  94. Well darn…I bet that title was in the used bookstore I went to yesterday! I saw several books by her but didn’t pause and look! Guess I either need to go back or just put it on my paper wish list for “next time”.

    Reply
  95. Well darn…I bet that title was in the used bookstore I went to yesterday! I saw several books by her but didn’t pause and look! Guess I either need to go back or just put it on my paper wish list for “next time”.

    Reply
  96. I’m trying just to skim through all these wonderful lists because I really don’t need any more books on my plate! But I don’t think I’ve tried Elizabeth Essex. I’m off to take a look.

    Reply
  97. I’m trying just to skim through all these wonderful lists because I really don’t need any more books on my plate! But I don’t think I’ve tried Elizabeth Essex. I’m off to take a look.

    Reply
  98. I’m trying just to skim through all these wonderful lists because I really don’t need any more books on my plate! But I don’t think I’ve tried Elizabeth Essex. I’m off to take a look.

    Reply
  99. I’m trying just to skim through all these wonderful lists because I really don’t need any more books on my plate! But I don’t think I’ve tried Elizabeth Essex. I’m off to take a look.

    Reply
  100. I’m trying just to skim through all these wonderful lists because I really don’t need any more books on my plate! But I don’t think I’ve tried Elizabeth Essex. I’m off to take a look.

    Reply
  101. Argh, I thought I was escaping with only one title but now I need to try Lauren Layne. I could use a dash of fun right now!
    But Wench readers are so reliable, it’s great to hear about new authors from them, so thank you!

    Reply
  102. Argh, I thought I was escaping with only one title but now I need to try Lauren Layne. I could use a dash of fun right now!
    But Wench readers are so reliable, it’s great to hear about new authors from them, so thank you!

    Reply
  103. Argh, I thought I was escaping with only one title but now I need to try Lauren Layne. I could use a dash of fun right now!
    But Wench readers are so reliable, it’s great to hear about new authors from them, so thank you!

    Reply
  104. Argh, I thought I was escaping with only one title but now I need to try Lauren Layne. I could use a dash of fun right now!
    But Wench readers are so reliable, it’s great to hear about new authors from them, so thank you!

    Reply
  105. Argh, I thought I was escaping with only one title but now I need to try Lauren Layne. I could use a dash of fun right now!
    But Wench readers are so reliable, it’s great to hear about new authors from them, so thank you!

    Reply
  106. Mary, yes, I did read the series from the beginning, and though I think you could read it as a stand-alone, it adds to your understanding of the development of the characters to read it from the beginning.

    Reply
  107. Mary, yes, I did read the series from the beginning, and though I think you could read it as a stand-alone, it adds to your understanding of the development of the characters to read it from the beginning.

    Reply
  108. Mary, yes, I did read the series from the beginning, and though I think you could read it as a stand-alone, it adds to your understanding of the development of the characters to read it from the beginning.

    Reply
  109. Mary, yes, I did read the series from the beginning, and though I think you could read it as a stand-alone, it adds to your understanding of the development of the characters to read it from the beginning.

    Reply
  110. Mary, yes, I did read the series from the beginning, and though I think you could read it as a stand-alone, it adds to your understanding of the development of the characters to read it from the beginning.

    Reply
  111. Annette, yes, it’s a wonderful series and the premise is so very powerful. I love that it shows how it could totally ruin a family socially — and then each of these people work their way through the ruination and end up happier than they ever would have been.

    Reply
  112. Annette, yes, it’s a wonderful series and the premise is so very powerful. I love that it shows how it could totally ruin a family socially — and then each of these people work their way through the ruination and end up happier than they ever would have been.

    Reply
  113. Annette, yes, it’s a wonderful series and the premise is so very powerful. I love that it shows how it could totally ruin a family socially — and then each of these people work their way through the ruination and end up happier than they ever would have been.

    Reply
  114. Annette, yes, it’s a wonderful series and the premise is so very powerful. I love that it shows how it could totally ruin a family socially — and then each of these people work their way through the ruination and end up happier than they ever would have been.

    Reply
  115. Annette, yes, it’s a wonderful series and the premise is so very powerful. I love that it shows how it could totally ruin a family socially — and then each of these people work their way through the ruination and end up happier than they ever would have been.

    Reply
  116. I agree Sonya, it was wonderful to see this dignified middle-aged woman, who’d done the right thing her whole life and then had suffered terribly for her husband’s dishonesty, try to snatch a few weeks for herself — and then get so much more than she bargained for.

    Reply
  117. I agree Sonya, it was wonderful to see this dignified middle-aged woman, who’d done the right thing her whole life and then had suffered terribly for her husband’s dishonesty, try to snatch a few weeks for herself — and then get so much more than she bargained for.

    Reply
  118. I agree Sonya, it was wonderful to see this dignified middle-aged woman, who’d done the right thing her whole life and then had suffered terribly for her husband’s dishonesty, try to snatch a few weeks for herself — and then get so much more than she bargained for.

    Reply
  119. I agree Sonya, it was wonderful to see this dignified middle-aged woman, who’d done the right thing her whole life and then had suffered terribly for her husband’s dishonesty, try to snatch a few weeks for herself — and then get so much more than she bargained for.

    Reply
  120. I agree Sonya, it was wonderful to see this dignified middle-aged woman, who’d done the right thing her whole life and then had suffered terribly for her husband’s dishonesty, try to snatch a few weeks for herself — and then get so much more than she bargained for.

    Reply
  121. Anne, I like Devil in Winter, but it is not even my favorite Kleypas. LOS is high on my top ten list, and I was sad to see it lose the #1 spot it had claimed for nearly two decades. I think Flowers from the Storm is a powerful, brilliant book, but I found it such a wrenching read that I have never reread the book in full–a rare thing for a rereader like me. FFTS certainly has a place in my top 100, but my top ten consists of books that I have reread again and again and again, that I turn to for comfort and to counteract book slumps.

    Reply
  122. Anne, I like Devil in Winter, but it is not even my favorite Kleypas. LOS is high on my top ten list, and I was sad to see it lose the #1 spot it had claimed for nearly two decades. I think Flowers from the Storm is a powerful, brilliant book, but I found it such a wrenching read that I have never reread the book in full–a rare thing for a rereader like me. FFTS certainly has a place in my top 100, but my top ten consists of books that I have reread again and again and again, that I turn to for comfort and to counteract book slumps.

    Reply
  123. Anne, I like Devil in Winter, but it is not even my favorite Kleypas. LOS is high on my top ten list, and I was sad to see it lose the #1 spot it had claimed for nearly two decades. I think Flowers from the Storm is a powerful, brilliant book, but I found it such a wrenching read that I have never reread the book in full–a rare thing for a rereader like me. FFTS certainly has a place in my top 100, but my top ten consists of books that I have reread again and again and again, that I turn to for comfort and to counteract book slumps.

    Reply
  124. Anne, I like Devil in Winter, but it is not even my favorite Kleypas. LOS is high on my top ten list, and I was sad to see it lose the #1 spot it had claimed for nearly two decades. I think Flowers from the Storm is a powerful, brilliant book, but I found it such a wrenching read that I have never reread the book in full–a rare thing for a rereader like me. FFTS certainly has a place in my top 100, but my top ten consists of books that I have reread again and again and again, that I turn to for comfort and to counteract book slumps.

    Reply
  125. Anne, I like Devil in Winter, but it is not even my favorite Kleypas. LOS is high on my top ten list, and I was sad to see it lose the #1 spot it had claimed for nearly two decades. I think Flowers from the Storm is a powerful, brilliant book, but I found it such a wrenching read that I have never reread the book in full–a rare thing for a rereader like me. FFTS certainly has a place in my top 100, but my top ten consists of books that I have reread again and again and again, that I turn to for comfort and to counteract book slumps.

    Reply
  126. I should stop reading this column. My TBR is already approaching 600. Sigh. I’m reading several Ilona Andrews books in different series. And the new Lucy Parker, of course.

    Reply
  127. I should stop reading this column. My TBR is already approaching 600. Sigh. I’m reading several Ilona Andrews books in different series. And the new Lucy Parker, of course.

    Reply
  128. I should stop reading this column. My TBR is already approaching 600. Sigh. I’m reading several Ilona Andrews books in different series. And the new Lucy Parker, of course.

    Reply
  129. I should stop reading this column. My TBR is already approaching 600. Sigh. I’m reading several Ilona Andrews books in different series. And the new Lucy Parker, of course.

    Reply
  130. I should stop reading this column. My TBR is already approaching 600. Sigh. I’m reading several Ilona Andrews books in different series. And the new Lucy Parker, of course.

    Reply

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