What We’re Reading — January 2014

Anne here, hosting the WWR discussion for this month. We've got a wonderful selection for you — varied as usual, with some great recommendations. I don't know about you, but these discussions always end up with me ordering more books. I'd also remind you that these are books we're genuinly reading and enjoying — there's no "promotion" happening here.

Pat Rice said: I didn't have much time for holiday reading but my latest favorites are Ilona Andrews CLEAN SWEEP, the start of a series set in Texas but with interplanetary beings occasionally dropping in. Our heroine owns a B&B for them, and her hunky neighbor turns out to be an alien species of werewolf. Love the humor and the characters. AshleyGardnerBundle

I also finished a boxed set of Ashley Gardner's Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries, which have been recommended here from time to time. Love the way she uses the setting to enhance the character and the mystery.

And for a bit of whimsy, D.E. Stevenson's MISS  BUNCLE'S BOOK about an early twentieth century English village. It's a mystery, but the characters are beautifully drawn and the whole thing works better than an Agatha Christie, and there's even love and romance!

Falling Upwards Cara/Andrea says: I’ve been madly busy with the release of my new trilogy, so my reading time has been a bit less than usual. However, I have been able to sneak in a few pages late at night . . .and am thoroughly enjoying two books at the moment. Falling Upwards by Richard Holmes is a delightful history of early ballooning/flight filled with fascinating anecdotes of the intrepid adventurers who dared to dream of conquering the skies. An expansion of his section in the award-winning The Age of Wonder,  it’s written with the same entertaining yet informative prose that makes any work by Holmes a must-read for me.  

For fiction, I’m reading Murder at Hatfield House, a wonderful Elizabethan-set historical mystery by my good friend Amanda Carmack (many of you know her as Regency author Amanda McCabe.) The first book in a new series, it offers a fascinating look at the political intrigue swirling around young Elizabeth just before she comes to the throne. Carmack crafts very interesting characters and twisty plots that draw in the history of the era.  I’m really looking forward to the next book.   Longbourn

Nicola said: 
I'm currently reading LONGBOURN by Jo Baker. It's a reimagining of Pride and
Prejudice written from the point of view of the servants. It's a
beautifully written book and so interesting to see such a well known story
told from a completely different perspective. My favourite line so far is:
"If Elizabeth Bennet had the washing of her own petticoats, Sarah thought,
she would be more careful not to tramp through muddy fields."

Moon&back
 Mary Jo said: Jill Mansell is a British author whose work is probably classified as chicklit, though romantic women's fiction might be a better description. I have a bunch of her books on my Nook, and have enjoyed all the ones I've read, but I was particularly struck by To the Moon and Back, which I read when on holiday last week. It's not a spoiler to reveal that the book starts when Ellie Kendal's much loved young husband dies. This sounds sad, and Ellie's grief is real and well portrayed, but as she survives and then moves on with her life, there is humor, colorful other characters, and no less than three different romances with satisfactory endings.  Highly recommended.

Joanna here.  I've been reading like a houseafire this last week. Two books.  I'm a double-fisted reader.  I finished Ilona Andrews' Magic Rises — another rock-em, sock-em shapeshifter book.   Kate Daniels, the protagonist, is not merely a kick-ass heroine.  She chops off random body parts of her enemies with fair regularity.  And the hero, Curran, is a werelion.  I mean, giant cat.  The series just has all the good. Magic-Rises_bg

I'm about halfway through Barbara Hambly's A Free Man of Color.  It's excellently written and deeply moving.  The story is a mystery, set in New Orleans in 1833.  The protagonist is a musician and doctor, a black man in a city where color meant everything.  Free Man of Color is an intricate journey through the dozen cities that were New Orleans.  I'm going through Free Man in small chunks because I'll go reading along and I begin to rage and I have to put the book down for a while.  That's the reaction Hambly's aiming for.

 Anne here. I've done quite a bit of reading on long hot summer evenings here and several are standout recommendations, and, as it happens, also Australian, though that's not why I'm recommending them. First up is Melina Marchetta On the Jellicoe Road. Young adult, but not for kids, this is a clever, dark, beautiful, intriguing read that slowly unravels the mystery at the heart of a young woman's existence. It's a coming of age story with a lovely romance as well. Highly recommended.

HeartofIronNext up is Bec McMaster, a new writer who I noticed had made Library Journal's best of 2013 romance list. When I realized she only lived a few hours from me, I was curious and I bought her first book in the London steampunk series, Kiss of Steel.  Lovely writing, and great storytelling, she seamlessly blends the Victorian historical era with steampunk and vampire elements, creating a world all her own. Very clever worldbuilding, too, using elements we know from history to add to the paranormal effect. 

For instance she's built on the exclusivity of the ton, now called the Echelon, and uses the term 'bluebloods' in a deliciously vampiric angle. And "verwulfen" in the UK have been all but wiped out, the final massacre being at Culloden. But at heart it's a romance, and a wonderful romance at that. I was enthralled and I've since read all three of her books and been recommending her to all my friends. 
(The image on the left is of her second book, Heart of Iron which was on Library Journal's "Best of 2013" romance list.)

So that's it from us for the moment. What books have you been reading and enjoying?

195 thoughts on “What We’re Reading — January 2014”

  1. Hilery Mantel has been my latest fascination. I just finished Wolf Hall and am now started on Bringing Up the Bodies. Once I got past the strange use of tense, I came to love the narrator voice of the book. I could never be a courtier but I love reading about a master.
    On my snow days, I read Andrew, Lord of Despair by Grace Burrowes and the Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas. Both engaged me for the full day. Andrew had that affectionate tone that I love, and Luckiest Lady in London was full of irony that balanced the sweetness.

    Reply
  2. Hilery Mantel has been my latest fascination. I just finished Wolf Hall and am now started on Bringing Up the Bodies. Once I got past the strange use of tense, I came to love the narrator voice of the book. I could never be a courtier but I love reading about a master.
    On my snow days, I read Andrew, Lord of Despair by Grace Burrowes and the Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas. Both engaged me for the full day. Andrew had that affectionate tone that I love, and Luckiest Lady in London was full of irony that balanced the sweetness.

    Reply
  3. Hilery Mantel has been my latest fascination. I just finished Wolf Hall and am now started on Bringing Up the Bodies. Once I got past the strange use of tense, I came to love the narrator voice of the book. I could never be a courtier but I love reading about a master.
    On my snow days, I read Andrew, Lord of Despair by Grace Burrowes and the Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas. Both engaged me for the full day. Andrew had that affectionate tone that I love, and Luckiest Lady in London was full of irony that balanced the sweetness.

    Reply
  4. Hilery Mantel has been my latest fascination. I just finished Wolf Hall and am now started on Bringing Up the Bodies. Once I got past the strange use of tense, I came to love the narrator voice of the book. I could never be a courtier but I love reading about a master.
    On my snow days, I read Andrew, Lord of Despair by Grace Burrowes and the Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas. Both engaged me for the full day. Andrew had that affectionate tone that I love, and Luckiest Lady in London was full of irony that balanced the sweetness.

    Reply
  5. Hilery Mantel has been my latest fascination. I just finished Wolf Hall and am now started on Bringing Up the Bodies. Once I got past the strange use of tense, I came to love the narrator voice of the book. I could never be a courtier but I love reading about a master.
    On my snow days, I read Andrew, Lord of Despair by Grace Burrowes and the Luckiest Lady in London by Sherry Thomas. Both engaged me for the full day. Andrew had that affectionate tone that I love, and Luckiest Lady in London was full of irony that balanced the sweetness.

    Reply
  6. Shannon, I haven't read Hilary Mantel — might check her out — thanks.
    Grace Burrowes and Sherry Thomas are always reliably good reads, I think — and Sherry Thomas's The Luckiest Lady in London was on the same Library Journal  "best of 2013 books" as Bec McMaster's book and my Autumn Bride.
    Thanks for sharing your reading recommendations.

    Reply
  7. Shannon, I haven't read Hilary Mantel — might check her out — thanks.
    Grace Burrowes and Sherry Thomas are always reliably good reads, I think — and Sherry Thomas's The Luckiest Lady in London was on the same Library Journal  "best of 2013 books" as Bec McMaster's book and my Autumn Bride.
    Thanks for sharing your reading recommendations.

    Reply
  8. Shannon, I haven't read Hilary Mantel — might check her out — thanks.
    Grace Burrowes and Sherry Thomas are always reliably good reads, I think — and Sherry Thomas's The Luckiest Lady in London was on the same Library Journal  "best of 2013 books" as Bec McMaster's book and my Autumn Bride.
    Thanks for sharing your reading recommendations.

    Reply
  9. Shannon, I haven't read Hilary Mantel — might check her out — thanks.
    Grace Burrowes and Sherry Thomas are always reliably good reads, I think — and Sherry Thomas's The Luckiest Lady in London was on the same Library Journal  "best of 2013 books" as Bec McMaster's book and my Autumn Bride.
    Thanks for sharing your reading recommendations.

    Reply
  10. Shannon, I haven't read Hilary Mantel — might check her out — thanks.
    Grace Burrowes and Sherry Thomas are always reliably good reads, I think — and Sherry Thomas's The Luckiest Lady in London was on the same Library Journal  "best of 2013 books" as Bec McMaster's book and my Autumn Bride.
    Thanks for sharing your reading recommendations.

    Reply
  11. Thank you so much for these thoughts, books that are nearly all new to me and sound delicious.
    This month I’ve been reading books new to me, mostly picked at random, and there isn’t one I would recommend.(Went back to Autumn Bride by -er – Anne Gracie at one point, in need of comfort.) So this has saved January at the last gasp.

    Reply
  12. Thank you so much for these thoughts, books that are nearly all new to me and sound delicious.
    This month I’ve been reading books new to me, mostly picked at random, and there isn’t one I would recommend.(Went back to Autumn Bride by -er – Anne Gracie at one point, in need of comfort.) So this has saved January at the last gasp.

    Reply
  13. Thank you so much for these thoughts, books that are nearly all new to me and sound delicious.
    This month I’ve been reading books new to me, mostly picked at random, and there isn’t one I would recommend.(Went back to Autumn Bride by -er – Anne Gracie at one point, in need of comfort.) So this has saved January at the last gasp.

    Reply
  14. Thank you so much for these thoughts, books that are nearly all new to me and sound delicious.
    This month I’ve been reading books new to me, mostly picked at random, and there isn’t one I would recommend.(Went back to Autumn Bride by -er – Anne Gracie at one point, in need of comfort.) So this has saved January at the last gasp.

    Reply
  15. Thank you so much for these thoughts, books that are nearly all new to me and sound delicious.
    This month I’ve been reading books new to me, mostly picked at random, and there isn’t one I would recommend.(Went back to Autumn Bride by -er – Anne Gracie at one point, in need of comfort.) So this has saved January at the last gasp.

    Reply
  16. Mary Jo, thank you so much for your kind words – I’m thrilled you enjoyed To the Moon and Back. My poor editor was so worried when I first told her that I was writing a book in which one of the main characters was dead, but thankfully she let me go ahead and finish it!
    Best,
    Jill xx

    Reply
  17. Mary Jo, thank you so much for your kind words – I’m thrilled you enjoyed To the Moon and Back. My poor editor was so worried when I first told her that I was writing a book in which one of the main characters was dead, but thankfully she let me go ahead and finish it!
    Best,
    Jill xx

    Reply
  18. Mary Jo, thank you so much for your kind words – I’m thrilled you enjoyed To the Moon and Back. My poor editor was so worried when I first told her that I was writing a book in which one of the main characters was dead, but thankfully she let me go ahead and finish it!
    Best,
    Jill xx

    Reply
  19. Mary Jo, thank you so much for your kind words – I’m thrilled you enjoyed To the Moon and Back. My poor editor was so worried when I first told her that I was writing a book in which one of the main characters was dead, but thankfully she let me go ahead and finish it!
    Best,
    Jill xx

    Reply
  20. Mary Jo, thank you so much for your kind words – I’m thrilled you enjoyed To the Moon and Back. My poor editor was so worried when I first told her that I was writing a book in which one of the main characters was dead, but thankfully she let me go ahead and finish it!
    Best,
    Jill xx

    Reply
  21. Lately I was intrigued by The Landing a Lord serie by Suzanne Medeiros, whenever there is a serie I’m in it! However the writing is good and the characters engaging, it’s a pity I couldn’t download Beguiling the Earl ( I read them on kindle).
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn’t allow me to download some books and sometimes I can’t take the special price….

    Reply
  22. Lately I was intrigued by The Landing a Lord serie by Suzanne Medeiros, whenever there is a serie I’m in it! However the writing is good and the characters engaging, it’s a pity I couldn’t download Beguiling the Earl ( I read them on kindle).
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn’t allow me to download some books and sometimes I can’t take the special price….

    Reply
  23. Lately I was intrigued by The Landing a Lord serie by Suzanne Medeiros, whenever there is a serie I’m in it! However the writing is good and the characters engaging, it’s a pity I couldn’t download Beguiling the Earl ( I read them on kindle).
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn’t allow me to download some books and sometimes I can’t take the special price….

    Reply
  24. Lately I was intrigued by The Landing a Lord serie by Suzanne Medeiros, whenever there is a serie I’m in it! However the writing is good and the characters engaging, it’s a pity I couldn’t download Beguiling the Earl ( I read them on kindle).
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn’t allow me to download some books and sometimes I can’t take the special price….

    Reply
  25. Lately I was intrigued by The Landing a Lord serie by Suzanne Medeiros, whenever there is a serie I’m in it! However the writing is good and the characters engaging, it’s a pity I couldn’t download Beguiling the Earl ( I read them on kindle).
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn’t allow me to download some books and sometimes I can’t take the special price….

    Reply
  26. Aw, thank you, Jenny. 🙂
    I do love this wenchly feature of ours — usually we discuss the books before the post has gone up so we've already either downloaded or ordered half the books.
    I'm planning to read Nicola's recommendation of Longbourn and I also love the sound of Richard Holmes's Falling Upward one that Cara/Andrea mentioned. And then there's Jo Bourne's Free Man of Color recommendation — and when two wenches recommend an author I've not read, well, that's almost like a signpost, isn't it? Really I want to read them all.

    Reply
  27. Aw, thank you, Jenny. 🙂
    I do love this wenchly feature of ours — usually we discuss the books before the post has gone up so we've already either downloaded or ordered half the books.
    I'm planning to read Nicola's recommendation of Longbourn and I also love the sound of Richard Holmes's Falling Upward one that Cara/Andrea mentioned. And then there's Jo Bourne's Free Man of Color recommendation — and when two wenches recommend an author I've not read, well, that's almost like a signpost, isn't it? Really I want to read them all.

    Reply
  28. Aw, thank you, Jenny. 🙂
    I do love this wenchly feature of ours — usually we discuss the books before the post has gone up so we've already either downloaded or ordered half the books.
    I'm planning to read Nicola's recommendation of Longbourn and I also love the sound of Richard Holmes's Falling Upward one that Cara/Andrea mentioned. And then there's Jo Bourne's Free Man of Color recommendation — and when two wenches recommend an author I've not read, well, that's almost like a signpost, isn't it? Really I want to read them all.

    Reply
  29. Aw, thank you, Jenny. 🙂
    I do love this wenchly feature of ours — usually we discuss the books before the post has gone up so we've already either downloaded or ordered half the books.
    I'm planning to read Nicola's recommendation of Longbourn and I also love the sound of Richard Holmes's Falling Upward one that Cara/Andrea mentioned. And then there's Jo Bourne's Free Man of Color recommendation — and when two wenches recommend an author I've not read, well, that's almost like a signpost, isn't it? Really I want to read them all.

    Reply
  30. Aw, thank you, Jenny. 🙂
    I do love this wenchly feature of ours — usually we discuss the books before the post has gone up so we've already either downloaded or ordered half the books.
    I'm planning to read Nicola's recommendation of Longbourn and I also love the sound of Richard Holmes's Falling Upward one that Cara/Andrea mentioned. And then there's Jo Bourne's Free Man of Color recommendation — and when two wenches recommend an author I've not read, well, that's almost like a signpost, isn't it? Really I want to read them all.

    Reply
  31. Thanks, Laura — I haven't read Suzanne Medeiros. How nice to get a recommendation for a new-to-me author.
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn't allow me to download some books and sometimes I can't take the special price….
    It's the same in Australia, we don't often get the specials either. 
    I wish they'd embrace the fact that if the web is supposed to be "world-wide" it needs to be accessible to the world.

    Reply
  32. Thanks, Laura — I haven't read Suzanne Medeiros. How nice to get a recommendation for a new-to-me author.
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn't allow me to download some books and sometimes I can't take the special price….
    It's the same in Australia, we don't often get the specials either. 
    I wish they'd embrace the fact that if the web is supposed to be "world-wide" it needs to be accessible to the world.

    Reply
  33. Thanks, Laura — I haven't read Suzanne Medeiros. How nice to get a recommendation for a new-to-me author.
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn't allow me to download some books and sometimes I can't take the special price….
    It's the same in Australia, we don't often get the specials either. 
    I wish they'd embrace the fact that if the web is supposed to be "world-wide" it needs to be accessible to the world.

    Reply
  34. Thanks, Laura — I haven't read Suzanne Medeiros. How nice to get a recommendation for a new-to-me author.
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn't allow me to download some books and sometimes I can't take the special price….
    It's the same in Australia, we don't often get the specials either. 
    I wish they'd embrace the fact that if the web is supposed to be "world-wide" it needs to be accessible to the world.

    Reply
  35. Thanks, Laura — I haven't read Suzanne Medeiros. How nice to get a recommendation for a new-to-me author.
    Unfortunately the Italian kindle store doesn't allow me to download some books and sometimes I can't take the special price….
    It's the same in Australia, we don't often get the specials either. 
    I wish they'd embrace the fact that if the web is supposed to be "world-wide" it needs to be accessible to the world.

    Reply
  36. Yes this is my wish too! I thought almost the same words! But perhaps earlier yah we know we’ll be able to buy in the world-wide without limits!

    Reply
  37. Yes this is my wish too! I thought almost the same words! But perhaps earlier yah we know we’ll be able to buy in the world-wide without limits!

    Reply
  38. Yes this is my wish too! I thought almost the same words! But perhaps earlier yah we know we’ll be able to buy in the world-wide without limits!

    Reply
  39. Yes this is my wish too! I thought almost the same words! But perhaps earlier yah we know we’ll be able to buy in the world-wide without limits!

    Reply
  40. Yes this is my wish too! I thought almost the same words! But perhaps earlier yah we know we’ll be able to buy in the world-wide without limits!

    Reply
  41. I’ve been looking at ‘Longbourn’ for a couple of weeks. It gets such mixed reviews, but then I think that’s the case with any book that ‘dares’ touch Austen’s work! Personally, I like books that paint the past more realistically, so I suppose I’ll buy it.
    I’ve had a bit of a break from my regular reading this week. I just read ‘A 1950s Housewife’ by Sheila Hardy, which is the most informative book about 50s life I’ve ever come across.
    I’m also rereading ‘Outlander’ because a couple of trailers for the miniseries have been released. I’m wondering how the show with deal with the scene where Jamie beats Claire. Not my favourite scene…

    Reply
  42. I’ve been looking at ‘Longbourn’ for a couple of weeks. It gets such mixed reviews, but then I think that’s the case with any book that ‘dares’ touch Austen’s work! Personally, I like books that paint the past more realistically, so I suppose I’ll buy it.
    I’ve had a bit of a break from my regular reading this week. I just read ‘A 1950s Housewife’ by Sheila Hardy, which is the most informative book about 50s life I’ve ever come across.
    I’m also rereading ‘Outlander’ because a couple of trailers for the miniseries have been released. I’m wondering how the show with deal with the scene where Jamie beats Claire. Not my favourite scene…

    Reply
  43. I’ve been looking at ‘Longbourn’ for a couple of weeks. It gets such mixed reviews, but then I think that’s the case with any book that ‘dares’ touch Austen’s work! Personally, I like books that paint the past more realistically, so I suppose I’ll buy it.
    I’ve had a bit of a break from my regular reading this week. I just read ‘A 1950s Housewife’ by Sheila Hardy, which is the most informative book about 50s life I’ve ever come across.
    I’m also rereading ‘Outlander’ because a couple of trailers for the miniseries have been released. I’m wondering how the show with deal with the scene where Jamie beats Claire. Not my favourite scene…

    Reply
  44. I’ve been looking at ‘Longbourn’ for a couple of weeks. It gets such mixed reviews, but then I think that’s the case with any book that ‘dares’ touch Austen’s work! Personally, I like books that paint the past more realistically, so I suppose I’ll buy it.
    I’ve had a bit of a break from my regular reading this week. I just read ‘A 1950s Housewife’ by Sheila Hardy, which is the most informative book about 50s life I’ve ever come across.
    I’m also rereading ‘Outlander’ because a couple of trailers for the miniseries have been released. I’m wondering how the show with deal with the scene where Jamie beats Claire. Not my favourite scene…

    Reply
  45. I’ve been looking at ‘Longbourn’ for a couple of weeks. It gets such mixed reviews, but then I think that’s the case with any book that ‘dares’ touch Austen’s work! Personally, I like books that paint the past more realistically, so I suppose I’ll buy it.
    I’ve had a bit of a break from my regular reading this week. I just read ‘A 1950s Housewife’ by Sheila Hardy, which is the most informative book about 50s life I’ve ever come across.
    I’m also rereading ‘Outlander’ because a couple of trailers for the miniseries have been released. I’m wondering how the show with deal with the scene where Jamie beats Claire. Not my favourite scene…

    Reply
  46. I just finished reading Leigh LaValle’s The Rogue Returns. It was awesome & I’d highly recommend it. The writing is beautiful & I love how the characters grow & change throughout the story.

    Reply
  47. I just finished reading Leigh LaValle’s The Rogue Returns. It was awesome & I’d highly recommend it. The writing is beautiful & I love how the characters grow & change throughout the story.

    Reply
  48. I just finished reading Leigh LaValle’s The Rogue Returns. It was awesome & I’d highly recommend it. The writing is beautiful & I love how the characters grow & change throughout the story.

    Reply
  49. I just finished reading Leigh LaValle’s The Rogue Returns. It was awesome & I’d highly recommend it. The writing is beautiful & I love how the characters grow & change throughout the story.

    Reply
  50. I just finished reading Leigh LaValle’s The Rogue Returns. It was awesome & I’d highly recommend it. The writing is beautiful & I love how the characters grow & change throughout the story.

    Reply
  51. Hi, and thanks to Mary Jo for the gorgeous words about my book. So thrilled you liked it! My editor was initially unsure when I told her one of the main characters would be dead!

    Reply
  52. Hi, and thanks to Mary Jo for the gorgeous words about my book. So thrilled you liked it! My editor was initially unsure when I told her one of the main characters would be dead!

    Reply
  53. Hi, and thanks to Mary Jo for the gorgeous words about my book. So thrilled you liked it! My editor was initially unsure when I told her one of the main characters would be dead!

    Reply
  54. Hi, and thanks to Mary Jo for the gorgeous words about my book. So thrilled you liked it! My editor was initially unsure when I told her one of the main characters would be dead!

    Reply
  55. Hi, and thanks to Mary Jo for the gorgeous words about my book. So thrilled you liked it! My editor was initially unsure when I told her one of the main characters would be dead!

    Reply
  56. I read this post, pausing for several Yes! exclamations. Longbourne was on my best of 2013 list, and To the Moon and Back is one of my favorites of Mansell’s. (Did anyone else go wild with the recent Mansell ebook sale?) D. E. Stevenson was one of my mother’s favorite authors, and I grew up reading her books. I was elated when Sourcebooks Landmark reissued the Miss Buncle trilogy. I think the first one is the best, but I love all three.
    My recent reading has been ARCs for review, so my recommendations are all coming attractions. Eloisa James’s Three Weeks with Lady X is a book I begged for because I wanted the hero’s story, but I loved the heroine just as much. And the story has one of my favorite child characters ever. I also loved Julie Anne Long’s Between the Devil and Ian Eversea and Kristan Hiigins’s Waiting on You, the next book in her Blue Heron series. All are March 25 releases.

    Reply
  57. I read this post, pausing for several Yes! exclamations. Longbourne was on my best of 2013 list, and To the Moon and Back is one of my favorites of Mansell’s. (Did anyone else go wild with the recent Mansell ebook sale?) D. E. Stevenson was one of my mother’s favorite authors, and I grew up reading her books. I was elated when Sourcebooks Landmark reissued the Miss Buncle trilogy. I think the first one is the best, but I love all three.
    My recent reading has been ARCs for review, so my recommendations are all coming attractions. Eloisa James’s Three Weeks with Lady X is a book I begged for because I wanted the hero’s story, but I loved the heroine just as much. And the story has one of my favorite child characters ever. I also loved Julie Anne Long’s Between the Devil and Ian Eversea and Kristan Hiigins’s Waiting on You, the next book in her Blue Heron series. All are March 25 releases.

    Reply
  58. I read this post, pausing for several Yes! exclamations. Longbourne was on my best of 2013 list, and To the Moon and Back is one of my favorites of Mansell’s. (Did anyone else go wild with the recent Mansell ebook sale?) D. E. Stevenson was one of my mother’s favorite authors, and I grew up reading her books. I was elated when Sourcebooks Landmark reissued the Miss Buncle trilogy. I think the first one is the best, but I love all three.
    My recent reading has been ARCs for review, so my recommendations are all coming attractions. Eloisa James’s Three Weeks with Lady X is a book I begged for because I wanted the hero’s story, but I loved the heroine just as much. And the story has one of my favorite child characters ever. I also loved Julie Anne Long’s Between the Devil and Ian Eversea and Kristan Hiigins’s Waiting on You, the next book in her Blue Heron series. All are March 25 releases.

    Reply
  59. I read this post, pausing for several Yes! exclamations. Longbourne was on my best of 2013 list, and To the Moon and Back is one of my favorites of Mansell’s. (Did anyone else go wild with the recent Mansell ebook sale?) D. E. Stevenson was one of my mother’s favorite authors, and I grew up reading her books. I was elated when Sourcebooks Landmark reissued the Miss Buncle trilogy. I think the first one is the best, but I love all three.
    My recent reading has been ARCs for review, so my recommendations are all coming attractions. Eloisa James’s Three Weeks with Lady X is a book I begged for because I wanted the hero’s story, but I loved the heroine just as much. And the story has one of my favorite child characters ever. I also loved Julie Anne Long’s Between the Devil and Ian Eversea and Kristan Hiigins’s Waiting on You, the next book in her Blue Heron series. All are March 25 releases.

    Reply
  60. I read this post, pausing for several Yes! exclamations. Longbourne was on my best of 2013 list, and To the Moon and Back is one of my favorites of Mansell’s. (Did anyone else go wild with the recent Mansell ebook sale?) D. E. Stevenson was one of my mother’s favorite authors, and I grew up reading her books. I was elated when Sourcebooks Landmark reissued the Miss Buncle trilogy. I think the first one is the best, but I love all three.
    My recent reading has been ARCs for review, so my recommendations are all coming attractions. Eloisa James’s Three Weeks with Lady X is a book I begged for because I wanted the hero’s story, but I loved the heroine just as much. And the story has one of my favorite child characters ever. I also loved Julie Anne Long’s Between the Devil and Ian Eversea and Kristan Hiigins’s Waiting on You, the next book in her Blue Heron series. All are March 25 releases.

    Reply
  61. My credit card groans every time I read one of these “What We’re Reading” posts!
    Definitely going to find Falling Upwards as I’ve always been fascinated by balloon travel.
    And I finally succumbed to the lure of Kristen Callihan’s Victorian steampunk books. I just finished Shadowdance and I loved it! Now I have to find the other books in the series to catch up.
    Just finished an arc of Christina Brooke’s The Greatest Lover Ever and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It’s a second chance at love story with a hero and heroine who needed to grow up before they could appreciate and love each other.
    Sabrina Jeffries’ When the Rogue Returns was another awesome read. The hero was especially yummy.
    Secrets for Seducing a Royal Bodyguard is Vanessa Kelly’s latest and I am looking forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. Great read!
    I am always reading a writing craft book and a Regency research book in addition to my fiction reading.
    Right now I am reading Cheryl St. John’s WRITING WITH EMOTION, TENSION and CONFLICT and it is an amazing eye-opener with great exercises and advice.
    My brother and sister-in-law’s Christmas gift enabled me to purchase Coke and Borg’s VAUXHALL and it is an amazing book. I hope to use some of the information and research in it in my workshop at this year’s Beau Monde Mini Conference in Austin this year. I’ll be giving a workshop on opera during the Regency.

    Reply
  62. My credit card groans every time I read one of these “What We’re Reading” posts!
    Definitely going to find Falling Upwards as I’ve always been fascinated by balloon travel.
    And I finally succumbed to the lure of Kristen Callihan’s Victorian steampunk books. I just finished Shadowdance and I loved it! Now I have to find the other books in the series to catch up.
    Just finished an arc of Christina Brooke’s The Greatest Lover Ever and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It’s a second chance at love story with a hero and heroine who needed to grow up before they could appreciate and love each other.
    Sabrina Jeffries’ When the Rogue Returns was another awesome read. The hero was especially yummy.
    Secrets for Seducing a Royal Bodyguard is Vanessa Kelly’s latest and I am looking forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. Great read!
    I am always reading a writing craft book and a Regency research book in addition to my fiction reading.
    Right now I am reading Cheryl St. John’s WRITING WITH EMOTION, TENSION and CONFLICT and it is an amazing eye-opener with great exercises and advice.
    My brother and sister-in-law’s Christmas gift enabled me to purchase Coke and Borg’s VAUXHALL and it is an amazing book. I hope to use some of the information and research in it in my workshop at this year’s Beau Monde Mini Conference in Austin this year. I’ll be giving a workshop on opera during the Regency.

    Reply
  63. My credit card groans every time I read one of these “What We’re Reading” posts!
    Definitely going to find Falling Upwards as I’ve always been fascinated by balloon travel.
    And I finally succumbed to the lure of Kristen Callihan’s Victorian steampunk books. I just finished Shadowdance and I loved it! Now I have to find the other books in the series to catch up.
    Just finished an arc of Christina Brooke’s The Greatest Lover Ever and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It’s a second chance at love story with a hero and heroine who needed to grow up before they could appreciate and love each other.
    Sabrina Jeffries’ When the Rogue Returns was another awesome read. The hero was especially yummy.
    Secrets for Seducing a Royal Bodyguard is Vanessa Kelly’s latest and I am looking forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. Great read!
    I am always reading a writing craft book and a Regency research book in addition to my fiction reading.
    Right now I am reading Cheryl St. John’s WRITING WITH EMOTION, TENSION and CONFLICT and it is an amazing eye-opener with great exercises and advice.
    My brother and sister-in-law’s Christmas gift enabled me to purchase Coke and Borg’s VAUXHALL and it is an amazing book. I hope to use some of the information and research in it in my workshop at this year’s Beau Monde Mini Conference in Austin this year. I’ll be giving a workshop on opera during the Regency.

    Reply
  64. My credit card groans every time I read one of these “What We’re Reading” posts!
    Definitely going to find Falling Upwards as I’ve always been fascinated by balloon travel.
    And I finally succumbed to the lure of Kristen Callihan’s Victorian steampunk books. I just finished Shadowdance and I loved it! Now I have to find the other books in the series to catch up.
    Just finished an arc of Christina Brooke’s The Greatest Lover Ever and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It’s a second chance at love story with a hero and heroine who needed to grow up before they could appreciate and love each other.
    Sabrina Jeffries’ When the Rogue Returns was another awesome read. The hero was especially yummy.
    Secrets for Seducing a Royal Bodyguard is Vanessa Kelly’s latest and I am looking forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. Great read!
    I am always reading a writing craft book and a Regency research book in addition to my fiction reading.
    Right now I am reading Cheryl St. John’s WRITING WITH EMOTION, TENSION and CONFLICT and it is an amazing eye-opener with great exercises and advice.
    My brother and sister-in-law’s Christmas gift enabled me to purchase Coke and Borg’s VAUXHALL and it is an amazing book. I hope to use some of the information and research in it in my workshop at this year’s Beau Monde Mini Conference in Austin this year. I’ll be giving a workshop on opera during the Regency.

    Reply
  65. My credit card groans every time I read one of these “What We’re Reading” posts!
    Definitely going to find Falling Upwards as I’ve always been fascinated by balloon travel.
    And I finally succumbed to the lure of Kristen Callihan’s Victorian steampunk books. I just finished Shadowdance and I loved it! Now I have to find the other books in the series to catch up.
    Just finished an arc of Christina Brooke’s The Greatest Lover Ever and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It’s a second chance at love story with a hero and heroine who needed to grow up before they could appreciate and love each other.
    Sabrina Jeffries’ When the Rogue Returns was another awesome read. The hero was especially yummy.
    Secrets for Seducing a Royal Bodyguard is Vanessa Kelly’s latest and I am looking forward to reading the rest of the books in the series. Great read!
    I am always reading a writing craft book and a Regency research book in addition to my fiction reading.
    Right now I am reading Cheryl St. John’s WRITING WITH EMOTION, TENSION and CONFLICT and it is an amazing eye-opener with great exercises and advice.
    My brother and sister-in-law’s Christmas gift enabled me to purchase Coke and Borg’s VAUXHALL and it is an amazing book. I hope to use some of the information and research in it in my workshop at this year’s Beau Monde Mini Conference in Austin this year. I’ll be giving a workshop on opera during the Regency.

    Reply
  66. Jill, I’m so glad you hit on my recommendation! I’ve read a number of your books on my Nook, and Afte To the Moon and Back, I’m about to make a list of the ones I haven’t read so I can buy them all. *G* I can understand your editor’s hesitation, but the story is so powerful and ultimately satisfying that I’m really glad you brought her around. *G*

    Reply
  67. Jill, I’m so glad you hit on my recommendation! I’ve read a number of your books on my Nook, and Afte To the Moon and Back, I’m about to make a list of the ones I haven’t read so I can buy them all. *G* I can understand your editor’s hesitation, but the story is so powerful and ultimately satisfying that I’m really glad you brought her around. *G*

    Reply
  68. Jill, I’m so glad you hit on my recommendation! I’ve read a number of your books on my Nook, and Afte To the Moon and Back, I’m about to make a list of the ones I haven’t read so I can buy them all. *G* I can understand your editor’s hesitation, but the story is so powerful and ultimately satisfying that I’m really glad you brought her around. *G*

    Reply
  69. Jill, I’m so glad you hit on my recommendation! I’ve read a number of your books on my Nook, and Afte To the Moon and Back, I’m about to make a list of the ones I haven’t read so I can buy them all. *G* I can understand your editor’s hesitation, but the story is so powerful and ultimately satisfying that I’m really glad you brought her around. *G*

    Reply
  70. Jill, I’m so glad you hit on my recommendation! I’ve read a number of your books on my Nook, and Afte To the Moon and Back, I’m about to make a list of the ones I haven’t read so I can buy them all. *G* I can understand your editor’s hesitation, but the story is so powerful and ultimately satisfying that I’m really glad you brought her around. *G*

    Reply
  71. I just read D.E. Stevenson’s MISS BUNCLE’S BOOK too. It’s an absolute delight. Sort of Miss Marple minus the murders. Just the memory of it makes me smile.

    Reply
  72. I just read D.E. Stevenson’s MISS BUNCLE’S BOOK too. It’s an absolute delight. Sort of Miss Marple minus the murders. Just the memory of it makes me smile.

    Reply
  73. I just read D.E. Stevenson’s MISS BUNCLE’S BOOK too. It’s an absolute delight. Sort of Miss Marple minus the murders. Just the memory of it makes me smile.

    Reply
  74. I just read D.E. Stevenson’s MISS BUNCLE’S BOOK too. It’s an absolute delight. Sort of Miss Marple minus the murders. Just the memory of it makes me smile.

    Reply
  75. I just read D.E. Stevenson’s MISS BUNCLE’S BOOK too. It’s an absolute delight. Sort of Miss Marple minus the murders. Just the memory of it makes me smile.

    Reply
  76. Oh, Janga, you terrible temptress, you! 😉 Making our mouths water in anticipation of future books.
    I think it was your recommendation of "Longbourne" that put Jo Banks on my TBR list.
    I haven't read the Mansell book yet, but I have others of hers on the shelf, so I'll be looking for it shortly.
    Thanks for sharing your recommendations.

    Reply
  77. Oh, Janga, you terrible temptress, you! 😉 Making our mouths water in anticipation of future books.
    I think it was your recommendation of "Longbourne" that put Jo Banks on my TBR list.
    I haven't read the Mansell book yet, but I have others of hers on the shelf, so I'll be looking for it shortly.
    Thanks for sharing your recommendations.

    Reply
  78. Oh, Janga, you terrible temptress, you! 😉 Making our mouths water in anticipation of future books.
    I think it was your recommendation of "Longbourne" that put Jo Banks on my TBR list.
    I haven't read the Mansell book yet, but I have others of hers on the shelf, so I'll be looking for it shortly.
    Thanks for sharing your recommendations.

    Reply
  79. Oh, Janga, you terrible temptress, you! 😉 Making our mouths water in anticipation of future books.
    I think it was your recommendation of "Longbourne" that put Jo Banks on my TBR list.
    I haven't read the Mansell book yet, but I have others of hers on the shelf, so I'll be looking for it shortly.
    Thanks for sharing your recommendations.

    Reply
  80. Oh, Janga, you terrible temptress, you! 😉 Making our mouths water in anticipation of future books.
    I think it was your recommendation of "Longbourne" that put Jo Banks on my TBR list.
    I haven't read the Mansell book yet, but I have others of hers on the shelf, so I'll be looking for it shortly.
    Thanks for sharing your recommendations.

    Reply
  81. My credit cards joins yours in groaning, Louisa.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I have the Christina Brooke one, though I haven't started it yet — so many books, so little time. Why will nobody pay me to read? 😉
    And thanks for those non fiction recommendations — I love craft-of-writing books, and the one on Vauxhall sounds excellent, too.

    Reply
  82. My credit cards joins yours in groaning, Louisa.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I have the Christina Brooke one, though I haven't started it yet — so many books, so little time. Why will nobody pay me to read? 😉
    And thanks for those non fiction recommendations — I love craft-of-writing books, and the one on Vauxhall sounds excellent, too.

    Reply
  83. My credit cards joins yours in groaning, Louisa.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I have the Christina Brooke one, though I haven't started it yet — so many books, so little time. Why will nobody pay me to read? 😉
    And thanks for those non fiction recommendations — I love craft-of-writing books, and the one on Vauxhall sounds excellent, too.

    Reply
  84. My credit cards joins yours in groaning, Louisa.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I have the Christina Brooke one, though I haven't started it yet — so many books, so little time. Why will nobody pay me to read? 😉
    And thanks for those non fiction recommendations — I love craft-of-writing books, and the one on Vauxhall sounds excellent, too.

    Reply
  85. My credit cards joins yours in groaning, Louisa.
    Thanks for those recommendations. I have the Christina Brooke one, though I haven't started it yet — so many books, so little time. Why will nobody pay me to read? 😉
    And thanks for those non fiction recommendations — I love craft-of-writing books, and the one on Vauxhall sounds excellent, too.

    Reply
  86. Oh dear — the credit card groans again (though there's a secret smile there as well)
    With so many people recommending it, I'm practically obliged to order it, aren't I?
    Thanks, Lil.

    Reply
  87. Oh dear — the credit card groans again (though there's a secret smile there as well)
    With so many people recommending it, I'm practically obliged to order it, aren't I?
    Thanks, Lil.

    Reply
  88. Oh dear — the credit card groans again (though there's a secret smile there as well)
    With so many people recommending it, I'm practically obliged to order it, aren't I?
    Thanks, Lil.

    Reply
  89. Oh dear — the credit card groans again (though there's a secret smile there as well)
    With so many people recommending it, I'm practically obliged to order it, aren't I?
    Thanks, Lil.

    Reply
  90. Oh dear — the credit card groans again (though there's a secret smile there as well)
    With so many people recommending it, I'm practically obliged to order it, aren't I?
    Thanks, Lil.

    Reply
  91. Jill–
    I’m so glad you overcame your editor’s doubts! It’s a powerful and satisfying story. I already had a bunch of your books on my Nook, but To The Moon and Back means I now have to hunt down all the others. *G*

    Reply
  92. Jill–
    I’m so glad you overcame your editor’s doubts! It’s a powerful and satisfying story. I already had a bunch of your books on my Nook, but To The Moon and Back means I now have to hunt down all the others. *G*

    Reply
  93. Jill–
    I’m so glad you overcame your editor’s doubts! It’s a powerful and satisfying story. I already had a bunch of your books on my Nook, but To The Moon and Back means I now have to hunt down all the others. *G*

    Reply
  94. Jill–
    I’m so glad you overcame your editor’s doubts! It’s a powerful and satisfying story. I already had a bunch of your books on my Nook, but To The Moon and Back means I now have to hunt down all the others. *G*

    Reply
  95. Jill–
    I’m so glad you overcame your editor’s doubts! It’s a powerful and satisfying story. I already had a bunch of your books on my Nook, but To The Moon and Back means I now have to hunt down all the others. *G*

    Reply
  96. I’m having a Romance Writers’ of Australia reading festival so January saw me reading The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie. Good stuff. I also read Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB book The Summer They Never Forgot which was sweet and redolent of the south coast of NSW. Now onto Shannon Curtis’s For Her Eyes Only. Shannon does a good caper novel.

    Reply
  97. I’m having a Romance Writers’ of Australia reading festival so January saw me reading The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie. Good stuff. I also read Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB book The Summer They Never Forgot which was sweet and redolent of the south coast of NSW. Now onto Shannon Curtis’s For Her Eyes Only. Shannon does a good caper novel.

    Reply
  98. I’m having a Romance Writers’ of Australia reading festival so January saw me reading The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie. Good stuff. I also read Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB book The Summer They Never Forgot which was sweet and redolent of the south coast of NSW. Now onto Shannon Curtis’s For Her Eyes Only. Shannon does a good caper novel.

    Reply
  99. I’m having a Romance Writers’ of Australia reading festival so January saw me reading The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie. Good stuff. I also read Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB book The Summer They Never Forgot which was sweet and redolent of the south coast of NSW. Now onto Shannon Curtis’s For Her Eyes Only. Shannon does a good caper novel.

    Reply
  100. I’m having a Romance Writers’ of Australia reading festival so January saw me reading The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie. Good stuff. I also read Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB book The Summer They Never Forgot which was sweet and redolent of the south coast of NSW. Now onto Shannon Curtis’s For Her Eyes Only. Shannon does a good caper novel.

    Reply
  101. Curses, it did disappear. Oh well, just saying I read The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie, which was terrific and Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB, The Summer They Never Forgot. Set in the south coast of NSW which had me wanting to go on a road trip. Thanks for putting up the link to Bec McMaster Anne. Have now bought!

    Reply
  102. Curses, it did disappear. Oh well, just saying I read The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie, which was terrific and Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB, The Summer They Never Forgot. Set in the south coast of NSW which had me wanting to go on a road trip. Thanks for putting up the link to Bec McMaster Anne. Have now bought!

    Reply
  103. Curses, it did disappear. Oh well, just saying I read The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie, which was terrific and Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB, The Summer They Never Forgot. Set in the south coast of NSW which had me wanting to go on a road trip. Thanks for putting up the link to Bec McMaster Anne. Have now bought!

    Reply
  104. Curses, it did disappear. Oh well, just saying I read The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie, which was terrific and Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB, The Summer They Never Forgot. Set in the south coast of NSW which had me wanting to go on a road trip. Thanks for putting up the link to Bec McMaster Anne. Have now bought!

    Reply
  105. Curses, it did disappear. Oh well, just saying I read The Honourable Thief by one Ms Gracie, which was terrific and Kandy Shepherd’s first HMB, The Summer They Never Forgot. Set in the south coast of NSW which had me wanting to go on a road trip. Thanks for putting up the link to Bec McMaster Anne. Have now bought!

    Reply
  106. Several harmless and innocent comments have been dropped into spam — my apologies. We had a period of masses of dreadful, ugly spam, and typepad has become extra vigilant in response — thank you type-pad.
    I’ve just released a few comments that had been wrongly caught in the spam trap, so if anybody seems to be repeating themselves — that’s why. My apologies.

    Reply
  107. Several harmless and innocent comments have been dropped into spam — my apologies. We had a period of masses of dreadful, ugly spam, and typepad has become extra vigilant in response — thank you type-pad.
    I’ve just released a few comments that had been wrongly caught in the spam trap, so if anybody seems to be repeating themselves — that’s why. My apologies.

    Reply
  108. Several harmless and innocent comments have been dropped into spam — my apologies. We had a period of masses of dreadful, ugly spam, and typepad has become extra vigilant in response — thank you type-pad.
    I’ve just released a few comments that had been wrongly caught in the spam trap, so if anybody seems to be repeating themselves — that’s why. My apologies.

    Reply
  109. Several harmless and innocent comments have been dropped into spam — my apologies. We had a period of masses of dreadful, ugly spam, and typepad has become extra vigilant in response — thank you type-pad.
    I’ve just released a few comments that had been wrongly caught in the spam trap, so if anybody seems to be repeating themselves — that’s why. My apologies.

    Reply
  110. Several harmless and innocent comments have been dropped into spam — my apologies. We had a period of masses of dreadful, ugly spam, and typepad has become extra vigilant in response — thank you type-pad.
    I’ve just released a few comments that had been wrongly caught in the spam trap, so if anybody seems to be repeating themselves — that’s why. My apologies.

    Reply
  111. It did, but when I saw your comment I went and rescued it from the spam trap. But in the maantime, you’d commented again. Thanks for your persistence, Keziah, and thank you for your kind comments on Honorable Thief, which was a lonnng time ago.
    Thanks, also for your recommendations.

    Reply
  112. It did, but when I saw your comment I went and rescued it from the spam trap. But in the maantime, you’d commented again. Thanks for your persistence, Keziah, and thank you for your kind comments on Honorable Thief, which was a lonnng time ago.
    Thanks, also for your recommendations.

    Reply
  113. It did, but when I saw your comment I went and rescued it from the spam trap. But in the maantime, you’d commented again. Thanks for your persistence, Keziah, and thank you for your kind comments on Honorable Thief, which was a lonnng time ago.
    Thanks, also for your recommendations.

    Reply
  114. It did, but when I saw your comment I went and rescued it from the spam trap. But in the maantime, you’d commented again. Thanks for your persistence, Keziah, and thank you for your kind comments on Honorable Thief, which was a lonnng time ago.
    Thanks, also for your recommendations.

    Reply
  115. It did, but when I saw your comment I went and rescued it from the spam trap. But in the maantime, you’d commented again. Thanks for your persistence, Keziah, and thank you for your kind comments on Honorable Thief, which was a lonnng time ago.
    Thanks, also for your recommendations.

    Reply
  116. 🙂 I don’t want to start a debate, but I just reread that scene and it says, “beat within an in of my life” – twice.
    I know some people are fine with the scene and other people couldn’t finish the book because of it. I sit in the middle, and I love the book, but I’d have trouble forgiving a man who beat me with a leather strap…

    Reply
  117. 🙂 I don’t want to start a debate, but I just reread that scene and it says, “beat within an in of my life” – twice.
    I know some people are fine with the scene and other people couldn’t finish the book because of it. I sit in the middle, and I love the book, but I’d have trouble forgiving a man who beat me with a leather strap…

    Reply
  118. 🙂 I don’t want to start a debate, but I just reread that scene and it says, “beat within an in of my life” – twice.
    I know some people are fine with the scene and other people couldn’t finish the book because of it. I sit in the middle, and I love the book, but I’d have trouble forgiving a man who beat me with a leather strap…

    Reply
  119. 🙂 I don’t want to start a debate, but I just reread that scene and it says, “beat within an in of my life” – twice.
    I know some people are fine with the scene and other people couldn’t finish the book because of it. I sit in the middle, and I love the book, but I’d have trouble forgiving a man who beat me with a leather strap…

    Reply
  120. 🙂 I don’t want to start a debate, but I just reread that scene and it says, “beat within an in of my life” – twice.
    I know some people are fine with the scene and other people couldn’t finish the book because of it. I sit in the middle, and I love the book, but I’d have trouble forgiving a man who beat me with a leather strap…

    Reply
  121. I’ve been catching up with some of Nicola Cornick’s books, I enjoyed “The Lady and the Laird” but so far loving “One Night With the Laird” even more.
    I also stumbled across a couple of sweet old romances which were super satisfying and quick reads: “Hester Waring’s Marriage” by Paula Marshall is a rescue story. The heroine comes from a good family but was left destitute, and the hero is a wealthy merchant. The twist is that it takes place in early 19c Australia. Last night I just whipped through “Fallen Angel” by Charlotte Louise Dolan, an old Signet book re-released on Kindle. Again there’s a Cinderella heroine, and the hero is a very grouchy misanthropic Earl. Both of these books were total catnip.

    Reply
  122. I’ve been catching up with some of Nicola Cornick’s books, I enjoyed “The Lady and the Laird” but so far loving “One Night With the Laird” even more.
    I also stumbled across a couple of sweet old romances which were super satisfying and quick reads: “Hester Waring’s Marriage” by Paula Marshall is a rescue story. The heroine comes from a good family but was left destitute, and the hero is a wealthy merchant. The twist is that it takes place in early 19c Australia. Last night I just whipped through “Fallen Angel” by Charlotte Louise Dolan, an old Signet book re-released on Kindle. Again there’s a Cinderella heroine, and the hero is a very grouchy misanthropic Earl. Both of these books were total catnip.

    Reply
  123. I’ve been catching up with some of Nicola Cornick’s books, I enjoyed “The Lady and the Laird” but so far loving “One Night With the Laird” even more.
    I also stumbled across a couple of sweet old romances which were super satisfying and quick reads: “Hester Waring’s Marriage” by Paula Marshall is a rescue story. The heroine comes from a good family but was left destitute, and the hero is a wealthy merchant. The twist is that it takes place in early 19c Australia. Last night I just whipped through “Fallen Angel” by Charlotte Louise Dolan, an old Signet book re-released on Kindle. Again there’s a Cinderella heroine, and the hero is a very grouchy misanthropic Earl. Both of these books were total catnip.

    Reply
  124. I’ve been catching up with some of Nicola Cornick’s books, I enjoyed “The Lady and the Laird” but so far loving “One Night With the Laird” even more.
    I also stumbled across a couple of sweet old romances which were super satisfying and quick reads: “Hester Waring’s Marriage” by Paula Marshall is a rescue story. The heroine comes from a good family but was left destitute, and the hero is a wealthy merchant. The twist is that it takes place in early 19c Australia. Last night I just whipped through “Fallen Angel” by Charlotte Louise Dolan, an old Signet book re-released on Kindle. Again there’s a Cinderella heroine, and the hero is a very grouchy misanthropic Earl. Both of these books were total catnip.

    Reply
  125. I’ve been catching up with some of Nicola Cornick’s books, I enjoyed “The Lady and the Laird” but so far loving “One Night With the Laird” even more.
    I also stumbled across a couple of sweet old romances which were super satisfying and quick reads: “Hester Waring’s Marriage” by Paula Marshall is a rescue story. The heroine comes from a good family but was left destitute, and the hero is a wealthy merchant. The twist is that it takes place in early 19c Australia. Last night I just whipped through “Fallen Angel” by Charlotte Louise Dolan, an old Signet book re-released on Kindle. Again there’s a Cinderella heroine, and the hero is a very grouchy misanthropic Earl. Both of these books were total catnip.

    Reply
  126. Hallo, Hallo lovely Wenches! 🙂
    Feels as though a proper age has transpired since I was able to return! I’ve been knee deep in reading books on deadlines, and it feels wonderful to have a week simply to read & share books in one of my favourite genres which is science fiction (& fantasy)!! I get to take a breathier this month, as I was all caught up in the joy of blog tours, I sort of stretched myself a bit thin in January!
    Saturdays are especially happy as I’ve been wrapped up in ChocLit novels,… wink, wink. And, I noticed that Ms. Cornick is reading one of the books I attempted to read but ran out of hours before it boomeranged back to the library! (Longbourn!) Pride & Prejudice is one of my absolute favourites, and I am finding I am rather keen on the after canons!
    Ms. Elliott oh, isn’t that a lovely mystery series!? I googled straight over to Ms. Carmack’s site! 🙂 A New Year full of possibilities if you ask me! I love discovering new murder mysteries! Cheers!
    I best be keeping this short, I’m off to sink into writing up my thoughts on ‘writing sci-fi & fantasy’,… I’ll drop by again soon! Waving my New Year’s Hallos!! You all must adore *February!*, being romance writers!! What are your favourite reads for this lovely month?!

    Reply
  127. Hallo, Hallo lovely Wenches! 🙂
    Feels as though a proper age has transpired since I was able to return! I’ve been knee deep in reading books on deadlines, and it feels wonderful to have a week simply to read & share books in one of my favourite genres which is science fiction (& fantasy)!! I get to take a breathier this month, as I was all caught up in the joy of blog tours, I sort of stretched myself a bit thin in January!
    Saturdays are especially happy as I’ve been wrapped up in ChocLit novels,… wink, wink. And, I noticed that Ms. Cornick is reading one of the books I attempted to read but ran out of hours before it boomeranged back to the library! (Longbourn!) Pride & Prejudice is one of my absolute favourites, and I am finding I am rather keen on the after canons!
    Ms. Elliott oh, isn’t that a lovely mystery series!? I googled straight over to Ms. Carmack’s site! 🙂 A New Year full of possibilities if you ask me! I love discovering new murder mysteries! Cheers!
    I best be keeping this short, I’m off to sink into writing up my thoughts on ‘writing sci-fi & fantasy’,… I’ll drop by again soon! Waving my New Year’s Hallos!! You all must adore *February!*, being romance writers!! What are your favourite reads for this lovely month?!

    Reply
  128. Hallo, Hallo lovely Wenches! 🙂
    Feels as though a proper age has transpired since I was able to return! I’ve been knee deep in reading books on deadlines, and it feels wonderful to have a week simply to read & share books in one of my favourite genres which is science fiction (& fantasy)!! I get to take a breathier this month, as I was all caught up in the joy of blog tours, I sort of stretched myself a bit thin in January!
    Saturdays are especially happy as I’ve been wrapped up in ChocLit novels,… wink, wink. And, I noticed that Ms. Cornick is reading one of the books I attempted to read but ran out of hours before it boomeranged back to the library! (Longbourn!) Pride & Prejudice is one of my absolute favourites, and I am finding I am rather keen on the after canons!
    Ms. Elliott oh, isn’t that a lovely mystery series!? I googled straight over to Ms. Carmack’s site! 🙂 A New Year full of possibilities if you ask me! I love discovering new murder mysteries! Cheers!
    I best be keeping this short, I’m off to sink into writing up my thoughts on ‘writing sci-fi & fantasy’,… I’ll drop by again soon! Waving my New Year’s Hallos!! You all must adore *February!*, being romance writers!! What are your favourite reads for this lovely month?!

    Reply
  129. Hallo, Hallo lovely Wenches! 🙂
    Feels as though a proper age has transpired since I was able to return! I’ve been knee deep in reading books on deadlines, and it feels wonderful to have a week simply to read & share books in one of my favourite genres which is science fiction (& fantasy)!! I get to take a breathier this month, as I was all caught up in the joy of blog tours, I sort of stretched myself a bit thin in January!
    Saturdays are especially happy as I’ve been wrapped up in ChocLit novels,… wink, wink. And, I noticed that Ms. Cornick is reading one of the books I attempted to read but ran out of hours before it boomeranged back to the library! (Longbourn!) Pride & Prejudice is one of my absolute favourites, and I am finding I am rather keen on the after canons!
    Ms. Elliott oh, isn’t that a lovely mystery series!? I googled straight over to Ms. Carmack’s site! 🙂 A New Year full of possibilities if you ask me! I love discovering new murder mysteries! Cheers!
    I best be keeping this short, I’m off to sink into writing up my thoughts on ‘writing sci-fi & fantasy’,… I’ll drop by again soon! Waving my New Year’s Hallos!! You all must adore *February!*, being romance writers!! What are your favourite reads for this lovely month?!

    Reply
  130. Hallo, Hallo lovely Wenches! 🙂
    Feels as though a proper age has transpired since I was able to return! I’ve been knee deep in reading books on deadlines, and it feels wonderful to have a week simply to read & share books in one of my favourite genres which is science fiction (& fantasy)!! I get to take a breathier this month, as I was all caught up in the joy of blog tours, I sort of stretched myself a bit thin in January!
    Saturdays are especially happy as I’ve been wrapped up in ChocLit novels,… wink, wink. And, I noticed that Ms. Cornick is reading one of the books I attempted to read but ran out of hours before it boomeranged back to the library! (Longbourn!) Pride & Prejudice is one of my absolute favourites, and I am finding I am rather keen on the after canons!
    Ms. Elliott oh, isn’t that a lovely mystery series!? I googled straight over to Ms. Carmack’s site! 🙂 A New Year full of possibilities if you ask me! I love discovering new murder mysteries! Cheers!
    I best be keeping this short, I’m off to sink into writing up my thoughts on ‘writing sci-fi & fantasy’,… I’ll drop by again soon! Waving my New Year’s Hallos!! You all must adore *February!*, being romance writers!! What are your favourite reads for this lovely month?!

    Reply
  131. Jorie, thanks for dropping by — wow it sounds like you've been very busy. Glad you've been able to get some reading in.
    As for our February reads, well, we have to read them first.
    This column is about what we happened to have read and enjoyed, and none of us has a schedule of reading — we go where the whim takes us, so you'll just have to wait and see. 🙂

    Reply
  132. Jorie, thanks for dropping by — wow it sounds like you've been very busy. Glad you've been able to get some reading in.
    As for our February reads, well, we have to read them first.
    This column is about what we happened to have read and enjoyed, and none of us has a schedule of reading — we go where the whim takes us, so you'll just have to wait and see. 🙂

    Reply
  133. Jorie, thanks for dropping by — wow it sounds like you've been very busy. Glad you've been able to get some reading in.
    As for our February reads, well, we have to read them first.
    This column is about what we happened to have read and enjoyed, and none of us has a schedule of reading — we go where the whim takes us, so you'll just have to wait and see. 🙂

    Reply
  134. Jorie, thanks for dropping by — wow it sounds like you've been very busy. Glad you've been able to get some reading in.
    As for our February reads, well, we have to read them first.
    This column is about what we happened to have read and enjoyed, and none of us has a schedule of reading — we go where the whim takes us, so you'll just have to wait and see. 🙂

    Reply
  135. Jorie, thanks for dropping by — wow it sounds like you've been very busy. Glad you've been able to get some reading in.
    As for our February reads, well, we have to read them first.
    This column is about what we happened to have read and enjoyed, and none of us has a schedule of reading — we go where the whim takes us, so you'll just have to wait and see. 🙂

    Reply
  136. Hallo Ms. Gracie,
    Yes, I’ve been keeping busy lately! 🙂 Oh, I understand reading on whim – I thought maybe you guys might re-read a particular book during the year, and I figured it might be during February, that’s all! 🙂 Its a bit like how I’d like to re-read a few novels during a blizzard once I live in a state which gets snowfall! 🙂 Laughs. I’ll stay curious, then! Happy reading!

    Reply
  137. Hallo Ms. Gracie,
    Yes, I’ve been keeping busy lately! 🙂 Oh, I understand reading on whim – I thought maybe you guys might re-read a particular book during the year, and I figured it might be during February, that’s all! 🙂 Its a bit like how I’d like to re-read a few novels during a blizzard once I live in a state which gets snowfall! 🙂 Laughs. I’ll stay curious, then! Happy reading!

    Reply
  138. Hallo Ms. Gracie,
    Yes, I’ve been keeping busy lately! 🙂 Oh, I understand reading on whim – I thought maybe you guys might re-read a particular book during the year, and I figured it might be during February, that’s all! 🙂 Its a bit like how I’d like to re-read a few novels during a blizzard once I live in a state which gets snowfall! 🙂 Laughs. I’ll stay curious, then! Happy reading!

    Reply
  139. Hallo Ms. Gracie,
    Yes, I’ve been keeping busy lately! 🙂 Oh, I understand reading on whim – I thought maybe you guys might re-read a particular book during the year, and I figured it might be during February, that’s all! 🙂 Its a bit like how I’d like to re-read a few novels during a blizzard once I live in a state which gets snowfall! 🙂 Laughs. I’ll stay curious, then! Happy reading!

    Reply
  140. Hallo Ms. Gracie,
    Yes, I’ve been keeping busy lately! 🙂 Oh, I understand reading on whim – I thought maybe you guys might re-read a particular book during the year, and I figured it might be during February, that’s all! 🙂 Its a bit like how I’d like to re-read a few novels during a blizzard once I live in a state which gets snowfall! 🙂 Laughs. I’ll stay curious, then! Happy reading!

    Reply
  141. During January I finished Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which is set during WW1 and is at once a very atmospheric novel of the times and a moving romance. I would recommend it very highly.
    Other than that, I’ve read half a dozen vintage regencies to be written up for Regency Retro Reads; Beyond Area 51 by Mack Maloney; some stuff on my kindle which I have forgotten because kindle isn’t physical; and my bedtime listening has been The Fellowship of the Ring from my small collection of audiobooks I can stand to hear more than once 🙂

    Reply
  142. During January I finished Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which is set during WW1 and is at once a very atmospheric novel of the times and a moving romance. I would recommend it very highly.
    Other than that, I’ve read half a dozen vintage regencies to be written up for Regency Retro Reads; Beyond Area 51 by Mack Maloney; some stuff on my kindle which I have forgotten because kindle isn’t physical; and my bedtime listening has been The Fellowship of the Ring from my small collection of audiobooks I can stand to hear more than once 🙂

    Reply
  143. During January I finished Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which is set during WW1 and is at once a very atmospheric novel of the times and a moving romance. I would recommend it very highly.
    Other than that, I’ve read half a dozen vintage regencies to be written up for Regency Retro Reads; Beyond Area 51 by Mack Maloney; some stuff on my kindle which I have forgotten because kindle isn’t physical; and my bedtime listening has been The Fellowship of the Ring from my small collection of audiobooks I can stand to hear more than once 🙂

    Reply
  144. During January I finished Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which is set during WW1 and is at once a very atmospheric novel of the times and a moving romance. I would recommend it very highly.
    Other than that, I’ve read half a dozen vintage regencies to be written up for Regency Retro Reads; Beyond Area 51 by Mack Maloney; some stuff on my kindle which I have forgotten because kindle isn’t physical; and my bedtime listening has been The Fellowship of the Ring from my small collection of audiobooks I can stand to hear more than once 🙂

    Reply
  145. During January I finished Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which is set during WW1 and is at once a very atmospheric novel of the times and a moving romance. I would recommend it very highly.
    Other than that, I’ve read half a dozen vintage regencies to be written up for Regency Retro Reads; Beyond Area 51 by Mack Maloney; some stuff on my kindle which I have forgotten because kindle isn’t physical; and my bedtime listening has been The Fellowship of the Ring from my small collection of audiobooks I can stand to hear more than once 🙂

    Reply
  146. Thanks Janice
    I haven't read "Somewhere in France" but it certainly sounds interesting. I think books about WW1 and 2 are coming back into fashion again, more WW2 I think, perhaps because that those who remembered those days have passed on and the living are curious. But maybe also because so much of WW1 was so tragic and that "the war to end all wars" wasn't, and the sons of those WW1 soldiers also were sent off to war. I used to devour WW2 stories when I was a kid, but hadn't seen any for year — until a few years ago, when they started emerging again. A friend of mine has recently written a book with an old WW2 romance between an American and an Australian girl woven into a contemporary story.

    Reply
  147. Thanks Janice
    I haven't read "Somewhere in France" but it certainly sounds interesting. I think books about WW1 and 2 are coming back into fashion again, more WW2 I think, perhaps because that those who remembered those days have passed on and the living are curious. But maybe also because so much of WW1 was so tragic and that "the war to end all wars" wasn't, and the sons of those WW1 soldiers also were sent off to war. I used to devour WW2 stories when I was a kid, but hadn't seen any for year — until a few years ago, when they started emerging again. A friend of mine has recently written a book with an old WW2 romance between an American and an Australian girl woven into a contemporary story.

    Reply
  148. Thanks Janice
    I haven't read "Somewhere in France" but it certainly sounds interesting. I think books about WW1 and 2 are coming back into fashion again, more WW2 I think, perhaps because that those who remembered those days have passed on and the living are curious. But maybe also because so much of WW1 was so tragic and that "the war to end all wars" wasn't, and the sons of those WW1 soldiers also were sent off to war. I used to devour WW2 stories when I was a kid, but hadn't seen any for year — until a few years ago, when they started emerging again. A friend of mine has recently written a book with an old WW2 romance between an American and an Australian girl woven into a contemporary story.

    Reply
  149. Thanks Janice
    I haven't read "Somewhere in France" but it certainly sounds interesting. I think books about WW1 and 2 are coming back into fashion again, more WW2 I think, perhaps because that those who remembered those days have passed on and the living are curious. But maybe also because so much of WW1 was so tragic and that "the war to end all wars" wasn't, and the sons of those WW1 soldiers also were sent off to war. I used to devour WW2 stories when I was a kid, but hadn't seen any for year — until a few years ago, when they started emerging again. A friend of mine has recently written a book with an old WW2 romance between an American and an Australian girl woven into a contemporary story.

    Reply
  150. Thanks Janice
    I haven't read "Somewhere in France" but it certainly sounds interesting. I think books about WW1 and 2 are coming back into fashion again, more WW2 I think, perhaps because that those who remembered those days have passed on and the living are curious. But maybe also because so much of WW1 was so tragic and that "the war to end all wars" wasn't, and the sons of those WW1 soldiers also were sent off to war. I used to devour WW2 stories when I was a kid, but hadn't seen any for year — until a few years ago, when they started emerging again. A friend of mine has recently written a book with an old WW2 romance between an American and an Australian girl woven into a contemporary story.

    Reply

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