What We’re Reading in October

SpeakeasyNicola here with our monthly blog post on What We Are Reading. As usual, there's a wonderful range of intriguing books—so dive in for some great recommendations and be sure to tell us what YOU have been reading too!

Christina: This month I’ve read my way through Sarina Bowen’s True North series, starting with Bittersweet. I wasn’t sure if I’d like these stories as much as the ice hockey ones (Brooklyn Bruisers), but I did and once I’d started, I couldn’t stop until I had devoured them all. Bittersweet is the story of Griffin Shipley, a farmer and cider brewer who has had to step into his father’s shoes far too early and shoulder the responsibility for the family, thereby giving up some of his dreams. He feels the strain and the last thing he has time for is dating, but then an old flame turns up unexpectedly and suddenly he’s not as tired as he thought … It was great seeing this gruff and grumpy man being tamed by the right woman – a wonderful start to the series. But my favourite of all is Speakeasy, because the hero, Alec Rossi, is simply irresistible! He’s a total player, but with a fabulous sense of humour and he’s way smarter than he gives himself credit for. I fell in love with him right from the first page and wanted him to prove the doubters wrong!

Another story I really enjoyed this month was Jenni Keer’s Hawthorn Place, a timeslip story with magical elements. It is Hawthorn Place (002) based on two amazing Arts & Crafts houses (from the late 1800s), mysteriously designed and built by the same architect, and the heroine Molly in the present visits them both. To begin with, she is naïve, spoiled and entitled, but she is also endearing and the reader can’t help but like her. Bewildered by her parents’ sudden tough love, we watch her grow in maturity and blossom as she gains some valuable insights and starts to turn her life around. Her adventures throughout a summer spent with her grandfather in Dorset were a joy to read about. Then there is 19th century architect Percy, whose unrequited love seems hopeless, even though the reader wants nothing more than for him to be happy. Gentle humour abounds, and there is a simmering love story in the present, as well as an all-consuming one in the past. Both were equally riveting and I thoroughly enjoyed reading about them – a lovely dual time story.

Mistletoe (002)Finally, I had the pleasure of reading an ARC of Sue Moorcroft’s new book, Under the Mistletoe. If you’re in the mood for a perfect Christmas story, this is it! I loved this book from the first page to the last, and stayed up way too late to finish it. Laurel, the heroine, has returned to the village where she grew up in order to help her sister, who suffers from agoraphobia. It’s the last place she wants to be as she has bad memories from an incident that happened there when she was a teenager. Making things worse, she immediately comes face to face with some people from the past who she’d rather not see again. But meeting up with old flame Grady awakens feelings she thought long forgotten, and he’s such a wonderful hero – how could she resist him? I definitely couldn’t! I was rooting for this couple all the way through and hoping they could find a resolution to their problems. I really wanted Laurel to forgive and forget, because Grady didn’t deserve to suffer for something he didn’t do. This is a truly festive read, complete with mistletoe, snow and Christmas cheer!

Pat here: I recently dived into the ARC for Andrea's MURDER AT THE ROYAL BOTANIC GARDENS for the next episode in her wonderful historical mystery series featuring Wrexford and Sloane, the earl and the satirical artist. In this one, the intrepid pair set out to find who murdered a scientist who had found a cure for malaria—and for the plant that might save millions. And they really need to solve this case before their wedding! The familiar cast of characters grows in depth and interest and are just as fascinating as the mystery. Historical mystery fans–and anyone who just likes a great story, highly recommended!

And then for a lovely departure from history:  Rosaline Palmer takes the Cake by Alexis Hall is hilarious, angsty women’s fiction about a single mother who Rosaline palmer expected to become a doctor. Instead, she ends up on a British bake show in hopes of winning enough to fix her alien boiler. Warning: tons of the funniest swearing I’ve ever read, a bit of graphic sex, an almost-forced sex scene, and truly terrific depictions of not-always-heterosexual perspectives. If this all sounds like a contradiction in terms, that’s because this book is. It has romance but it’s not a romance. It has amazing mother/daughter scenes while being totally about a fascinating collection of bake show contestants. Let’s just call this book original and funny and if you want to get out of your rut, give it a try.

500 miles from YouSusan writes: The other day I finished 500 Miles from You by Jenny Colgan, and loved it. She is a favorite among the Wenches, though this is the first of her books that I've read. When Lissa, a nurse based in London, witnesses a shocking accident and is devastated by the experience, she is assigned to a temporary post far away from the madding crowd to give her a chance to recuperate mentally and chill a little. The assignment sends her to the Scottish Highlands to substitute for another nurse, a former Army medic who will temporarily take her place in London until they swap jobs again. Cormac, a native Highlander, is not keen on taking on duties in London, which seems a foreign and unappealing place to him. The swap has both Lissa and Cormac experiencing some culture shock. The city girl is not used to the peace and quiet of the Highlands or the whimsical laid-back attitude of the locals, and the country guy is at odds with the pace and demands of city life, and for both, the medical duties are very different as well. Jenny Colgan sets up a unique romance that grows slowly between two people who are only texting and emailing – an interesting story challenge – and the progression is fascinating, as they begin to rely on and care about one another. When they finally meet, it's unexpected and deliciously romantic, and I adored it. This is a comedy of errors with wonderful characters, humor, and real depth – and a nice plus is that it incorporates one of my favorite Scottish rock songs, the Proclaimers' "And I Would Walk (500 Miles)." Colgan writes with a light hand and yet with true wisdom and a deft touch that is at times poignant, meaningful, touching, yet without ooky sentimentality. Just lovely, and I will be glomming her other books soon. No wonder she's a Wench favorite! 

Nicola: It’s no secret that we Wenches are big fans of Sarah Morgan and I grabbed her latest book The Christmas Escape as soon as I could get my hands on it. Christmas escape As with all Sarah’s books, it’s a wonderful multi-generational story full of reflections on friendship and relationships, with some gorgeous Christmas sparkle! Christy Sullivan had planned the perfect Christmas on a dream trip to Lapland with her family and her best friend Alix. Then her marriage to Seb is plunged into crisis and she has to ask Alix, and Seb’s oldest friend Zac, to take her daughter Holly on the trip, aiming for them all to meet up to celebrate Christmas Day together.

Alix is a career woman who is inexperienced with children and terrified that she’ll not be up to the task of taking care of Holly. Plus she has history with Zac that she’d rather not remember. The spiky relationship between the two of them is funny and sexy whilst the barriers that Christy and Seb have to overcome to find honesty between them are deftly handled and thought-provoking. It’s a happy feel-good read with depth and poignancy and it’s also so, so Christmassy! I wanted to run away to Lapland for Christmas and ever after!

Andrea here:

Once a lairdI was lucky enough to snag two ARCs this past month and am delighted to give a big shout-out to both! First of all, our own Mary Jo has a new Rogues Redeemed book, which is always cause for celebration. Once A Laird (which just released!) features the enigmatic Kai Ramsay, who has been an intriguing presence earlier in the series. He's been summoned home to the remote Thorsay Islands in Scotland after years of absence. The old laird is dying, and Kai must face his duty of taking over the responsibilities of caring for the islands and his people . . . and who better to teach him than the fiery Signe Matheson, who has been handling the demands in his absence. Needless to say, sparks fly when the old acquaintances meet and need to work together despite their complicated past. What I love about Mary Jo’s books is that her characters are so wonderfully real and “mature”—they have suffered disappointments and set-backs, so they are bruised, but also strong, having gained wisdom and resilience. They think beyond their own needs to make honorable and hard decisions . . .which is why it is always such a joy to watch them slowly come to discover love and fulfillment with the perfect partner. Complementing the engaging characters, the setting of the starkly beautiful islands is magical . . . and who can resist a one-eyed cat named Odin!

The Regency-era setting continues in Stephanie Barron’s latest book in her delightful mystery series starring Jane Austen as Jane Austen the sleuth. In Jane and the Year Without A Summer, we find a mature Jane now beginning to suffer from fragile heath—which she thinks is caused by the travails engulfing her family. With money short, and the future uncertain, she decides to take her apothecary’s advice and splurge on a visit to the spa in Cheltenham with her sister Cassandra in order to take the waters. The weather is wretched—Britain is suffering from a horribly cold and wet summer—and so they find themselves much confined to their lodging house . . .where the presence of a beautiful invalid and her quiet companion soon draw Jane into the middle of a dark mystery. The invalid turns out to be a runway wife, and when her husband appears demanding to take her back home, a number of questions arise, complicated by the intentions of the other guests at the lodging house. I love this series, as Barron always creates such a wonderful ambiance, a twisty mystery and a lovely imagining of Jane, based on meticulous research. It’s a slightly bittersweet story as we see Jane struggle with her health, but it’s a wonderful read— and it has poignant romantic element that mirrors the manuscript that Jane is currently writing.I highly recommend it!

From Mary Jo: I've had a bunch of reading fails this month, and the books I like most were rereads of old favorites. But I found one new winner:

BoyfriendBoyfriend by Sarina Bowen. Sarina Bowen is popular with the Wenches, and this new release was great fun. It's set at Moo U, which I assume is Bowen's version of the University of Vermont.  Naturally, the hero is a hot hockey player. <G>

The heroine, Abbi, is another student who works long hours as a slinger of burgers and chicken wings to pay for her cold, tiny apartment.   She particularly likes it when the hockey team comes in after practice or a game because they're fun, they tip well, and she has a quiet crush one of the players, the handsome and charming Weston Griggs.

Abbi doesn't want to go home for Thanksgiving for a good reason, so when she sees an anonymous posting on a bulletin board:

Rent a boyfriend for the holiday. For $25, I will be your Thanksgiving date. I will talk hockey with your dad. I will bring your mother flowers. I will be polite, and wear a nicely ironed shirt…

When she finds out it's posted by Weston, she makes a pitch and he chooses her.  Of course he recognizes her from the restaurant, they get along find, and he is just the buffer/fake boyfriend she needs for Thanksgiving.

It turns out that Weston has good reasons for not wanting to go to his home for Christmas, so he enlists Abbi to go as his fake girlfriend….  As I said, the book is lots of fun and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

 

Anne here, and this month I have three recommendations for you. The first is The Last Bookshop in London, by Madeline Martin. August 1939 and war is London hanging over England. Orphaned Grace Bennett comes to London with her friend Viv, hoping for a job in Harrods. Instead she gets one in a messy, cluttered and dusty bookshop in the heart of the city. Grace is no reader, but she's a good worker and has a gift for organization and sales and soon the bookshop is attracting more customers. She meets an attractive man, but before their first date can happen, he's called up. He gives her his favorite book, The Count of Monte Cristo, and that eventually starts Grace reading.

The war finally hits London, in horrific nightly bombing raids, and one night Grace starts reading her current book aloud to the others sheltering in an underground station. And it becomes a regular thing.

I won't tell you any more, except to say it's a wonderful story. It's very evocative of what it must have been like for people stuck in London during the Blitz, and while it doesn't shy away from the terrors of war, it's also heartwarming and ends on a positive note. As well, it's an ode to the power of good books. I couldn't put it down. Highly recommended.

CastleAs regular readers will know, I'm a fan of Trisha Ashley's books, especially her Christmas ones, and her latest book, One More Christmas at the Castle is a worthy addition to the collection.

Elderly widow Sabine is dying, and she wants one last Christmas in Mitras Castle, her grand family home — the kind of Christmas she loved as a child. To this end she invites the people who most matter to her for Christmas and hires Dido Jones and her business partner Henry, who run a brilliant service called Heavenly Houseparties to organize and cater the whole event.

It's classic Trisha Ashley with an intriguing collection of characters, a number of family and other secrets lurking beneath the surface, a lovely dose of romance, and all the fun of Christmas, including her trademark lashings of English comfort food. Most enjoyable, and I've already read it twice.

Lastly, if any of you have been reading the JD Kirk Scottish crime series I've regularly recommended, I bought and read the first in his new series — Northwind — a spinoff that stars disgraced former Detective Superintendent Bob Hoon. I wasn't sure I'd like it — in the original series Bob Hoon distinguishes himself as foul-mouthed, infuriating and not particularly likable. However in recent books he showed there was more to him than that. To quote from the amazon blurb: "He may be a disgraced ex-copper, a barely-functioning alcoholic, and a borderline psychopath, but Bob Hoon still believes in justice."

Anyway to cut a long story short, it's funny outrageous and dramatic, and if you've hesitated about picking up the Hoon book, don't — I loved it.

Now it's over to you! What are your reading recommendations this month? Please share!

 

90 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in October”

  1. I listened to two Wench novels this month …. always a guarantee of a satisfying read. Anne’s ‘Scoundrel’s Daughter’, where the heroine struggles with demands of a blackmailing scoundrel was particularly enjoyable. I know its all going to end well but the ingenuity in achieving that HEA had me guessing! MJPs YA ‘Dark Mirror’ was my other read. Despite reservations about the physics of time travel portals, I was hooked by the characters and thoroughly enjoyed it … so much so that I tried another (free) YA audio magic book ‘Reckless Magic’ by Rachel Higginson. First in a long series it is an intricate story about adventure, magic and forbidden love. If you liked Harry Potter you will probably enjoy this.
    I note that Sarina Bowen features again this week. I read the first of the Brooklyn Bruisers series ‘Rookie Move’ and really enjoyed it. The book had everything that I was looking for. Sport, conflict, frustrated love and of course a big HEA.
    Finally I tried a SciFi novel ‘Dark Horse’ by Michelle Diener. I’m now hooked on her class 5 series! The artificial intelligence Sazo steals the show when he befriends Rose and helps her escape captivity. The narration is excellent.

    Reply
  2. I listened to two Wench novels this month …. always a guarantee of a satisfying read. Anne’s ‘Scoundrel’s Daughter’, where the heroine struggles with demands of a blackmailing scoundrel was particularly enjoyable. I know its all going to end well but the ingenuity in achieving that HEA had me guessing! MJPs YA ‘Dark Mirror’ was my other read. Despite reservations about the physics of time travel portals, I was hooked by the characters and thoroughly enjoyed it … so much so that I tried another (free) YA audio magic book ‘Reckless Magic’ by Rachel Higginson. First in a long series it is an intricate story about adventure, magic and forbidden love. If you liked Harry Potter you will probably enjoy this.
    I note that Sarina Bowen features again this week. I read the first of the Brooklyn Bruisers series ‘Rookie Move’ and really enjoyed it. The book had everything that I was looking for. Sport, conflict, frustrated love and of course a big HEA.
    Finally I tried a SciFi novel ‘Dark Horse’ by Michelle Diener. I’m now hooked on her class 5 series! The artificial intelligence Sazo steals the show when he befriends Rose and helps her escape captivity. The narration is excellent.

    Reply
  3. I listened to two Wench novels this month …. always a guarantee of a satisfying read. Anne’s ‘Scoundrel’s Daughter’, where the heroine struggles with demands of a blackmailing scoundrel was particularly enjoyable. I know its all going to end well but the ingenuity in achieving that HEA had me guessing! MJPs YA ‘Dark Mirror’ was my other read. Despite reservations about the physics of time travel portals, I was hooked by the characters and thoroughly enjoyed it … so much so that I tried another (free) YA audio magic book ‘Reckless Magic’ by Rachel Higginson. First in a long series it is an intricate story about adventure, magic and forbidden love. If you liked Harry Potter you will probably enjoy this.
    I note that Sarina Bowen features again this week. I read the first of the Brooklyn Bruisers series ‘Rookie Move’ and really enjoyed it. The book had everything that I was looking for. Sport, conflict, frustrated love and of course a big HEA.
    Finally I tried a SciFi novel ‘Dark Horse’ by Michelle Diener. I’m now hooked on her class 5 series! The artificial intelligence Sazo steals the show when he befriends Rose and helps her escape captivity. The narration is excellent.

    Reply
  4. I listened to two Wench novels this month …. always a guarantee of a satisfying read. Anne’s ‘Scoundrel’s Daughter’, where the heroine struggles with demands of a blackmailing scoundrel was particularly enjoyable. I know its all going to end well but the ingenuity in achieving that HEA had me guessing! MJPs YA ‘Dark Mirror’ was my other read. Despite reservations about the physics of time travel portals, I was hooked by the characters and thoroughly enjoyed it … so much so that I tried another (free) YA audio magic book ‘Reckless Magic’ by Rachel Higginson. First in a long series it is an intricate story about adventure, magic and forbidden love. If you liked Harry Potter you will probably enjoy this.
    I note that Sarina Bowen features again this week. I read the first of the Brooklyn Bruisers series ‘Rookie Move’ and really enjoyed it. The book had everything that I was looking for. Sport, conflict, frustrated love and of course a big HEA.
    Finally I tried a SciFi novel ‘Dark Horse’ by Michelle Diener. I’m now hooked on her class 5 series! The artificial intelligence Sazo steals the show when he befriends Rose and helps her escape captivity. The narration is excellent.

    Reply
  5. I listened to two Wench novels this month …. always a guarantee of a satisfying read. Anne’s ‘Scoundrel’s Daughter’, where the heroine struggles with demands of a blackmailing scoundrel was particularly enjoyable. I know its all going to end well but the ingenuity in achieving that HEA had me guessing! MJPs YA ‘Dark Mirror’ was my other read. Despite reservations about the physics of time travel portals, I was hooked by the characters and thoroughly enjoyed it … so much so that I tried another (free) YA audio magic book ‘Reckless Magic’ by Rachel Higginson. First in a long series it is an intricate story about adventure, magic and forbidden love. If you liked Harry Potter you will probably enjoy this.
    I note that Sarina Bowen features again this week. I read the first of the Brooklyn Bruisers series ‘Rookie Move’ and really enjoyed it. The book had everything that I was looking for. Sport, conflict, frustrated love and of course a big HEA.
    Finally I tried a SciFi novel ‘Dark Horse’ by Michelle Diener. I’m now hooked on her class 5 series! The artificial intelligence Sazo steals the show when he befriends Rose and helps her escape captivity. The narration is excellent.

    Reply
  6. Hi Quantum and thank you for the recommendations! I’ve heard good things about Michelle Diener’s books and will look out for that one. I loved Anne’s book as well, it was lovely and so satisfying, and I still regularly re-read Mary Jo’s YA series for those great characters and the amazing world she builds.

    Reply
  7. Hi Quantum and thank you for the recommendations! I’ve heard good things about Michelle Diener’s books and will look out for that one. I loved Anne’s book as well, it was lovely and so satisfying, and I still regularly re-read Mary Jo’s YA series for those great characters and the amazing world she builds.

    Reply
  8. Hi Quantum and thank you for the recommendations! I’ve heard good things about Michelle Diener’s books and will look out for that one. I loved Anne’s book as well, it was lovely and so satisfying, and I still regularly re-read Mary Jo’s YA series for those great characters and the amazing world she builds.

    Reply
  9. Hi Quantum and thank you for the recommendations! I’ve heard good things about Michelle Diener’s books and will look out for that one. I loved Anne’s book as well, it was lovely and so satisfying, and I still regularly re-read Mary Jo’s YA series for those great characters and the amazing world she builds.

    Reply
  10. Hi Quantum and thank you for the recommendations! I’ve heard good things about Michelle Diener’s books and will look out for that one. I loved Anne’s book as well, it was lovely and so satisfying, and I still regularly re-read Mary Jo’s YA series for those great characters and the amazing world she builds.

    Reply
  11. What a wonderful assortment of books listed above; I’ve added several to my list.
    The Class 5 books are a lot of fun. Enjoy, @Quantum and @Nicola!

    Reply
  12. What a wonderful assortment of books listed above; I’ve added several to my list.
    The Class 5 books are a lot of fun. Enjoy, @Quantum and @Nicola!

    Reply
  13. What a wonderful assortment of books listed above; I’ve added several to my list.
    The Class 5 books are a lot of fun. Enjoy, @Quantum and @Nicola!

    Reply
  14. What a wonderful assortment of books listed above; I’ve added several to my list.
    The Class 5 books are a lot of fun. Enjoy, @Quantum and @Nicola!

    Reply
  15. What a wonderful assortment of books listed above; I’ve added several to my list.
    The Class 5 books are a lot of fun. Enjoy, @Quantum and @Nicola!

    Reply
  16. Since last time, week by week ~
    — Gravedigger’s Brawl by Abigail Roux. I’m not sorry that I read this contemporary m/m romance, but it was a little too eerie for my taste.
    — The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood; I quite enjoyed this contemporary romance. It made me reflect on some of my own grad school experiences — Chemistry in my case versus Biology for the book’s heroine. I look forward to the author’s next book.
    — Murder in Material Gain: A Doyle & Acton Mystery by Anne Cleeland; it’s the brand new Acton and Doyle book, and I enjoyed revisiting the characters. This is the latest book in a series that needs to be read in order.
    — reread Stray and Lab Rat One by Andrea K. Höst which I enjoyed once again. NOTE: Stray is FREE for US Kindle readers.
    The final week of my reading challenge on a different site had me read a book whose cover art you love. I wouldn’t say that I “loved” the covers of these books, but they are all attractive to my eye.
    Tattoos & Teacups by Anna Martin
    This romance featured men who were quite different — Robert (Scottish, tea drinking, rather staid 32 year old professor of literature) and Chris (23 year old, tattooed, motorcycle riding, rock band and symphonic percussionist). I almost didn’t finish the book several times in the first half, but then the book became more engaging. I’d describe the book as low angst.
    **
    Honeytrap by Aster Glenn Gray
    I quite enjoyed this cold war era romance featuring an FBI agent and a Soviet agent who are paired to find the person behind an unsuccessful assassination attempt on Khrushchev during his 1959 visit to the US. The first segment of the book takes place over three months or so as the men drive through various states seeking information; during this time, they get to know and care for each other. The next two sections take place a number of years later. I expect to re-read this book.
    **
    A Ferry of Bones & Gold by Hailey Turner
    This book has mages, werewolves, seers, vampires, demons, succubi, Greek and Norse gods and goddesses manipulating others to their own ends, witches, a number of governmental agencies, and let’s not forget the villains; I’d describe it as busy! Our main leads are Patrick (a mage with metaphysical, physical, and emotional scars) who is sent to NYC to work on a serial killer case and Jono (a British alpha werewolf who is packless in NYC). This is the first book in a series; I enjoyed it, but I’m unsure whether I’ll read on.
    **
    Dalí by E.M. Hamill
    This science fiction work is set in space in the future; the title character is an empath, an ambassador, and a changeling third-gender (an intersex human able to assume a male or female form at will). Dalí’s husband, wife, and unborn child were killed in a bombing six months ago and, when the novel begins, Dalí is grieving. Other third-gender changelings have gone missing from various worlds, and Dalí is recruited to go undercover to learn more. I enjoyed this book and look forward to reading the sequel.
    — During my daughter’s visit from South Korea (her first visit in two and a half years), I reread with pleasure the remainder of the Touchstone series: Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day by Andrea K Höst.
    — For my distant book group, I read The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories by Anthony Marra. This was a collection of linked stories from the 1930s to near the present day set in Russia/the USSR/Chechen. I’d describe the mood of the stories as sad; it’s not a book I have any plan of rereading but our discussion was interesting.
    — Tales from the Folly: A Rivers of London Short Story Collection by Ben Aaronovitch, a collection of stories and a few very short pieces. As with most anthologies, I enjoyed some stories more than others. This book is a companion to the author’s Rivers of London series and is not a stand alone.
    — enjoyed rereading The Accidentals by Sarina Bowen; this is marketed as a young adult novel, but clearly it appeals to older readers as well.
    — The Soulmate Equation by Christina Lauren; this was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — enjoyed The Physicians of Vilnoc by Lois McMaster Bujold. (This is a series that needs to be read in order; begin with Penric’s Demon.)
    — the book that my local book group selected, The Overstory: A Novel by Richard Powers. This was a lengthy but fascinating book. Initially it seemed that it was a collection of unconnected stories all of which featured trees; however, ultimately it all tied together.
    — Death Can Be Habit-Forming: Another John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 11) by Sheri Cobb South which I quite enjoyed. This is the latest book in a series that should be read in order. Begin with the FREE book In Milady’s Chamber: A John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 1).
    — Uncommon Ground (Aliens in New York Book 1) by Kelly Jensen; this was an enjoyable contemporary science fiction romance with two male leads.
    — read An Accidental Death: A DC Smith Investigation Series, Book 1 by Peter Grainger and quite enjoyed it. Sadly, neither of my libraries has the follow on books.
    — the contemporary romance Off the Leash (White House Protection Force Book 1) by M. L. Buchman; this was an enjoyable read that featured a chocolatier hero (who knits) and a dog handler who is part of the Secret Service. Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!
    — The Other Me by Sarah Zachrich Jeng which I enjoyed. This was an intriguing science fiction read that left me pondering what ifs in my own life.

    Reply
  17. Since last time, week by week ~
    — Gravedigger’s Brawl by Abigail Roux. I’m not sorry that I read this contemporary m/m romance, but it was a little too eerie for my taste.
    — The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood; I quite enjoyed this contemporary romance. It made me reflect on some of my own grad school experiences — Chemistry in my case versus Biology for the book’s heroine. I look forward to the author’s next book.
    — Murder in Material Gain: A Doyle & Acton Mystery by Anne Cleeland; it’s the brand new Acton and Doyle book, and I enjoyed revisiting the characters. This is the latest book in a series that needs to be read in order.
    — reread Stray and Lab Rat One by Andrea K. Höst which I enjoyed once again. NOTE: Stray is FREE for US Kindle readers.
    The final week of my reading challenge on a different site had me read a book whose cover art you love. I wouldn’t say that I “loved” the covers of these books, but they are all attractive to my eye.
    Tattoos & Teacups by Anna Martin
    This romance featured men who were quite different — Robert (Scottish, tea drinking, rather staid 32 year old professor of literature) and Chris (23 year old, tattooed, motorcycle riding, rock band and symphonic percussionist). I almost didn’t finish the book several times in the first half, but then the book became more engaging. I’d describe the book as low angst.
    **
    Honeytrap by Aster Glenn Gray
    I quite enjoyed this cold war era romance featuring an FBI agent and a Soviet agent who are paired to find the person behind an unsuccessful assassination attempt on Khrushchev during his 1959 visit to the US. The first segment of the book takes place over three months or so as the men drive through various states seeking information; during this time, they get to know and care for each other. The next two sections take place a number of years later. I expect to re-read this book.
    **
    A Ferry of Bones & Gold by Hailey Turner
    This book has mages, werewolves, seers, vampires, demons, succubi, Greek and Norse gods and goddesses manipulating others to their own ends, witches, a number of governmental agencies, and let’s not forget the villains; I’d describe it as busy! Our main leads are Patrick (a mage with metaphysical, physical, and emotional scars) who is sent to NYC to work on a serial killer case and Jono (a British alpha werewolf who is packless in NYC). This is the first book in a series; I enjoyed it, but I’m unsure whether I’ll read on.
    **
    Dalí by E.M. Hamill
    This science fiction work is set in space in the future; the title character is an empath, an ambassador, and a changeling third-gender (an intersex human able to assume a male or female form at will). Dalí’s husband, wife, and unborn child were killed in a bombing six months ago and, when the novel begins, Dalí is grieving. Other third-gender changelings have gone missing from various worlds, and Dalí is recruited to go undercover to learn more. I enjoyed this book and look forward to reading the sequel.
    — During my daughter’s visit from South Korea (her first visit in two and a half years), I reread with pleasure the remainder of the Touchstone series: Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day by Andrea K Höst.
    — For my distant book group, I read The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories by Anthony Marra. This was a collection of linked stories from the 1930s to near the present day set in Russia/the USSR/Chechen. I’d describe the mood of the stories as sad; it’s not a book I have any plan of rereading but our discussion was interesting.
    — Tales from the Folly: A Rivers of London Short Story Collection by Ben Aaronovitch, a collection of stories and a few very short pieces. As with most anthologies, I enjoyed some stories more than others. This book is a companion to the author’s Rivers of London series and is not a stand alone.
    — enjoyed rereading The Accidentals by Sarina Bowen; this is marketed as a young adult novel, but clearly it appeals to older readers as well.
    — The Soulmate Equation by Christina Lauren; this was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — enjoyed The Physicians of Vilnoc by Lois McMaster Bujold. (This is a series that needs to be read in order; begin with Penric’s Demon.)
    — the book that my local book group selected, The Overstory: A Novel by Richard Powers. This was a lengthy but fascinating book. Initially it seemed that it was a collection of unconnected stories all of which featured trees; however, ultimately it all tied together.
    — Death Can Be Habit-Forming: Another John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 11) by Sheri Cobb South which I quite enjoyed. This is the latest book in a series that should be read in order. Begin with the FREE book In Milady’s Chamber: A John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 1).
    — Uncommon Ground (Aliens in New York Book 1) by Kelly Jensen; this was an enjoyable contemporary science fiction romance with two male leads.
    — read An Accidental Death: A DC Smith Investigation Series, Book 1 by Peter Grainger and quite enjoyed it. Sadly, neither of my libraries has the follow on books.
    — the contemporary romance Off the Leash (White House Protection Force Book 1) by M. L. Buchman; this was an enjoyable read that featured a chocolatier hero (who knits) and a dog handler who is part of the Secret Service. Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!
    — The Other Me by Sarah Zachrich Jeng which I enjoyed. This was an intriguing science fiction read that left me pondering what ifs in my own life.

    Reply
  18. Since last time, week by week ~
    — Gravedigger’s Brawl by Abigail Roux. I’m not sorry that I read this contemporary m/m romance, but it was a little too eerie for my taste.
    — The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood; I quite enjoyed this contemporary romance. It made me reflect on some of my own grad school experiences — Chemistry in my case versus Biology for the book’s heroine. I look forward to the author’s next book.
    — Murder in Material Gain: A Doyle & Acton Mystery by Anne Cleeland; it’s the brand new Acton and Doyle book, and I enjoyed revisiting the characters. This is the latest book in a series that needs to be read in order.
    — reread Stray and Lab Rat One by Andrea K. Höst which I enjoyed once again. NOTE: Stray is FREE for US Kindle readers.
    The final week of my reading challenge on a different site had me read a book whose cover art you love. I wouldn’t say that I “loved” the covers of these books, but they are all attractive to my eye.
    Tattoos & Teacups by Anna Martin
    This romance featured men who were quite different — Robert (Scottish, tea drinking, rather staid 32 year old professor of literature) and Chris (23 year old, tattooed, motorcycle riding, rock band and symphonic percussionist). I almost didn’t finish the book several times in the first half, but then the book became more engaging. I’d describe the book as low angst.
    **
    Honeytrap by Aster Glenn Gray
    I quite enjoyed this cold war era romance featuring an FBI agent and a Soviet agent who are paired to find the person behind an unsuccessful assassination attempt on Khrushchev during his 1959 visit to the US. The first segment of the book takes place over three months or so as the men drive through various states seeking information; during this time, they get to know and care for each other. The next two sections take place a number of years later. I expect to re-read this book.
    **
    A Ferry of Bones & Gold by Hailey Turner
    This book has mages, werewolves, seers, vampires, demons, succubi, Greek and Norse gods and goddesses manipulating others to their own ends, witches, a number of governmental agencies, and let’s not forget the villains; I’d describe it as busy! Our main leads are Patrick (a mage with metaphysical, physical, and emotional scars) who is sent to NYC to work on a serial killer case and Jono (a British alpha werewolf who is packless in NYC). This is the first book in a series; I enjoyed it, but I’m unsure whether I’ll read on.
    **
    Dalí by E.M. Hamill
    This science fiction work is set in space in the future; the title character is an empath, an ambassador, and a changeling third-gender (an intersex human able to assume a male or female form at will). Dalí’s husband, wife, and unborn child were killed in a bombing six months ago and, when the novel begins, Dalí is grieving. Other third-gender changelings have gone missing from various worlds, and Dalí is recruited to go undercover to learn more. I enjoyed this book and look forward to reading the sequel.
    — During my daughter’s visit from South Korea (her first visit in two and a half years), I reread with pleasure the remainder of the Touchstone series: Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day by Andrea K Höst.
    — For my distant book group, I read The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories by Anthony Marra. This was a collection of linked stories from the 1930s to near the present day set in Russia/the USSR/Chechen. I’d describe the mood of the stories as sad; it’s not a book I have any plan of rereading but our discussion was interesting.
    — Tales from the Folly: A Rivers of London Short Story Collection by Ben Aaronovitch, a collection of stories and a few very short pieces. As with most anthologies, I enjoyed some stories more than others. This book is a companion to the author’s Rivers of London series and is not a stand alone.
    — enjoyed rereading The Accidentals by Sarina Bowen; this is marketed as a young adult novel, but clearly it appeals to older readers as well.
    — The Soulmate Equation by Christina Lauren; this was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — enjoyed The Physicians of Vilnoc by Lois McMaster Bujold. (This is a series that needs to be read in order; begin with Penric’s Demon.)
    — the book that my local book group selected, The Overstory: A Novel by Richard Powers. This was a lengthy but fascinating book. Initially it seemed that it was a collection of unconnected stories all of which featured trees; however, ultimately it all tied together.
    — Death Can Be Habit-Forming: Another John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 11) by Sheri Cobb South which I quite enjoyed. This is the latest book in a series that should be read in order. Begin with the FREE book In Milady’s Chamber: A John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 1).
    — Uncommon Ground (Aliens in New York Book 1) by Kelly Jensen; this was an enjoyable contemporary science fiction romance with two male leads.
    — read An Accidental Death: A DC Smith Investigation Series, Book 1 by Peter Grainger and quite enjoyed it. Sadly, neither of my libraries has the follow on books.
    — the contemporary romance Off the Leash (White House Protection Force Book 1) by M. L. Buchman; this was an enjoyable read that featured a chocolatier hero (who knits) and a dog handler who is part of the Secret Service. Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!
    — The Other Me by Sarah Zachrich Jeng which I enjoyed. This was an intriguing science fiction read that left me pondering what ifs in my own life.

    Reply
  19. Since last time, week by week ~
    — Gravedigger’s Brawl by Abigail Roux. I’m not sorry that I read this contemporary m/m romance, but it was a little too eerie for my taste.
    — The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood; I quite enjoyed this contemporary romance. It made me reflect on some of my own grad school experiences — Chemistry in my case versus Biology for the book’s heroine. I look forward to the author’s next book.
    — Murder in Material Gain: A Doyle & Acton Mystery by Anne Cleeland; it’s the brand new Acton and Doyle book, and I enjoyed revisiting the characters. This is the latest book in a series that needs to be read in order.
    — reread Stray and Lab Rat One by Andrea K. Höst which I enjoyed once again. NOTE: Stray is FREE for US Kindle readers.
    The final week of my reading challenge on a different site had me read a book whose cover art you love. I wouldn’t say that I “loved” the covers of these books, but they are all attractive to my eye.
    Tattoos & Teacups by Anna Martin
    This romance featured men who were quite different — Robert (Scottish, tea drinking, rather staid 32 year old professor of literature) and Chris (23 year old, tattooed, motorcycle riding, rock band and symphonic percussionist). I almost didn’t finish the book several times in the first half, but then the book became more engaging. I’d describe the book as low angst.
    **
    Honeytrap by Aster Glenn Gray
    I quite enjoyed this cold war era romance featuring an FBI agent and a Soviet agent who are paired to find the person behind an unsuccessful assassination attempt on Khrushchev during his 1959 visit to the US. The first segment of the book takes place over three months or so as the men drive through various states seeking information; during this time, they get to know and care for each other. The next two sections take place a number of years later. I expect to re-read this book.
    **
    A Ferry of Bones & Gold by Hailey Turner
    This book has mages, werewolves, seers, vampires, demons, succubi, Greek and Norse gods and goddesses manipulating others to their own ends, witches, a number of governmental agencies, and let’s not forget the villains; I’d describe it as busy! Our main leads are Patrick (a mage with metaphysical, physical, and emotional scars) who is sent to NYC to work on a serial killer case and Jono (a British alpha werewolf who is packless in NYC). This is the first book in a series; I enjoyed it, but I’m unsure whether I’ll read on.
    **
    Dalí by E.M. Hamill
    This science fiction work is set in space in the future; the title character is an empath, an ambassador, and a changeling third-gender (an intersex human able to assume a male or female form at will). Dalí’s husband, wife, and unborn child were killed in a bombing six months ago and, when the novel begins, Dalí is grieving. Other third-gender changelings have gone missing from various worlds, and Dalí is recruited to go undercover to learn more. I enjoyed this book and look forward to reading the sequel.
    — During my daughter’s visit from South Korea (her first visit in two and a half years), I reread with pleasure the remainder of the Touchstone series: Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day by Andrea K Höst.
    — For my distant book group, I read The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories by Anthony Marra. This was a collection of linked stories from the 1930s to near the present day set in Russia/the USSR/Chechen. I’d describe the mood of the stories as sad; it’s not a book I have any plan of rereading but our discussion was interesting.
    — Tales from the Folly: A Rivers of London Short Story Collection by Ben Aaronovitch, a collection of stories and a few very short pieces. As with most anthologies, I enjoyed some stories more than others. This book is a companion to the author’s Rivers of London series and is not a stand alone.
    — enjoyed rereading The Accidentals by Sarina Bowen; this is marketed as a young adult novel, but clearly it appeals to older readers as well.
    — The Soulmate Equation by Christina Lauren; this was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — enjoyed The Physicians of Vilnoc by Lois McMaster Bujold. (This is a series that needs to be read in order; begin with Penric’s Demon.)
    — the book that my local book group selected, The Overstory: A Novel by Richard Powers. This was a lengthy but fascinating book. Initially it seemed that it was a collection of unconnected stories all of which featured trees; however, ultimately it all tied together.
    — Death Can Be Habit-Forming: Another John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 11) by Sheri Cobb South which I quite enjoyed. This is the latest book in a series that should be read in order. Begin with the FREE book In Milady’s Chamber: A John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 1).
    — Uncommon Ground (Aliens in New York Book 1) by Kelly Jensen; this was an enjoyable contemporary science fiction romance with two male leads.
    — read An Accidental Death: A DC Smith Investigation Series, Book 1 by Peter Grainger and quite enjoyed it. Sadly, neither of my libraries has the follow on books.
    — the contemporary romance Off the Leash (White House Protection Force Book 1) by M. L. Buchman; this was an enjoyable read that featured a chocolatier hero (who knits) and a dog handler who is part of the Secret Service. Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!
    — The Other Me by Sarah Zachrich Jeng which I enjoyed. This was an intriguing science fiction read that left me pondering what ifs in my own life.

    Reply
  20. Since last time, week by week ~
    — Gravedigger’s Brawl by Abigail Roux. I’m not sorry that I read this contemporary m/m romance, but it was a little too eerie for my taste.
    — The Love Hypothesis by Ali Hazelwood; I quite enjoyed this contemporary romance. It made me reflect on some of my own grad school experiences — Chemistry in my case versus Biology for the book’s heroine. I look forward to the author’s next book.
    — Murder in Material Gain: A Doyle & Acton Mystery by Anne Cleeland; it’s the brand new Acton and Doyle book, and I enjoyed revisiting the characters. This is the latest book in a series that needs to be read in order.
    — reread Stray and Lab Rat One by Andrea K. Höst which I enjoyed once again. NOTE: Stray is FREE for US Kindle readers.
    The final week of my reading challenge on a different site had me read a book whose cover art you love. I wouldn’t say that I “loved” the covers of these books, but they are all attractive to my eye.
    Tattoos & Teacups by Anna Martin
    This romance featured men who were quite different — Robert (Scottish, tea drinking, rather staid 32 year old professor of literature) and Chris (23 year old, tattooed, motorcycle riding, rock band and symphonic percussionist). I almost didn’t finish the book several times in the first half, but then the book became more engaging. I’d describe the book as low angst.
    **
    Honeytrap by Aster Glenn Gray
    I quite enjoyed this cold war era romance featuring an FBI agent and a Soviet agent who are paired to find the person behind an unsuccessful assassination attempt on Khrushchev during his 1959 visit to the US. The first segment of the book takes place over three months or so as the men drive through various states seeking information; during this time, they get to know and care for each other. The next two sections take place a number of years later. I expect to re-read this book.
    **
    A Ferry of Bones & Gold by Hailey Turner
    This book has mages, werewolves, seers, vampires, demons, succubi, Greek and Norse gods and goddesses manipulating others to their own ends, witches, a number of governmental agencies, and let’s not forget the villains; I’d describe it as busy! Our main leads are Patrick (a mage with metaphysical, physical, and emotional scars) who is sent to NYC to work on a serial killer case and Jono (a British alpha werewolf who is packless in NYC). This is the first book in a series; I enjoyed it, but I’m unsure whether I’ll read on.
    **
    Dalí by E.M. Hamill
    This science fiction work is set in space in the future; the title character is an empath, an ambassador, and a changeling third-gender (an intersex human able to assume a male or female form at will). Dalí’s husband, wife, and unborn child were killed in a bombing six months ago and, when the novel begins, Dalí is grieving. Other third-gender changelings have gone missing from various worlds, and Dalí is recruited to go undercover to learn more. I enjoyed this book and look forward to reading the sequel.
    — During my daughter’s visit from South Korea (her first visit in two and a half years), I reread with pleasure the remainder of the Touchstone series: Caszandra, Gratuitous Epilogue, In Arcadia, and Snow Day by Andrea K Höst.
    — For my distant book group, I read The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories by Anthony Marra. This was a collection of linked stories from the 1930s to near the present day set in Russia/the USSR/Chechen. I’d describe the mood of the stories as sad; it’s not a book I have any plan of rereading but our discussion was interesting.
    — Tales from the Folly: A Rivers of London Short Story Collection by Ben Aaronovitch, a collection of stories and a few very short pieces. As with most anthologies, I enjoyed some stories more than others. This book is a companion to the author’s Rivers of London series and is not a stand alone.
    — enjoyed rereading The Accidentals by Sarina Bowen; this is marketed as a young adult novel, but clearly it appeals to older readers as well.
    — The Soulmate Equation by Christina Lauren; this was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — enjoyed The Physicians of Vilnoc by Lois McMaster Bujold. (This is a series that needs to be read in order; begin with Penric’s Demon.)
    — the book that my local book group selected, The Overstory: A Novel by Richard Powers. This was a lengthy but fascinating book. Initially it seemed that it was a collection of unconnected stories all of which featured trees; however, ultimately it all tied together.
    — Death Can Be Habit-Forming: Another John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 11) by Sheri Cobb South which I quite enjoyed. This is the latest book in a series that should be read in order. Begin with the FREE book In Milady’s Chamber: A John Pickett Mystery (John Pickett Mysteries Book 1).
    — Uncommon Ground (Aliens in New York Book 1) by Kelly Jensen; this was an enjoyable contemporary science fiction romance with two male leads.
    — read An Accidental Death: A DC Smith Investigation Series, Book 1 by Peter Grainger and quite enjoyed it. Sadly, neither of my libraries has the follow on books.
    — the contemporary romance Off the Leash (White House Protection Force Book 1) by M. L. Buchman; this was an enjoyable read that featured a chocolatier hero (who knits) and a dog handler who is part of the Secret Service. Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!
    — The Other Me by Sarah Zachrich Jeng which I enjoyed. This was an intriguing science fiction read that left me pondering what ifs in my own life.

    Reply
  21. Always my favorite blog of the month! I think I already mentioned I’m on the third book of Mary Jo’s YA series. So so good. For my bookclub we read Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir The Secret to Super Human Strength. We’re reading another graphic novel for November which I haven’t started yet. I love the Christmas books mention & will put them on my wish list. I read 3 of Simone St. James books set just after WW1. Perfect for October.

    Reply
  22. Always my favorite blog of the month! I think I already mentioned I’m on the third book of Mary Jo’s YA series. So so good. For my bookclub we read Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir The Secret to Super Human Strength. We’re reading another graphic novel for November which I haven’t started yet. I love the Christmas books mention & will put them on my wish list. I read 3 of Simone St. James books set just after WW1. Perfect for October.

    Reply
  23. Always my favorite blog of the month! I think I already mentioned I’m on the third book of Mary Jo’s YA series. So so good. For my bookclub we read Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir The Secret to Super Human Strength. We’re reading another graphic novel for November which I haven’t started yet. I love the Christmas books mention & will put them on my wish list. I read 3 of Simone St. James books set just after WW1. Perfect for October.

    Reply
  24. Always my favorite blog of the month! I think I already mentioned I’m on the third book of Mary Jo’s YA series. So so good. For my bookclub we read Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir The Secret to Super Human Strength. We’re reading another graphic novel for November which I haven’t started yet. I love the Christmas books mention & will put them on my wish list. I read 3 of Simone St. James books set just after WW1. Perfect for October.

    Reply
  25. Always my favorite blog of the month! I think I already mentioned I’m on the third book of Mary Jo’s YA series. So so good. For my bookclub we read Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir The Secret to Super Human Strength. We’re reading another graphic novel for November which I haven’t started yet. I love the Christmas books mention & will put them on my wish list. I read 3 of Simone St. James books set just after WW1. Perfect for October.

    Reply
  26. I’ve been trying to reconstruct what I read in October but it appears it was mostly meh, unmemorable or just okay.
    At the beginning of the month I was still on my Rosamunde Pilcher kick and re-read Coming Home. That took quite a few days as it was almost 1,000 pages long! Very lyrical descriptions of scenery and events. It had been so long since I read it it felt new to me. Covers a 10 year period in England – pre WWII and thru the end of WWII. The heroine is a school girl in the beginning, left behind as her mother and sister return to Malaysia to be with her father who works out there. The ups and downs of life as a school girl, losing her guardian aunt, living with another family, graduating school and her war work. Has a good ending.
    Wednesday I got my own copy of Mary Jo’s Once a Laird so had to read it again. Since I wasn’t racing through it, I enjoyed it in a totally different way this time. Excellent as always.
    Between those 2 books there were a lot of okay books. There is always hope for the next month!

    Reply
  27. I’ve been trying to reconstruct what I read in October but it appears it was mostly meh, unmemorable or just okay.
    At the beginning of the month I was still on my Rosamunde Pilcher kick and re-read Coming Home. That took quite a few days as it was almost 1,000 pages long! Very lyrical descriptions of scenery and events. It had been so long since I read it it felt new to me. Covers a 10 year period in England – pre WWII and thru the end of WWII. The heroine is a school girl in the beginning, left behind as her mother and sister return to Malaysia to be with her father who works out there. The ups and downs of life as a school girl, losing her guardian aunt, living with another family, graduating school and her war work. Has a good ending.
    Wednesday I got my own copy of Mary Jo’s Once a Laird so had to read it again. Since I wasn’t racing through it, I enjoyed it in a totally different way this time. Excellent as always.
    Between those 2 books there were a lot of okay books. There is always hope for the next month!

    Reply
  28. I’ve been trying to reconstruct what I read in October but it appears it was mostly meh, unmemorable or just okay.
    At the beginning of the month I was still on my Rosamunde Pilcher kick and re-read Coming Home. That took quite a few days as it was almost 1,000 pages long! Very lyrical descriptions of scenery and events. It had been so long since I read it it felt new to me. Covers a 10 year period in England – pre WWII and thru the end of WWII. The heroine is a school girl in the beginning, left behind as her mother and sister return to Malaysia to be with her father who works out there. The ups and downs of life as a school girl, losing her guardian aunt, living with another family, graduating school and her war work. Has a good ending.
    Wednesday I got my own copy of Mary Jo’s Once a Laird so had to read it again. Since I wasn’t racing through it, I enjoyed it in a totally different way this time. Excellent as always.
    Between those 2 books there were a lot of okay books. There is always hope for the next month!

    Reply
  29. I’ve been trying to reconstruct what I read in October but it appears it was mostly meh, unmemorable or just okay.
    At the beginning of the month I was still on my Rosamunde Pilcher kick and re-read Coming Home. That took quite a few days as it was almost 1,000 pages long! Very lyrical descriptions of scenery and events. It had been so long since I read it it felt new to me. Covers a 10 year period in England – pre WWII and thru the end of WWII. The heroine is a school girl in the beginning, left behind as her mother and sister return to Malaysia to be with her father who works out there. The ups and downs of life as a school girl, losing her guardian aunt, living with another family, graduating school and her war work. Has a good ending.
    Wednesday I got my own copy of Mary Jo’s Once a Laird so had to read it again. Since I wasn’t racing through it, I enjoyed it in a totally different way this time. Excellent as always.
    Between those 2 books there were a lot of okay books. There is always hope for the next month!

    Reply
  30. I’ve been trying to reconstruct what I read in October but it appears it was mostly meh, unmemorable or just okay.
    At the beginning of the month I was still on my Rosamunde Pilcher kick and re-read Coming Home. That took quite a few days as it was almost 1,000 pages long! Very lyrical descriptions of scenery and events. It had been so long since I read it it felt new to me. Covers a 10 year period in England – pre WWII and thru the end of WWII. The heroine is a school girl in the beginning, left behind as her mother and sister return to Malaysia to be with her father who works out there. The ups and downs of life as a school girl, losing her guardian aunt, living with another family, graduating school and her war work. Has a good ending.
    Wednesday I got my own copy of Mary Jo’s Once a Laird so had to read it again. Since I wasn’t racing through it, I enjoyed it in a totally different way this time. Excellent as always.
    Between those 2 books there were a lot of okay books. There is always hope for the next month!

    Reply
  31. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump lately – reading nothing but re-reads. But I’m coming out of it now. It started with Anne Gracie’s THE SCROUNDRAL’S DAUGHTER – which I loved. Had a lot of enjoyable humor in this one. First book in her latest series “The Brides of Bellaire Gardens.” Looking forward to the next book in the series.
    Moved on the Caroline Warfield’s THE WAYWARD SON which is also the first book in her new series “The Ashmead Heirs.” Loved it also. I’ve already ordered the next book, but haven’t gotten around to reading it yet.
    Finally, I’m just finishing a Barbara Metzger novel I had somehow missed (thought I had all of her books that were available). LADY WILTON’S WEDDING is a sweet story with a lot of humor. Most of it provided by a band of petty thieves roaming the neighborhood – Jake, his dog Sal, and his two nitwit nephews – Sailor and Handy who were named for their fathers (Hey Sailor and Hi Handsome.)
    I love this post. A lot of good ideas presented. Thanks.

    Reply
  32. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump lately – reading nothing but re-reads. But I’m coming out of it now. It started with Anne Gracie’s THE SCROUNDRAL’S DAUGHTER – which I loved. Had a lot of enjoyable humor in this one. First book in her latest series “The Brides of Bellaire Gardens.” Looking forward to the next book in the series.
    Moved on the Caroline Warfield’s THE WAYWARD SON which is also the first book in her new series “The Ashmead Heirs.” Loved it also. I’ve already ordered the next book, but haven’t gotten around to reading it yet.
    Finally, I’m just finishing a Barbara Metzger novel I had somehow missed (thought I had all of her books that were available). LADY WILTON’S WEDDING is a sweet story with a lot of humor. Most of it provided by a band of petty thieves roaming the neighborhood – Jake, his dog Sal, and his two nitwit nephews – Sailor and Handy who were named for their fathers (Hey Sailor and Hi Handsome.)
    I love this post. A lot of good ideas presented. Thanks.

    Reply
  33. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump lately – reading nothing but re-reads. But I’m coming out of it now. It started with Anne Gracie’s THE SCROUNDRAL’S DAUGHTER – which I loved. Had a lot of enjoyable humor in this one. First book in her latest series “The Brides of Bellaire Gardens.” Looking forward to the next book in the series.
    Moved on the Caroline Warfield’s THE WAYWARD SON which is also the first book in her new series “The Ashmead Heirs.” Loved it also. I’ve already ordered the next book, but haven’t gotten around to reading it yet.
    Finally, I’m just finishing a Barbara Metzger novel I had somehow missed (thought I had all of her books that were available). LADY WILTON’S WEDDING is a sweet story with a lot of humor. Most of it provided by a band of petty thieves roaming the neighborhood – Jake, his dog Sal, and his two nitwit nephews – Sailor and Handy who were named for their fathers (Hey Sailor and Hi Handsome.)
    I love this post. A lot of good ideas presented. Thanks.

    Reply
  34. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump lately – reading nothing but re-reads. But I’m coming out of it now. It started with Anne Gracie’s THE SCROUNDRAL’S DAUGHTER – which I loved. Had a lot of enjoyable humor in this one. First book in her latest series “The Brides of Bellaire Gardens.” Looking forward to the next book in the series.
    Moved on the Caroline Warfield’s THE WAYWARD SON which is also the first book in her new series “The Ashmead Heirs.” Loved it also. I’ve already ordered the next book, but haven’t gotten around to reading it yet.
    Finally, I’m just finishing a Barbara Metzger novel I had somehow missed (thought I had all of her books that were available). LADY WILTON’S WEDDING is a sweet story with a lot of humor. Most of it provided by a band of petty thieves roaming the neighborhood – Jake, his dog Sal, and his two nitwit nephews – Sailor and Handy who were named for their fathers (Hey Sailor and Hi Handsome.)
    I love this post. A lot of good ideas presented. Thanks.

    Reply
  35. I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump lately – reading nothing but re-reads. But I’m coming out of it now. It started with Anne Gracie’s THE SCROUNDRAL’S DAUGHTER – which I loved. Had a lot of enjoyable humor in this one. First book in her latest series “The Brides of Bellaire Gardens.” Looking forward to the next book in the series.
    Moved on the Caroline Warfield’s THE WAYWARD SON which is also the first book in her new series “The Ashmead Heirs.” Loved it also. I’ve already ordered the next book, but haven’t gotten around to reading it yet.
    Finally, I’m just finishing a Barbara Metzger novel I had somehow missed (thought I had all of her books that were available). LADY WILTON’S WEDDING is a sweet story with a lot of humor. Most of it provided by a band of petty thieves roaming the neighborhood – Jake, his dog Sal, and his two nitwit nephews – Sailor and Handy who were named for their fathers (Hey Sailor and Hi Handsome.)
    I love this post. A lot of good ideas presented. Thanks.

    Reply
  36. Unlike you ladies, I have little to report. I am finishing a reread of AIRS & GRACES by Elizabeth Hewitt, with the lovely Allan Kass cover for Signet. After that I swear I will finish THE JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY by Natalie Jenner, which I have heard many people praise but which hasn’t charizzed me yet. Sometimes it is better to wait for the movie. After than, PIRANESI is in the stack 🙂
    I did read THE LAST BOOKSHOP IN LONDON a couple of months ago and agree that it was most entertaining, and not too modern.
    I did read one remarkable Fawcett Coventry, REQUIEM FOR A RAKE by Freda Michel, which was quite a curiosity, I thought. It is the current review at Regency Retro Reads so no need to repeat that here.
    I have a stack of old Signets I’m rereading. I find the writing level satisfies and the stories haven’t been modernized too much. I always loved the Signet line best.

    Reply
  37. Unlike you ladies, I have little to report. I am finishing a reread of AIRS & GRACES by Elizabeth Hewitt, with the lovely Allan Kass cover for Signet. After that I swear I will finish THE JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY by Natalie Jenner, which I have heard many people praise but which hasn’t charizzed me yet. Sometimes it is better to wait for the movie. After than, PIRANESI is in the stack 🙂
    I did read THE LAST BOOKSHOP IN LONDON a couple of months ago and agree that it was most entertaining, and not too modern.
    I did read one remarkable Fawcett Coventry, REQUIEM FOR A RAKE by Freda Michel, which was quite a curiosity, I thought. It is the current review at Regency Retro Reads so no need to repeat that here.
    I have a stack of old Signets I’m rereading. I find the writing level satisfies and the stories haven’t been modernized too much. I always loved the Signet line best.

    Reply
  38. Unlike you ladies, I have little to report. I am finishing a reread of AIRS & GRACES by Elizabeth Hewitt, with the lovely Allan Kass cover for Signet. After that I swear I will finish THE JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY by Natalie Jenner, which I have heard many people praise but which hasn’t charizzed me yet. Sometimes it is better to wait for the movie. After than, PIRANESI is in the stack 🙂
    I did read THE LAST BOOKSHOP IN LONDON a couple of months ago and agree that it was most entertaining, and not too modern.
    I did read one remarkable Fawcett Coventry, REQUIEM FOR A RAKE by Freda Michel, which was quite a curiosity, I thought. It is the current review at Regency Retro Reads so no need to repeat that here.
    I have a stack of old Signets I’m rereading. I find the writing level satisfies and the stories haven’t been modernized too much. I always loved the Signet line best.

    Reply
  39. Unlike you ladies, I have little to report. I am finishing a reread of AIRS & GRACES by Elizabeth Hewitt, with the lovely Allan Kass cover for Signet. After that I swear I will finish THE JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY by Natalie Jenner, which I have heard many people praise but which hasn’t charizzed me yet. Sometimes it is better to wait for the movie. After than, PIRANESI is in the stack 🙂
    I did read THE LAST BOOKSHOP IN LONDON a couple of months ago and agree that it was most entertaining, and not too modern.
    I did read one remarkable Fawcett Coventry, REQUIEM FOR A RAKE by Freda Michel, which was quite a curiosity, I thought. It is the current review at Regency Retro Reads so no need to repeat that here.
    I have a stack of old Signets I’m rereading. I find the writing level satisfies and the stories haven’t been modernized too much. I always loved the Signet line best.

    Reply
  40. Unlike you ladies, I have little to report. I am finishing a reread of AIRS & GRACES by Elizabeth Hewitt, with the lovely Allan Kass cover for Signet. After that I swear I will finish THE JANE AUSTEN SOCIETY by Natalie Jenner, which I have heard many people praise but which hasn’t charizzed me yet. Sometimes it is better to wait for the movie. After than, PIRANESI is in the stack 🙂
    I did read THE LAST BOOKSHOP IN LONDON a couple of months ago and agree that it was most entertaining, and not too modern.
    I did read one remarkable Fawcett Coventry, REQUIEM FOR A RAKE by Freda Michel, which was quite a curiosity, I thought. It is the current review at Regency Retro Reads so no need to repeat that here.
    I have a stack of old Signets I’m rereading. I find the writing level satisfies and the stories haven’t been modernized too much. I always loved the Signet line best.

    Reply
  41. Quantum, thanks so much for your very kind words about my Scoundrel’s Daughter. Much appreciated. I read and enjoyed MJP’s Dark series when they first came out and might have to reread them.
    Sarina Bowen is an auto-buy author for me, and the Brooklyn Bruisers is my favourite series of hers, through they’re all good.
    I’m also a fan of Michelle Diener’s and you might be interested in this interview I did with her on the wenches some time ago.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2017/05/meet-michelle-diener.html

    Reply
  42. Quantum, thanks so much for your very kind words about my Scoundrel’s Daughter. Much appreciated. I read and enjoyed MJP’s Dark series when they first came out and might have to reread them.
    Sarina Bowen is an auto-buy author for me, and the Brooklyn Bruisers is my favourite series of hers, through they’re all good.
    I’m also a fan of Michelle Diener’s and you might be interested in this interview I did with her on the wenches some time ago.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2017/05/meet-michelle-diener.html

    Reply
  43. Quantum, thanks so much for your very kind words about my Scoundrel’s Daughter. Much appreciated. I read and enjoyed MJP’s Dark series when they first came out and might have to reread them.
    Sarina Bowen is an auto-buy author for me, and the Brooklyn Bruisers is my favourite series of hers, through they’re all good.
    I’m also a fan of Michelle Diener’s and you might be interested in this interview I did with her on the wenches some time ago.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2017/05/meet-michelle-diener.html

    Reply
  44. Quantum, thanks so much for your very kind words about my Scoundrel’s Daughter. Much appreciated. I read and enjoyed MJP’s Dark series when they first came out and might have to reread them.
    Sarina Bowen is an auto-buy author for me, and the Brooklyn Bruisers is my favourite series of hers, through they’re all good.
    I’m also a fan of Michelle Diener’s and you might be interested in this interview I did with her on the wenches some time ago.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2017/05/meet-michelle-diener.html

    Reply
  45. Quantum, thanks so much for your very kind words about my Scoundrel’s Daughter. Much appreciated. I read and enjoyed MJP’s Dark series when they first came out and might have to reread them.
    Sarina Bowen is an auto-buy author for me, and the Brooklyn Bruisers is my favourite series of hers, through they’re all good.
    I’m also a fan of Michelle Diener’s and you might be interested in this interview I did with her on the wenches some time ago.
    https://wordwenches.typepad.com/word_wenches/2017/05/meet-michelle-diener.html

    Reply
  46. Wow, Kareni, as always you blow me away with your extensive reading list. I did chuckle at your “Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!” I nearly put a “dieters beware” warning on the Trisha Ashley book recommendation. *g*

    Reply
  47. Wow, Kareni, as always you blow me away with your extensive reading list. I did chuckle at your “Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!” I nearly put a “dieters beware” warning on the Trisha Ashley book recommendation. *g*

    Reply
  48. Wow, Kareni, as always you blow me away with your extensive reading list. I did chuckle at your “Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!” I nearly put a “dieters beware” warning on the Trisha Ashley book recommendation. *g*

    Reply
  49. Wow, Kareni, as always you blow me away with your extensive reading list. I did chuckle at your “Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!” I nearly put a “dieters beware” warning on the Trisha Ashley book recommendation. *g*

    Reply
  50. Wow, Kareni, as always you blow me away with your extensive reading list. I did chuckle at your “Be prepared to want chocolate if you read this!” I nearly put a “dieters beware” warning on the Trisha Ashley book recommendation. *g*

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Mary, I’m so glad you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. The next book in the series is called The Rake’s Daughter, but though it’s “in the can” so to speak, I haven’t been given a release date for it.

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Mary, I’m so glad you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. The next book in the series is called The Rake’s Daughter, but though it’s “in the can” so to speak, I haven’t been given a release date for it.

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Mary, I’m so glad you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. The next book in the series is called The Rake’s Daughter, but though it’s “in the can” so to speak, I haven’t been given a release date for it.

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Mary, I’m so glad you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. The next book in the series is called The Rake’s Daughter, but though it’s “in the can” so to speak, I haven’t been given a release date for it.

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Mary, I’m so glad you enjoyed my Scoundrel’s Daughter. The next book in the series is called The Rake’s Daughter, but though it’s “in the can” so to speak, I haven’t been given a release date for it.

    Reply
  56. Janice it might have been you who caused me to buy and read The Last Bookshop in London — I know I picked up the recommendation from somebody. I just can’t recall who. Anyway I’m glad I did.

    Reply
  57. Janice it might have been you who caused me to buy and read The Last Bookshop in London — I know I picked up the recommendation from somebody. I just can’t recall who. Anyway I’m glad I did.

    Reply
  58. Janice it might have been you who caused me to buy and read The Last Bookshop in London — I know I picked up the recommendation from somebody. I just can’t recall who. Anyway I’m glad I did.

    Reply
  59. Janice it might have been you who caused me to buy and read The Last Bookshop in London — I know I picked up the recommendation from somebody. I just can’t recall who. Anyway I’m glad I did.

    Reply
  60. Janice it might have been you who caused me to buy and read The Last Bookshop in London — I know I picked up the recommendation from somebody. I just can’t recall who. Anyway I’m glad I did.

    Reply
  61. I’m so glad you enjoy the WWR, Jeanne! I have to admit it’s one of my favourite ones too and this time I have gathered a LOT of new recommendations! Happy reading!

    Reply
  62. I’m so glad you enjoy the WWR, Jeanne! I have to admit it’s one of my favourite ones too and this time I have gathered a LOT of new recommendations! Happy reading!

    Reply
  63. I’m so glad you enjoy the WWR, Jeanne! I have to admit it’s one of my favourite ones too and this time I have gathered a LOT of new recommendations! Happy reading!

    Reply
  64. I’m so glad you enjoy the WWR, Jeanne! I have to admit it’s one of my favourite ones too and this time I have gathered a LOT of new recommendations! Happy reading!

    Reply
  65. I’m so glad you enjoy the WWR, Jeanne! I have to admit it’s one of my favourite ones too and this time I have gathered a LOT of new recommendations! Happy reading!

    Reply
  66. You’ve prompted me to re-read Coming Home, Vicki. I have always enjoyed Rosamunde Pilcher’s beautiful descriptions and gentle but thought-provoking stories. I hope you have a great reading November!

    Reply
  67. You’ve prompted me to re-read Coming Home, Vicki. I have always enjoyed Rosamunde Pilcher’s beautiful descriptions and gentle but thought-provoking stories. I hope you have a great reading November!

    Reply
  68. You’ve prompted me to re-read Coming Home, Vicki. I have always enjoyed Rosamunde Pilcher’s beautiful descriptions and gentle but thought-provoking stories. I hope you have a great reading November!

    Reply
  69. You’ve prompted me to re-read Coming Home, Vicki. I have always enjoyed Rosamunde Pilcher’s beautiful descriptions and gentle but thought-provoking stories. I hope you have a great reading November!

    Reply
  70. You’ve prompted me to re-read Coming Home, Vicki. I have always enjoyed Rosamunde Pilcher’s beautiful descriptions and gentle but thought-provoking stories. I hope you have a great reading November!

    Reply
  71. Just finished The Widow of Rose House by Diana Biller and I loved it! It has a disgraced heroine, the swoon worthy hero who loves her, and a ghost – who could ask for anything more. Her newest book is the story of one of the brothers of the hero so I see several more books in the future featuring this loving, funny, scientific family. I cried a bit towards the end but loved every moment of this story – I highly recommend it.
    I get many new authors from this site so thank you!

    Reply
  72. Just finished The Widow of Rose House by Diana Biller and I loved it! It has a disgraced heroine, the swoon worthy hero who loves her, and a ghost – who could ask for anything more. Her newest book is the story of one of the brothers of the hero so I see several more books in the future featuring this loving, funny, scientific family. I cried a bit towards the end but loved every moment of this story – I highly recommend it.
    I get many new authors from this site so thank you!

    Reply
  73. Just finished The Widow of Rose House by Diana Biller and I loved it! It has a disgraced heroine, the swoon worthy hero who loves her, and a ghost – who could ask for anything more. Her newest book is the story of one of the brothers of the hero so I see several more books in the future featuring this loving, funny, scientific family. I cried a bit towards the end but loved every moment of this story – I highly recommend it.
    I get many new authors from this site so thank you!

    Reply
  74. Just finished The Widow of Rose House by Diana Biller and I loved it! It has a disgraced heroine, the swoon worthy hero who loves her, and a ghost – who could ask for anything more. Her newest book is the story of one of the brothers of the hero so I see several more books in the future featuring this loving, funny, scientific family. I cried a bit towards the end but loved every moment of this story – I highly recommend it.
    I get many new authors from this site so thank you!

    Reply
  75. Just finished The Widow of Rose House by Diana Biller and I loved it! It has a disgraced heroine, the swoon worthy hero who loves her, and a ghost – who could ask for anything more. Her newest book is the story of one of the brothers of the hero so I see several more books in the future featuring this loving, funny, scientific family. I cried a bit towards the end but loved every moment of this story – I highly recommend it.
    I get many new authors from this site so thank you!

    Reply
  76. Thanks for the link Anne. I had forgotten that interview … even though I commented! Time passes quickly when your having fun. 😊

    Reply
  77. Thanks for the link Anne. I had forgotten that interview … even though I commented! Time passes quickly when your having fun. 😊

    Reply
  78. Thanks for the link Anne. I had forgotten that interview … even though I commented! Time passes quickly when your having fun. 😊

    Reply
  79. Thanks for the link Anne. I had forgotten that interview … even though I commented! Time passes quickly when your having fun. 😊

    Reply
  80. Thanks for the link Anne. I had forgotten that interview … even though I commented! Time passes quickly when your having fun. 😊

    Reply

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