What We’re Reading in May

Susan here. What did we read in May, and what did we add to our TBR stacks? Here are some highlights and delights from the books on our  shelves (and tables, and chairs, and in baskets, and stacked here, there…)! 

Joanna:  

Wench small magicsEvery once in a while I think how great it would be if I could write novellas or short stories without twisting myself into knots. So I’ve been looking at collections of short stories by authors I already know I like. One of them struck me in particular.

Small Magics by Ilona Andrews. This is five or six stories set in the Ilona Andrews universe. (Magic, warrior women, shape shifters, post-Apocalypse world, folks fighting with swords.)  A couple YA stories, a couple little love stories.

Can I call them warm and funny when they’re full of monsters and bloodshed? I enjoyed this lot, anyway, and it might be just what you need if you don’t have time to sit down and concentrate for a long stretch.

Mary Jo: 

Here's a pile of what I've been reading!  By chance, two of my favorite authors had IMG_4358 releases on May 7th and arrived at the same time. Yum!  Did I have the self control to space the reads out? You're kidding, right?

Storm Cursed by Patricia Briggs:  I adore Patricia Briggs' Mercedes Thompson books.  Her characterization, worldbuilding, and plotting are amazing, and there's romance and humor woven in as well.  Mercy Thompson is a coyote shape shifter and Volkswagen mechanic, and through no fault of her own, she is continuing getting drawn into lethal situations involving werewolves, vampires, and the fae.  They are all immensely more powerful than she is, but she has the wiliness of a coyote and a genius for surviving.  (Over the course of the books, she had mated and married the totally hot and wonderful alpha werewolf next door–and drives him crazy with her fearless refusal to not do the right thing.)

Tightrope by Amanda Quick.  The historical pseudonym of Jayne Ann Krentz, this is the third in her Burning Cove series set in a fictional California town in the early 1930s.  The glamorous little town is popular with movie stars and Hollywood movers and shakers. <G>  Amalie Vaughn was a famous trapeze artist until a near escape from murder convinces her use her inheritance to buy a mansion in Burning Cover and turn it into a B&B.  Then things start happening!  

Also in my book pile is an advance reading copy of Seduction on a Snowy Night, a Christmas anthology I'm in with other Kensington authors Madeline Hunter and Sabrina Jeffries.  The book will be released 9/24 (available for preorder now.) 

The pile also include a research book, and leaning against the stack is my e-reader, though you can't see it.  No shortage of books here! 

Anne booksAnne:

I, too read and loved STORM CURSED by Patricia Briggs. Pat and Mary Jo put me onto Patricia Briggs some time back, and since then I've read and reread her books. In fact, in preparation for the arrival of the new Mercy Thompson book, I reread all of that series, and enjoyed it as much the umpteenth time around. If you haven't read her, start with MOON CALLED

I seem to be in a paranormal reading mood, because I've also been rereading various Sharon Shinn series — another author who Mary Jo put me onto after I'd noticed a stack of her books on Mary Jo's "keeper" bookshelves. Her stories are action filled, full of magic, with wonderful world-building and characters I really connect with. I have the "Archangel" series in paperback but the series I've most recently reread is the Twelve Houses. Start with MYSTIC AND RIDER. 

ArchangelShinnI read mostly on my e-reader these days, so when Susan asked for photos of the books we'd been reading I was a bit stumped, but luckily I had all these in "real" on my bookshelf. And they're not even set up photos — I didn't rearrange, I didn't even dust! And can you spot a few other favorite authors slipped in awaiting tidying? I've run out of shelf space — again. Hence the e-reader.

I did read a new contemporary romance — ONE SUMMER IN PARIS by Sarah Morgan. It's more a women's fiction story, but there is romance as well. A US woman organizes a holiday in Paris for her 25th anniversary, only to be told that her husband wants a divorce. A teenage girl in England escapes family pressures by taking a job in a little Paris bookshop, even though she doesn't speak French. The two meet up, become unlikely friends and learn from each other. A slowish start but once they hit Paris it's wonderful.00



Nicola:

This month's booksNicola here and this month I’ve been mixing love and death by flitting between romance and cosy crime. I loved Annie West’s latest Harlequin Presents, Wedding Night Reunion in Greece, which is a classic runaway bride story. When Emma hears her new husband telling his best man that he has only married her for business reasons she leaves him standing at the wedding reception if not the altar and runs away to Corfu whilst she plots to arrange a divorce. Naturally her new husband, Christo, has other ideas and when he follows her there a battle of wills ensues. Christo starts off as a typical alpha hero and in some books I find that a bit too macho for my reading tastes but the author very skilfully sets up a story of real emotional conflict and depth as well as some fiery passion. Emma is more than a match for Christo’s determination and the happy ending is really satisfying.

Murder at the Old Vicarage by Jill McGown is an old book and there’s quite a lot of romance in that as well. I hadn’t come across this author or her “Lloyd and Hill” series before but they are very much in Midsomer Murders style and the plot was suitably complicated and the characters multi-dimensional with interesting human conflicts. It helped me pass a long train journey very well!

Here is the rest of my TBR pile… And then there’s the Kindle…

418NKsHfoHLAndrea:

My reading this month including two very different and interesting—and quirky— books that I enjoyed very much. I had read that Anthony Horowitz, creator of Foyle’s War and Midsomer Murders, is also a mystery writer, so I really wanted to try him, as I’m a huge fan of Foyle’s War. So I checked out The Word Is Murderand found it to be a delightful showcase of both his intricate plotting skills and his sly sense of humor. It’s written in first person and he’s one of the main protagonists—he’s the real-life Anthony Horowitz dealing with filming glitches for Foyle’s War, meetings with his agent and other mundane daily activities. But he also, much against his better judgment, has accepted the book deal to shadow a brilliant  “real” detective and write about how he solves cases . . . and that’s where the fun begins. (As it says on Amazon, he writes a fictional account of himself as Watson to a modern-day Holmes) Horowitz doesn’t really like the detective (or so he claims, though one sees a grudging partnership developing) and takes it as a personal challenge to solve the suspicious death to which his subject is assigned.

 It’s a very twisty mystery, involving parent-child relationships, and the complexities of guilt as well as the pressures of expectations. And then there is the personal friction between Horowitz and the detective . . . He writes so cleverly that I found myself checking and re-checking that yes, this was a novel, not a non-fiction narrative. All in all, I found it very engaging.

41oSK+hKPGLThe other new-to-me author was Casey McQuiston, and her debut book, Red, White and Royal Blue, a contemporary—and very modern—romance between an English prince (younger brother of the heir to the British throne) and the son of the first woman president of the U.S.—which has been getting a lot of buzz.  It’s wonderfully well-written, with sharp, funny dialogue, and a richly developed cast of characters that create a beautiful story about love, friendship, family, and how one navigates the complexities of life while trying to decide who you are meant to be and what will make you happy.  

Pat: 

I've been scrubbing the bottom of the barrel this month. My e-readers are full of books by Kindlefavorite authors I've already talked about, so I dug up something a little different. BURIED FOR PLEASURE, a Gervase Fen Mystery,  by Edmund Crispin is an old mystery, set in England just after WWII. Gervase Fen is a charming Oxford professor known for having solved a few mysteries. In this book, he is bored and has decided to run for office—one week before the local elections. He manages to become wrapped up in several murders, save a mysterious young woman, meet a poltergeist, and simultaneously grow bored with running for office. His resignation from his campaign is nothing short of hilarious and shows politics hasn’t changed a great deal over the last century. The humor is very dry, but one can almost see a Monty Python skit as the rector flings pebbles back at the poltergeist and essentially tells it to go on about its business and leave him alone. There are passages of whimsical description easily skipped, but the workings of Fen’s mind is a sight to behold. A leisurely read when one wants a different cuppa tea.


20190530_200132Susan:

My eyes have been bigger than my reading capacity this month. I've read some, browsed more, tucking into a few chapters of this and that, piling up books I want to finish soon. I've been on a nonfiction history kick again, reading for research (19th century and medieval Scotland both). And I've been indulging my love of ancient history, starting with When Women Ruled the World by Kara Cooney, a fascinating study of six Egyptian queens, and the complex society that both accepted and undermined female rulership. Then I moved on to Ten Caesars: Roman Emperors from Augustus to Constantine by Barry Strauss. A new release, this look at Roman history through its caesars is highly readable, detailed and insightful, with a deft, light touch. It's good and compelling nonfiction. This also coincided with an urge to return to Lindsey Davis' brilliant historical mystery series featuring Marcus Didius Falco, ancient Roman gumshoe and one of the smartest, most enjoyable, most wry–and secretly tenderhearted–sleuths in all of historical mystery. I read some of the series years ago, when I was dealing with babies and little guys and writing my own novels, so I never managed to finish it. Last month I read The Silver Pigs again (which ranks high on my list of all-time favorite mysteries), went on to Shadows in Bronze, then Venus in Copper, and I'm into The Iron Hand of Mars just now. 

Here's a photo of my current reading/wish list–I've just started Christina Lauren's My Favorite Half-Night Stand, and it's breezy, sassy, and intelligently done–it's pulling me in, that writing team always does! I'm still working my way through Lethal White by Robert Galbraith. Much as I like this series and Cormoran Strike and Robin, I'm finding this one a slow, hefty, but very intriguing read, and I'm determined to find time to plow through–I want to know what's going to happen. You'll also notice a slim kid's book in the stack–What the Ladybug Heard by Julia Donaldson is one of my granddaughter's favorites at my house. It's utterly charming, catchy, and fun, as the ladybug knows how to catch a thief–if only the other animals will listen! 

 What are your reading highlights and delights in May? We'd love to know! 

 

 

115 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in May”

  1. I love the “Burning Cove” series by Amanda Quick, that one is on my must get list. I have “Lethal White” in my ever expanding to read pile. I’m currently reading Anne Perry’s Second Daniel Pitt book “Triple Jeopardy.”

    Reply
  2. I love the “Burning Cove” series by Amanda Quick, that one is on my must get list. I have “Lethal White” in my ever expanding to read pile. I’m currently reading Anne Perry’s Second Daniel Pitt book “Triple Jeopardy.”

    Reply
  3. I love the “Burning Cove” series by Amanda Quick, that one is on my must get list. I have “Lethal White” in my ever expanding to read pile. I’m currently reading Anne Perry’s Second Daniel Pitt book “Triple Jeopardy.”

    Reply
  4. I love the “Burning Cove” series by Amanda Quick, that one is on my must get list. I have “Lethal White” in my ever expanding to read pile. I’m currently reading Anne Perry’s Second Daniel Pitt book “Triple Jeopardy.”

    Reply
  5. I love the “Burning Cove” series by Amanda Quick, that one is on my must get list. I have “Lethal White” in my ever expanding to read pile. I’m currently reading Anne Perry’s Second Daniel Pitt book “Triple Jeopardy.”

    Reply
  6. Well dang it all…my nice long comment due to electronic mischief disappeared before I could hit send. My perfect prose is gone…grin.
    Yesterday I read To Love a Thief by Julie Anne Long which was very good and funny. A Pygmalion Regency Romance (St. Giles thief turned into a Lady). A very satisfying HEA.
    This week I reread Amanada Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes and The Girl Who Knew Too Much. Earlier in the month I had read Tightrope. I must have been #1 on the library waitlist because I got it right on the release date. Oddly enough I enjoyed the other 2 Burning Cove books more this time than I did the first time around. It was fun seeing Tightrope in Mary Jo’s stack.
    Two Carolyn Brown books this month – both rereads because at the time I needed something I knew I could put down. Cowboy Boots for Christmas because I just love those two characters and Long Tall Cowboy Christmas.
    White Tiger by Jennifer Ashley. That was neat seeing that Anne had several of Jennifer Ashley books on her shelf. I don’t think I’ve read the 2 Anne has yet. I’ve just been reading that series here and there out of order.
    I’ve added Andrea’s Murder on Black Swan Lane to the very top of my Mt. TBR because I was lucky enough to win it during the Wenchiversy (sp) give away. Yea me….and thanks to Andrea. Many thanks indeed.
    Here is a funny story about a DNF from this month. I pulled a book off the shelf to read and realized, huh, I had started it several years ago and set it aside. Took the bookmark out and started from the beginning. I may have made it 10 pages further this time when I decided no…this book isn’t going to cut it the 2nd time around either.
    Dipped into in 150 pages further in. Nope…still just as stupid. Went to the last 20 pages – even the ending was STUPID!
    Apparently my feelings about it 2 or 3 years ago were correct and I should have just totally abandoned it at the time. The only reason I didn’t abandon it was because I’d read many books by that author that I had enjoyed previously.
    Luckily I did read some good books after that so they erased the taste of that one from my mind. Grin.

    Reply
  7. Well dang it all…my nice long comment due to electronic mischief disappeared before I could hit send. My perfect prose is gone…grin.
    Yesterday I read To Love a Thief by Julie Anne Long which was very good and funny. A Pygmalion Regency Romance (St. Giles thief turned into a Lady). A very satisfying HEA.
    This week I reread Amanada Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes and The Girl Who Knew Too Much. Earlier in the month I had read Tightrope. I must have been #1 on the library waitlist because I got it right on the release date. Oddly enough I enjoyed the other 2 Burning Cove books more this time than I did the first time around. It was fun seeing Tightrope in Mary Jo’s stack.
    Two Carolyn Brown books this month – both rereads because at the time I needed something I knew I could put down. Cowboy Boots for Christmas because I just love those two characters and Long Tall Cowboy Christmas.
    White Tiger by Jennifer Ashley. That was neat seeing that Anne had several of Jennifer Ashley books on her shelf. I don’t think I’ve read the 2 Anne has yet. I’ve just been reading that series here and there out of order.
    I’ve added Andrea’s Murder on Black Swan Lane to the very top of my Mt. TBR because I was lucky enough to win it during the Wenchiversy (sp) give away. Yea me….and thanks to Andrea. Many thanks indeed.
    Here is a funny story about a DNF from this month. I pulled a book off the shelf to read and realized, huh, I had started it several years ago and set it aside. Took the bookmark out and started from the beginning. I may have made it 10 pages further this time when I decided no…this book isn’t going to cut it the 2nd time around either.
    Dipped into in 150 pages further in. Nope…still just as stupid. Went to the last 20 pages – even the ending was STUPID!
    Apparently my feelings about it 2 or 3 years ago were correct and I should have just totally abandoned it at the time. The only reason I didn’t abandon it was because I’d read many books by that author that I had enjoyed previously.
    Luckily I did read some good books after that so they erased the taste of that one from my mind. Grin.

    Reply
  8. Well dang it all…my nice long comment due to electronic mischief disappeared before I could hit send. My perfect prose is gone…grin.
    Yesterday I read To Love a Thief by Julie Anne Long which was very good and funny. A Pygmalion Regency Romance (St. Giles thief turned into a Lady). A very satisfying HEA.
    This week I reread Amanada Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes and The Girl Who Knew Too Much. Earlier in the month I had read Tightrope. I must have been #1 on the library waitlist because I got it right on the release date. Oddly enough I enjoyed the other 2 Burning Cove books more this time than I did the first time around. It was fun seeing Tightrope in Mary Jo’s stack.
    Two Carolyn Brown books this month – both rereads because at the time I needed something I knew I could put down. Cowboy Boots for Christmas because I just love those two characters and Long Tall Cowboy Christmas.
    White Tiger by Jennifer Ashley. That was neat seeing that Anne had several of Jennifer Ashley books on her shelf. I don’t think I’ve read the 2 Anne has yet. I’ve just been reading that series here and there out of order.
    I’ve added Andrea’s Murder on Black Swan Lane to the very top of my Mt. TBR because I was lucky enough to win it during the Wenchiversy (sp) give away. Yea me….and thanks to Andrea. Many thanks indeed.
    Here is a funny story about a DNF from this month. I pulled a book off the shelf to read and realized, huh, I had started it several years ago and set it aside. Took the bookmark out and started from the beginning. I may have made it 10 pages further this time when I decided no…this book isn’t going to cut it the 2nd time around either.
    Dipped into in 150 pages further in. Nope…still just as stupid. Went to the last 20 pages – even the ending was STUPID!
    Apparently my feelings about it 2 or 3 years ago were correct and I should have just totally abandoned it at the time. The only reason I didn’t abandon it was because I’d read many books by that author that I had enjoyed previously.
    Luckily I did read some good books after that so they erased the taste of that one from my mind. Grin.

    Reply
  9. Well dang it all…my nice long comment due to electronic mischief disappeared before I could hit send. My perfect prose is gone…grin.
    Yesterday I read To Love a Thief by Julie Anne Long which was very good and funny. A Pygmalion Regency Romance (St. Giles thief turned into a Lady). A very satisfying HEA.
    This week I reread Amanada Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes and The Girl Who Knew Too Much. Earlier in the month I had read Tightrope. I must have been #1 on the library waitlist because I got it right on the release date. Oddly enough I enjoyed the other 2 Burning Cove books more this time than I did the first time around. It was fun seeing Tightrope in Mary Jo’s stack.
    Two Carolyn Brown books this month – both rereads because at the time I needed something I knew I could put down. Cowboy Boots for Christmas because I just love those two characters and Long Tall Cowboy Christmas.
    White Tiger by Jennifer Ashley. That was neat seeing that Anne had several of Jennifer Ashley books on her shelf. I don’t think I’ve read the 2 Anne has yet. I’ve just been reading that series here and there out of order.
    I’ve added Andrea’s Murder on Black Swan Lane to the very top of my Mt. TBR because I was lucky enough to win it during the Wenchiversy (sp) give away. Yea me….and thanks to Andrea. Many thanks indeed.
    Here is a funny story about a DNF from this month. I pulled a book off the shelf to read and realized, huh, I had started it several years ago and set it aside. Took the bookmark out and started from the beginning. I may have made it 10 pages further this time when I decided no…this book isn’t going to cut it the 2nd time around either.
    Dipped into in 150 pages further in. Nope…still just as stupid. Went to the last 20 pages – even the ending was STUPID!
    Apparently my feelings about it 2 or 3 years ago were correct and I should have just totally abandoned it at the time. The only reason I didn’t abandon it was because I’d read many books by that author that I had enjoyed previously.
    Luckily I did read some good books after that so they erased the taste of that one from my mind. Grin.

    Reply
  10. Well dang it all…my nice long comment due to electronic mischief disappeared before I could hit send. My perfect prose is gone…grin.
    Yesterday I read To Love a Thief by Julie Anne Long which was very good and funny. A Pygmalion Regency Romance (St. Giles thief turned into a Lady). A very satisfying HEA.
    This week I reread Amanada Quick’s The Other Lady Vanishes and The Girl Who Knew Too Much. Earlier in the month I had read Tightrope. I must have been #1 on the library waitlist because I got it right on the release date. Oddly enough I enjoyed the other 2 Burning Cove books more this time than I did the first time around. It was fun seeing Tightrope in Mary Jo’s stack.
    Two Carolyn Brown books this month – both rereads because at the time I needed something I knew I could put down. Cowboy Boots for Christmas because I just love those two characters and Long Tall Cowboy Christmas.
    White Tiger by Jennifer Ashley. That was neat seeing that Anne had several of Jennifer Ashley books on her shelf. I don’t think I’ve read the 2 Anne has yet. I’ve just been reading that series here and there out of order.
    I’ve added Andrea’s Murder on Black Swan Lane to the very top of my Mt. TBR because I was lucky enough to win it during the Wenchiversy (sp) give away. Yea me….and thanks to Andrea. Many thanks indeed.
    Here is a funny story about a DNF from this month. I pulled a book off the shelf to read and realized, huh, I had started it several years ago and set it aside. Took the bookmark out and started from the beginning. I may have made it 10 pages further this time when I decided no…this book isn’t going to cut it the 2nd time around either.
    Dipped into in 150 pages further in. Nope…still just as stupid. Went to the last 20 pages – even the ending was STUPID!
    Apparently my feelings about it 2 or 3 years ago were correct and I should have just totally abandoned it at the time. The only reason I didn’t abandon it was because I’d read many books by that author that I had enjoyed previously.
    Luckily I did read some good books after that so they erased the taste of that one from my mind. Grin.

    Reply
  11. Lots of interesting suggestions here.
    I read quite a few of Amanda Quick’s early novels which I rated highly, so will be interested to try the ‘Burning Cove’ series ( recently appeared on Audible). As a detective fan I also liked the look of ‘The Word is Murder’
    Over the past month I have really enjoyed Philippa Gregory’s two-book series ‘Earthly Joys’ and ‘Virgin Earth’. It tells the story of the Tradescant family,famous plant collectors and gardeners, covering end of 16th and beginning of 17th century including the civil war in Britain and the colonization of Virginia in the US. For me Gregory has the ability to really make history come to life by focusing on the experience of a few characters …highly recommended as audio books.
    Top of my audio wish list for next month when new credits arrive I have MJP’s Fallen Angels books 6 and 7 and Jane Casey’s Maeve Kerrigan series …. I have a fatal weakness for lady detectives thriving in the modern police force!

    Reply
  12. Lots of interesting suggestions here.
    I read quite a few of Amanda Quick’s early novels which I rated highly, so will be interested to try the ‘Burning Cove’ series ( recently appeared on Audible). As a detective fan I also liked the look of ‘The Word is Murder’
    Over the past month I have really enjoyed Philippa Gregory’s two-book series ‘Earthly Joys’ and ‘Virgin Earth’. It tells the story of the Tradescant family,famous plant collectors and gardeners, covering end of 16th and beginning of 17th century including the civil war in Britain and the colonization of Virginia in the US. For me Gregory has the ability to really make history come to life by focusing on the experience of a few characters …highly recommended as audio books.
    Top of my audio wish list for next month when new credits arrive I have MJP’s Fallen Angels books 6 and 7 and Jane Casey’s Maeve Kerrigan series …. I have a fatal weakness for lady detectives thriving in the modern police force!

    Reply
  13. Lots of interesting suggestions here.
    I read quite a few of Amanda Quick’s early novels which I rated highly, so will be interested to try the ‘Burning Cove’ series ( recently appeared on Audible). As a detective fan I also liked the look of ‘The Word is Murder’
    Over the past month I have really enjoyed Philippa Gregory’s two-book series ‘Earthly Joys’ and ‘Virgin Earth’. It tells the story of the Tradescant family,famous plant collectors and gardeners, covering end of 16th and beginning of 17th century including the civil war in Britain and the colonization of Virginia in the US. For me Gregory has the ability to really make history come to life by focusing on the experience of a few characters …highly recommended as audio books.
    Top of my audio wish list for next month when new credits arrive I have MJP’s Fallen Angels books 6 and 7 and Jane Casey’s Maeve Kerrigan series …. I have a fatal weakness for lady detectives thriving in the modern police force!

    Reply
  14. Lots of interesting suggestions here.
    I read quite a few of Amanda Quick’s early novels which I rated highly, so will be interested to try the ‘Burning Cove’ series ( recently appeared on Audible). As a detective fan I also liked the look of ‘The Word is Murder’
    Over the past month I have really enjoyed Philippa Gregory’s two-book series ‘Earthly Joys’ and ‘Virgin Earth’. It tells the story of the Tradescant family,famous plant collectors and gardeners, covering end of 16th and beginning of 17th century including the civil war in Britain and the colonization of Virginia in the US. For me Gregory has the ability to really make history come to life by focusing on the experience of a few characters …highly recommended as audio books.
    Top of my audio wish list for next month when new credits arrive I have MJP’s Fallen Angels books 6 and 7 and Jane Casey’s Maeve Kerrigan series …. I have a fatal weakness for lady detectives thriving in the modern police force!

    Reply
  15. Lots of interesting suggestions here.
    I read quite a few of Amanda Quick’s early novels which I rated highly, so will be interested to try the ‘Burning Cove’ series ( recently appeared on Audible). As a detective fan I also liked the look of ‘The Word is Murder’
    Over the past month I have really enjoyed Philippa Gregory’s two-book series ‘Earthly Joys’ and ‘Virgin Earth’. It tells the story of the Tradescant family,famous plant collectors and gardeners, covering end of 16th and beginning of 17th century including the civil war in Britain and the colonization of Virginia in the US. For me Gregory has the ability to really make history come to life by focusing on the experience of a few characters …highly recommended as audio books.
    Top of my audio wish list for next month when new credits arrive I have MJP’s Fallen Angels books 6 and 7 and Jane Casey’s Maeve Kerrigan series …. I have a fatal weakness for lady detectives thriving in the modern police force!

    Reply
  16. Vicki, I really enjoy Jennfer Ashley’s “shifter” books as well as her historicals — and if you haven’t read them start with The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. She also writes historical mystery as Ashley Gardiner, so she’s very versatile.
    And I did a similar thing — picking up a book I hadn’t got very far into before dropping. I started it again . . . and yes, got about 30 pages in and thought, nope. And she’s an author I normally like, too. It won’t stop me buying her next one, though.

    Reply
  17. Vicki, I really enjoy Jennfer Ashley’s “shifter” books as well as her historicals — and if you haven’t read them start with The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. She also writes historical mystery as Ashley Gardiner, so she’s very versatile.
    And I did a similar thing — picking up a book I hadn’t got very far into before dropping. I started it again . . . and yes, got about 30 pages in and thought, nope. And she’s an author I normally like, too. It won’t stop me buying her next one, though.

    Reply
  18. Vicki, I really enjoy Jennfer Ashley’s “shifter” books as well as her historicals — and if you haven’t read them start with The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. She also writes historical mystery as Ashley Gardiner, so she’s very versatile.
    And I did a similar thing — picking up a book I hadn’t got very far into before dropping. I started it again . . . and yes, got about 30 pages in and thought, nope. And she’s an author I normally like, too. It won’t stop me buying her next one, though.

    Reply
  19. Vicki, I really enjoy Jennfer Ashley’s “shifter” books as well as her historicals — and if you haven’t read them start with The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. She also writes historical mystery as Ashley Gardiner, so she’s very versatile.
    And I did a similar thing — picking up a book I hadn’t got very far into before dropping. I started it again . . . and yes, got about 30 pages in and thought, nope. And she’s an author I normally like, too. It won’t stop me buying her next one, though.

    Reply
  20. Vicki, I really enjoy Jennfer Ashley’s “shifter” books as well as her historicals — and if you haven’t read them start with The Madness of Lord Ian Mackenzie. She also writes historical mystery as Ashley Gardiner, so she’s very versatile.
    And I did a similar thing — picking up a book I hadn’t got very far into before dropping. I started it again . . . and yes, got about 30 pages in and thought, nope. And she’s an author I normally like, too. It won’t stop me buying her next one, though.

    Reply
  21. LOL, Jeanette — a friend of mine says the same thing about me. Really I suspect it might be a good way to go . . . except I’d want to finish reading them all first. Oh, but then there wouldn’t be a TBR pile.
    But of course there would — this is me I’m talking about. I’m always buying books.
    Thanks for the chuckle.

    Reply
  22. LOL, Jeanette — a friend of mine says the same thing about me. Really I suspect it might be a good way to go . . . except I’d want to finish reading them all first. Oh, but then there wouldn’t be a TBR pile.
    But of course there would — this is me I’m talking about. I’m always buying books.
    Thanks for the chuckle.

    Reply
  23. LOL, Jeanette — a friend of mine says the same thing about me. Really I suspect it might be a good way to go . . . except I’d want to finish reading them all first. Oh, but then there wouldn’t be a TBR pile.
    But of course there would — this is me I’m talking about. I’m always buying books.
    Thanks for the chuckle.

    Reply
  24. LOL, Jeanette — a friend of mine says the same thing about me. Really I suspect it might be a good way to go . . . except I’d want to finish reading them all first. Oh, but then there wouldn’t be a TBR pile.
    But of course there would — this is me I’m talking about. I’m always buying books.
    Thanks for the chuckle.

    Reply
  25. LOL, Jeanette — a friend of mine says the same thing about me. Really I suspect it might be a good way to go . . . except I’d want to finish reading them all first. Oh, but then there wouldn’t be a TBR pile.
    But of course there would — this is me I’m talking about. I’m always buying books.
    Thanks for the chuckle.

    Reply
  26. Read in May ~
    — read Maria Vale’s A Wolf Apart (The Legend of All Wolves Book 2) which I enjoyed. 
    — reread Anne Bishop’s Wild Country which I continue to think has a large cast of characters. It’s not my favorite entry in the series, but I definitely look forward to more books in this world.
    — enjoyed reading Lucy Parker’s The Austen Playbook.
    — a book by a favorite author which I enjoyed: Earth Fathers Are Weird by Lyn Gala. It’s a male/alien romance.
    — Carla Kelly’s The Unlikely Master Genius (St. Brendan Book 1) which I quite enjoyed. It stands alone, but there is a prequel novella THE CHRISTMAS ANGLE which appeared in the collection A Country Christmas. I look forward to reading more in this series.
    — The Chosen: A Novella of the Elder Races by Thea Harrison. It was a pleasant read but not stellar.
    — for my book group: Island of a Thousand Mirrors: A Novel by Nayomi Munaweera. I found it an easy read, but it was a sad story that made me cry. Sadder still when one realizes that Sri Lanka is still plagued with violence.
    — Shards of Honor (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I look forward to reading more in the series.
    — enjoyed the paranormal male/male mystery The Wolf at the Door (Big Bad Wolf Book 1) by Charlie Adhara.
    — an art project book. It was a light and quick read and I intend to do one of the projects. Tattoo a Banana: And Other Ways to Turn Anything and Everything into Art by Phil Hansen.
    — Vacant (Mindspace Investigations Book 4) by Alex Hughes; this is the fourth book in an urban fantasy series which I enjoyed.
    — The Stars Blue Yonder (The Outback Stars Book 3) by Sandra McDonald; this is from a series that must be read in order, so I do not recommend beginning with this book. I enjoyed the entire series which was an interesting blend of science fiction, fantasy, and some Australian aborigine myth.
    — read and enjoyed the first book in a series by a favorite author: American Witch by Thea Harrison.
    — Skin and Bone (Digging Up Bones Book 2) by TA Moore which I enjoyed reading despite the bloodshed. This is a male/male romance.
    — a mystery that I enjoyed; admittedly, I did have a few quibbles. The Scent of Murder (A Jazz Ramsey Mystery)
    — began but did not finish a book with a very curious storyline; it was a tad too weird for me! Larque on the Wing by Nancy Springer.
    — Unfettered III: this is a fantasy anthology that could be described as a tome due to its seven hundred plus pages. I tried every story; many I finished, others I did not. I particularly enjoyed the stories of Seanan McGuire, Naomi Novik, Callie Bates, Lev Grossman, Marc Turner, Anna Stephens, Megan Lindholm, Cat Rambo, and Scott Sigler. Some of these authors were already known to me, others were not.
    — The Goblin Emperor which I reread for the, uh, nth time. I enjoyed it once again.
    — I also read about fifty book samples of the hundreds I have on my Kindle.

    Reply
  27. Read in May ~
    — read Maria Vale’s A Wolf Apart (The Legend of All Wolves Book 2) which I enjoyed. 
    — reread Anne Bishop’s Wild Country which I continue to think has a large cast of characters. It’s not my favorite entry in the series, but I definitely look forward to more books in this world.
    — enjoyed reading Lucy Parker’s The Austen Playbook.
    — a book by a favorite author which I enjoyed: Earth Fathers Are Weird by Lyn Gala. It’s a male/alien romance.
    — Carla Kelly’s The Unlikely Master Genius (St. Brendan Book 1) which I quite enjoyed. It stands alone, but there is a prequel novella THE CHRISTMAS ANGLE which appeared in the collection A Country Christmas. I look forward to reading more in this series.
    — The Chosen: A Novella of the Elder Races by Thea Harrison. It was a pleasant read but not stellar.
    — for my book group: Island of a Thousand Mirrors: A Novel by Nayomi Munaweera. I found it an easy read, but it was a sad story that made me cry. Sadder still when one realizes that Sri Lanka is still plagued with violence.
    — Shards of Honor (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I look forward to reading more in the series.
    — enjoyed the paranormal male/male mystery The Wolf at the Door (Big Bad Wolf Book 1) by Charlie Adhara.
    — an art project book. It was a light and quick read and I intend to do one of the projects. Tattoo a Banana: And Other Ways to Turn Anything and Everything into Art by Phil Hansen.
    — Vacant (Mindspace Investigations Book 4) by Alex Hughes; this is the fourth book in an urban fantasy series which I enjoyed.
    — The Stars Blue Yonder (The Outback Stars Book 3) by Sandra McDonald; this is from a series that must be read in order, so I do not recommend beginning with this book. I enjoyed the entire series which was an interesting blend of science fiction, fantasy, and some Australian aborigine myth.
    — read and enjoyed the first book in a series by a favorite author: American Witch by Thea Harrison.
    — Skin and Bone (Digging Up Bones Book 2) by TA Moore which I enjoyed reading despite the bloodshed. This is a male/male romance.
    — a mystery that I enjoyed; admittedly, I did have a few quibbles. The Scent of Murder (A Jazz Ramsey Mystery)
    — began but did not finish a book with a very curious storyline; it was a tad too weird for me! Larque on the Wing by Nancy Springer.
    — Unfettered III: this is a fantasy anthology that could be described as a tome due to its seven hundred plus pages. I tried every story; many I finished, others I did not. I particularly enjoyed the stories of Seanan McGuire, Naomi Novik, Callie Bates, Lev Grossman, Marc Turner, Anna Stephens, Megan Lindholm, Cat Rambo, and Scott Sigler. Some of these authors were already known to me, others were not.
    — The Goblin Emperor which I reread for the, uh, nth time. I enjoyed it once again.
    — I also read about fifty book samples of the hundreds I have on my Kindle.

    Reply
  28. Read in May ~
    — read Maria Vale’s A Wolf Apart (The Legend of All Wolves Book 2) which I enjoyed. 
    — reread Anne Bishop’s Wild Country which I continue to think has a large cast of characters. It’s not my favorite entry in the series, but I definitely look forward to more books in this world.
    — enjoyed reading Lucy Parker’s The Austen Playbook.
    — a book by a favorite author which I enjoyed: Earth Fathers Are Weird by Lyn Gala. It’s a male/alien romance.
    — Carla Kelly’s The Unlikely Master Genius (St. Brendan Book 1) which I quite enjoyed. It stands alone, but there is a prequel novella THE CHRISTMAS ANGLE which appeared in the collection A Country Christmas. I look forward to reading more in this series.
    — The Chosen: A Novella of the Elder Races by Thea Harrison. It was a pleasant read but not stellar.
    — for my book group: Island of a Thousand Mirrors: A Novel by Nayomi Munaweera. I found it an easy read, but it was a sad story that made me cry. Sadder still when one realizes that Sri Lanka is still plagued with violence.
    — Shards of Honor (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I look forward to reading more in the series.
    — enjoyed the paranormal male/male mystery The Wolf at the Door (Big Bad Wolf Book 1) by Charlie Adhara.
    — an art project book. It was a light and quick read and I intend to do one of the projects. Tattoo a Banana: And Other Ways to Turn Anything and Everything into Art by Phil Hansen.
    — Vacant (Mindspace Investigations Book 4) by Alex Hughes; this is the fourth book in an urban fantasy series which I enjoyed.
    — The Stars Blue Yonder (The Outback Stars Book 3) by Sandra McDonald; this is from a series that must be read in order, so I do not recommend beginning with this book. I enjoyed the entire series which was an interesting blend of science fiction, fantasy, and some Australian aborigine myth.
    — read and enjoyed the first book in a series by a favorite author: American Witch by Thea Harrison.
    — Skin and Bone (Digging Up Bones Book 2) by TA Moore which I enjoyed reading despite the bloodshed. This is a male/male romance.
    — a mystery that I enjoyed; admittedly, I did have a few quibbles. The Scent of Murder (A Jazz Ramsey Mystery)
    — began but did not finish a book with a very curious storyline; it was a tad too weird for me! Larque on the Wing by Nancy Springer.
    — Unfettered III: this is a fantasy anthology that could be described as a tome due to its seven hundred plus pages. I tried every story; many I finished, others I did not. I particularly enjoyed the stories of Seanan McGuire, Naomi Novik, Callie Bates, Lev Grossman, Marc Turner, Anna Stephens, Megan Lindholm, Cat Rambo, and Scott Sigler. Some of these authors were already known to me, others were not.
    — The Goblin Emperor which I reread for the, uh, nth time. I enjoyed it once again.
    — I also read about fifty book samples of the hundreds I have on my Kindle.

    Reply
  29. Read in May ~
    — read Maria Vale’s A Wolf Apart (The Legend of All Wolves Book 2) which I enjoyed. 
    — reread Anne Bishop’s Wild Country which I continue to think has a large cast of characters. It’s not my favorite entry in the series, but I definitely look forward to more books in this world.
    — enjoyed reading Lucy Parker’s The Austen Playbook.
    — a book by a favorite author which I enjoyed: Earth Fathers Are Weird by Lyn Gala. It’s a male/alien romance.
    — Carla Kelly’s The Unlikely Master Genius (St. Brendan Book 1) which I quite enjoyed. It stands alone, but there is a prequel novella THE CHRISTMAS ANGLE which appeared in the collection A Country Christmas. I look forward to reading more in this series.
    — The Chosen: A Novella of the Elder Races by Thea Harrison. It was a pleasant read but not stellar.
    — for my book group: Island of a Thousand Mirrors: A Novel by Nayomi Munaweera. I found it an easy read, but it was a sad story that made me cry. Sadder still when one realizes that Sri Lanka is still plagued with violence.
    — Shards of Honor (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I look forward to reading more in the series.
    — enjoyed the paranormal male/male mystery The Wolf at the Door (Big Bad Wolf Book 1) by Charlie Adhara.
    — an art project book. It was a light and quick read and I intend to do one of the projects. Tattoo a Banana: And Other Ways to Turn Anything and Everything into Art by Phil Hansen.
    — Vacant (Mindspace Investigations Book 4) by Alex Hughes; this is the fourth book in an urban fantasy series which I enjoyed.
    — The Stars Blue Yonder (The Outback Stars Book 3) by Sandra McDonald; this is from a series that must be read in order, so I do not recommend beginning with this book. I enjoyed the entire series which was an interesting blend of science fiction, fantasy, and some Australian aborigine myth.
    — read and enjoyed the first book in a series by a favorite author: American Witch by Thea Harrison.
    — Skin and Bone (Digging Up Bones Book 2) by TA Moore which I enjoyed reading despite the bloodshed. This is a male/male romance.
    — a mystery that I enjoyed; admittedly, I did have a few quibbles. The Scent of Murder (A Jazz Ramsey Mystery)
    — began but did not finish a book with a very curious storyline; it was a tad too weird for me! Larque on the Wing by Nancy Springer.
    — Unfettered III: this is a fantasy anthology that could be described as a tome due to its seven hundred plus pages. I tried every story; many I finished, others I did not. I particularly enjoyed the stories of Seanan McGuire, Naomi Novik, Callie Bates, Lev Grossman, Marc Turner, Anna Stephens, Megan Lindholm, Cat Rambo, and Scott Sigler. Some of these authors were already known to me, others were not.
    — The Goblin Emperor which I reread for the, uh, nth time. I enjoyed it once again.
    — I also read about fifty book samples of the hundreds I have on my Kindle.

    Reply
  30. Read in May ~
    — read Maria Vale’s A Wolf Apart (The Legend of All Wolves Book 2) which I enjoyed. 
    — reread Anne Bishop’s Wild Country which I continue to think has a large cast of characters. It’s not my favorite entry in the series, but I definitely look forward to more books in this world.
    — enjoyed reading Lucy Parker’s The Austen Playbook.
    — a book by a favorite author which I enjoyed: Earth Fathers Are Weird by Lyn Gala. It’s a male/alien romance.
    — Carla Kelly’s The Unlikely Master Genius (St. Brendan Book 1) which I quite enjoyed. It stands alone, but there is a prequel novella THE CHRISTMAS ANGLE which appeared in the collection A Country Christmas. I look forward to reading more in this series.
    — The Chosen: A Novella of the Elder Races by Thea Harrison. It was a pleasant read but not stellar.
    — for my book group: Island of a Thousand Mirrors: A Novel by Nayomi Munaweera. I found it an easy read, but it was a sad story that made me cry. Sadder still when one realizes that Sri Lanka is still plagued with violence.
    — Shards of Honor (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I look forward to reading more in the series.
    — enjoyed the paranormal male/male mystery The Wolf at the Door (Big Bad Wolf Book 1) by Charlie Adhara.
    — an art project book. It was a light and quick read and I intend to do one of the projects. Tattoo a Banana: And Other Ways to Turn Anything and Everything into Art by Phil Hansen.
    — Vacant (Mindspace Investigations Book 4) by Alex Hughes; this is the fourth book in an urban fantasy series which I enjoyed.
    — The Stars Blue Yonder (The Outback Stars Book 3) by Sandra McDonald; this is from a series that must be read in order, so I do not recommend beginning with this book. I enjoyed the entire series which was an interesting blend of science fiction, fantasy, and some Australian aborigine myth.
    — read and enjoyed the first book in a series by a favorite author: American Witch by Thea Harrison.
    — Skin and Bone (Digging Up Bones Book 2) by TA Moore which I enjoyed reading despite the bloodshed. This is a male/male romance.
    — a mystery that I enjoyed; admittedly, I did have a few quibbles. The Scent of Murder (A Jazz Ramsey Mystery)
    — began but did not finish a book with a very curious storyline; it was a tad too weird for me! Larque on the Wing by Nancy Springer.
    — Unfettered III: this is a fantasy anthology that could be described as a tome due to its seven hundred plus pages. I tried every story; many I finished, others I did not. I particularly enjoyed the stories of Seanan McGuire, Naomi Novik, Callie Bates, Lev Grossman, Marc Turner, Anna Stephens, Megan Lindholm, Cat Rambo, and Scott Sigler. Some of these authors were already known to me, others were not.
    — The Goblin Emperor which I reread for the, uh, nth time. I enjoyed it once again.
    — I also read about fifty book samples of the hundreds I have on my Kindle.

    Reply
  31. I read all month; as usual, because it was mostly re-reads and they don’t stand out in my memory. Just good “comfort food” style reading. This is becasue the allergies let up and I realized the house iw overwhelmed with jobs I havent done all winter. So I’ve been re-organizing p and phsically and on the computer and my attention is directed to that task.
    I did read Quick’s The Girl Who Knew Too Much and The Other Lady Vanishes mentioned above.
    And 1 re-read stands out in my mind: Susanna Kearsley’s Bellewhether. Usually when I read a book for the first timeI read it twice a race through immediately followed by a second read. Somehow, when I first read Bellewhether I missed out on that second read. I have done that now and I feel much closer to be book because of “completing” my introductory reads.

    Reply
  32. I read all month; as usual, because it was mostly re-reads and they don’t stand out in my memory. Just good “comfort food” style reading. This is becasue the allergies let up and I realized the house iw overwhelmed with jobs I havent done all winter. So I’ve been re-organizing p and phsically and on the computer and my attention is directed to that task.
    I did read Quick’s The Girl Who Knew Too Much and The Other Lady Vanishes mentioned above.
    And 1 re-read stands out in my mind: Susanna Kearsley’s Bellewhether. Usually when I read a book for the first timeI read it twice a race through immediately followed by a second read. Somehow, when I first read Bellewhether I missed out on that second read. I have done that now and I feel much closer to be book because of “completing” my introductory reads.

    Reply
  33. I read all month; as usual, because it was mostly re-reads and they don’t stand out in my memory. Just good “comfort food” style reading. This is becasue the allergies let up and I realized the house iw overwhelmed with jobs I havent done all winter. So I’ve been re-organizing p and phsically and on the computer and my attention is directed to that task.
    I did read Quick’s The Girl Who Knew Too Much and The Other Lady Vanishes mentioned above.
    And 1 re-read stands out in my mind: Susanna Kearsley’s Bellewhether. Usually when I read a book for the first timeI read it twice a race through immediately followed by a second read. Somehow, when I first read Bellewhether I missed out on that second read. I have done that now and I feel much closer to be book because of “completing” my introductory reads.

    Reply
  34. I read all month; as usual, because it was mostly re-reads and they don’t stand out in my memory. Just good “comfort food” style reading. This is becasue the allergies let up and I realized the house iw overwhelmed with jobs I havent done all winter. So I’ve been re-organizing p and phsically and on the computer and my attention is directed to that task.
    I did read Quick’s The Girl Who Knew Too Much and The Other Lady Vanishes mentioned above.
    And 1 re-read stands out in my mind: Susanna Kearsley’s Bellewhether. Usually when I read a book for the first timeI read it twice a race through immediately followed by a second read. Somehow, when I first read Bellewhether I missed out on that second read. I have done that now and I feel much closer to be book because of “completing” my introductory reads.

    Reply
  35. I read all month; as usual, because it was mostly re-reads and they don’t stand out in my memory. Just good “comfort food” style reading. This is becasue the allergies let up and I realized the house iw overwhelmed with jobs I havent done all winter. So I’ve been re-organizing p and phsically and on the computer and my attention is directed to that task.
    I did read Quick’s The Girl Who Knew Too Much and The Other Lady Vanishes mentioned above.
    And 1 re-read stands out in my mind: Susanna Kearsley’s Bellewhether. Usually when I read a book for the first timeI read it twice a race through immediately followed by a second read. Somehow, when I first read Bellewhether I missed out on that second read. I have done that now and I feel much closer to be book because of “completing” my introductory reads.

    Reply
  36. Quantum, I’ll have to look into Phillipa Gregory’s 2 books since I do enjoy anything having to plant collectors, explorers and passionate gardeners. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  37. Quantum, I’ll have to look into Phillipa Gregory’s 2 books since I do enjoy anything having to plant collectors, explorers and passionate gardeners. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  38. Quantum, I’ll have to look into Phillipa Gregory’s 2 books since I do enjoy anything having to plant collectors, explorers and passionate gardeners. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  39. Quantum, I’ll have to look into Phillipa Gregory’s 2 books since I do enjoy anything having to plant collectors, explorers and passionate gardeners. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  40. Quantum, I’ll have to look into Phillipa Gregory’s 2 books since I do enjoy anything having to plant collectors, explorers and passionate gardeners. Thanks for mentioning it.

    Reply
  41. Oh love her McKenzie books and have read many of them already. I don’t think I’ve looked for her Ashley Gardiner books. Will have to try those as well.

    Reply
  42. Oh love her McKenzie books and have read many of them already. I don’t think I’ve looked for her Ashley Gardiner books. Will have to try those as well.

    Reply
  43. Oh love her McKenzie books and have read many of them already. I don’t think I’ve looked for her Ashley Gardiner books. Will have to try those as well.

    Reply
  44. Oh love her McKenzie books and have read many of them already. I don’t think I’ve looked for her Ashley Gardiner books. Will have to try those as well.

    Reply
  45. Oh love her McKenzie books and have read many of them already. I don’t think I’ve looked for her Ashley Gardiner books. Will have to try those as well.

    Reply
  46. Thank you, all, for your wonderful lists. My daughter gave me Red, White and Royally Blue for Mother’s Day, but then I turned around and lent to to her as her tbr pile is smaller than mine:) I also listened to My Favorite Half-Night Stand and liked it very much. I finally lost my Neil Gaiman virginity and found Anansi Boys a fun read. But May included numerous titles I gave up on after only a short while; either I picked bad books or my tolerance was extremely low. One I loved, though, was Lovely War, by Julie Berry. It took a little while to capture my full attention, but once it did, I was hooked and quite sorry to reach the end. And finally, just as the calendar turned, I finished and really enjoyed The Duchess Deal by Tess Dare.

    Reply
  47. Thank you, all, for your wonderful lists. My daughter gave me Red, White and Royally Blue for Mother’s Day, but then I turned around and lent to to her as her tbr pile is smaller than mine:) I also listened to My Favorite Half-Night Stand and liked it very much. I finally lost my Neil Gaiman virginity and found Anansi Boys a fun read. But May included numerous titles I gave up on after only a short while; either I picked bad books or my tolerance was extremely low. One I loved, though, was Lovely War, by Julie Berry. It took a little while to capture my full attention, but once it did, I was hooked and quite sorry to reach the end. And finally, just as the calendar turned, I finished and really enjoyed The Duchess Deal by Tess Dare.

    Reply
  48. Thank you, all, for your wonderful lists. My daughter gave me Red, White and Royally Blue for Mother’s Day, but then I turned around and lent to to her as her tbr pile is smaller than mine:) I also listened to My Favorite Half-Night Stand and liked it very much. I finally lost my Neil Gaiman virginity and found Anansi Boys a fun read. But May included numerous titles I gave up on after only a short while; either I picked bad books or my tolerance was extremely low. One I loved, though, was Lovely War, by Julie Berry. It took a little while to capture my full attention, but once it did, I was hooked and quite sorry to reach the end. And finally, just as the calendar turned, I finished and really enjoyed The Duchess Deal by Tess Dare.

    Reply
  49. Thank you, all, for your wonderful lists. My daughter gave me Red, White and Royally Blue for Mother’s Day, but then I turned around and lent to to her as her tbr pile is smaller than mine:) I also listened to My Favorite Half-Night Stand and liked it very much. I finally lost my Neil Gaiman virginity and found Anansi Boys a fun read. But May included numerous titles I gave up on after only a short while; either I picked bad books or my tolerance was extremely low. One I loved, though, was Lovely War, by Julie Berry. It took a little while to capture my full attention, but once it did, I was hooked and quite sorry to reach the end. And finally, just as the calendar turned, I finished and really enjoyed The Duchess Deal by Tess Dare.

    Reply
  50. Thank you, all, for your wonderful lists. My daughter gave me Red, White and Royally Blue for Mother’s Day, but then I turned around and lent to to her as her tbr pile is smaller than mine:) I also listened to My Favorite Half-Night Stand and liked it very much. I finally lost my Neil Gaiman virginity and found Anansi Boys a fun read. But May included numerous titles I gave up on after only a short while; either I picked bad books or my tolerance was extremely low. One I loved, though, was Lovely War, by Julie Berry. It took a little while to capture my full attention, but once it did, I was hooked and quite sorry to reach the end. And finally, just as the calendar turned, I finished and really enjoyed The Duchess Deal by Tess Dare.

    Reply
  51. and one great one that I forgot to mention, but most heartily recommend: Educated, by Tara Westover. This was a beautifully written book that had me constantly shaking my head in horror and amazement.

    Reply
  52. and one great one that I forgot to mention, but most heartily recommend: Educated, by Tara Westover. This was a beautifully written book that had me constantly shaking my head in horror and amazement.

    Reply
  53. and one great one that I forgot to mention, but most heartily recommend: Educated, by Tara Westover. This was a beautifully written book that had me constantly shaking my head in horror and amazement.

    Reply
  54. and one great one that I forgot to mention, but most heartily recommend: Educated, by Tara Westover. This was a beautifully written book that had me constantly shaking my head in horror and amazement.

    Reply
  55. and one great one that I forgot to mention, but most heartily recommend: Educated, by Tara Westover. This was a beautifully written book that had me constantly shaking my head in horror and amazement.

    Reply
  56. Kareni, I think you’ve outpaced all of us with your reading in May! Fascinating list with lots of variety. I’m noting down some titles, and I’m also reminded to clear through some of the manymanymany samples I’ve collected on my Kindle!

    Reply
  57. Kareni, I think you’ve outpaced all of us with your reading in May! Fascinating list with lots of variety. I’m noting down some titles, and I’m also reminded to clear through some of the manymanymany samples I’ve collected on my Kindle!

    Reply
  58. Kareni, I think you’ve outpaced all of us with your reading in May! Fascinating list with lots of variety. I’m noting down some titles, and I’m also reminded to clear through some of the manymanymany samples I’ve collected on my Kindle!

    Reply
  59. Kareni, I think you’ve outpaced all of us with your reading in May! Fascinating list with lots of variety. I’m noting down some titles, and I’m also reminded to clear through some of the manymanymany samples I’ve collected on my Kindle!

    Reply
  60. Kareni, I think you’ve outpaced all of us with your reading in May! Fascinating list with lots of variety. I’m noting down some titles, and I’m also reminded to clear through some of the manymanymany samples I’ve collected on my Kindle!

    Reply
  61. Your double-read technique is really interesting, Sue! I’ve done that only occasionally, when a book was so good I just didn’t want to let it go. I’ll have to try it more often to really immerse in a story.

    Reply
  62. Your double-read technique is really interesting, Sue! I’ve done that only occasionally, when a book was so good I just didn’t want to let it go. I’ll have to try it more often to really immerse in a story.

    Reply
  63. Your double-read technique is really interesting, Sue! I’ve done that only occasionally, when a book was so good I just didn’t want to let it go. I’ll have to try it more often to really immerse in a story.

    Reply
  64. Your double-read technique is really interesting, Sue! I’ve done that only occasionally, when a book was so good I just didn’t want to let it go. I’ll have to try it more often to really immerse in a story.

    Reply
  65. Your double-read technique is really interesting, Sue! I’ve done that only occasionally, when a book was so good I just didn’t want to let it go. I’ll have to try it more often to really immerse in a story.

    Reply
  66. Margaret, I read Educated several months ago, and I totally agree with you. It’s a stunning book in more than one way. What she endured for the sake of family and the sake of gaining an education was astonishing. Some books take courage to write, and a little courage to read as well, and well worth the experience.

    Reply
  67. Margaret, I read Educated several months ago, and I totally agree with you. It’s a stunning book in more than one way. What she endured for the sake of family and the sake of gaining an education was astonishing. Some books take courage to write, and a little courage to read as well, and well worth the experience.

    Reply
  68. Margaret, I read Educated several months ago, and I totally agree with you. It’s a stunning book in more than one way. What she endured for the sake of family and the sake of gaining an education was astonishing. Some books take courage to write, and a little courage to read as well, and well worth the experience.

    Reply
  69. Margaret, I read Educated several months ago, and I totally agree with you. It’s a stunning book in more than one way. What she endured for the sake of family and the sake of gaining an education was astonishing. Some books take courage to write, and a little courage to read as well, and well worth the experience.

    Reply
  70. Margaret, I read Educated several months ago, and I totally agree with you. It’s a stunning book in more than one way. What she endured for the sake of family and the sake of gaining an education was astonishing. Some books take courage to write, and a little courage to read as well, and well worth the experience.

    Reply
  71. I normally only mention best reads but following Vicki L I thought it might be amusing to mention worst read/dnf as a warning. I downloaded the audio of Naomi Alderman’s ‘Power’ from my public library as it had received excellent reviews. The beginning is good and very unusual.Women have developed a genetic ability to produce lethal electric shocks … very interesting start. But development of the idea was poor and silly IMHO. Unnecessary bad language and blasphemous reference to religious ideas lead me to abandon this one after about 1/4 way through. I suspect that people (including me) are more likely to review a book when they enjoy it so that published reviews get skewed towards the positive. My reading time is valuable to me so I will choose with more care in future! 🙁

    Reply
  72. I normally only mention best reads but following Vicki L I thought it might be amusing to mention worst read/dnf as a warning. I downloaded the audio of Naomi Alderman’s ‘Power’ from my public library as it had received excellent reviews. The beginning is good and very unusual.Women have developed a genetic ability to produce lethal electric shocks … very interesting start. But development of the idea was poor and silly IMHO. Unnecessary bad language and blasphemous reference to religious ideas lead me to abandon this one after about 1/4 way through. I suspect that people (including me) are more likely to review a book when they enjoy it so that published reviews get skewed towards the positive. My reading time is valuable to me so I will choose with more care in future! 🙁

    Reply
  73. I normally only mention best reads but following Vicki L I thought it might be amusing to mention worst read/dnf as a warning. I downloaded the audio of Naomi Alderman’s ‘Power’ from my public library as it had received excellent reviews. The beginning is good and very unusual.Women have developed a genetic ability to produce lethal electric shocks … very interesting start. But development of the idea was poor and silly IMHO. Unnecessary bad language and blasphemous reference to religious ideas lead me to abandon this one after about 1/4 way through. I suspect that people (including me) are more likely to review a book when they enjoy it so that published reviews get skewed towards the positive. My reading time is valuable to me so I will choose with more care in future! 🙁

    Reply
  74. I normally only mention best reads but following Vicki L I thought it might be amusing to mention worst read/dnf as a warning. I downloaded the audio of Naomi Alderman’s ‘Power’ from my public library as it had received excellent reviews. The beginning is good and very unusual.Women have developed a genetic ability to produce lethal electric shocks … very interesting start. But development of the idea was poor and silly IMHO. Unnecessary bad language and blasphemous reference to religious ideas lead me to abandon this one after about 1/4 way through. I suspect that people (including me) are more likely to review a book when they enjoy it so that published reviews get skewed towards the positive. My reading time is valuable to me so I will choose with more care in future! 🙁

    Reply
  75. I normally only mention best reads but following Vicki L I thought it might be amusing to mention worst read/dnf as a warning. I downloaded the audio of Naomi Alderman’s ‘Power’ from my public library as it had received excellent reviews. The beginning is good and very unusual.Women have developed a genetic ability to produce lethal electric shocks … very interesting start. But development of the idea was poor and silly IMHO. Unnecessary bad language and blasphemous reference to religious ideas lead me to abandon this one after about 1/4 way through. I suspect that people (including me) are more likely to review a book when they enjoy it so that published reviews get skewed towards the positive. My reading time is valuable to me so I will choose with more care in future! 🙁

    Reply
  76. I’m reading Nicola Cornick’s fabulous novel House of Shadows. OMG, it’s like I’m living through generations of Craven lovers. Amazing!
    Additionally, I’ve got Julie Checkoway’s collection of author essays titled Creating Fiction. My goal is to write characters vivid enough to make folks cry. So far, the authors offer inspiring words, but no advice, alas.
    Then there’s The Devious Book for Cats by Fluffy & Bonkers. Very funny, and last but hardly least is What the Heart Wants, a book of poetry by Muriel Harris Weinstein, who was a dear friend and brilliant writer. She died last year, but left this book and many others which all offer exactly what the heart wants.

    Reply
  77. I’m reading Nicola Cornick’s fabulous novel House of Shadows. OMG, it’s like I’m living through generations of Craven lovers. Amazing!
    Additionally, I’ve got Julie Checkoway’s collection of author essays titled Creating Fiction. My goal is to write characters vivid enough to make folks cry. So far, the authors offer inspiring words, but no advice, alas.
    Then there’s The Devious Book for Cats by Fluffy & Bonkers. Very funny, and last but hardly least is What the Heart Wants, a book of poetry by Muriel Harris Weinstein, who was a dear friend and brilliant writer. She died last year, but left this book and many others which all offer exactly what the heart wants.

    Reply
  78. I’m reading Nicola Cornick’s fabulous novel House of Shadows. OMG, it’s like I’m living through generations of Craven lovers. Amazing!
    Additionally, I’ve got Julie Checkoway’s collection of author essays titled Creating Fiction. My goal is to write characters vivid enough to make folks cry. So far, the authors offer inspiring words, but no advice, alas.
    Then there’s The Devious Book for Cats by Fluffy & Bonkers. Very funny, and last but hardly least is What the Heart Wants, a book of poetry by Muriel Harris Weinstein, who was a dear friend and brilliant writer. She died last year, but left this book and many others which all offer exactly what the heart wants.

    Reply
  79. I’m reading Nicola Cornick’s fabulous novel House of Shadows. OMG, it’s like I’m living through generations of Craven lovers. Amazing!
    Additionally, I’ve got Julie Checkoway’s collection of author essays titled Creating Fiction. My goal is to write characters vivid enough to make folks cry. So far, the authors offer inspiring words, but no advice, alas.
    Then there’s The Devious Book for Cats by Fluffy & Bonkers. Very funny, and last but hardly least is What the Heart Wants, a book of poetry by Muriel Harris Weinstein, who was a dear friend and brilliant writer. She died last year, but left this book and many others which all offer exactly what the heart wants.

    Reply
  80. I’m reading Nicola Cornick’s fabulous novel House of Shadows. OMG, it’s like I’m living through generations of Craven lovers. Amazing!
    Additionally, I’ve got Julie Checkoway’s collection of author essays titled Creating Fiction. My goal is to write characters vivid enough to make folks cry. So far, the authors offer inspiring words, but no advice, alas.
    Then there’s The Devious Book for Cats by Fluffy & Bonkers. Very funny, and last but hardly least is What the Heart Wants, a book of poetry by Muriel Harris Weinstein, who was a dear friend and brilliant writer. She died last year, but left this book and many others which all offer exactly what the heart wants.

    Reply
  81. If you like the Marcus Didius Falco books you should try Ruth Downie’s mysteries about a Roman military doctor in Britain. Humor and a nice romance with a native British woman. The first in the series is Medicus. I just got the audio version of Vita Brevis to keep me company on a looong drive to visit my grandchildren.

    Reply
  82. If you like the Marcus Didius Falco books you should try Ruth Downie’s mysteries about a Roman military doctor in Britain. Humor and a nice romance with a native British woman. The first in the series is Medicus. I just got the audio version of Vita Brevis to keep me company on a looong drive to visit my grandchildren.

    Reply
  83. If you like the Marcus Didius Falco books you should try Ruth Downie’s mysteries about a Roman military doctor in Britain. Humor and a nice romance with a native British woman. The first in the series is Medicus. I just got the audio version of Vita Brevis to keep me company on a looong drive to visit my grandchildren.

    Reply
  84. If you like the Marcus Didius Falco books you should try Ruth Downie’s mysteries about a Roman military doctor in Britain. Humor and a nice romance with a native British woman. The first in the series is Medicus. I just got the audio version of Vita Brevis to keep me company on a looong drive to visit my grandchildren.

    Reply
  85. If you like the Marcus Didius Falco books you should try Ruth Downie’s mysteries about a Roman military doctor in Britain. Humor and a nice romance with a native British woman. The first in the series is Medicus. I just got the audio version of Vita Brevis to keep me company on a looong drive to visit my grandchildren.

    Reply

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