What We’re Reading in March

 … and what a medley it is.

Joanna here, with some lovely book suggestions from all of us.Wench bujold

I’m rereading one of Lois MlcMaster Bujold’s books. The Curse of Chalion. I picked it up at the library because the librarian had it out on the Recommended Shelf and I was reminded of it. 

When we reread books we sometimes come at them a little differently or, at least, I do. This time, when I approached Bujold’s broken, exhausted, emotionally and psychically destroyed protagonist I was better able to see the honorable man beneath. It’s a new way for me to look at heroism and I’m hoping to learn from it.

This is not a Romance, but it’s a satisfying portrayal of a complex protagonist and — yes — a bit of a love story.

 

Andrea writes:

I’m a big fan of Charles Finch’s historical mysteries—I find his Charles Lenox series, set in early Victorian England, an absolute delight. So it’s always a treat when a new one comes out.

Now, Finch has done something really interesting with the series. In the first book, A Beautiful Blue Death, which came out 12 years ago, we meet Lenox as an established amateur detective. He’s a cultured, erudite, clever younger son, so his slightly “black sheep” profession is tolerated by family and friends (it helps that he’s such a lovely, sensitive fellow) And throughout the next nine books, we see him develop, take on new challenges, dabble in politics, get married, have a child . . . all while unraveling some very intriguing mysteries.

Wench vanishing manThen lo and behold, like the clever mystery writer he is, Finch suddenly surprised his readers with a unexpected plot twist. In his previous book, The Woman in the Water, the 11th in the series, he started writing a “prequel to the series—we meed Charles as a green cub, just down from Oxford, trying to decide what he wants to do in life. He loves solving conundrums, but everyone thinks he’s a fool to consider it as a possible career. Nonetheless, he keeps reading the papers about crime, and finds he has an idea he thinks may help solve one. The police, of course, dismiss him as fop and


dilettante. But he perseveres . . .

His newest release, The Vanishing Man, continues with the young Charles. Rather than feel it's a disconnect, because I know the older Charles well, I love these early stories. We see him as a vulnerable youth, confident in many ways, but also surprising fragile, especially in his love life. One of the things I love about Finch is not only is he very perceptive about people, and writes very lyrically about everyday moments (his musings on Charles missing his recently deceased father is beautifully rendered.) He also has a sly and sharp wit, but  uses it very gently. His books are “cozies” in the very best sense of the word, and for me, they’re the perfect antidote to the increasingly strident shouting that echoes all around us. If you’re looking for good writing and a more genteel world, I highly recommend the series.

 

Wench Pat brings us a book I actually have on my TBR pile. I’ve been following the author on Twitter

Wench jenny lawson
Pat says: I run funny and/or weird graphics on my Facebook page. I often don't know where they come from, they just catch my eye. I can't remember which one triggered a reader to tell me about Jenny the Bloggess. I tracked down her blog (https://thebloggess.com/) and was amused, so I looked up her books and tried

Let's Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) by Jenny Lawson, the Bloggess
This is not even close to a romance and not remotely historical except that it was published in 2012, but it’s hysterical and gives insight into why men used to call women hysterics. Jenny Lawson admits that she’s mentally ill. She has anxiety disorder and is OCD and the fact that her husband hasn’t killed her is proof that she’s too funny to die. And honestly, if I were raised with a father like hers, I’d probably be a serial killer, so being only half insane proves she’s still functional. Mostly. The most sane chapter is when she’s working for the HR department, and even my IT husband rolled on the floor over that one.

So if you need a laugh, go check out this book. I really don’t think I’ve laughed so much over a book—ever.

 

From Nicola:
 
This month past I have barely done any fiction reading and have been immersed in research for my new WIP. Wench kings bed and lost prince

It’s a dual time story set in the 15th century and the present. I haven’t read any non-fiction about the period since I was at college, so way too long ago to remember, but I dusted off my old text books and plunged in.  First up was Richard III, magnates and their motives in the Wars of the Roses by Michael Hicks. It was quite… chewy. I think my concentration span has reduced since I last read it!

Then I dipped into Thomas Penn’s excellent biography of Henry VII, The Winter King. Despite my predisposition towards Richard I do try to be even-handed! Most interesting, and a clue to where the story might be taking me, was The Lost Prince, the Survival of Richard of York. Richard was the younger of the “princes in the tower” and rumours of his continued existence plagued Henry VII’s reign for a number of years. The author, David Baldwin, makes a clear and interesting case that Richard was passed off as “Richard of Eastwell” an illegitimate son of King Richard III to preserve his life, and that he subsequently lived to the grand old age of 81, pretending to be a stonemason. Those readers who enjoy Ricardian history and are as old as I may remember a fictional version of this story by Margaret Campbell Barnes, called The King’s Bed.

 

Wench kiss quoAnd Mary Jo:

Mary Jo Putney here, and I want to talk about Helen Hoang's The Kiss Quotient
 
The book was one of the Washington Post’s 50 Notable Works of Fiction in 2018 and one of Amazon’s Top 100 Books of 2018.  It is also an #ownvoices book, meaning that the story content is by a minority writer speaking her or his own truth. 
 
In The Kiss Quotient, the heroine, Stella Lane, is a brilliant and successful econometrician, meaning she's really good at crunching data.  What she is not good at is human relationships because she's Asperger's and really awkward around people.  The story starts when her mother says to Stella that she knows her daughter wants clear communication about expectations, therefore she needs to know that her parents are ready to become grandparents.
 
Stella loves her work, but her experience with relationships and sex have been very off putting.  Yet she wants to please her parents so she needs to get good at sex and relationships, and in pursuit of that goal, she hires a well-vetted escort.  As one does. <G> 
 
Enter Michael Phan, half Vietnamese, half Swedish, totally gorgeous, and very patient.  He doesn't like being a part time escort, but he desperately needs the money to keep his family afloat, so he will do what is necessary. Both of them have Issues, but there is real attraction and a deep relationship gradually develops.  And yes, a happy ending that makes sense!
 
But I found the author's note at the end the most interesting part of the book because Helen Hoang describes how she started researching the autism spectrum and realized that she was on it.  She also learned that women tend to react to the condition differently from men, and she'd been doing that her whole life.  She had wanted to write a Pretty Woman story with the genders reversed, and the result is her much-acclaimed The Kiss Quotient. Wench dog matching

On a lighter note, I don't believe I've ever mentioned the books of Beth Kendrick.  They would be classified as chicklit, I think, since they are about young women getting their lives sorted out, but that label doesn't do her books justice. 
 
My favorite is The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service , described as a "hilarious and heartwarming story about bad dogs and the women who love them." 
 
Lara Madigan loves dogs and has a gift for pairing the right person to the right dog, but she has a lot of sorting out to do in her personal and professional lives. Woof!

 

Susan brings us:

This month I did some reading, some research, some writing, and a lot of rushing about in the car, so I had time that Wench owe youway to finish one book in audio, and a very enjoyable listen it was. Sophie Kinsella's newest, I Owe You One, is as much a tale of family loyalties and tensions as it is a romance–possibly even more so.

Fixie Farr helps manage the family store in London alongside her mother, sister, and brother, and often is the one doing the hardest work. She is somewhat awkward, not the beautiful one, not the successful one; she is shy, a bit compulsive/obsessive (which is nicely drawn), and compelled to fix things, hence her nickname. And sometimes she just can't leave well enough alone. She also is half in love with a guy she's had a crush on since her teenage years. When he comes back into her life, she's head over heels, though it's maybe not the best thing or the best timing. She juggles trying to fix his problems, trying to run a busy store in her mother's absence and her siblings' disinterest, and trying to sort out everyone's life but her own.

When a disaster in a coffee shop results in her rescuing a stranger's laptop, for once she's thanked for her efforts. Sebastian Marlowe is endlessly grateful to Fixie for saving his files from obliteration, and promises any favor she needs. What she wants is to fix someone else's life. Promises and favors lead to one disaster and wrong turn after another–and fate brings Fixie together with Seb again and again, until she is involved far more deeply than she ever intended–and soon faces a tough decision between what is best for family, and what is best for her and her dreams. 

This is a rich, layered, beautifully detailed story about family, about the difference and the challenge between what is owed and what could be given unconditionally. Wrapped within is a luscious, rewarding romance–if Fixie can get past her family's needs to realize what could be. Kinsella excels at quirky, energetic, lovable heroines and strong, resolute heroes, and she has an ability to convey a sense of warmth and naturalism throughout her stories. I was drawn into the book as if I knew these people, and could not wait to listen to the next chapter and the next. I love most of Kinsella's books (I never quite connected with the Shopaholic books, though I tried) — and I find her individual novels increasingly complex and satisfying in emotional maturity without sentimentality, with lots of humor and a sense of love even beyond romance. Narrated by Fiona Hardingham, whose warm, lovely voice adds even more to the book, Kinsella's newest is delightful, compelling, and one of her best.   

 

Wench sweetshopAnd Anne finishes out our reading month.

Rosie Hopkins Sweetshop of Dreams by Jenny Colgan, is one of those English romantic stories, rather than a full-on romance –where a nice woman with a dreary job and stale relationship has to move to the country for some reason, and ends up with a new life and a new man. In this case Rosie Hopkins has to go to a small village to pack up and sell her 85 year old great aunt's house and sweetshop, and move her into aged care.

I found it charming and very readable, with a lovely cast of minor characters. It's the first book in a series of three, and though the romance is achieved by the end of book one, book two and three follow the same couple through. Light, pleasant, feel-good reads, I read and enjoyed all three.

 

 

How about you?

What did you read this month that intrigued you or delighted you or made you laugh?

165 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in March”

  1. I have continued to cruise through some more vintage Fawcett Coventry titles, including The Belle of Brighton and The Tempestuous Petticoat; these have the virtues of being short and entertaining but not likely to keep me up at night.
    In the trade paperback category, I’ve read The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir (wasn’t impressed with its beginning but as I read on, it became more engrossing, though I do not think it has the voice of that era quite right) and Nicola’s The Woman in the Lake (an excellent time-slip story). I would recommend both.
    I’ve been in the mood for thrillers lately, so I’ve read The Gray Man by Mark Greaney (#1 in that series; improbably high body count but a real page turner) and I’m halfway through The Late Show by Michael Connelly (the first Renee Ballard title – she will encounter Harry Bosch in the next one – she’s an LAPD detective also based in Hollywood, pretty much lives on the beach, has a rescue dog named Lola, and exists for her job).
    I also read (or sampled) a couple of dozen kindle books but I never remember them. I am a print person, I guess.
    The new Jane Ashford should arrive today and that will be next. And then it will be April 🙂

    Reply
  2. I have continued to cruise through some more vintage Fawcett Coventry titles, including The Belle of Brighton and The Tempestuous Petticoat; these have the virtues of being short and entertaining but not likely to keep me up at night.
    In the trade paperback category, I’ve read The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir (wasn’t impressed with its beginning but as I read on, it became more engrossing, though I do not think it has the voice of that era quite right) and Nicola’s The Woman in the Lake (an excellent time-slip story). I would recommend both.
    I’ve been in the mood for thrillers lately, so I’ve read The Gray Man by Mark Greaney (#1 in that series; improbably high body count but a real page turner) and I’m halfway through The Late Show by Michael Connelly (the first Renee Ballard title – she will encounter Harry Bosch in the next one – she’s an LAPD detective also based in Hollywood, pretty much lives on the beach, has a rescue dog named Lola, and exists for her job).
    I also read (or sampled) a couple of dozen kindle books but I never remember them. I am a print person, I guess.
    The new Jane Ashford should arrive today and that will be next. And then it will be April 🙂

    Reply
  3. I have continued to cruise through some more vintage Fawcett Coventry titles, including The Belle of Brighton and The Tempestuous Petticoat; these have the virtues of being short and entertaining but not likely to keep me up at night.
    In the trade paperback category, I’ve read The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir (wasn’t impressed with its beginning but as I read on, it became more engrossing, though I do not think it has the voice of that era quite right) and Nicola’s The Woman in the Lake (an excellent time-slip story). I would recommend both.
    I’ve been in the mood for thrillers lately, so I’ve read The Gray Man by Mark Greaney (#1 in that series; improbably high body count but a real page turner) and I’m halfway through The Late Show by Michael Connelly (the first Renee Ballard title – she will encounter Harry Bosch in the next one – she’s an LAPD detective also based in Hollywood, pretty much lives on the beach, has a rescue dog named Lola, and exists for her job).
    I also read (or sampled) a couple of dozen kindle books but I never remember them. I am a print person, I guess.
    The new Jane Ashford should arrive today and that will be next. And then it will be April 🙂

    Reply
  4. I have continued to cruise through some more vintage Fawcett Coventry titles, including The Belle of Brighton and The Tempestuous Petticoat; these have the virtues of being short and entertaining but not likely to keep me up at night.
    In the trade paperback category, I’ve read The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir (wasn’t impressed with its beginning but as I read on, it became more engrossing, though I do not think it has the voice of that era quite right) and Nicola’s The Woman in the Lake (an excellent time-slip story). I would recommend both.
    I’ve been in the mood for thrillers lately, so I’ve read The Gray Man by Mark Greaney (#1 in that series; improbably high body count but a real page turner) and I’m halfway through The Late Show by Michael Connelly (the first Renee Ballard title – she will encounter Harry Bosch in the next one – she’s an LAPD detective also based in Hollywood, pretty much lives on the beach, has a rescue dog named Lola, and exists for her job).
    I also read (or sampled) a couple of dozen kindle books but I never remember them. I am a print person, I guess.
    The new Jane Ashford should arrive today and that will be next. And then it will be April 🙂

    Reply
  5. I have continued to cruise through some more vintage Fawcett Coventry titles, including The Belle of Brighton and The Tempestuous Petticoat; these have the virtues of being short and entertaining but not likely to keep me up at night.
    In the trade paperback category, I’ve read The Chilbury Ladies’ Choir (wasn’t impressed with its beginning but as I read on, it became more engrossing, though I do not think it has the voice of that era quite right) and Nicola’s The Woman in the Lake (an excellent time-slip story). I would recommend both.
    I’ve been in the mood for thrillers lately, so I’ve read The Gray Man by Mark Greaney (#1 in that series; improbably high body count but a real page turner) and I’m halfway through The Late Show by Michael Connelly (the first Renee Ballard title – she will encounter Harry Bosch in the next one – she’s an LAPD detective also based in Hollywood, pretty much lives on the beach, has a rescue dog named Lola, and exists for her job).
    I also read (or sampled) a couple of dozen kindle books but I never remember them. I am a print person, I guess.
    The new Jane Ashford should arrive today and that will be next. And then it will be April 🙂

    Reply
  6. I’ve just read Zen Cho’s The True Queen. The heroine comes from a Malay island, where she has been looked after by a powerful witch, Mak Genggang, after she and her sister are found with no memories. They decide to travel to England to see if they can get help from the Sorcerer to the Crown – Sorcerer to the Crown being the first book in the series.
    I do think they’re worth reading in order – there’s a little bit of romance in both books, but not enough that I’d be comfortable calling them romances, but they are good – regencies with magic, what’s not to love?
    I also read Tana French’s The Wych Elm, which I hadn’t picked up immediately, despite loving (most of) the Dublin Murders series, because I’d seen a couple of so-so reviews. For my money, it’s quite as good as any of the Dublin Murders books, but at the same time I can completely see why some readers might feel so-so about it. (Be spoilerific to say why.)

    Reply
  7. I’ve just read Zen Cho’s The True Queen. The heroine comes from a Malay island, where she has been looked after by a powerful witch, Mak Genggang, after she and her sister are found with no memories. They decide to travel to England to see if they can get help from the Sorcerer to the Crown – Sorcerer to the Crown being the first book in the series.
    I do think they’re worth reading in order – there’s a little bit of romance in both books, but not enough that I’d be comfortable calling them romances, but they are good – regencies with magic, what’s not to love?
    I also read Tana French’s The Wych Elm, which I hadn’t picked up immediately, despite loving (most of) the Dublin Murders series, because I’d seen a couple of so-so reviews. For my money, it’s quite as good as any of the Dublin Murders books, but at the same time I can completely see why some readers might feel so-so about it. (Be spoilerific to say why.)

    Reply
  8. I’ve just read Zen Cho’s The True Queen. The heroine comes from a Malay island, where she has been looked after by a powerful witch, Mak Genggang, after she and her sister are found with no memories. They decide to travel to England to see if they can get help from the Sorcerer to the Crown – Sorcerer to the Crown being the first book in the series.
    I do think they’re worth reading in order – there’s a little bit of romance in both books, but not enough that I’d be comfortable calling them romances, but they are good – regencies with magic, what’s not to love?
    I also read Tana French’s The Wych Elm, which I hadn’t picked up immediately, despite loving (most of) the Dublin Murders series, because I’d seen a couple of so-so reviews. For my money, it’s quite as good as any of the Dublin Murders books, but at the same time I can completely see why some readers might feel so-so about it. (Be spoilerific to say why.)

    Reply
  9. I’ve just read Zen Cho’s The True Queen. The heroine comes from a Malay island, where she has been looked after by a powerful witch, Mak Genggang, after she and her sister are found with no memories. They decide to travel to England to see if they can get help from the Sorcerer to the Crown – Sorcerer to the Crown being the first book in the series.
    I do think they’re worth reading in order – there’s a little bit of romance in both books, but not enough that I’d be comfortable calling them romances, but they are good – regencies with magic, what’s not to love?
    I also read Tana French’s The Wych Elm, which I hadn’t picked up immediately, despite loving (most of) the Dublin Murders series, because I’d seen a couple of so-so reviews. For my money, it’s quite as good as any of the Dublin Murders books, but at the same time I can completely see why some readers might feel so-so about it. (Be spoilerific to say why.)

    Reply
  10. I’ve just read Zen Cho’s The True Queen. The heroine comes from a Malay island, where she has been looked after by a powerful witch, Mak Genggang, after she and her sister are found with no memories. They decide to travel to England to see if they can get help from the Sorcerer to the Crown – Sorcerer to the Crown being the first book in the series.
    I do think they’re worth reading in order – there’s a little bit of romance in both books, but not enough that I’d be comfortable calling them romances, but they are good – regencies with magic, what’s not to love?
    I also read Tana French’s The Wych Elm, which I hadn’t picked up immediately, despite loving (most of) the Dublin Murders series, because I’d seen a couple of so-so reviews. For my money, it’s quite as good as any of the Dublin Murders books, but at the same time I can completely see why some readers might feel so-so about it. (Be spoilerific to say why.)

    Reply
  11. Since last month ~
    — Doris Egan’s fantasy The Gate of Ivory. I enjoyed it, but I’m not sure if I’ll continue on with the trilogy.feed
    — Cat Pictures Please and Other Stories by Naomi Kritzer. This is a collection of stories that I quite enjoyed. The stories are quite diverse in setting and subject matter. I liked some more than others, but I liked them all. The title story won a Hugo Award.
    — read with pleasure Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Just Cause (The Doyle & Acton Mystery Series Book 9),
    — read New Readers Press’ Teaching Adults: A Literacy Resource Book as I intend to resume literacy tutoring after a long hiatus. While I wouldn’t describe it as a scintillating read, it had some worthwhile information.
    — Matthew Quick’s young adult novel Every Exquisite Thing; I almost gave up on the book but persevered and ultimately found it an intriguing read.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Linesman yet again.
    — Mutineer (Alexis Carew Book 2) by J.A. Sutherland: This series is very much Horatio Hornblower in space complete with cutlasses, space suits, and cat o’ nine tails. I zipped through the book and am now wondering how looking it will take to borrow book three.
    — Karen Lord’s science fiction The Best of All Possible Worlds: A Novel which I enjoyed.
    — reread SK Dunstall’s Alliance and Confluence yet again.
    — The Fairies of Sadieville: The Final Tufa Novel by Alex Bledsoe. This wasn’t my favorite book in the series though all of them were good reads; it did a good job of tying up loose ends.
    — I read about a third of Karen Rivers’ young adult novel You Are The Everything before it got a bit odd, and I simply skimmed to the end. 
    — Clean by Alex Hughes which I enjoyed. I’d describe it as futuristic urban fantasy.
    — happily read Anne Bishop’s newest book Wild Country. This book had a large cast of characters; I’d describe it as a busy book, but I enjoyed it. I’ll doubtless be rereading it soon since I zipped through it on this first reading.
    — I mentioned having read Clean by Alex Hughes. I continued on with the Mindspace series and finished the novels Sharp and Marked as well as the (FREE) story Rabbit Trick all of which I enjoyed.
    — read another FREE Kindle work, but it was far-fetched and not a book I’ll be rereading: Healing Hands: A SciFi Alien Romance by Stella Cassy
    — read and reread the novella Briarley by Aster Glenn Gray. This is a World War II-era retelling of Beauty and the Beast. I recommend it to those who enjoy fairytale retellings as well as to those who might enjoy reading a male/male romance that has no explicit content. I will be looking to see what this author next publishes.
    — for my book group, Amor Towles’ A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel which I very much enjoyed.
    — also reread a favorite novella which I enjoyed once again — Sarina Bowen’s Blonde Date.
    — The Outback Stars by Sandra McDonald. This is a science fiction book that had an Australian aboriginal component; I enjoyed it.
    — The Stars Down Under by Sandra McDonald. It was different from the first book in the series but proved to be an intriguing story. I’ll have to see if I can get the third book through inter-library loan.
    — Duchess by Deception by Marie Force: this is author Marie Force’s first historical romance. While I enjoy the author’s contemporary romantic suspense Fatal series, I’ll admit that I found this book less satisfying.
    — an enjoyable short story, A Dead Djinn in Cairo by P. Djèlí Clark which is available for FREE as part of this large collection Some of the Best from Tor.com: 2016: A Tor.com Original. https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MS8EZ9X/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_b01ms8ez9x
    — started but did not finish three new books; I ultimately decided to reread a favorite. Read Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse and then went on to read Dark Deeds and Dark Minds as well.

    Reply
  12. Since last month ~
    — Doris Egan’s fantasy The Gate of Ivory. I enjoyed it, but I’m not sure if I’ll continue on with the trilogy.feed
    — Cat Pictures Please and Other Stories by Naomi Kritzer. This is a collection of stories that I quite enjoyed. The stories are quite diverse in setting and subject matter. I liked some more than others, but I liked them all. The title story won a Hugo Award.
    — read with pleasure Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Just Cause (The Doyle & Acton Mystery Series Book 9),
    — read New Readers Press’ Teaching Adults: A Literacy Resource Book as I intend to resume literacy tutoring after a long hiatus. While I wouldn’t describe it as a scintillating read, it had some worthwhile information.
    — Matthew Quick’s young adult novel Every Exquisite Thing; I almost gave up on the book but persevered and ultimately found it an intriguing read.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Linesman yet again.
    — Mutineer (Alexis Carew Book 2) by J.A. Sutherland: This series is very much Horatio Hornblower in space complete with cutlasses, space suits, and cat o’ nine tails. I zipped through the book and am now wondering how looking it will take to borrow book three.
    — Karen Lord’s science fiction The Best of All Possible Worlds: A Novel which I enjoyed.
    — reread SK Dunstall’s Alliance and Confluence yet again.
    — The Fairies of Sadieville: The Final Tufa Novel by Alex Bledsoe. This wasn’t my favorite book in the series though all of them were good reads; it did a good job of tying up loose ends.
    — I read about a third of Karen Rivers’ young adult novel You Are The Everything before it got a bit odd, and I simply skimmed to the end. 
    — Clean by Alex Hughes which I enjoyed. I’d describe it as futuristic urban fantasy.
    — happily read Anne Bishop’s newest book Wild Country. This book had a large cast of characters; I’d describe it as a busy book, but I enjoyed it. I’ll doubtless be rereading it soon since I zipped through it on this first reading.
    — I mentioned having read Clean by Alex Hughes. I continued on with the Mindspace series and finished the novels Sharp and Marked as well as the (FREE) story Rabbit Trick all of which I enjoyed.
    — read another FREE Kindle work, but it was far-fetched and not a book I’ll be rereading: Healing Hands: A SciFi Alien Romance by Stella Cassy
    — read and reread the novella Briarley by Aster Glenn Gray. This is a World War II-era retelling of Beauty and the Beast. I recommend it to those who enjoy fairytale retellings as well as to those who might enjoy reading a male/male romance that has no explicit content. I will be looking to see what this author next publishes.
    — for my book group, Amor Towles’ A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel which I very much enjoyed.
    — also reread a favorite novella which I enjoyed once again — Sarina Bowen’s Blonde Date.
    — The Outback Stars by Sandra McDonald. This is a science fiction book that had an Australian aboriginal component; I enjoyed it.
    — The Stars Down Under by Sandra McDonald. It was different from the first book in the series but proved to be an intriguing story. I’ll have to see if I can get the third book through inter-library loan.
    — Duchess by Deception by Marie Force: this is author Marie Force’s first historical romance. While I enjoy the author’s contemporary romantic suspense Fatal series, I’ll admit that I found this book less satisfying.
    — an enjoyable short story, A Dead Djinn in Cairo by P. Djèlí Clark which is available for FREE as part of this large collection Some of the Best from Tor.com: 2016: A Tor.com Original. https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MS8EZ9X/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_b01ms8ez9x
    — started but did not finish three new books; I ultimately decided to reread a favorite. Read Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse and then went on to read Dark Deeds and Dark Minds as well.

    Reply
  13. Since last month ~
    — Doris Egan’s fantasy The Gate of Ivory. I enjoyed it, but I’m not sure if I’ll continue on with the trilogy.feed
    — Cat Pictures Please and Other Stories by Naomi Kritzer. This is a collection of stories that I quite enjoyed. The stories are quite diverse in setting and subject matter. I liked some more than others, but I liked them all. The title story won a Hugo Award.
    — read with pleasure Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Just Cause (The Doyle & Acton Mystery Series Book 9),
    — read New Readers Press’ Teaching Adults: A Literacy Resource Book as I intend to resume literacy tutoring after a long hiatus. While I wouldn’t describe it as a scintillating read, it had some worthwhile information.
    — Matthew Quick’s young adult novel Every Exquisite Thing; I almost gave up on the book but persevered and ultimately found it an intriguing read.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Linesman yet again.
    — Mutineer (Alexis Carew Book 2) by J.A. Sutherland: This series is very much Horatio Hornblower in space complete with cutlasses, space suits, and cat o’ nine tails. I zipped through the book and am now wondering how looking it will take to borrow book three.
    — Karen Lord’s science fiction The Best of All Possible Worlds: A Novel which I enjoyed.
    — reread SK Dunstall’s Alliance and Confluence yet again.
    — The Fairies of Sadieville: The Final Tufa Novel by Alex Bledsoe. This wasn’t my favorite book in the series though all of them were good reads; it did a good job of tying up loose ends.
    — I read about a third of Karen Rivers’ young adult novel You Are The Everything before it got a bit odd, and I simply skimmed to the end. 
    — Clean by Alex Hughes which I enjoyed. I’d describe it as futuristic urban fantasy.
    — happily read Anne Bishop’s newest book Wild Country. This book had a large cast of characters; I’d describe it as a busy book, but I enjoyed it. I’ll doubtless be rereading it soon since I zipped through it on this first reading.
    — I mentioned having read Clean by Alex Hughes. I continued on with the Mindspace series and finished the novels Sharp and Marked as well as the (FREE) story Rabbit Trick all of which I enjoyed.
    — read another FREE Kindle work, but it was far-fetched and not a book I’ll be rereading: Healing Hands: A SciFi Alien Romance by Stella Cassy
    — read and reread the novella Briarley by Aster Glenn Gray. This is a World War II-era retelling of Beauty and the Beast. I recommend it to those who enjoy fairytale retellings as well as to those who might enjoy reading a male/male romance that has no explicit content. I will be looking to see what this author next publishes.
    — for my book group, Amor Towles’ A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel which I very much enjoyed.
    — also reread a favorite novella which I enjoyed once again — Sarina Bowen’s Blonde Date.
    — The Outback Stars by Sandra McDonald. This is a science fiction book that had an Australian aboriginal component; I enjoyed it.
    — The Stars Down Under by Sandra McDonald. It was different from the first book in the series but proved to be an intriguing story. I’ll have to see if I can get the third book through inter-library loan.
    — Duchess by Deception by Marie Force: this is author Marie Force’s first historical romance. While I enjoy the author’s contemporary romantic suspense Fatal series, I’ll admit that I found this book less satisfying.
    — an enjoyable short story, A Dead Djinn in Cairo by P. Djèlí Clark which is available for FREE as part of this large collection Some of the Best from Tor.com: 2016: A Tor.com Original. https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MS8EZ9X/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_b01ms8ez9x
    — started but did not finish three new books; I ultimately decided to reread a favorite. Read Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse and then went on to read Dark Deeds and Dark Minds as well.

    Reply
  14. Since last month ~
    — Doris Egan’s fantasy The Gate of Ivory. I enjoyed it, but I’m not sure if I’ll continue on with the trilogy.feed
    — Cat Pictures Please and Other Stories by Naomi Kritzer. This is a collection of stories that I quite enjoyed. The stories are quite diverse in setting and subject matter. I liked some more than others, but I liked them all. The title story won a Hugo Award.
    — read with pleasure Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Just Cause (The Doyle & Acton Mystery Series Book 9),
    — read New Readers Press’ Teaching Adults: A Literacy Resource Book as I intend to resume literacy tutoring after a long hiatus. While I wouldn’t describe it as a scintillating read, it had some worthwhile information.
    — Matthew Quick’s young adult novel Every Exquisite Thing; I almost gave up on the book but persevered and ultimately found it an intriguing read.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Linesman yet again.
    — Mutineer (Alexis Carew Book 2) by J.A. Sutherland: This series is very much Horatio Hornblower in space complete with cutlasses, space suits, and cat o’ nine tails. I zipped through the book and am now wondering how looking it will take to borrow book three.
    — Karen Lord’s science fiction The Best of All Possible Worlds: A Novel which I enjoyed.
    — reread SK Dunstall’s Alliance and Confluence yet again.
    — The Fairies of Sadieville: The Final Tufa Novel by Alex Bledsoe. This wasn’t my favorite book in the series though all of them were good reads; it did a good job of tying up loose ends.
    — I read about a third of Karen Rivers’ young adult novel You Are The Everything before it got a bit odd, and I simply skimmed to the end. 
    — Clean by Alex Hughes which I enjoyed. I’d describe it as futuristic urban fantasy.
    — happily read Anne Bishop’s newest book Wild Country. This book had a large cast of characters; I’d describe it as a busy book, but I enjoyed it. I’ll doubtless be rereading it soon since I zipped through it on this first reading.
    — I mentioned having read Clean by Alex Hughes. I continued on with the Mindspace series and finished the novels Sharp and Marked as well as the (FREE) story Rabbit Trick all of which I enjoyed.
    — read another FREE Kindle work, but it was far-fetched and not a book I’ll be rereading: Healing Hands: A SciFi Alien Romance by Stella Cassy
    — read and reread the novella Briarley by Aster Glenn Gray. This is a World War II-era retelling of Beauty and the Beast. I recommend it to those who enjoy fairytale retellings as well as to those who might enjoy reading a male/male romance that has no explicit content. I will be looking to see what this author next publishes.
    — for my book group, Amor Towles’ A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel which I very much enjoyed.
    — also reread a favorite novella which I enjoyed once again — Sarina Bowen’s Blonde Date.
    — The Outback Stars by Sandra McDonald. This is a science fiction book that had an Australian aboriginal component; I enjoyed it.
    — The Stars Down Under by Sandra McDonald. It was different from the first book in the series but proved to be an intriguing story. I’ll have to see if I can get the third book through inter-library loan.
    — Duchess by Deception by Marie Force: this is author Marie Force’s first historical romance. While I enjoy the author’s contemporary romantic suspense Fatal series, I’ll admit that I found this book less satisfying.
    — an enjoyable short story, A Dead Djinn in Cairo by P. Djèlí Clark which is available for FREE as part of this large collection Some of the Best from Tor.com: 2016: A Tor.com Original. https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MS8EZ9X/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_b01ms8ez9x
    — started but did not finish three new books; I ultimately decided to reread a favorite. Read Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse and then went on to read Dark Deeds and Dark Minds as well.

    Reply
  15. Since last month ~
    — Doris Egan’s fantasy The Gate of Ivory. I enjoyed it, but I’m not sure if I’ll continue on with the trilogy.feed
    — Cat Pictures Please and Other Stories by Naomi Kritzer. This is a collection of stories that I quite enjoyed. The stories are quite diverse in setting and subject matter. I liked some more than others, but I liked them all. The title story won a Hugo Award.
    — read with pleasure Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Just Cause (The Doyle & Acton Mystery Series Book 9),
    — read New Readers Press’ Teaching Adults: A Literacy Resource Book as I intend to resume literacy tutoring after a long hiatus. While I wouldn’t describe it as a scintillating read, it had some worthwhile information.
    — Matthew Quick’s young adult novel Every Exquisite Thing; I almost gave up on the book but persevered and ultimately found it an intriguing read.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Linesman yet again.
    — Mutineer (Alexis Carew Book 2) by J.A. Sutherland: This series is very much Horatio Hornblower in space complete with cutlasses, space suits, and cat o’ nine tails. I zipped through the book and am now wondering how looking it will take to borrow book three.
    — Karen Lord’s science fiction The Best of All Possible Worlds: A Novel which I enjoyed.
    — reread SK Dunstall’s Alliance and Confluence yet again.
    — The Fairies of Sadieville: The Final Tufa Novel by Alex Bledsoe. This wasn’t my favorite book in the series though all of them were good reads; it did a good job of tying up loose ends.
    — I read about a third of Karen Rivers’ young adult novel You Are The Everything before it got a bit odd, and I simply skimmed to the end. 
    — Clean by Alex Hughes which I enjoyed. I’d describe it as futuristic urban fantasy.
    — happily read Anne Bishop’s newest book Wild Country. This book had a large cast of characters; I’d describe it as a busy book, but I enjoyed it. I’ll doubtless be rereading it soon since I zipped through it on this first reading.
    — I mentioned having read Clean by Alex Hughes. I continued on with the Mindspace series and finished the novels Sharp and Marked as well as the (FREE) story Rabbit Trick all of which I enjoyed.
    — read another FREE Kindle work, but it was far-fetched and not a book I’ll be rereading: Healing Hands: A SciFi Alien Romance by Stella Cassy
    — read and reread the novella Briarley by Aster Glenn Gray. This is a World War II-era retelling of Beauty and the Beast. I recommend it to those who enjoy fairytale retellings as well as to those who might enjoy reading a male/male romance that has no explicit content. I will be looking to see what this author next publishes.
    — for my book group, Amor Towles’ A Gentleman in Moscow: A Novel which I very much enjoyed.
    — also reread a favorite novella which I enjoyed once again — Sarina Bowen’s Blonde Date.
    — The Outback Stars by Sandra McDonald. This is a science fiction book that had an Australian aboriginal component; I enjoyed it.
    — The Stars Down Under by Sandra McDonald. It was different from the first book in the series but proved to be an intriguing story. I’ll have to see if I can get the third book through inter-library loan.
    — Duchess by Deception by Marie Force: this is author Marie Force’s first historical romance. While I enjoy the author’s contemporary romantic suspense Fatal series, I’ll admit that I found this book less satisfying.
    — an enjoyable short story, A Dead Djinn in Cairo by P. Djèlí Clark which is available for FREE as part of this large collection Some of the Best from Tor.com: 2016: A Tor.com Original. https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B01MS8EZ9X/ref=dbs_a_w_dp_b01ms8ez9x
    — started but did not finish three new books; I ultimately decided to reread a favorite. Read Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse and then went on to read Dark Deeds and Dark Minds as well.

    Reply
  16. Thre new novels: Alliance Rising by CJ Cherryh and Jane Fancher (science fiction, and a book that is earlier in the Alliance/Union stories than any of the others already written). Patricia Rice’S latest: Azure Secrets. And Karen Harper’s An American Duchess.
    I have started re-reading the Cherryh Alliance-Union Books in the order now being suggested by CJ and Jane. So I’m rereading “Heavy Time.” right now. I have also been reading books by Cara Elliott and Andrea Pickens (I’m holding Andrea Penrose until the new book appears) and Nicola Cornick. Some Patricia Rice and Mary Jo Putney is being readied for re-reads. (But nobody here would know those names.)

    Reply
  17. Thre new novels: Alliance Rising by CJ Cherryh and Jane Fancher (science fiction, and a book that is earlier in the Alliance/Union stories than any of the others already written). Patricia Rice’S latest: Azure Secrets. And Karen Harper’s An American Duchess.
    I have started re-reading the Cherryh Alliance-Union Books in the order now being suggested by CJ and Jane. So I’m rereading “Heavy Time.” right now. I have also been reading books by Cara Elliott and Andrea Pickens (I’m holding Andrea Penrose until the new book appears) and Nicola Cornick. Some Patricia Rice and Mary Jo Putney is being readied for re-reads. (But nobody here would know those names.)

    Reply
  18. Thre new novels: Alliance Rising by CJ Cherryh and Jane Fancher (science fiction, and a book that is earlier in the Alliance/Union stories than any of the others already written). Patricia Rice’S latest: Azure Secrets. And Karen Harper’s An American Duchess.
    I have started re-reading the Cherryh Alliance-Union Books in the order now being suggested by CJ and Jane. So I’m rereading “Heavy Time.” right now. I have also been reading books by Cara Elliott and Andrea Pickens (I’m holding Andrea Penrose until the new book appears) and Nicola Cornick. Some Patricia Rice and Mary Jo Putney is being readied for re-reads. (But nobody here would know those names.)

    Reply
  19. Thre new novels: Alliance Rising by CJ Cherryh and Jane Fancher (science fiction, and a book that is earlier in the Alliance/Union stories than any of the others already written). Patricia Rice’S latest: Azure Secrets. And Karen Harper’s An American Duchess.
    I have started re-reading the Cherryh Alliance-Union Books in the order now being suggested by CJ and Jane. So I’m rereading “Heavy Time.” right now. I have also been reading books by Cara Elliott and Andrea Pickens (I’m holding Andrea Penrose until the new book appears) and Nicola Cornick. Some Patricia Rice and Mary Jo Putney is being readied for re-reads. (But nobody here would know those names.)

    Reply
  20. Thre new novels: Alliance Rising by CJ Cherryh and Jane Fancher (science fiction, and a book that is earlier in the Alliance/Union stories than any of the others already written). Patricia Rice’S latest: Azure Secrets. And Karen Harper’s An American Duchess.
    I have started re-reading the Cherryh Alliance-Union Books in the order now being suggested by CJ and Jane. So I’m rereading “Heavy Time.” right now. I have also been reading books by Cara Elliott and Andrea Pickens (I’m holding Andrea Penrose until the new book appears) and Nicola Cornick. Some Patricia Rice and Mary Jo Putney is being readied for re-reads. (But nobody here would know those names.)

    Reply
  21. Interesting you should say that about kindle. I’ve often wondered if I get a different reading experience with kindle than with print books.
    Mostly I just want a comfy chair and (where applicable) a good light. Is that too much to ask.

    Reply
  22. Interesting you should say that about kindle. I’ve often wondered if I get a different reading experience with kindle than with print books.
    Mostly I just want a comfy chair and (where applicable) a good light. Is that too much to ask.

    Reply
  23. Interesting you should say that about kindle. I’ve often wondered if I get a different reading experience with kindle than with print books.
    Mostly I just want a comfy chair and (where applicable) a good light. Is that too much to ask.

    Reply
  24. Interesting you should say that about kindle. I’ve often wondered if I get a different reading experience with kindle than with print books.
    Mostly I just want a comfy chair and (where applicable) a good light. Is that too much to ask.

    Reply
  25. Interesting you should say that about kindle. I’ve often wondered if I get a different reading experience with kindle than with print books.
    Mostly I just want a comfy chair and (where applicable) a good light. Is that too much to ask.

    Reply
  26. I read The Gate of Ivory and found it enjoyable. But it’s been so long I’ve forgotten the details .
    I see you have lots of SF&F books working for you. I’ll have to pick more of those up. It seems the right time.

    Reply
  27. I read The Gate of Ivory and found it enjoyable. But it’s been so long I’ve forgotten the details .
    I see you have lots of SF&F books working for you. I’ll have to pick more of those up. It seems the right time.

    Reply
  28. I read The Gate of Ivory and found it enjoyable. But it’s been so long I’ve forgotten the details .
    I see you have lots of SF&F books working for you. I’ll have to pick more of those up. It seems the right time.

    Reply
  29. I read The Gate of Ivory and found it enjoyable. But it’s been so long I’ve forgotten the details .
    I see you have lots of SF&F books working for you. I’ll have to pick more of those up. It seems the right time.

    Reply
  30. I read The Gate of Ivory and found it enjoyable. But it’s been so long I’ve forgotten the details .
    I see you have lots of SF&F books working for you. I’ll have to pick more of those up. It seems the right time.

    Reply
  31. I know I get a different reading experience from kindle than from print. I retain less from kindle; I don’t seem to get immersed as easily. It just doesn’t seem to make the same impression; my hunch is that in that kindle form, books are more like TV, which I find (mostly) immediately forgettable. On kindle I can start some book and forget all about it. I am also used to flipping back and forth in a book, or marking it up, which is more easily done with a print copy. I also resent having to purchase a copy of a book that I can then do nothing with after I’ve read it; I can’t mail it to a friend, resell it or put it on the shelf to admire.
    I do have the kindle app on my phone, for when I get stuck waiting somewhere, which I keep stocked with old favorites. I also have it on my desktop, where it is very useful for searching text. I leave my actual kindle in the bedroom, because it can be read in indifferent lighting — but lately I’ve come to prefer radio or audiobooks for bedtime entertainment and I keep forgetting to keep it charged.
    But for pleasure and relaxation, like you, I still prefer to hold a book with a nice light behind me and my feet up 🙂

    Reply
  32. I know I get a different reading experience from kindle than from print. I retain less from kindle; I don’t seem to get immersed as easily. It just doesn’t seem to make the same impression; my hunch is that in that kindle form, books are more like TV, which I find (mostly) immediately forgettable. On kindle I can start some book and forget all about it. I am also used to flipping back and forth in a book, or marking it up, which is more easily done with a print copy. I also resent having to purchase a copy of a book that I can then do nothing with after I’ve read it; I can’t mail it to a friend, resell it or put it on the shelf to admire.
    I do have the kindle app on my phone, for when I get stuck waiting somewhere, which I keep stocked with old favorites. I also have it on my desktop, where it is very useful for searching text. I leave my actual kindle in the bedroom, because it can be read in indifferent lighting — but lately I’ve come to prefer radio or audiobooks for bedtime entertainment and I keep forgetting to keep it charged.
    But for pleasure and relaxation, like you, I still prefer to hold a book with a nice light behind me and my feet up 🙂

    Reply
  33. I know I get a different reading experience from kindle than from print. I retain less from kindle; I don’t seem to get immersed as easily. It just doesn’t seem to make the same impression; my hunch is that in that kindle form, books are more like TV, which I find (mostly) immediately forgettable. On kindle I can start some book and forget all about it. I am also used to flipping back and forth in a book, or marking it up, which is more easily done with a print copy. I also resent having to purchase a copy of a book that I can then do nothing with after I’ve read it; I can’t mail it to a friend, resell it or put it on the shelf to admire.
    I do have the kindle app on my phone, for when I get stuck waiting somewhere, which I keep stocked with old favorites. I also have it on my desktop, where it is very useful for searching text. I leave my actual kindle in the bedroom, because it can be read in indifferent lighting — but lately I’ve come to prefer radio or audiobooks for bedtime entertainment and I keep forgetting to keep it charged.
    But for pleasure and relaxation, like you, I still prefer to hold a book with a nice light behind me and my feet up 🙂

    Reply
  34. I know I get a different reading experience from kindle than from print. I retain less from kindle; I don’t seem to get immersed as easily. It just doesn’t seem to make the same impression; my hunch is that in that kindle form, books are more like TV, which I find (mostly) immediately forgettable. On kindle I can start some book and forget all about it. I am also used to flipping back and forth in a book, or marking it up, which is more easily done with a print copy. I also resent having to purchase a copy of a book that I can then do nothing with after I’ve read it; I can’t mail it to a friend, resell it or put it on the shelf to admire.
    I do have the kindle app on my phone, for when I get stuck waiting somewhere, which I keep stocked with old favorites. I also have it on my desktop, where it is very useful for searching text. I leave my actual kindle in the bedroom, because it can be read in indifferent lighting — but lately I’ve come to prefer radio or audiobooks for bedtime entertainment and I keep forgetting to keep it charged.
    But for pleasure and relaxation, like you, I still prefer to hold a book with a nice light behind me and my feet up 🙂

    Reply
  35. I know I get a different reading experience from kindle than from print. I retain less from kindle; I don’t seem to get immersed as easily. It just doesn’t seem to make the same impression; my hunch is that in that kindle form, books are more like TV, which I find (mostly) immediately forgettable. On kindle I can start some book and forget all about it. I am also used to flipping back and forth in a book, or marking it up, which is more easily done with a print copy. I also resent having to purchase a copy of a book that I can then do nothing with after I’ve read it; I can’t mail it to a friend, resell it or put it on the shelf to admire.
    I do have the kindle app on my phone, for when I get stuck waiting somewhere, which I keep stocked with old favorites. I also have it on my desktop, where it is very useful for searching text. I leave my actual kindle in the bedroom, because it can be read in indifferent lighting — but lately I’ve come to prefer radio or audiobooks for bedtime entertainment and I keep forgetting to keep it charged.
    But for pleasure and relaxation, like you, I still prefer to hold a book with a nice light behind me and my feet up 🙂

    Reply
  36. LOL, Sue, yeah, MJ and I are pretty invisible around here. 😉 I haven’t read Cherryh in a while. I need to go back and take another look, thanks! And Karen is always most excellent.

    Reply
  37. LOL, Sue, yeah, MJ and I are pretty invisible around here. 😉 I haven’t read Cherryh in a while. I need to go back and take another look, thanks! And Karen is always most excellent.

    Reply
  38. LOL, Sue, yeah, MJ and I are pretty invisible around here. 😉 I haven’t read Cherryh in a while. I need to go back and take another look, thanks! And Karen is always most excellent.

    Reply
  39. LOL, Sue, yeah, MJ and I are pretty invisible around here. 😉 I haven’t read Cherryh in a while. I need to go back and take another look, thanks! And Karen is always most excellent.

    Reply
  40. LOL, Sue, yeah, MJ and I are pretty invisible around here. 😉 I haven’t read Cherryh in a while. I need to go back and take another look, thanks! And Karen is always most excellent.

    Reply
  41. Lots of humorous and/or cozy recommendations this month, which sound great.
    I managed to get hold of used paperback copies of 3 of Dinah Dean’s old-fashioned romances set in Russia, and I gobbled them up! First, “Flight of the Eagle” which was the greatest, then “The Eagle’s Fate” and “The Ice Prince”. It’s so fascinating to see the Napoleonic Wars from the POV of Moscow and St. Petersburg instead of the usual Regency era books set in the Peninsula or at Waterloo. These are wonderful stories with great heroes and heroines.
    I also read “Polaris Rising”, a terrific military adventure sci-fi romance, which should definitely appeal to fans of Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse series.
    Now I’m catching up with a couple of books everyone else read years ago, but I somehow missed: “Act Like It” by Lucy Parker, and Susanna’s “The Winter Sea”. I’m at the point in “The Winter Sea” where the plot is really starting to thicken!

    Reply
  42. Lots of humorous and/or cozy recommendations this month, which sound great.
    I managed to get hold of used paperback copies of 3 of Dinah Dean’s old-fashioned romances set in Russia, and I gobbled them up! First, “Flight of the Eagle” which was the greatest, then “The Eagle’s Fate” and “The Ice Prince”. It’s so fascinating to see the Napoleonic Wars from the POV of Moscow and St. Petersburg instead of the usual Regency era books set in the Peninsula or at Waterloo. These are wonderful stories with great heroes and heroines.
    I also read “Polaris Rising”, a terrific military adventure sci-fi romance, which should definitely appeal to fans of Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse series.
    Now I’m catching up with a couple of books everyone else read years ago, but I somehow missed: “Act Like It” by Lucy Parker, and Susanna’s “The Winter Sea”. I’m at the point in “The Winter Sea” where the plot is really starting to thicken!

    Reply
  43. Lots of humorous and/or cozy recommendations this month, which sound great.
    I managed to get hold of used paperback copies of 3 of Dinah Dean’s old-fashioned romances set in Russia, and I gobbled them up! First, “Flight of the Eagle” which was the greatest, then “The Eagle’s Fate” and “The Ice Prince”. It’s so fascinating to see the Napoleonic Wars from the POV of Moscow and St. Petersburg instead of the usual Regency era books set in the Peninsula or at Waterloo. These are wonderful stories with great heroes and heroines.
    I also read “Polaris Rising”, a terrific military adventure sci-fi romance, which should definitely appeal to fans of Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse series.
    Now I’m catching up with a couple of books everyone else read years ago, but I somehow missed: “Act Like It” by Lucy Parker, and Susanna’s “The Winter Sea”. I’m at the point in “The Winter Sea” where the plot is really starting to thicken!

    Reply
  44. Lots of humorous and/or cozy recommendations this month, which sound great.
    I managed to get hold of used paperback copies of 3 of Dinah Dean’s old-fashioned romances set in Russia, and I gobbled them up! First, “Flight of the Eagle” which was the greatest, then “The Eagle’s Fate” and “The Ice Prince”. It’s so fascinating to see the Napoleonic Wars from the POV of Moscow and St. Petersburg instead of the usual Regency era books set in the Peninsula or at Waterloo. These are wonderful stories with great heroes and heroines.
    I also read “Polaris Rising”, a terrific military adventure sci-fi romance, which should definitely appeal to fans of Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse series.
    Now I’m catching up with a couple of books everyone else read years ago, but I somehow missed: “Act Like It” by Lucy Parker, and Susanna’s “The Winter Sea”. I’m at the point in “The Winter Sea” where the plot is really starting to thicken!

    Reply
  45. Lots of humorous and/or cozy recommendations this month, which sound great.
    I managed to get hold of used paperback copies of 3 of Dinah Dean’s old-fashioned romances set in Russia, and I gobbled them up! First, “Flight of the Eagle” which was the greatest, then “The Eagle’s Fate” and “The Ice Prince”. It’s so fascinating to see the Napoleonic Wars from the POV of Moscow and St. Petersburg instead of the usual Regency era books set in the Peninsula or at Waterloo. These are wonderful stories with great heroes and heroines.
    I also read “Polaris Rising”, a terrific military adventure sci-fi romance, which should definitely appeal to fans of Michelle Diener’s Dark Horse series.
    Now I’m catching up with a couple of books everyone else read years ago, but I somehow missed: “Act Like It” by Lucy Parker, and Susanna’s “The Winter Sea”. I’m at the point in “The Winter Sea” where the plot is really starting to thicken!

    Reply
  46. I have already forgotten half of what I read last month. I guess they weren’t that good (smile). But I did find a new author that I like quite a bit. That is always exciting.
    Before Christmas, I downloaded about 4 Christmas novellas by authors I was not familiar with. I only got around to reading the last of them about a week ago – A HOLIDAY BY GASLIGHT by Mimi Matthews. I liked it so much I immediately ordered another book by her – THE VISCOUNT AND THE VICAR’S DAUGHTER. I loved it too. Feel like I struck gold!

    Reply
  47. I have already forgotten half of what I read last month. I guess they weren’t that good (smile). But I did find a new author that I like quite a bit. That is always exciting.
    Before Christmas, I downloaded about 4 Christmas novellas by authors I was not familiar with. I only got around to reading the last of them about a week ago – A HOLIDAY BY GASLIGHT by Mimi Matthews. I liked it so much I immediately ordered another book by her – THE VISCOUNT AND THE VICAR’S DAUGHTER. I loved it too. Feel like I struck gold!

    Reply
  48. I have already forgotten half of what I read last month. I guess they weren’t that good (smile). But I did find a new author that I like quite a bit. That is always exciting.
    Before Christmas, I downloaded about 4 Christmas novellas by authors I was not familiar with. I only got around to reading the last of them about a week ago – A HOLIDAY BY GASLIGHT by Mimi Matthews. I liked it so much I immediately ordered another book by her – THE VISCOUNT AND THE VICAR’S DAUGHTER. I loved it too. Feel like I struck gold!

    Reply
  49. I have already forgotten half of what I read last month. I guess they weren’t that good (smile). But I did find a new author that I like quite a bit. That is always exciting.
    Before Christmas, I downloaded about 4 Christmas novellas by authors I was not familiar with. I only got around to reading the last of them about a week ago – A HOLIDAY BY GASLIGHT by Mimi Matthews. I liked it so much I immediately ordered another book by her – THE VISCOUNT AND THE VICAR’S DAUGHTER. I loved it too. Feel like I struck gold!

    Reply
  50. I have already forgotten half of what I read last month. I guess they weren’t that good (smile). But I did find a new author that I like quite a bit. That is always exciting.
    Before Christmas, I downloaded about 4 Christmas novellas by authors I was not familiar with. I only got around to reading the last of them about a week ago – A HOLIDAY BY GASLIGHT by Mimi Matthews. I liked it so much I immediately ordered another book by her – THE VISCOUNT AND THE VICAR’S DAUGHTER. I loved it too. Feel like I struck gold!

    Reply
  51. I must be the outlier. I prefer to read on my iPad, probably because my eyes are not in the best shape. I can adjust the type size and brightness.

    Reply
  52. I must be the outlier. I prefer to read on my iPad, probably because my eyes are not in the best shape. I can adjust the type size and brightness.

    Reply
  53. I must be the outlier. I prefer to read on my iPad, probably because my eyes are not in the best shape. I can adjust the type size and brightness.

    Reply
  54. I must be the outlier. I prefer to read on my iPad, probably because my eyes are not in the best shape. I can adjust the type size and brightness.

    Reply
  55. I must be the outlier. I prefer to read on my iPad, probably because my eyes are not in the best shape. I can adjust the type size and brightness.

    Reply
  56. This month I managed to obtain a used (and crayoned-on-the-cover!) copy of “Flight of the Eagle (for a small fortune!), but I haven’t read it yet. (added it to the teetering t-b-r mountain) After the ghost-writer plagiarism scandal in the romance world, I finally read a few Courtney Milan books, and I particularly enjoyed her contemporary romances Trade Me and Hold Me, and I’m eager to read more from her. I also greatly enjoyed the mystery The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths (I think it was a Wench recommendation), but my favorite of the month, and one of the better books I’ve ever read, was A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. Not a romance, but an incredibly moving story of the love and conflicts among family members, in this case an immigrant Moslem family in California. The end had me sobbing and recommending it to all my friends who appreciate literature that makes you think. Three other great March reads: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah, My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan, and at long last, Susanna’s wonderful Bellewether.

    Reply
  57. This month I managed to obtain a used (and crayoned-on-the-cover!) copy of “Flight of the Eagle (for a small fortune!), but I haven’t read it yet. (added it to the teetering t-b-r mountain) After the ghost-writer plagiarism scandal in the romance world, I finally read a few Courtney Milan books, and I particularly enjoyed her contemporary romances Trade Me and Hold Me, and I’m eager to read more from her. I also greatly enjoyed the mystery The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths (I think it was a Wench recommendation), but my favorite of the month, and one of the better books I’ve ever read, was A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. Not a romance, but an incredibly moving story of the love and conflicts among family members, in this case an immigrant Moslem family in California. The end had me sobbing and recommending it to all my friends who appreciate literature that makes you think. Three other great March reads: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah, My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan, and at long last, Susanna’s wonderful Bellewether.

    Reply
  58. This month I managed to obtain a used (and crayoned-on-the-cover!) copy of “Flight of the Eagle (for a small fortune!), but I haven’t read it yet. (added it to the teetering t-b-r mountain) After the ghost-writer plagiarism scandal in the romance world, I finally read a few Courtney Milan books, and I particularly enjoyed her contemporary romances Trade Me and Hold Me, and I’m eager to read more from her. I also greatly enjoyed the mystery The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths (I think it was a Wench recommendation), but my favorite of the month, and one of the better books I’ve ever read, was A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. Not a romance, but an incredibly moving story of the love and conflicts among family members, in this case an immigrant Moslem family in California. The end had me sobbing and recommending it to all my friends who appreciate literature that makes you think. Three other great March reads: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah, My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan, and at long last, Susanna’s wonderful Bellewether.

    Reply
  59. This month I managed to obtain a used (and crayoned-on-the-cover!) copy of “Flight of the Eagle (for a small fortune!), but I haven’t read it yet. (added it to the teetering t-b-r mountain) After the ghost-writer plagiarism scandal in the romance world, I finally read a few Courtney Milan books, and I particularly enjoyed her contemporary romances Trade Me and Hold Me, and I’m eager to read more from her. I also greatly enjoyed the mystery The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths (I think it was a Wench recommendation), but my favorite of the month, and one of the better books I’ve ever read, was A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. Not a romance, but an incredibly moving story of the love and conflicts among family members, in this case an immigrant Moslem family in California. The end had me sobbing and recommending it to all my friends who appreciate literature that makes you think. Three other great March reads: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah, My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan, and at long last, Susanna’s wonderful Bellewether.

    Reply
  60. This month I managed to obtain a used (and crayoned-on-the-cover!) copy of “Flight of the Eagle (for a small fortune!), but I haven’t read it yet. (added it to the teetering t-b-r mountain) After the ghost-writer plagiarism scandal in the romance world, I finally read a few Courtney Milan books, and I particularly enjoyed her contemporary romances Trade Me and Hold Me, and I’m eager to read more from her. I also greatly enjoyed the mystery The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths (I think it was a Wench recommendation), but my favorite of the month, and one of the better books I’ve ever read, was A Place For Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza. Not a romance, but an incredibly moving story of the love and conflicts among family members, in this case an immigrant Moslem family in California. The end had me sobbing and recommending it to all my friends who appreciate literature that makes you think. Three other great March reads: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah, My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan, and at long last, Susanna’s wonderful Bellewether.

    Reply
  61. … there is nothing — absolutely nothing — half so much worth doing as
    (No. Not “simply messing about in boats,”)
    finding a lovely new author.
    That’s why we have to keep picking up folks we haven’t read and giving them a chance.

    Reply
  62. … there is nothing — absolutely nothing — half so much worth doing as
    (No. Not “simply messing about in boats,”)
    finding a lovely new author.
    That’s why we have to keep picking up folks we haven’t read and giving them a chance.

    Reply
  63. … there is nothing — absolutely nothing — half so much worth doing as
    (No. Not “simply messing about in boats,”)
    finding a lovely new author.
    That’s why we have to keep picking up folks we haven’t read and giving them a chance.

    Reply
  64. … there is nothing — absolutely nothing — half so much worth doing as
    (No. Not “simply messing about in boats,”)
    finding a lovely new author.
    That’s why we have to keep picking up folks we haven’t read and giving them a chance.

    Reply
  65. … there is nothing — absolutely nothing — half so much worth doing as
    (No. Not “simply messing about in boats,”)
    finding a lovely new author.
    That’s why we have to keep picking up folks we haven’t read and giving them a chance.

    Reply
  66. I did so enjoy The Winter Sea when I read it.
    I haven’t done lot of exploring of the Napoleonic War in Russia. Maybe I should pull those Dinah Dean books out somehow and read them.
    I am going to admit I found War and Peace rather heavy going.

    Reply
  67. I did so enjoy The Winter Sea when I read it.
    I haven’t done lot of exploring of the Napoleonic War in Russia. Maybe I should pull those Dinah Dean books out somehow and read them.
    I am going to admit I found War and Peace rather heavy going.

    Reply
  68. I did so enjoy The Winter Sea when I read it.
    I haven’t done lot of exploring of the Napoleonic War in Russia. Maybe I should pull those Dinah Dean books out somehow and read them.
    I am going to admit I found War and Peace rather heavy going.

    Reply
  69. I did so enjoy The Winter Sea when I read it.
    I haven’t done lot of exploring of the Napoleonic War in Russia. Maybe I should pull those Dinah Dean books out somehow and read them.
    I am going to admit I found War and Peace rather heavy going.

    Reply
  70. I did so enjoy The Winter Sea when I read it.
    I haven’t done lot of exploring of the Napoleonic War in Russia. Maybe I should pull those Dinah Dean books out somehow and read them.
    I am going to admit I found War and Peace rather heavy going.

    Reply
  71. I finally got to read The Cockermouth Mail which has been mentioned numerous times and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I also read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane and Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. Home to Cavendish proved to be a bit of a disappointment. I’ve just finished Heart of Disaster: A Titanic Novel of love and loss by Rachel Wesson. A nice light quick read. So onwards and upwards for next month.

    Reply
  72. I finally got to read The Cockermouth Mail which has been mentioned numerous times and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I also read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane and Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. Home to Cavendish proved to be a bit of a disappointment. I’ve just finished Heart of Disaster: A Titanic Novel of love and loss by Rachel Wesson. A nice light quick read. So onwards and upwards for next month.

    Reply
  73. I finally got to read The Cockermouth Mail which has been mentioned numerous times and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I also read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane and Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. Home to Cavendish proved to be a bit of a disappointment. I’ve just finished Heart of Disaster: A Titanic Novel of love and loss by Rachel Wesson. A nice light quick read. So onwards and upwards for next month.

    Reply
  74. I finally got to read The Cockermouth Mail which has been mentioned numerous times and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I also read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane and Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. Home to Cavendish proved to be a bit of a disappointment. I’ve just finished Heart of Disaster: A Titanic Novel of love and loss by Rachel Wesson. A nice light quick read. So onwards and upwards for next month.

    Reply
  75. I finally got to read The Cockermouth Mail which has been mentioned numerous times and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I also read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane and Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. Home to Cavendish proved to be a bit of a disappointment. I’ve just finished Heart of Disaster: A Titanic Novel of love and loss by Rachel Wesson. A nice light quick read. So onwards and upwards for next month.

    Reply
  76. I have read quite a few books in March. My favorites – A Blunt Instrument by Georgette Heyer and A Match Made in Good Hope by Cindy Kirk. I won The Gown by Jennifer Robson and have just started it….I am gonna like this book a bunch.
    Just as a comment on Kindle vs actual really real books.
    I think for me, it would be difficult to read on a phone. I have a Kindle and at first it took me some time to get used to it. And yes, I love actual books. But, Kindle books are not hard to get into – because the size of the kindle is almost the same as a paperback book and the page is about the same size.
    See, who said size does not matter?

    Reply
  77. I have read quite a few books in March. My favorites – A Blunt Instrument by Georgette Heyer and A Match Made in Good Hope by Cindy Kirk. I won The Gown by Jennifer Robson and have just started it….I am gonna like this book a bunch.
    Just as a comment on Kindle vs actual really real books.
    I think for me, it would be difficult to read on a phone. I have a Kindle and at first it took me some time to get used to it. And yes, I love actual books. But, Kindle books are not hard to get into – because the size of the kindle is almost the same as a paperback book and the page is about the same size.
    See, who said size does not matter?

    Reply
  78. I have read quite a few books in March. My favorites – A Blunt Instrument by Georgette Heyer and A Match Made in Good Hope by Cindy Kirk. I won The Gown by Jennifer Robson and have just started it….I am gonna like this book a bunch.
    Just as a comment on Kindle vs actual really real books.
    I think for me, it would be difficult to read on a phone. I have a Kindle and at first it took me some time to get used to it. And yes, I love actual books. But, Kindle books are not hard to get into – because the size of the kindle is almost the same as a paperback book and the page is about the same size.
    See, who said size does not matter?

    Reply
  79. I have read quite a few books in March. My favorites – A Blunt Instrument by Georgette Heyer and A Match Made in Good Hope by Cindy Kirk. I won The Gown by Jennifer Robson and have just started it….I am gonna like this book a bunch.
    Just as a comment on Kindle vs actual really real books.
    I think for me, it would be difficult to read on a phone. I have a Kindle and at first it took me some time to get used to it. And yes, I love actual books. But, Kindle books are not hard to get into – because the size of the kindle is almost the same as a paperback book and the page is about the same size.
    See, who said size does not matter?

    Reply
  80. I have read quite a few books in March. My favorites – A Blunt Instrument by Georgette Heyer and A Match Made in Good Hope by Cindy Kirk. I won The Gown by Jennifer Robson and have just started it….I am gonna like this book a bunch.
    Just as a comment on Kindle vs actual really real books.
    I think for me, it would be difficult to read on a phone. I have a Kindle and at first it took me some time to get used to it. And yes, I love actual books. But, Kindle books are not hard to get into – because the size of the kindle is almost the same as a paperback book and the page is about the same size.
    See, who said size does not matter?

    Reply
  81. It’s me again. I just bought The King’s Bed. That’s what I love about these ‘What we’re reading’ posts. I have discovered so many new authors and new books through this!!

    Reply
  82. It’s me again. I just bought The King’s Bed. That’s what I love about these ‘What we’re reading’ posts. I have discovered so many new authors and new books through this!!

    Reply
  83. It’s me again. I just bought The King’s Bed. That’s what I love about these ‘What we’re reading’ posts. I have discovered so many new authors and new books through this!!

    Reply
  84. It’s me again. I just bought The King’s Bed. That’s what I love about these ‘What we’re reading’ posts. I have discovered so many new authors and new books through this!!

    Reply
  85. It’s me again. I just bought The King’s Bed. That’s what I love about these ‘What we’re reading’ posts. I have discovered so many new authors and new books through this!!

    Reply
  86. Oh, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Dinah Dean book, Teresa. I thought it was a lovely story. I enjoy all her books very much. I hope you like The King’s Bed, too. And thank you for the shout out for TWITL!

    Reply
  87. Oh, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Dinah Dean book, Teresa. I thought it was a lovely story. I enjoy all her books very much. I hope you like The King’s Bed, too. And thank you for the shout out for TWITL!

    Reply
  88. Oh, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Dinah Dean book, Teresa. I thought it was a lovely story. I enjoy all her books very much. I hope you like The King’s Bed, too. And thank you for the shout out for TWITL!

    Reply
  89. Oh, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Dinah Dean book, Teresa. I thought it was a lovely story. I enjoy all her books very much. I hope you like The King’s Bed, too. And thank you for the shout out for TWITL!

    Reply
  90. Oh, I’m so glad you enjoyed the Dinah Dean book, Teresa. I thought it was a lovely story. I enjoy all her books very much. I hope you like The King’s Bed, too. And thank you for the shout out for TWITL!

    Reply
  91. Just finished the new Donna Leon, Unto Us a Son Is Given – her writing is always so insightful of the human condition, and Guido Brunetti ranks right up there on my Favorite Fictional Males list. Yes, each outing is a murder mystery, but they are so much more – in this one, the murder doesn’t even occur until halfway through.
    The holiday season was so crammed with work, illness and other obligations that I am just catching up on the holiday romances (those I read on my iPad, unlike the hardcover DLeons). My sister introduced me to Trisha Ashley by recommending Twelve Days of Christmas, which I enjoyed so much, I am working my way through her oeuvre of Christmas shorts and novels. As with many holiday stories, somewhat predictable endings, but the combo of characters, food (recipes included!), humor and romance make them wonderfully enjoyable. And agree with Mary T about A Holiday By Gaslight — very good!
    Last but most definitely not least, LOVED Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. I don’t usually like time slips, but this may change me permanently!

    Reply
  92. Just finished the new Donna Leon, Unto Us a Son Is Given – her writing is always so insightful of the human condition, and Guido Brunetti ranks right up there on my Favorite Fictional Males list. Yes, each outing is a murder mystery, but they are so much more – in this one, the murder doesn’t even occur until halfway through.
    The holiday season was so crammed with work, illness and other obligations that I am just catching up on the holiday romances (those I read on my iPad, unlike the hardcover DLeons). My sister introduced me to Trisha Ashley by recommending Twelve Days of Christmas, which I enjoyed so much, I am working my way through her oeuvre of Christmas shorts and novels. As with many holiday stories, somewhat predictable endings, but the combo of characters, food (recipes included!), humor and romance make them wonderfully enjoyable. And agree with Mary T about A Holiday By Gaslight — very good!
    Last but most definitely not least, LOVED Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. I don’t usually like time slips, but this may change me permanently!

    Reply
  93. Just finished the new Donna Leon, Unto Us a Son Is Given – her writing is always so insightful of the human condition, and Guido Brunetti ranks right up there on my Favorite Fictional Males list. Yes, each outing is a murder mystery, but they are so much more – in this one, the murder doesn’t even occur until halfway through.
    The holiday season was so crammed with work, illness and other obligations that I am just catching up on the holiday romances (those I read on my iPad, unlike the hardcover DLeons). My sister introduced me to Trisha Ashley by recommending Twelve Days of Christmas, which I enjoyed so much, I am working my way through her oeuvre of Christmas shorts and novels. As with many holiday stories, somewhat predictable endings, but the combo of characters, food (recipes included!), humor and romance make them wonderfully enjoyable. And agree with Mary T about A Holiday By Gaslight — very good!
    Last but most definitely not least, LOVED Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. I don’t usually like time slips, but this may change me permanently!

    Reply
  94. Just finished the new Donna Leon, Unto Us a Son Is Given – her writing is always so insightful of the human condition, and Guido Brunetti ranks right up there on my Favorite Fictional Males list. Yes, each outing is a murder mystery, but they are so much more – in this one, the murder doesn’t even occur until halfway through.
    The holiday season was so crammed with work, illness and other obligations that I am just catching up on the holiday romances (those I read on my iPad, unlike the hardcover DLeons). My sister introduced me to Trisha Ashley by recommending Twelve Days of Christmas, which I enjoyed so much, I am working my way through her oeuvre of Christmas shorts and novels. As with many holiday stories, somewhat predictable endings, but the combo of characters, food (recipes included!), humor and romance make them wonderfully enjoyable. And agree with Mary T about A Holiday By Gaslight — very good!
    Last but most definitely not least, LOVED Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. I don’t usually like time slips, but this may change me permanently!

    Reply
  95. Just finished the new Donna Leon, Unto Us a Son Is Given – her writing is always so insightful of the human condition, and Guido Brunetti ranks right up there on my Favorite Fictional Males list. Yes, each outing is a murder mystery, but they are so much more – in this one, the murder doesn’t even occur until halfway through.
    The holiday season was so crammed with work, illness and other obligations that I am just catching up on the holiday romances (those I read on my iPad, unlike the hardcover DLeons). My sister introduced me to Trisha Ashley by recommending Twelve Days of Christmas, which I enjoyed so much, I am working my way through her oeuvre of Christmas shorts and novels. As with many holiday stories, somewhat predictable endings, but the combo of characters, food (recipes included!), humor and romance make them wonderfully enjoyable. And agree with Mary T about A Holiday By Gaslight — very good!
    Last but most definitely not least, LOVED Nicola’s Woman in the Lake. I don’t usually like time slips, but this may change me permanently!

    Reply
  96. I never used the Kindle app on my older Samsung Galaxy 3 phone — it did feel too small – but when I got the taller Galaxy 8, I found that a very comfortable shape for reading. Not as good as print, but very handy!

    Reply
  97. I never used the Kindle app on my older Samsung Galaxy 3 phone — it did feel too small – but when I got the taller Galaxy 8, I found that a very comfortable shape for reading. Not as good as print, but very handy!

    Reply
  98. I never used the Kindle app on my older Samsung Galaxy 3 phone — it did feel too small – but when I got the taller Galaxy 8, I found that a very comfortable shape for reading. Not as good as print, but very handy!

    Reply
  99. I never used the Kindle app on my older Samsung Galaxy 3 phone — it did feel too small – but when I got the taller Galaxy 8, I found that a very comfortable shape for reading. Not as good as print, but very handy!

    Reply
  100. I never used the Kindle app on my older Samsung Galaxy 3 phone — it did feel too small – but when I got the taller Galaxy 8, I found that a very comfortable shape for reading. Not as good as print, but very handy!

    Reply
  101. Hmm….I made no notes this month so don’t have much to contribute to the discussion. Though I did run across a small pamphlet called Widows, Weepers & Wakes: Mourning in Middle Tennessee by Janet S. Hasson.
    It was really very interesting how the “Cult of Mourning” developed and then eased up. That the height of it was between the Civil War and ended around WWI. They traced how various practices came over from the UK as well.
    I did just finish re-reading for the umpteenth time “One Perfect Rose” by Mary Jo Putney. Excellent as always.
    Mostly I read totally forgettable books and a couple of ARRGH why did I continue reading books.
    As for the Kindle versus book discussion. I can read books with the Kindle but not with the Kindle app on my phone or tablet. On the phone it scrolls by so fast that it makes me queasy. It isn’t as bad on the tablet but…nope. The Kindle itself doesn’t cause me any queasiness.
    Outside that, I much prefer a book that I can go back to, pick up and find the spot that I’ve been thinking about and reread THAT spot. I also agree that I become more deeply immersed in a “real” book versus a Kindle book.
    I have discovered some really neat authors via Kindle. Plus the Kindle is good for traveling because of the amount of space it save but for Keepers, paper is it.

    Reply
  102. Hmm….I made no notes this month so don’t have much to contribute to the discussion. Though I did run across a small pamphlet called Widows, Weepers & Wakes: Mourning in Middle Tennessee by Janet S. Hasson.
    It was really very interesting how the “Cult of Mourning” developed and then eased up. That the height of it was between the Civil War and ended around WWI. They traced how various practices came over from the UK as well.
    I did just finish re-reading for the umpteenth time “One Perfect Rose” by Mary Jo Putney. Excellent as always.
    Mostly I read totally forgettable books and a couple of ARRGH why did I continue reading books.
    As for the Kindle versus book discussion. I can read books with the Kindle but not with the Kindle app on my phone or tablet. On the phone it scrolls by so fast that it makes me queasy. It isn’t as bad on the tablet but…nope. The Kindle itself doesn’t cause me any queasiness.
    Outside that, I much prefer a book that I can go back to, pick up and find the spot that I’ve been thinking about and reread THAT spot. I also agree that I become more deeply immersed in a “real” book versus a Kindle book.
    I have discovered some really neat authors via Kindle. Plus the Kindle is good for traveling because of the amount of space it save but for Keepers, paper is it.

    Reply
  103. Hmm….I made no notes this month so don’t have much to contribute to the discussion. Though I did run across a small pamphlet called Widows, Weepers & Wakes: Mourning in Middle Tennessee by Janet S. Hasson.
    It was really very interesting how the “Cult of Mourning” developed and then eased up. That the height of it was between the Civil War and ended around WWI. They traced how various practices came over from the UK as well.
    I did just finish re-reading for the umpteenth time “One Perfect Rose” by Mary Jo Putney. Excellent as always.
    Mostly I read totally forgettable books and a couple of ARRGH why did I continue reading books.
    As for the Kindle versus book discussion. I can read books with the Kindle but not with the Kindle app on my phone or tablet. On the phone it scrolls by so fast that it makes me queasy. It isn’t as bad on the tablet but…nope. The Kindle itself doesn’t cause me any queasiness.
    Outside that, I much prefer a book that I can go back to, pick up and find the spot that I’ve been thinking about and reread THAT spot. I also agree that I become more deeply immersed in a “real” book versus a Kindle book.
    I have discovered some really neat authors via Kindle. Plus the Kindle is good for traveling because of the amount of space it save but for Keepers, paper is it.

    Reply
  104. Hmm….I made no notes this month so don’t have much to contribute to the discussion. Though I did run across a small pamphlet called Widows, Weepers & Wakes: Mourning in Middle Tennessee by Janet S. Hasson.
    It was really very interesting how the “Cult of Mourning” developed and then eased up. That the height of it was between the Civil War and ended around WWI. They traced how various practices came over from the UK as well.
    I did just finish re-reading for the umpteenth time “One Perfect Rose” by Mary Jo Putney. Excellent as always.
    Mostly I read totally forgettable books and a couple of ARRGH why did I continue reading books.
    As for the Kindle versus book discussion. I can read books with the Kindle but not with the Kindle app on my phone or tablet. On the phone it scrolls by so fast that it makes me queasy. It isn’t as bad on the tablet but…nope. The Kindle itself doesn’t cause me any queasiness.
    Outside that, I much prefer a book that I can go back to, pick up and find the spot that I’ve been thinking about and reread THAT spot. I also agree that I become more deeply immersed in a “real” book versus a Kindle book.
    I have discovered some really neat authors via Kindle. Plus the Kindle is good for traveling because of the amount of space it save but for Keepers, paper is it.

    Reply
  105. Hmm….I made no notes this month so don’t have much to contribute to the discussion. Though I did run across a small pamphlet called Widows, Weepers & Wakes: Mourning in Middle Tennessee by Janet S. Hasson.
    It was really very interesting how the “Cult of Mourning” developed and then eased up. That the height of it was between the Civil War and ended around WWI. They traced how various practices came over from the UK as well.
    I did just finish re-reading for the umpteenth time “One Perfect Rose” by Mary Jo Putney. Excellent as always.
    Mostly I read totally forgettable books and a couple of ARRGH why did I continue reading books.
    As for the Kindle versus book discussion. I can read books with the Kindle but not with the Kindle app on my phone or tablet. On the phone it scrolls by so fast that it makes me queasy. It isn’t as bad on the tablet but…nope. The Kindle itself doesn’t cause me any queasiness.
    Outside that, I much prefer a book that I can go back to, pick up and find the spot that I’ve been thinking about and reread THAT spot. I also agree that I become more deeply immersed in a “real” book versus a Kindle book.
    I have discovered some really neat authors via Kindle. Plus the Kindle is good for traveling because of the amount of space it save but for Keepers, paper is it.

    Reply
  106. Widows, Weepers & Wakes sounds like an interesting book, if a bit grim.
    Victorian isn’t so much my period and I forget how much the US was also “Victorian”. Gone With the Wind, for instance, plays with this a lot — the movie more than the book, I think,

    Reply
  107. Widows, Weepers & Wakes sounds like an interesting book, if a bit grim.
    Victorian isn’t so much my period and I forget how much the US was also “Victorian”. Gone With the Wind, for instance, plays with this a lot — the movie more than the book, I think,

    Reply
  108. Widows, Weepers & Wakes sounds like an interesting book, if a bit grim.
    Victorian isn’t so much my period and I forget how much the US was also “Victorian”. Gone With the Wind, for instance, plays with this a lot — the movie more than the book, I think,

    Reply
  109. Widows, Weepers & Wakes sounds like an interesting book, if a bit grim.
    Victorian isn’t so much my period and I forget how much the US was also “Victorian”. Gone With the Wind, for instance, plays with this a lot — the movie more than the book, I think,

    Reply
  110. Widows, Weepers & Wakes sounds like an interesting book, if a bit grim.
    Victorian isn’t so much my period and I forget how much the US was also “Victorian”. Gone With the Wind, for instance, plays with this a lot — the movie more than the book, I think,

    Reply
  111. I am very fond of Heyer’s mysteries.
    Strange to think that if Heyer had only written those she would have been a moderately popular mystery writer and never become the wildly successful and influential Regency Romance diva.

    Reply
  112. I am very fond of Heyer’s mysteries.
    Strange to think that if Heyer had only written those she would have been a moderately popular mystery writer and never become the wildly successful and influential Regency Romance diva.

    Reply
  113. I am very fond of Heyer’s mysteries.
    Strange to think that if Heyer had only written those she would have been a moderately popular mystery writer and never become the wildly successful and influential Regency Romance diva.

    Reply
  114. I am very fond of Heyer’s mysteries.
    Strange to think that if Heyer had only written those she would have been a moderately popular mystery writer and never become the wildly successful and influential Regency Romance diva.

    Reply
  115. I am very fond of Heyer’s mysteries.
    Strange to think that if Heyer had only written those she would have been a moderately popular mystery writer and never become the wildly successful and influential Regency Romance diva.

    Reply
  116. I return to those Dinah Dean books time and again. They are great and have stood the test of time. I’ve also read a couple more in that series. It is interesting to see a different perspective on the Napoleonic wars.

    Reply
  117. I return to those Dinah Dean books time and again. They are great and have stood the test of time. I’ve also read a couple more in that series. It is interesting to see a different perspective on the Napoleonic wars.

    Reply
  118. I return to those Dinah Dean books time and again. They are great and have stood the test of time. I’ve also read a couple more in that series. It is interesting to see a different perspective on the Napoleonic wars.

    Reply
  119. I return to those Dinah Dean books time and again. They are great and have stood the test of time. I’ve also read a couple more in that series. It is interesting to see a different perspective on the Napoleonic wars.

    Reply
  120. I return to those Dinah Dean books time and again. They are great and have stood the test of time. I’ve also read a couple more in that series. It is interesting to see a different perspective on the Napoleonic wars.

    Reply
  121. Vicki, I’m glad ONE PERFECT ROSE is a book you can return to over and over. (I think of it as my death and dying book with an HEA. *G*) It’s going to be available in audio within a few weeks is you like audio.

    Reply
  122. Vicki, I’m glad ONE PERFECT ROSE is a book you can return to over and over. (I think of it as my death and dying book with an HEA. *G*) It’s going to be available in audio within a few weeks is you like audio.

    Reply
  123. Vicki, I’m glad ONE PERFECT ROSE is a book you can return to over and over. (I think of it as my death and dying book with an HEA. *G*) It’s going to be available in audio within a few weeks is you like audio.

    Reply
  124. Vicki, I’m glad ONE PERFECT ROSE is a book you can return to over and over. (I think of it as my death and dying book with an HEA. *G*) It’s going to be available in audio within a few weeks is you like audio.

    Reply
  125. Vicki, I’m glad ONE PERFECT ROSE is a book you can return to over and over. (I think of it as my death and dying book with an HEA. *G*) It’s going to be available in audio within a few weeks is you like audio.

    Reply

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