What We’re Reading in June

The Word Wenches have been reading the most lovely books.

Mary Jo's recommendations for this month include one of my own old favorites.

Mary Jo:

WwTheIvyTreeI've read some new books this last month, but the only stories that really grabbed me were two oldies.  The first was Mary Stewart's The Ivy TreeWe've discussed Mary Stewart here before–the Wenches are major fans and she shaped the writing for several of us, me included.

The Ivy Tree was the first Mary Stewart I ever read, in a condensed version in my mother's Ladies Home Journal.  I was riveted, and the big story twist was like being clubbed. (I'm harder to surprise now, but it's still one heck of a twist. <G>) 

Stewart is marvelous in her descriptions of story settings, and she makes a Northumberland summer come alive with sensual warmth.  Good suspense and romance, too.  (A lot of smoking goes on, as in most of Stewart's books, a sign of the changing times.)  It's still a wonderful story. 

My other favorite book is Sarah-Kate Lynch's The Wedding Bees, which I learned WwWedding Beesabout on an earlier WWR.  I think it was recommended by Anne Gracie and Pat Rice.  I was a little wary, not being over fond of stinging insects, but within a couple of chapters, I was hooked.  It's kind of magical realism with the heroine, Sugar Wallace, exiled from her beloved Southern home and each year moving herself and her bees to a new city chosen by her queen bee, one of a succession of Elizabeths.  (The current queen is Elizabeth the 6th.)

This time she's led to New York City in an apartment with a great views, a terrace for her bees, and a half dozen other units in the building occupied by miserable people.  Sugar is a healer with both her honey and her warmth, and by the end of the book, everyone in the building is happy, and they and her bees have healed her into happiness and love. A delightful story.

 

Susan brings us a most interesting mystery series and a rather famous book about writing itself.

 
WwdyingfallSusan:  This round, I read something new to me and something much-read (I won't mention the stack of to-be-reads, half-reads, meant-to-finishes, and forgot-I-hads that I didn't get through!). I'm leisurely making my way through Elly Griffiths' Ruth Galloway mystery series, picking one up now and then, and Dying Fall was a very good point in the series, about halfway through so far. Archaeologist and forensic bone specialist Dr. Ruth Galloway–single mom to a toddler she shares with Nelson, a local detective chief inspector–is drawn into a major archaeological discovery by an old friend who is soon murdered.


Griffiths writes tightly structured mysteries that move along quickly, helped by present tense, straightforward characters and no-frills language. She keeps it rolling along and I found this one especially enjoyable and interesting. The major find centers on the possible discovery of King Arthur's tomb, and the further chance that the warrior was of African descent rather than Briton. Add to that the interesting developments in Ruth's life that continue book to book–her relationship with Nelson being just one of those threads–and I'll keep going with this series. The intriguing info about Africans in the Roman legions in Britain sent me to find out more–all very interesting! 

 
After several years of collecting dust on a bookshelf, an old favorite got Wwbirdplucked up for a reread: Anne Lamott's Bird by Bird. Now and then, I find this one is like a B12 boost for writing energy. When I first read it as a new writer, I was a newbie soaking it up–now, reading it as a veteran, I am seeing the pure truths and clarity of her insights from a new angle while refreshing my own understanding of writing–scraping away the rust, as it were, and remembering to take it not just bird by bird, but word by word, page by page. If I read only one book on writing craft ever, this would be it. And while I'm taking some of that wisdom to the current manuscript that so far resists being finished, I may find time for the next Elly Griffiths in my TBR stack. 
 

Nicola brings us some lovely reads.

This month I’ve got back into my reading after a slump. I very much enjoyed A Royal Kiss and Tell by Julia London. It’s set in the Victorian era and is book 2 in the Royal Wedding series. I loved the first book, The Princess Plan, but I think I enjoyed this one even more. Julia’s writing is quirky and charming and funny, and she creates such wonderful characters and strong emotional stories. I loved both Caroline, the heroine, who is warm and loving and confident, and Leo, the hero, who is struggling with the issue of being the spare not the heir and trying to find a purpose in life. These two are, on the face of it, quite incompatible and yet they could not have been more perfect for each other.

Ww counterpointI also read a brilliant novella by Elizabeth St John who has been a Word Wench guest in the past. Counterpoint: Henry, the King’s Cavalier is part of The Lydiard Chronicles, set in the English Civil War, and is the prequel to book 3 in the series, Written in their Stars. It tells the story of the meeting between Henry Wilmot and Nan Lee, and is gorgeously written and very romantic.

Like Wench Susan, I’m also on a bit of an Elly Griffiths glom. I love the Dr Ruth Galloway mysteries; they combine just about everything I like in a crime novel – intriguing stories that aren’t too graphic or violent, complicated relationships for interesting characters, humour, history and a tinge of the supernatural. The way she creates a sense of place and atmosphere is terrific. I’ve just finished A Room Full of Bones, which was excellent, and am reading Dying Fall at the moment. Brilliant stuff!

 

 

Ww poisonpaddingtonPat recommends Poison in Paddington, a Cassie Coburn mystery by Samantha Silver.

She says, I adore a good mystery, usually a cozy because the violence is limited, and I enjoy getting to know the characters and the setting. But lately all of the cozies are alike, and I’d about given up on the genre. But I bumped into this one with a chicklitty cover, read the first page, and was hooked. The writing is excellent, the characters intriguing, and while I might quibble a bit over the mystery and clues, I thoroughly immersed myself in the story anyway.

The story is told from the POV of a woman whose career as a surgeon was stolen by an accident six months before she finished her residency. Depressed, she heads to the UK, where she meets a most unusual detective—a Frenchwoman who seems to be on the autism spectrum. On the way to solving the mystery of a serial killer who isn’t a serial killer, the characters learn about friendship and why life is worth living. A very nice change of pace, recommended! and it looks like it’s free!

I’ve since read Bombing in Belgravia, book #2, and enjoyed it in the same way.

 

Ww Escape to the French FarmhouseChristina brings us some armchair escape.

Christina: I’m afraid I haven’t read very much this month as I’ve been busy editing my own work, but as I was in need of some more armchair travel, I made time for Escape to the French Farmhouse by Jo Thomas. The sunny cover totally drew me in and this novel proved to be the perfect way to go abroad. I have never been to Provence but I now feel as though I know exactly how it feels – the warm sunshine on my face, the mistral wind sweeping through from time to time, the scent of lavender hanging in the air, and best of all – the food! I long for a bowl of moules marinières, boeuf bourguinon, a freshly baked baguette or flaky newly baked croissants. And I want to taste the exquisite lavender cookies the heroine bakes in her farmhouse kitchen. This is not your usual romance, as the heroine battles to come to terms with things that have happened in her life which will never be perfect, but it shows the reader that happiness is what you make it. The most important things are courage, kindness and living life to the full, then new beginnings can be exactly what we need!

 

For the rest of the month I’ve been in need of comfort reads, so I Ww Georgette Heyerturned to Georgette Heyer – she never fails to cheer me up! I hadn’t re-read The Toll Gate for quite a while – I’ve always loved that story and so it proved again. However, I didn’t remember quite how much Regency slang (or ‘cant’) Ms Heyer used in this book and I couldn’t help but feel it could have done with a bit less. The Reluctant Widow and Cotillion, however, were just as wonderful as ever before, making me laugh and forget everything else. The perfect antidote to these worrying times we’re living in! I shall now continue with The Talisman Ring, another favourite …

 

Ww Anne offers some reading magic:

My reading this month has had a bit of a magical theme. I always enjoy Juliet Marillier's writing. Her evocation of historical times is wonderful, and the magic she weaves through her stories is enthralling. Her latest book is Heart's Blood.

Caitrin has been trained by her father, a noted scribe, but when he dies, and brutal relatives take over her home, she flees. With nothing to support her but her skills, and in a time when reading and writing were rare, in desperation she takes a job in a castle that everyone warns her is cursed. And indeed it is . . . 

 

My magic theme continued with two books by Emily Larkin — each one the beginning of a new series. Both are a continuation of her "baleful godmother" series, where one wish is granted to each member of a family at their coming of age.  Primrose and the Dreadful Duke is the first in a "cousin-based female series, and Octavius and the Perfect Governess is the first in a male-centred series, where the wish now goes to a family with only male descendants.

 

Both books are most enjoyable. Emily Larkin knows her Regency era — you can tell she grew up reading Georgette Heyer — but the magical aspects add an extra layer in which she often explores some quite contemporary ideas. 

 

The first book in the Baleful Godmother series, Unmasking Miss Appleby, was about a poverty stricken young woman who chose the gift of transformation. To escape a dreary and restricted fWw Octaviusuture, she takes the form of a man. As well as a romance and a mystery, it's also a fun exploration of what it means to be a man. (It's also free)

 

In Octavius and the Perfect Governess she does the opposite. Octavius, having lost a bet, is challenged to attend an event as a woman, and because he also has the gift of transformation, he's female all the way. He discovers what life can be like for an unprotected female in the 19th century — and he decides to act to teach the men concerned a lesson they won't forget. Fun and feminist.

I'm looking forward to seeing where both series take us.

 

 
Andrea brings us a Romance adventure.
 
Andrea: This month I’ve been working my way through a very LONG but very fascinating biography of Ulysses S. Grant (more on it when I finish, but it’s by Ron Chrenow, who wrote the bio of Hamilton, on which the musical was based.He’s a wonderful biographer, and the book won all sorts of accolades when it came out, as it paints a very different portrait of Grant than the accepted view of him as a  drunk and an incompetent leader.) in between that, I read two shorter books, both of which I really enjoyed. 
 
Ww duke ladyI was lucky enough to get an ARC for A Duke, the Lady and a Baby by Vanessa Riley, which releases June 30, and can’t say enough good things about it! It’s such a fresh take on a Regency romance, with wonderfully nuances and complex characters, rich emotional intensity and a very engaging  plot. The heroine, a recently widowed West Indian heiress, questions whether her aristocratic English husband really committed suicide—and the man’s smarmy cousin immediately had her thrown in an asylum and takes charge of her infant son—the only person standing between the cousin and the title and estate. However, the twist he didn't expect was that Patience’s husband had named another relative as guardian—the Duke of Repington—a military hero recovering from a grievous war wound—and the duke takes his responsibilities seriously
 
Patience escapes from the asylum, and with the help of a group of ladies who come to her aid, she manages to get herself hired as a nurse to her child while she plans to contrive a way to escape and spirit the child out of England so he can’t be taken away from her. She finds the duke unbending and irascible, and he finds her managing and  . . mysterious. Sparks fly, yet slowly but surely a wary trust develops between two wary people who are nursing deep wounds. There’s wonderful humor in many scenes—I love the argument over whether an infant should have "crawling drills" to teach him discipline and resilience, And there are deeply poignant scenes of vulnerability and self-doubt as the two forge trust and and friendship—and then a totally unexpected love. And the HEA is is very fulfilling I highly recommend it!
 

Ww fatal I also read the latest “Daniel Pitt” mystery, One Fatal Flaw by Anne Perry. I really like this new series, which follows the son of her longtime hero/heroine Thomas and Charlotte Pitt series. Daniel is now  grown up and is a young barrister with a prestigious firm in London. So they are legal mysteries as a opposed to his father and mother’s police mysteries, with very complex and interesting cases. What makes them really appealing to me is the heroine is a spinster scholar who is 15 years old than Daniel. She’s a chemist and interested in using science to solve crimes, and the two of them have solved two crimes together. The relationship is getting very intriguing, and the plots are very well-woven. This is the third book, and I’d recommend starting with the first of the series. But for any fan of historical mysteries, this series is a winner.

 

And for myself ..

Ww ilonaJoanna here, winding things up.

My most interesting read this month has been by the writing team of Ilona Andrews. It's a work not yet finished. It's not even an ARC.

The story is set in the Kate Daniels World. Eight years ago Julie, adopted daughter of Guild Mercenary Kate Daniels and the Beast Lord Curren Lennart, got on her horse and left Atlanta to …

I dunnoh. She was a teenager. Maybe she was escaping the overwhelming presence of super-magical parents. Maybe she wanted to find herself. Who knows why teenagers do anything?

So, anyhow, the last Kate Daniels book, Magic Triumphs, ends with Julie headed off to parts unknown, seeking adventure in magic- and monster- filled post-apocalyptic America where she is almost certain to find it.

Now she's back. She's returned to Atlanta with a new name, new skills, and a deadly mission — to keep her mom from getting killed.

This new book, Ryder, is a story in the making. Ilona Andrews posts chapters as they finish them. Sometimes they go back and add in extra bits.

I find the process fascinating. The growing manuscript is here. You can watch the work-in-progress or wait a bit and the story will doubtless be finished and offered online in its entirety.

 

What did you read recently that rang your chimes or gave you joy or just livened up a dull evening or two?

 

 

 

320 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in June”

  1. My June reading ~
    — The Hallowed Hunt (Chalion Book 3) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I enjoyed this fantasy, but my favorite of the series is the first, The Curse of Chalion. While the first two books are linked, this one (while set in the same world) is described by the author as an independent prequel.
    — a collection of stories that I won from a Goodreads giveaway ~ Glow: A Collection of Stories by Jason Messina. The stories were somewhat eerie, and I don’t expect to read then again.
    — Hemingway’s Notebook: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North. It’s a time travel male/male romance that I quite enjoyed.
    — Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith. This is a young adult novel which I quite enjoyed. I would happily read more by this author.
    — Wild as the West Texas Wind: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North which I enjoyed.
    — Eating Stars by Angel Martinez, a science fiction romance novella which I quite enjoyed; the alien character was bi-pedal yet plant-like.
    — Her Cold-Blooded Protector by Lea Linnett. It was pleasant but not a book I’m likely to reread.
    — The Omega Objection: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger. It was an enjoyable read but not a book I’ll be quick to reread. G. L. Carriger is the name that Gail Carriger uses for her titles with ‘sexy queer joy.’
    — Cetaganda (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed. I would not, however, recommend starting the Vorkosigan series with this book.
    — continued on with my read of the Vorkosigan series and finished Ethan of Athos and the novella Labyrinth. I enjoyed them both.
    — Borders of Infinity (3-novella collection – Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold. I’d previously read two of the three novellas, but I enjoyed the title novella which was new to me as well as the framing story.
    — my book group book was an intriguing read: The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea.I
    More by Lois McMaster Bujold ~
    — Brothers in Arms. This was a somewhat tense read compared to others in the series, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.
    — Mirror Dance which proved to contain some rather dark events.
    — Memory which I quite enjoyed.
    — Komarr (this might be my favorite of the series this far).
    — A Civil Campaign which I enjoyed (despite the bugs!).
    — the novella Winterfair Gifts which I also enjoyed.
    — My summer reading program challenged me to read a book in translation; I chose to read Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World by Pénélope Bagieu (translated from the French by Montana Kane). I was only familiar with about a quarter of the featured women, so I learned a lot by reading this graphic novel. (What is the correct terminology for a graphic work of nonfiction? The spine label says Graphic Novel, but this was no work of fiction!)
    — Another challenge was to read a book of poetry, thus I read with pleasure The Apple That Astonished Paris: Poems by Billy Collins.
    — Another challenge was to read a biography or autobiography. I read a children’s book, Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess.
    — reread with pleasure Linesman by S. K. Dunstall.
    — read a historical male/male romance novella, Refugees by Kim Fielding which I enjoyed. It had a slight otherworldly aspect to it.
    — I continued with the Vorkosigan series and read Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. (Well, this book is actually set two hundred years prior to the others and thus features no Vorkosigans at all; I enjoyed it anyway.) Also enjoyed Diplomatic Immunity and Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance.

    Reply
  2. My June reading ~
    — The Hallowed Hunt (Chalion Book 3) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I enjoyed this fantasy, but my favorite of the series is the first, The Curse of Chalion. While the first two books are linked, this one (while set in the same world) is described by the author as an independent prequel.
    — a collection of stories that I won from a Goodreads giveaway ~ Glow: A Collection of Stories by Jason Messina. The stories were somewhat eerie, and I don’t expect to read then again.
    — Hemingway’s Notebook: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North. It’s a time travel male/male romance that I quite enjoyed.
    — Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith. This is a young adult novel which I quite enjoyed. I would happily read more by this author.
    — Wild as the West Texas Wind: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North which I enjoyed.
    — Eating Stars by Angel Martinez, a science fiction romance novella which I quite enjoyed; the alien character was bi-pedal yet plant-like.
    — Her Cold-Blooded Protector by Lea Linnett. It was pleasant but not a book I’m likely to reread.
    — The Omega Objection: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger. It was an enjoyable read but not a book I’ll be quick to reread. G. L. Carriger is the name that Gail Carriger uses for her titles with ‘sexy queer joy.’
    — Cetaganda (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed. I would not, however, recommend starting the Vorkosigan series with this book.
    — continued on with my read of the Vorkosigan series and finished Ethan of Athos and the novella Labyrinth. I enjoyed them both.
    — Borders of Infinity (3-novella collection – Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold. I’d previously read two of the three novellas, but I enjoyed the title novella which was new to me as well as the framing story.
    — my book group book was an intriguing read: The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea.I
    More by Lois McMaster Bujold ~
    — Brothers in Arms. This was a somewhat tense read compared to others in the series, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.
    — Mirror Dance which proved to contain some rather dark events.
    — Memory which I quite enjoyed.
    — Komarr (this might be my favorite of the series this far).
    — A Civil Campaign which I enjoyed (despite the bugs!).
    — the novella Winterfair Gifts which I also enjoyed.
    — My summer reading program challenged me to read a book in translation; I chose to read Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World by Pénélope Bagieu (translated from the French by Montana Kane). I was only familiar with about a quarter of the featured women, so I learned a lot by reading this graphic novel. (What is the correct terminology for a graphic work of nonfiction? The spine label says Graphic Novel, but this was no work of fiction!)
    — Another challenge was to read a book of poetry, thus I read with pleasure The Apple That Astonished Paris: Poems by Billy Collins.
    — Another challenge was to read a biography or autobiography. I read a children’s book, Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess.
    — reread with pleasure Linesman by S. K. Dunstall.
    — read a historical male/male romance novella, Refugees by Kim Fielding which I enjoyed. It had a slight otherworldly aspect to it.
    — I continued with the Vorkosigan series and read Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. (Well, this book is actually set two hundred years prior to the others and thus features no Vorkosigans at all; I enjoyed it anyway.) Also enjoyed Diplomatic Immunity and Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance.

    Reply
  3. My June reading ~
    — The Hallowed Hunt (Chalion Book 3) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I enjoyed this fantasy, but my favorite of the series is the first, The Curse of Chalion. While the first two books are linked, this one (while set in the same world) is described by the author as an independent prequel.
    — a collection of stories that I won from a Goodreads giveaway ~ Glow: A Collection of Stories by Jason Messina. The stories were somewhat eerie, and I don’t expect to read then again.
    — Hemingway’s Notebook: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North. It’s a time travel male/male romance that I quite enjoyed.
    — Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith. This is a young adult novel which I quite enjoyed. I would happily read more by this author.
    — Wild as the West Texas Wind: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North which I enjoyed.
    — Eating Stars by Angel Martinez, a science fiction romance novella which I quite enjoyed; the alien character was bi-pedal yet plant-like.
    — Her Cold-Blooded Protector by Lea Linnett. It was pleasant but not a book I’m likely to reread.
    — The Omega Objection: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger. It was an enjoyable read but not a book I’ll be quick to reread. G. L. Carriger is the name that Gail Carriger uses for her titles with ‘sexy queer joy.’
    — Cetaganda (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed. I would not, however, recommend starting the Vorkosigan series with this book.
    — continued on with my read of the Vorkosigan series and finished Ethan of Athos and the novella Labyrinth. I enjoyed them both.
    — Borders of Infinity (3-novella collection – Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold. I’d previously read two of the three novellas, but I enjoyed the title novella which was new to me as well as the framing story.
    — my book group book was an intriguing read: The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea.I
    More by Lois McMaster Bujold ~
    — Brothers in Arms. This was a somewhat tense read compared to others in the series, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.
    — Mirror Dance which proved to contain some rather dark events.
    — Memory which I quite enjoyed.
    — Komarr (this might be my favorite of the series this far).
    — A Civil Campaign which I enjoyed (despite the bugs!).
    — the novella Winterfair Gifts which I also enjoyed.
    — My summer reading program challenged me to read a book in translation; I chose to read Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World by Pénélope Bagieu (translated from the French by Montana Kane). I was only familiar with about a quarter of the featured women, so I learned a lot by reading this graphic novel. (What is the correct terminology for a graphic work of nonfiction? The spine label says Graphic Novel, but this was no work of fiction!)
    — Another challenge was to read a book of poetry, thus I read with pleasure The Apple That Astonished Paris: Poems by Billy Collins.
    — Another challenge was to read a biography or autobiography. I read a children’s book, Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess.
    — reread with pleasure Linesman by S. K. Dunstall.
    — read a historical male/male romance novella, Refugees by Kim Fielding which I enjoyed. It had a slight otherworldly aspect to it.
    — I continued with the Vorkosigan series and read Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. (Well, this book is actually set two hundred years prior to the others and thus features no Vorkosigans at all; I enjoyed it anyway.) Also enjoyed Diplomatic Immunity and Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance.

    Reply
  4. My June reading ~
    — The Hallowed Hunt (Chalion Book 3) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I enjoyed this fantasy, but my favorite of the series is the first, The Curse of Chalion. While the first two books are linked, this one (while set in the same world) is described by the author as an independent prequel.
    — a collection of stories that I won from a Goodreads giveaway ~ Glow: A Collection of Stories by Jason Messina. The stories were somewhat eerie, and I don’t expect to read then again.
    — Hemingway’s Notebook: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North. It’s a time travel male/male romance that I quite enjoyed.
    — Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith. This is a young adult novel which I quite enjoyed. I would happily read more by this author.
    — Wild as the West Texas Wind: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North which I enjoyed.
    — Eating Stars by Angel Martinez, a science fiction romance novella which I quite enjoyed; the alien character was bi-pedal yet plant-like.
    — Her Cold-Blooded Protector by Lea Linnett. It was pleasant but not a book I’m likely to reread.
    — The Omega Objection: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger. It was an enjoyable read but not a book I’ll be quick to reread. G. L. Carriger is the name that Gail Carriger uses for her titles with ‘sexy queer joy.’
    — Cetaganda (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed. I would not, however, recommend starting the Vorkosigan series with this book.
    — continued on with my read of the Vorkosigan series and finished Ethan of Athos and the novella Labyrinth. I enjoyed them both.
    — Borders of Infinity (3-novella collection – Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold. I’d previously read two of the three novellas, but I enjoyed the title novella which was new to me as well as the framing story.
    — my book group book was an intriguing read: The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea.I
    More by Lois McMaster Bujold ~
    — Brothers in Arms. This was a somewhat tense read compared to others in the series, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.
    — Mirror Dance which proved to contain some rather dark events.
    — Memory which I quite enjoyed.
    — Komarr (this might be my favorite of the series this far).
    — A Civil Campaign which I enjoyed (despite the bugs!).
    — the novella Winterfair Gifts which I also enjoyed.
    — My summer reading program challenged me to read a book in translation; I chose to read Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World by Pénélope Bagieu (translated from the French by Montana Kane). I was only familiar with about a quarter of the featured women, so I learned a lot by reading this graphic novel. (What is the correct terminology for a graphic work of nonfiction? The spine label says Graphic Novel, but this was no work of fiction!)
    — Another challenge was to read a book of poetry, thus I read with pleasure The Apple That Astonished Paris: Poems by Billy Collins.
    — Another challenge was to read a biography or autobiography. I read a children’s book, Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess.
    — reread with pleasure Linesman by S. K. Dunstall.
    — read a historical male/male romance novella, Refugees by Kim Fielding which I enjoyed. It had a slight otherworldly aspect to it.
    — I continued with the Vorkosigan series and read Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. (Well, this book is actually set two hundred years prior to the others and thus features no Vorkosigans at all; I enjoyed it anyway.) Also enjoyed Diplomatic Immunity and Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance.

    Reply
  5. My June reading ~
    — The Hallowed Hunt (Chalion Book 3) by Lois McMaster Bujold. I enjoyed this fantasy, but my favorite of the series is the first, The Curse of Chalion. While the first two books are linked, this one (while set in the same world) is described by the author as an independent prequel.
    — a collection of stories that I won from a Goodreads giveaway ~ Glow: A Collection of Stories by Jason Messina. The stories were somewhat eerie, and I don’t expect to read then again.
    — Hemingway’s Notebook: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North. It’s a time travel male/male romance that I quite enjoyed.
    — Field Notes on Love by Jennifer E. Smith. This is a young adult novel which I quite enjoyed. I would happily read more by this author.
    — Wild as the West Texas Wind: A Love Across Time Story by Jackie North which I enjoyed.
    — Eating Stars by Angel Martinez, a science fiction romance novella which I quite enjoyed; the alien character was bi-pedal yet plant-like.
    — Her Cold-Blooded Protector by Lea Linnett. It was pleasant but not a book I’m likely to reread.
    — The Omega Objection: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger. It was an enjoyable read but not a book I’ll be quick to reread. G. L. Carriger is the name that Gail Carriger uses for her titles with ‘sexy queer joy.’
    — Cetaganda (Vorkosigan Saga) by Lois McMaster Bujold which I enjoyed. I would not, however, recommend starting the Vorkosigan series with this book.
    — continued on with my read of the Vorkosigan series and finished Ethan of Athos and the novella Labyrinth. I enjoyed them both.
    — Borders of Infinity (3-novella collection – Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold. I’d previously read two of the three novellas, but I enjoyed the title novella which was new to me as well as the framing story.
    — my book group book was an intriguing read: The House of Broken Angels by Luis Alberto Urrea.I
    More by Lois McMaster Bujold ~
    — Brothers in Arms. This was a somewhat tense read compared to others in the series, but I enjoyed it nonetheless.
    — Mirror Dance which proved to contain some rather dark events.
    — Memory which I quite enjoyed.
    — Komarr (this might be my favorite of the series this far).
    — A Civil Campaign which I enjoyed (despite the bugs!).
    — the novella Winterfair Gifts which I also enjoyed.
    — My summer reading program challenged me to read a book in translation; I chose to read Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World by Pénélope Bagieu (translated from the French by Montana Kane). I was only familiar with about a quarter of the featured women, so I learned a lot by reading this graphic novel. (What is the correct terminology for a graphic work of nonfiction? The spine label says Graphic Novel, but this was no work of fiction!)
    — Another challenge was to read a book of poetry, thus I read with pleasure The Apple That Astonished Paris: Poems by Billy Collins.
    — Another challenge was to read a biography or autobiography. I read a children’s book, Enormous Smallness: A Story of E. E. Cummings by Matthew Burgess.
    — reread with pleasure Linesman by S. K. Dunstall.
    — read a historical male/male romance novella, Refugees by Kim Fielding which I enjoyed. It had a slight otherworldly aspect to it.
    — I continued with the Vorkosigan series and read Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. (Well, this book is actually set two hundred years prior to the others and thus features no Vorkosigans at all; I enjoyed it anyway.) Also enjoyed Diplomatic Immunity and Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance.

    Reply
  6. Wow, Kareni — a fabulous collection as always. I’m so pleased to see you glomming the Lois McMaster Bujold books. They’re wonderful, aren’t they? I did a huge reread of her books some months back and enjoyed them all over again.

    Reply
  7. Wow, Kareni — a fabulous collection as always. I’m so pleased to see you glomming the Lois McMaster Bujold books. They’re wonderful, aren’t they? I did a huge reread of her books some months back and enjoyed them all over again.

    Reply
  8. Wow, Kareni — a fabulous collection as always. I’m so pleased to see you glomming the Lois McMaster Bujold books. They’re wonderful, aren’t they? I did a huge reread of her books some months back and enjoyed them all over again.

    Reply
  9. Wow, Kareni — a fabulous collection as always. I’m so pleased to see you glomming the Lois McMaster Bujold books. They’re wonderful, aren’t they? I did a huge reread of her books some months back and enjoyed them all over again.

    Reply
  10. Wow, Kareni — a fabulous collection as always. I’m so pleased to see you glomming the Lois McMaster Bujold books. They’re wonderful, aren’t they? I did a huge reread of her books some months back and enjoyed them all over again.

    Reply
  11. I loved reading what the various word wenches are reading. There are several books in the list that will definitely be making their way onto my TBR pile and I was thrilled to see that Nicola Cornick enjoyed A Royal Kiss and Tell. I absolutely loved that book and book one in its series, The Princess Plan. I don’t care whether it’s contemporary or historical, a Julia London novel will always be on my TBR pile, whether or not I’ve read it before. I love her wit, her humour and her ability to delve into the human spirit. She has another fabulous book coming out soon. You Lucky Dog is contemporary and I adored it. It’s laugh out loud humour and the story is completely driven by love-smitten Basset hounds Hazel and Baxter. I like to mix up my reading, jumping through the various contemporary and historical romantic sub-genres. Annie West’s new contemporary, Claiming His Out Of Bounds Bride, was thoroughly enjoyable, particularly as it took me to gorgeous northern Italy at a time when I can’t travel much further than the garden gate and I’ve just started Alison Stuart’s latest book.The Goldminer’s Sister. So far I’m loving it just as much as I always love her wonderful thoughtfully researched historical novels. This one is set during the Australian gold rush in the Walhalla area of south eastern Victoria. Reading it I feel as though I’m watching history unfold before my eyes as the fiction is exquisitely interwoven with history. It’s thoroughly immersive.

    Reply
  12. I loved reading what the various word wenches are reading. There are several books in the list that will definitely be making their way onto my TBR pile and I was thrilled to see that Nicola Cornick enjoyed A Royal Kiss and Tell. I absolutely loved that book and book one in its series, The Princess Plan. I don’t care whether it’s contemporary or historical, a Julia London novel will always be on my TBR pile, whether or not I’ve read it before. I love her wit, her humour and her ability to delve into the human spirit. She has another fabulous book coming out soon. You Lucky Dog is contemporary and I adored it. It’s laugh out loud humour and the story is completely driven by love-smitten Basset hounds Hazel and Baxter. I like to mix up my reading, jumping through the various contemporary and historical romantic sub-genres. Annie West’s new contemporary, Claiming His Out Of Bounds Bride, was thoroughly enjoyable, particularly as it took me to gorgeous northern Italy at a time when I can’t travel much further than the garden gate and I’ve just started Alison Stuart’s latest book.The Goldminer’s Sister. So far I’m loving it just as much as I always love her wonderful thoughtfully researched historical novels. This one is set during the Australian gold rush in the Walhalla area of south eastern Victoria. Reading it I feel as though I’m watching history unfold before my eyes as the fiction is exquisitely interwoven with history. It’s thoroughly immersive.

    Reply
  13. I loved reading what the various word wenches are reading. There are several books in the list that will definitely be making their way onto my TBR pile and I was thrilled to see that Nicola Cornick enjoyed A Royal Kiss and Tell. I absolutely loved that book and book one in its series, The Princess Plan. I don’t care whether it’s contemporary or historical, a Julia London novel will always be on my TBR pile, whether or not I’ve read it before. I love her wit, her humour and her ability to delve into the human spirit. She has another fabulous book coming out soon. You Lucky Dog is contemporary and I adored it. It’s laugh out loud humour and the story is completely driven by love-smitten Basset hounds Hazel and Baxter. I like to mix up my reading, jumping through the various contemporary and historical romantic sub-genres. Annie West’s new contemporary, Claiming His Out Of Bounds Bride, was thoroughly enjoyable, particularly as it took me to gorgeous northern Italy at a time when I can’t travel much further than the garden gate and I’ve just started Alison Stuart’s latest book.The Goldminer’s Sister. So far I’m loving it just as much as I always love her wonderful thoughtfully researched historical novels. This one is set during the Australian gold rush in the Walhalla area of south eastern Victoria. Reading it I feel as though I’m watching history unfold before my eyes as the fiction is exquisitely interwoven with history. It’s thoroughly immersive.

    Reply
  14. I loved reading what the various word wenches are reading. There are several books in the list that will definitely be making their way onto my TBR pile and I was thrilled to see that Nicola Cornick enjoyed A Royal Kiss and Tell. I absolutely loved that book and book one in its series, The Princess Plan. I don’t care whether it’s contemporary or historical, a Julia London novel will always be on my TBR pile, whether or not I’ve read it before. I love her wit, her humour and her ability to delve into the human spirit. She has another fabulous book coming out soon. You Lucky Dog is contemporary and I adored it. It’s laugh out loud humour and the story is completely driven by love-smitten Basset hounds Hazel and Baxter. I like to mix up my reading, jumping through the various contemporary and historical romantic sub-genres. Annie West’s new contemporary, Claiming His Out Of Bounds Bride, was thoroughly enjoyable, particularly as it took me to gorgeous northern Italy at a time when I can’t travel much further than the garden gate and I’ve just started Alison Stuart’s latest book.The Goldminer’s Sister. So far I’m loving it just as much as I always love her wonderful thoughtfully researched historical novels. This one is set during the Australian gold rush in the Walhalla area of south eastern Victoria. Reading it I feel as though I’m watching history unfold before my eyes as the fiction is exquisitely interwoven with history. It’s thoroughly immersive.

    Reply
  15. I loved reading what the various word wenches are reading. There are several books in the list that will definitely be making their way onto my TBR pile and I was thrilled to see that Nicola Cornick enjoyed A Royal Kiss and Tell. I absolutely loved that book and book one in its series, The Princess Plan. I don’t care whether it’s contemporary or historical, a Julia London novel will always be on my TBR pile, whether or not I’ve read it before. I love her wit, her humour and her ability to delve into the human spirit. She has another fabulous book coming out soon. You Lucky Dog is contemporary and I adored it. It’s laugh out loud humour and the story is completely driven by love-smitten Basset hounds Hazel and Baxter. I like to mix up my reading, jumping through the various contemporary and historical romantic sub-genres. Annie West’s new contemporary, Claiming His Out Of Bounds Bride, was thoroughly enjoyable, particularly as it took me to gorgeous northern Italy at a time when I can’t travel much further than the garden gate and I’ve just started Alison Stuart’s latest book.The Goldminer’s Sister. So far I’m loving it just as much as I always love her wonderful thoughtfully researched historical novels. This one is set during the Australian gold rush in the Walhalla area of south eastern Victoria. Reading it I feel as though I’m watching history unfold before my eyes as the fiction is exquisitely interwoven with history. It’s thoroughly immersive.

    Reply
  16. I tend to do ‘binges’ …and the pandemic has brought that tendency out in full force. I just finished the last of the Joe Pickett books by CJ Box and have started my periodic re-reading of the unique Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels. He was truly one of the writing world’s treasures!
    Otherwise I have been working on our public library’s Adult Summer Reading Bingo which forces me to read titles and genres I normally avoid…so on the list is a biography of U>S> Grant, a banned book (“George” by Alex Gino), “The Hidden Life of Trees by Wohlleben, “John Brown’s Body” by Stephen Vincent Benet (my poetry selection), and the-classic-you-been-meaning-to-read “Walden” by Thoreau.

    Reply
  17. I tend to do ‘binges’ …and the pandemic has brought that tendency out in full force. I just finished the last of the Joe Pickett books by CJ Box and have started my periodic re-reading of the unique Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels. He was truly one of the writing world’s treasures!
    Otherwise I have been working on our public library’s Adult Summer Reading Bingo which forces me to read titles and genres I normally avoid…so on the list is a biography of U>S> Grant, a banned book (“George” by Alex Gino), “The Hidden Life of Trees by Wohlleben, “John Brown’s Body” by Stephen Vincent Benet (my poetry selection), and the-classic-you-been-meaning-to-read “Walden” by Thoreau.

    Reply
  18. I tend to do ‘binges’ …and the pandemic has brought that tendency out in full force. I just finished the last of the Joe Pickett books by CJ Box and have started my periodic re-reading of the unique Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels. He was truly one of the writing world’s treasures!
    Otherwise I have been working on our public library’s Adult Summer Reading Bingo which forces me to read titles and genres I normally avoid…so on the list is a biography of U>S> Grant, a banned book (“George” by Alex Gino), “The Hidden Life of Trees by Wohlleben, “John Brown’s Body” by Stephen Vincent Benet (my poetry selection), and the-classic-you-been-meaning-to-read “Walden” by Thoreau.

    Reply
  19. I tend to do ‘binges’ …and the pandemic has brought that tendency out in full force. I just finished the last of the Joe Pickett books by CJ Box and have started my periodic re-reading of the unique Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels. He was truly one of the writing world’s treasures!
    Otherwise I have been working on our public library’s Adult Summer Reading Bingo which forces me to read titles and genres I normally avoid…so on the list is a biography of U>S> Grant, a banned book (“George” by Alex Gino), “The Hidden Life of Trees by Wohlleben, “John Brown’s Body” by Stephen Vincent Benet (my poetry selection), and the-classic-you-been-meaning-to-read “Walden” by Thoreau.

    Reply
  20. I tend to do ‘binges’ …and the pandemic has brought that tendency out in full force. I just finished the last of the Joe Pickett books by CJ Box and have started my periodic re-reading of the unique Sir Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels. He was truly one of the writing world’s treasures!
    Otherwise I have been working on our public library’s Adult Summer Reading Bingo which forces me to read titles and genres I normally avoid…so on the list is a biography of U>S> Grant, a banned book (“George” by Alex Gino), “The Hidden Life of Trees by Wohlleben, “John Brown’s Body” by Stephen Vincent Benet (my poetry selection), and the-classic-you-been-meaning-to-read “Walden” by Thoreau.

    Reply
  21. Kareni, it sounds like you’ve glommed most of the Vorkosigan series, which I love dearly! Bujold’s fantasy THE CURSE OF CHALION is probably in my top five favorite books ever.
    But I can’t begin to touch your reading amazingness!

    Reply
  22. Kareni, it sounds like you’ve glommed most of the Vorkosigan series, which I love dearly! Bujold’s fantasy THE CURSE OF CHALION is probably in my top five favorite books ever.
    But I can’t begin to touch your reading amazingness!

    Reply
  23. Kareni, it sounds like you’ve glommed most of the Vorkosigan series, which I love dearly! Bujold’s fantasy THE CURSE OF CHALION is probably in my top five favorite books ever.
    But I can’t begin to touch your reading amazingness!

    Reply
  24. Kareni, it sounds like you’ve glommed most of the Vorkosigan series, which I love dearly! Bujold’s fantasy THE CURSE OF CHALION is probably in my top five favorite books ever.
    But I can’t begin to touch your reading amazingness!

    Reply
  25. Kareni, it sounds like you’ve glommed most of the Vorkosigan series, which I love dearly! Bujold’s fantasy THE CURSE OF CHALION is probably in my top five favorite books ever.
    But I can’t begin to touch your reading amazingness!

    Reply
  26. I too read THE WEDDING BEES because of you guys and loved it. This led to a couple more by the author, that I didn’t love as much. I am also re-reading lots of Heyer. I bought more books than I usually do because my libraries were closed, and read more of your suggestions that way. Bujold has long been a favorite of mine too. I still have many bookshelves of favorites and re-read a lot. I am so thankful that reading has kept me from being bored during my time of isolation. Thank all of you for helping me.

    Reply
  27. I too read THE WEDDING BEES because of you guys and loved it. This led to a couple more by the author, that I didn’t love as much. I am also re-reading lots of Heyer. I bought more books than I usually do because my libraries were closed, and read more of your suggestions that way. Bujold has long been a favorite of mine too. I still have many bookshelves of favorites and re-read a lot. I am so thankful that reading has kept me from being bored during my time of isolation. Thank all of you for helping me.

    Reply
  28. I too read THE WEDDING BEES because of you guys and loved it. This led to a couple more by the author, that I didn’t love as much. I am also re-reading lots of Heyer. I bought more books than I usually do because my libraries were closed, and read more of your suggestions that way. Bujold has long been a favorite of mine too. I still have many bookshelves of favorites and re-read a lot. I am so thankful that reading has kept me from being bored during my time of isolation. Thank all of you for helping me.

    Reply
  29. I too read THE WEDDING BEES because of you guys and loved it. This led to a couple more by the author, that I didn’t love as much. I am also re-reading lots of Heyer. I bought more books than I usually do because my libraries were closed, and read more of your suggestions that way. Bujold has long been a favorite of mine too. I still have many bookshelves of favorites and re-read a lot. I am so thankful that reading has kept me from being bored during my time of isolation. Thank all of you for helping me.

    Reply
  30. I too read THE WEDDING BEES because of you guys and loved it. This led to a couple more by the author, that I didn’t love as much. I am also re-reading lots of Heyer. I bought more books than I usually do because my libraries were closed, and read more of your suggestions that way. Bujold has long been a favorite of mine too. I still have many bookshelves of favorites and re-read a lot. I am so thankful that reading has kept me from being bored during my time of isolation. Thank all of you for helping me.

    Reply
  31. I was busy with classwork, so the only reading I did this month was genealogy text books. By this time next year, I’ll be a certified genealogist.

    Reply
  32. I was busy with classwork, so the only reading I did this month was genealogy text books. By this time next year, I’ll be a certified genealogist.

    Reply
  33. I was busy with classwork, so the only reading I did this month was genealogy text books. By this time next year, I’ll be a certified genealogist.

    Reply
  34. I was busy with classwork, so the only reading I did this month was genealogy text books. By this time next year, I’ll be a certified genealogist.

    Reply
  35. I was busy with classwork, so the only reading I did this month was genealogy text books. By this time next year, I’ll be a certified genealogist.

    Reply
  36. Oh, how lovely to find another Julia London fan here! Thank you for mentioning her new book. I’ll look out for that one!
    I also love Annie West and Alison Stuart’s books!

    Reply
  37. Oh, how lovely to find another Julia London fan here! Thank you for mentioning her new book. I’ll look out for that one!
    I also love Annie West and Alison Stuart’s books!

    Reply
  38. Oh, how lovely to find another Julia London fan here! Thank you for mentioning her new book. I’ll look out for that one!
    I also love Annie West and Alison Stuart’s books!

    Reply
  39. Oh, how lovely to find another Julia London fan here! Thank you for mentioning her new book. I’ll look out for that one!
    I also love Annie West and Alison Stuart’s books!

    Reply
  40. Oh, how lovely to find another Julia London fan here! Thank you for mentioning her new book. I’ll look out for that one!
    I also love Annie West and Alison Stuart’s books!

    Reply
  41. I’ve done a bit of binge reading and a bit of skipping around. With a few rereads as well. My library finally opened for curbside service!
    Kerry Greenwood – Miss Fisher series. I read Death at Victoria Dock and The Green mill Murder. Tomorrow I pick up Books 6 thru 9 at the library. I’m really enjoying those and look forward to the next ones as well.
    Amanda Quick – Close Up. The latest of her Burning Cove series. This one is set in 1928. In this book paranormal abilities are starting to show up in the characters (H/h) It was a nice piece of romantic suspense.
    Hannah Howell – Highland Warrior – set in 1472 Scotland. Clan wars/alliances. Very satisfying romance. Nice meaty story. I feel a glom coming on but will try to hold off until I get the library books read!
    Anna Jacobs – Trader series. In May I read The Trader’s Wife and enjoyed it so much I ended up getting the other 4 books in that series. The Trader’s Sister, The Trader’s Dream, The Trader’s Gift, The Trader’s Reward. I will end up keeping them all. Even the one that wasn’t as satisfying as the other 4 because there are important developments in it. Loved learning so much about immigrating to Australia. Ship life and traveling steerage. Early life in Australia. The opening of the Suez canal with small insights into 1870’s Egypt, Singapore, etc. really liked the main characters.
    Georgette Heyer – The Black Sheep. As always it was good. I’ll have to pick another GH to read this month!
    Jo Goodman – The Devil you Know and Stages of the Heart. Complicated characters. HEA. American Western Romances set in the mid to late 1800’s. I really like that I learn a little more about the history of the featured area as well as very good character development.
    Lastly, I’m about a 7th of the way through Total Recall by Arnold Schwarzenegger. It is a very readable book. Very fascinating too. It was recommended to me by my niece for our Family Reading Challenge
    Looking back I’ve really skipped around the world! Also time frames too. It was a good reading month.

    Reply
  42. I’ve done a bit of binge reading and a bit of skipping around. With a few rereads as well. My library finally opened for curbside service!
    Kerry Greenwood – Miss Fisher series. I read Death at Victoria Dock and The Green mill Murder. Tomorrow I pick up Books 6 thru 9 at the library. I’m really enjoying those and look forward to the next ones as well.
    Amanda Quick – Close Up. The latest of her Burning Cove series. This one is set in 1928. In this book paranormal abilities are starting to show up in the characters (H/h) It was a nice piece of romantic suspense.
    Hannah Howell – Highland Warrior – set in 1472 Scotland. Clan wars/alliances. Very satisfying romance. Nice meaty story. I feel a glom coming on but will try to hold off until I get the library books read!
    Anna Jacobs – Trader series. In May I read The Trader’s Wife and enjoyed it so much I ended up getting the other 4 books in that series. The Trader’s Sister, The Trader’s Dream, The Trader’s Gift, The Trader’s Reward. I will end up keeping them all. Even the one that wasn’t as satisfying as the other 4 because there are important developments in it. Loved learning so much about immigrating to Australia. Ship life and traveling steerage. Early life in Australia. The opening of the Suez canal with small insights into 1870’s Egypt, Singapore, etc. really liked the main characters.
    Georgette Heyer – The Black Sheep. As always it was good. I’ll have to pick another GH to read this month!
    Jo Goodman – The Devil you Know and Stages of the Heart. Complicated characters. HEA. American Western Romances set in the mid to late 1800’s. I really like that I learn a little more about the history of the featured area as well as very good character development.
    Lastly, I’m about a 7th of the way through Total Recall by Arnold Schwarzenegger. It is a very readable book. Very fascinating too. It was recommended to me by my niece for our Family Reading Challenge
    Looking back I’ve really skipped around the world! Also time frames too. It was a good reading month.

    Reply
  43. I’ve done a bit of binge reading and a bit of skipping around. With a few rereads as well. My library finally opened for curbside service!
    Kerry Greenwood – Miss Fisher series. I read Death at Victoria Dock and The Green mill Murder. Tomorrow I pick up Books 6 thru 9 at the library. I’m really enjoying those and look forward to the next ones as well.
    Amanda Quick – Close Up. The latest of her Burning Cove series. This one is set in 1928. In this book paranormal abilities are starting to show up in the characters (H/h) It was a nice piece of romantic suspense.
    Hannah Howell – Highland Warrior – set in 1472 Scotland. Clan wars/alliances. Very satisfying romance. Nice meaty story. I feel a glom coming on but will try to hold off until I get the library books read!
    Anna Jacobs – Trader series. In May I read The Trader’s Wife and enjoyed it so much I ended up getting the other 4 books in that series. The Trader’s Sister, The Trader’s Dream, The Trader’s Gift, The Trader’s Reward. I will end up keeping them all. Even the one that wasn’t as satisfying as the other 4 because there are important developments in it. Loved learning so much about immigrating to Australia. Ship life and traveling steerage. Early life in Australia. The opening of the Suez canal with small insights into 1870’s Egypt, Singapore, etc. really liked the main characters.
    Georgette Heyer – The Black Sheep. As always it was good. I’ll have to pick another GH to read this month!
    Jo Goodman – The Devil you Know and Stages of the Heart. Complicated characters. HEA. American Western Romances set in the mid to late 1800’s. I really like that I learn a little more about the history of the featured area as well as very good character development.
    Lastly, I’m about a 7th of the way through Total Recall by Arnold Schwarzenegger. It is a very readable book. Very fascinating too. It was recommended to me by my niece for our Family Reading Challenge
    Looking back I’ve really skipped around the world! Also time frames too. It was a good reading month.

    Reply
  44. I’ve done a bit of binge reading and a bit of skipping around. With a few rereads as well. My library finally opened for curbside service!
    Kerry Greenwood – Miss Fisher series. I read Death at Victoria Dock and The Green mill Murder. Tomorrow I pick up Books 6 thru 9 at the library. I’m really enjoying those and look forward to the next ones as well.
    Amanda Quick – Close Up. The latest of her Burning Cove series. This one is set in 1928. In this book paranormal abilities are starting to show up in the characters (H/h) It was a nice piece of romantic suspense.
    Hannah Howell – Highland Warrior – set in 1472 Scotland. Clan wars/alliances. Very satisfying romance. Nice meaty story. I feel a glom coming on but will try to hold off until I get the library books read!
    Anna Jacobs – Trader series. In May I read The Trader’s Wife and enjoyed it so much I ended up getting the other 4 books in that series. The Trader’s Sister, The Trader’s Dream, The Trader’s Gift, The Trader’s Reward. I will end up keeping them all. Even the one that wasn’t as satisfying as the other 4 because there are important developments in it. Loved learning so much about immigrating to Australia. Ship life and traveling steerage. Early life in Australia. The opening of the Suez canal with small insights into 1870’s Egypt, Singapore, etc. really liked the main characters.
    Georgette Heyer – The Black Sheep. As always it was good. I’ll have to pick another GH to read this month!
    Jo Goodman – The Devil you Know and Stages of the Heart. Complicated characters. HEA. American Western Romances set in the mid to late 1800’s. I really like that I learn a little more about the history of the featured area as well as very good character development.
    Lastly, I’m about a 7th of the way through Total Recall by Arnold Schwarzenegger. It is a very readable book. Very fascinating too. It was recommended to me by my niece for our Family Reading Challenge
    Looking back I’ve really skipped around the world! Also time frames too. It was a good reading month.

    Reply
  45. I’ve done a bit of binge reading and a bit of skipping around. With a few rereads as well. My library finally opened for curbside service!
    Kerry Greenwood – Miss Fisher series. I read Death at Victoria Dock and The Green mill Murder. Tomorrow I pick up Books 6 thru 9 at the library. I’m really enjoying those and look forward to the next ones as well.
    Amanda Quick – Close Up. The latest of her Burning Cove series. This one is set in 1928. In this book paranormal abilities are starting to show up in the characters (H/h) It was a nice piece of romantic suspense.
    Hannah Howell – Highland Warrior – set in 1472 Scotland. Clan wars/alliances. Very satisfying romance. Nice meaty story. I feel a glom coming on but will try to hold off until I get the library books read!
    Anna Jacobs – Trader series. In May I read The Trader’s Wife and enjoyed it so much I ended up getting the other 4 books in that series. The Trader’s Sister, The Trader’s Dream, The Trader’s Gift, The Trader’s Reward. I will end up keeping them all. Even the one that wasn’t as satisfying as the other 4 because there are important developments in it. Loved learning so much about immigrating to Australia. Ship life and traveling steerage. Early life in Australia. The opening of the Suez canal with small insights into 1870’s Egypt, Singapore, etc. really liked the main characters.
    Georgette Heyer – The Black Sheep. As always it was good. I’ll have to pick another GH to read this month!
    Jo Goodman – The Devil you Know and Stages of the Heart. Complicated characters. HEA. American Western Romances set in the mid to late 1800’s. I really like that I learn a little more about the history of the featured area as well as very good character development.
    Lastly, I’m about a 7th of the way through Total Recall by Arnold Schwarzenegger. It is a very readable book. Very fascinating too. It was recommended to me by my niece for our Family Reading Challenge
    Looking back I’ve really skipped around the world! Also time frames too. It was a good reading month.

    Reply
  46. I have just read Lab Girl by Hope Jahren – fascinating autobiography about a geobiologist, the challenges of being a female scientist and a bit of science of trees and soils. Otherwise I love these WWR articles – 6 more books on my TBR kindle pile

    Reply
  47. I have just read Lab Girl by Hope Jahren – fascinating autobiography about a geobiologist, the challenges of being a female scientist and a bit of science of trees and soils. Otherwise I love these WWR articles – 6 more books on my TBR kindle pile

    Reply
  48. I have just read Lab Girl by Hope Jahren – fascinating autobiography about a geobiologist, the challenges of being a female scientist and a bit of science of trees and soils. Otherwise I love these WWR articles – 6 more books on my TBR kindle pile

    Reply
  49. I have just read Lab Girl by Hope Jahren – fascinating autobiography about a geobiologist, the challenges of being a female scientist and a bit of science of trees and soils. Otherwise I love these WWR articles – 6 more books on my TBR kindle pile

    Reply
  50. I have just read Lab Girl by Hope Jahren – fascinating autobiography about a geobiologist, the challenges of being a female scientist and a bit of science of trees and soils. Otherwise I love these WWR articles – 6 more books on my TBR kindle pile

    Reply
  51. Bujold is one of my very favorite authors.
    I started out thinking I’d never feel more than so-so about The Curse of Chalion stories. But they are so very well written!
    By the time I’d read them through twice I was absolutely in love with them.
    Basically, I’ll read anything by Bujold. I think I’ve picked up all of her work.
    Interesting to learn Gail Carriger also writes as G. L. Carriger. I’ll have to go pick up some of her works under thqt name.

    Reply
  52. Bujold is one of my very favorite authors.
    I started out thinking I’d never feel more than so-so about The Curse of Chalion stories. But they are so very well written!
    By the time I’d read them through twice I was absolutely in love with them.
    Basically, I’ll read anything by Bujold. I think I’ve picked up all of her work.
    Interesting to learn Gail Carriger also writes as G. L. Carriger. I’ll have to go pick up some of her works under thqt name.

    Reply
  53. Bujold is one of my very favorite authors.
    I started out thinking I’d never feel more than so-so about The Curse of Chalion stories. But they are so very well written!
    By the time I’d read them through twice I was absolutely in love with them.
    Basically, I’ll read anything by Bujold. I think I’ve picked up all of her work.
    Interesting to learn Gail Carriger also writes as G. L. Carriger. I’ll have to go pick up some of her works under thqt name.

    Reply
  54. Bujold is one of my very favorite authors.
    I started out thinking I’d never feel more than so-so about The Curse of Chalion stories. But they are so very well written!
    By the time I’d read them through twice I was absolutely in love with them.
    Basically, I’ll read anything by Bujold. I think I’ve picked up all of her work.
    Interesting to learn Gail Carriger also writes as G. L. Carriger. I’ll have to go pick up some of her works under thqt name.

    Reply
  55. Bujold is one of my very favorite authors.
    I started out thinking I’d never feel more than so-so about The Curse of Chalion stories. But they are so very well written!
    By the time I’d read them through twice I was absolutely in love with them.
    Basically, I’ll read anything by Bujold. I think I’ve picked up all of her work.
    Interesting to learn Gail Carriger also writes as G. L. Carriger. I’ll have to go pick up some of her works under thqt name.

    Reply
  56. I am an old old fan of Terry Pratchett. I cannot even remember when I began reading them, but I think it had something to do with the cool, pulp fiction SF cover.
    I have a whole set of “let’s go off in the woods and live close to Nature and think about things” books, many of which are still on my bookshelves after many decades. The Nearings. The Outermost House …
    Thoreau wasn’t the founder of the genre — I imagine that was some Classical Roman guy. But he was on the right track, I think.

    Reply
  57. I am an old old fan of Terry Pratchett. I cannot even remember when I began reading them, but I think it had something to do with the cool, pulp fiction SF cover.
    I have a whole set of “let’s go off in the woods and live close to Nature and think about things” books, many of which are still on my bookshelves after many decades. The Nearings. The Outermost House …
    Thoreau wasn’t the founder of the genre — I imagine that was some Classical Roman guy. But he was on the right track, I think.

    Reply
  58. I am an old old fan of Terry Pratchett. I cannot even remember when I began reading them, but I think it had something to do with the cool, pulp fiction SF cover.
    I have a whole set of “let’s go off in the woods and live close to Nature and think about things” books, many of which are still on my bookshelves after many decades. The Nearings. The Outermost House …
    Thoreau wasn’t the founder of the genre — I imagine that was some Classical Roman guy. But he was on the right track, I think.

    Reply
  59. I am an old old fan of Terry Pratchett. I cannot even remember when I began reading them, but I think it had something to do with the cool, pulp fiction SF cover.
    I have a whole set of “let’s go off in the woods and live close to Nature and think about things” books, many of which are still on my bookshelves after many decades. The Nearings. The Outermost House …
    Thoreau wasn’t the founder of the genre — I imagine that was some Classical Roman guy. But he was on the right track, I think.

    Reply
  60. I am an old old fan of Terry Pratchett. I cannot even remember when I began reading them, but I think it had something to do with the cool, pulp fiction SF cover.
    I have a whole set of “let’s go off in the woods and live close to Nature and think about things” books, many of which are still on my bookshelves after many decades. The Nearings. The Outermost House …
    Thoreau wasn’t the founder of the genre — I imagine that was some Classical Roman guy. But he was on the right track, I think.

    Reply
  61. I’ve reread a lot of favorites these past couple months. My library has such a good collection online.
    Dorothy Gilman. Peter O’Donnell. Ian Fleming.
    My library’s been a lifesaver.

    Reply
  62. I’ve reread a lot of favorites these past couple months. My library has such a good collection online.
    Dorothy Gilman. Peter O’Donnell. Ian Fleming.
    My library’s been a lifesaver.

    Reply
  63. I’ve reread a lot of favorites these past couple months. My library has such a good collection online.
    Dorothy Gilman. Peter O’Donnell. Ian Fleming.
    My library’s been a lifesaver.

    Reply
  64. I’ve reread a lot of favorites these past couple months. My library has such a good collection online.
    Dorothy Gilman. Peter O’Donnell. Ian Fleming.
    My library’s been a lifesaver.

    Reply
  65. I’ve reread a lot of favorites these past couple months. My library has such a good collection online.
    Dorothy Gilman. Peter O’Donnell. Ian Fleming.
    My library’s been a lifesaver.

    Reply
  66. I used to work at the Library of Congress with a man who, in his off hours, used the resources there to pursue his genealogical hobby.
    He’d track down the family trees of notable Americans. Seems like a surprising number of them were related to somebody interesting.

    Reply
  67. I used to work at the Library of Congress with a man who, in his off hours, used the resources there to pursue his genealogical hobby.
    He’d track down the family trees of notable Americans. Seems like a surprising number of them were related to somebody interesting.

    Reply
  68. I used to work at the Library of Congress with a man who, in his off hours, used the resources there to pursue his genealogical hobby.
    He’d track down the family trees of notable Americans. Seems like a surprising number of them were related to somebody interesting.

    Reply
  69. I used to work at the Library of Congress with a man who, in his off hours, used the resources there to pursue his genealogical hobby.
    He’d track down the family trees of notable Americans. Seems like a surprising number of them were related to somebody interesting.

    Reply
  70. I used to work at the Library of Congress with a man who, in his off hours, used the resources there to pursue his genealogical hobby.
    He’d track down the family trees of notable Americans. Seems like a surprising number of them were related to somebody interesting.

    Reply
  71. I see you have made a circuit of the globe in your reading in this last month. Interesting.
    Amanda Quick has managed to sneak a few new books out without me noticing. I see I will have to do some diligent research to keep up.*g*

    Reply
  72. I see you have made a circuit of the globe in your reading in this last month. Interesting.
    Amanda Quick has managed to sneak a few new books out without me noticing. I see I will have to do some diligent research to keep up.*g*

    Reply
  73. I see you have made a circuit of the globe in your reading in this last month. Interesting.
    Amanda Quick has managed to sneak a few new books out without me noticing. I see I will have to do some diligent research to keep up.*g*

    Reply
  74. I see you have made a circuit of the globe in your reading in this last month. Interesting.
    Amanda Quick has managed to sneak a few new books out without me noticing. I see I will have to do some diligent research to keep up.*g*

    Reply
  75. I see you have made a circuit of the globe in your reading in this last month. Interesting.
    Amanda Quick has managed to sneak a few new books out without me noticing. I see I will have to do some diligent research to keep up.*g*

    Reply
  76. I haven’t heard about Lab Girl. Looks interesting.
    Any time I see somebody doing something useful I immediately want to go look over their shoulder. It’s a kind of fascination with specialized knowledge.

    Reply
  77. I haven’t heard about Lab Girl. Looks interesting.
    Any time I see somebody doing something useful I immediately want to go look over their shoulder. It’s a kind of fascination with specialized knowledge.

    Reply
  78. I haven’t heard about Lab Girl. Looks interesting.
    Any time I see somebody doing something useful I immediately want to go look over their shoulder. It’s a kind of fascination with specialized knowledge.

    Reply
  79. I haven’t heard about Lab Girl. Looks interesting.
    Any time I see somebody doing something useful I immediately want to go look over their shoulder. It’s a kind of fascination with specialized knowledge.

    Reply
  80. I haven’t heard about Lab Girl. Looks interesting.
    Any time I see somebody doing something useful I immediately want to go look over their shoulder. It’s a kind of fascination with specialized knowledge.

    Reply
  81. I read Kate Clayborn’s Love Lettering, I absolutely loved it. I’m not usually a fan of contemporary fiction but after reading so many recommendations, I dove in and I am so glad that I did! I also finished Project Duchess by Sabrina Jeffries and I am in the middle of It’s Getting Scot In Here by Suzanne Enoch. Love reading about burly, handsome me n in kilts!

    Reply
  82. I read Kate Clayborn’s Love Lettering, I absolutely loved it. I’m not usually a fan of contemporary fiction but after reading so many recommendations, I dove in and I am so glad that I did! I also finished Project Duchess by Sabrina Jeffries and I am in the middle of It’s Getting Scot In Here by Suzanne Enoch. Love reading about burly, handsome me n in kilts!

    Reply
  83. I read Kate Clayborn’s Love Lettering, I absolutely loved it. I’m not usually a fan of contemporary fiction but after reading so many recommendations, I dove in and I am so glad that I did! I also finished Project Duchess by Sabrina Jeffries and I am in the middle of It’s Getting Scot In Here by Suzanne Enoch. Love reading about burly, handsome me n in kilts!

    Reply
  84. I read Kate Clayborn’s Love Lettering, I absolutely loved it. I’m not usually a fan of contemporary fiction but after reading so many recommendations, I dove in and I am so glad that I did! I also finished Project Duchess by Sabrina Jeffries and I am in the middle of It’s Getting Scot In Here by Suzanne Enoch. Love reading about burly, handsome me n in kilts!

    Reply
  85. I read Kate Clayborn’s Love Lettering, I absolutely loved it. I’m not usually a fan of contemporary fiction but after reading so many recommendations, I dove in and I am so glad that I did! I also finished Project Duchess by Sabrina Jeffries and I am in the middle of It’s Getting Scot In Here by Suzanne Enoch. Love reading about burly, handsome me n in kilts!

    Reply
  86. I forgot to add that I finally read Mary Jo’s Silk and Shadows trilogy, which was brilliant and I can’t think why I hadn’t read them before. And now I think I will have to re-read M M Kaye’s Shadow of the Moon and The Far Pavilions

    Reply
  87. I forgot to add that I finally read Mary Jo’s Silk and Shadows trilogy, which was brilliant and I can’t think why I hadn’t read them before. And now I think I will have to re-read M M Kaye’s Shadow of the Moon and The Far Pavilions

    Reply
  88. I forgot to add that I finally read Mary Jo’s Silk and Shadows trilogy, which was brilliant and I can’t think why I hadn’t read them before. And now I think I will have to re-read M M Kaye’s Shadow of the Moon and The Far Pavilions

    Reply
  89. I forgot to add that I finally read Mary Jo’s Silk and Shadows trilogy, which was brilliant and I can’t think why I hadn’t read them before. And now I think I will have to re-read M M Kaye’s Shadow of the Moon and The Far Pavilions

    Reply
  90. I forgot to add that I finally read Mary Jo’s Silk and Shadows trilogy, which was brilliant and I can’t think why I hadn’t read them before. And now I think I will have to re-read M M Kaye’s Shadow of the Moon and The Far Pavilions

    Reply
  91. I have been spending my time rereading the print and paper copie I own of C. J. Cherryh’s “Foreigner” series. When my husband asks me a question, I say “I’can’t stop now – I’m in the middle of a crisis.” To which he replies “Of course you are!”
    If you know C. J. in general and this set of series, you will understand the joke. If you don’t know her, she’s well worth a try.

    Reply
  92. I have been spending my time rereading the print and paper copie I own of C. J. Cherryh’s “Foreigner” series. When my husband asks me a question, I say “I’can’t stop now – I’m in the middle of a crisis.” To which he replies “Of course you are!”
    If you know C. J. in general and this set of series, you will understand the joke. If you don’t know her, she’s well worth a try.

    Reply
  93. I have been spending my time rereading the print and paper copie I own of C. J. Cherryh’s “Foreigner” series. When my husband asks me a question, I say “I’can’t stop now – I’m in the middle of a crisis.” To which he replies “Of course you are!”
    If you know C. J. in general and this set of series, you will understand the joke. If you don’t know her, she’s well worth a try.

    Reply
  94. I have been spending my time rereading the print and paper copie I own of C. J. Cherryh’s “Foreigner” series. When my husband asks me a question, I say “I’can’t stop now – I’m in the middle of a crisis.” To which he replies “Of course you are!”
    If you know C. J. in general and this set of series, you will understand the joke. If you don’t know her, she’s well worth a try.

    Reply
  95. I have been spending my time rereading the print and paper copie I own of C. J. Cherryh’s “Foreigner” series. When my husband asks me a question, I say “I’can’t stop now – I’m in the middle of a crisis.” To which he replies “Of course you are!”
    If you know C. J. in general and this set of series, you will understand the joke. If you don’t know her, she’s well worth a try.

    Reply
  96. I just finished reading A Street Cat Named Bob (I watched the movie, too), The World According to Bob and A Gift from Bob by James Bowen. Right now I’m reading Warrior of the Highlands by Veronica Wolff.

    Reply
  97. I just finished reading A Street Cat Named Bob (I watched the movie, too), The World According to Bob and A Gift from Bob by James Bowen. Right now I’m reading Warrior of the Highlands by Veronica Wolff.

    Reply
  98. I just finished reading A Street Cat Named Bob (I watched the movie, too), The World According to Bob and A Gift from Bob by James Bowen. Right now I’m reading Warrior of the Highlands by Veronica Wolff.

    Reply
  99. I just finished reading A Street Cat Named Bob (I watched the movie, too), The World According to Bob and A Gift from Bob by James Bowen. Right now I’m reading Warrior of the Highlands by Veronica Wolff.

    Reply
  100. I just finished reading A Street Cat Named Bob (I watched the movie, too), The World According to Bob and A Gift from Bob by James Bowen. Right now I’m reading Warrior of the Highlands by Veronica Wolff.

    Reply
  101. Joanna, I’m not surprised that you, too, are riveted by Ilona Andrews’ blog serialization of the new book Ryder. I’ve been a blog devotee since I discovered the Innkeeper series, which actually is my favorite of their universally-awesome series.
    And what fun to find out from the article and the comments that I’m not the only one who’s been binge-reading old faves. Talk about comfort food for the soul!!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  102. Joanna, I’m not surprised that you, too, are riveted by Ilona Andrews’ blog serialization of the new book Ryder. I’ve been a blog devotee since I discovered the Innkeeper series, which actually is my favorite of their universally-awesome series.
    And what fun to find out from the article and the comments that I’m not the only one who’s been binge-reading old faves. Talk about comfort food for the soul!!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  103. Joanna, I’m not surprised that you, too, are riveted by Ilona Andrews’ blog serialization of the new book Ryder. I’ve been a blog devotee since I discovered the Innkeeper series, which actually is my favorite of their universally-awesome series.
    And what fun to find out from the article and the comments that I’m not the only one who’s been binge-reading old faves. Talk about comfort food for the soul!!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  104. Joanna, I’m not surprised that you, too, are riveted by Ilona Andrews’ blog serialization of the new book Ryder. I’ve been a blog devotee since I discovered the Innkeeper series, which actually is my favorite of their universally-awesome series.
    And what fun to find out from the article and the comments that I’m not the only one who’s been binge-reading old faves. Talk about comfort food for the soul!!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  105. Joanna, I’m not surprised that you, too, are riveted by Ilona Andrews’ blog serialization of the new book Ryder. I’ve been a blog devotee since I discovered the Innkeeper series, which actually is my favorite of their universally-awesome series.
    And what fun to find out from the article and the comments that I’m not the only one who’s been binge-reading old faves. Talk about comfort food for the soul!!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  106. Quite a few of the authors mentioned are on my fav list …. I must have very good taste!
    For example I’m on book 3 of Elly Griffith’s Ruth Galloway series and I rated Julia London’s Cabot Sister series as a 5* listen, especially with Rosalyn Landor as narrator.
    Outstanding listens for me this month were Catherine Anderson’s Annie’s Song … a real emotional roller coaster and Anne Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series. Finishing the latter means I have no more of Anne’s delightful audio’s to lighten the covid gloom.😬

    Reply
  107. Quite a few of the authors mentioned are on my fav list …. I must have very good taste!
    For example I’m on book 3 of Elly Griffith’s Ruth Galloway series and I rated Julia London’s Cabot Sister series as a 5* listen, especially with Rosalyn Landor as narrator.
    Outstanding listens for me this month were Catherine Anderson’s Annie’s Song … a real emotional roller coaster and Anne Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series. Finishing the latter means I have no more of Anne’s delightful audio’s to lighten the covid gloom.😬

    Reply
  108. Quite a few of the authors mentioned are on my fav list …. I must have very good taste!
    For example I’m on book 3 of Elly Griffith’s Ruth Galloway series and I rated Julia London’s Cabot Sister series as a 5* listen, especially with Rosalyn Landor as narrator.
    Outstanding listens for me this month were Catherine Anderson’s Annie’s Song … a real emotional roller coaster and Anne Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series. Finishing the latter means I have no more of Anne’s delightful audio’s to lighten the covid gloom.😬

    Reply
  109. Quite a few of the authors mentioned are on my fav list …. I must have very good taste!
    For example I’m on book 3 of Elly Griffith’s Ruth Galloway series and I rated Julia London’s Cabot Sister series as a 5* listen, especially with Rosalyn Landor as narrator.
    Outstanding listens for me this month were Catherine Anderson’s Annie’s Song … a real emotional roller coaster and Anne Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series. Finishing the latter means I have no more of Anne’s delightful audio’s to lighten the covid gloom.😬

    Reply
  110. Quite a few of the authors mentioned are on my fav list …. I must have very good taste!
    For example I’m on book 3 of Elly Griffith’s Ruth Galloway series and I rated Julia London’s Cabot Sister series as a 5* listen, especially with Rosalyn Landor as narrator.
    Outstanding listens for me this month were Catherine Anderson’s Annie’s Song … a real emotional roller coaster and Anne Gracie’s Marriage of Convenience series. Finishing the latter means I have no more of Anne’s delightful audio’s to lighten the covid gloom.😬

    Reply
  111. We need our comfort reads.
    I am not, just at the moment, looking for Important Literature (with caps) where people puddle into despair.
    I want folks who hit back when times are bad.
    Though I’ll admit my own ‘hitting back’ at this time is pretty much limited to, y’know, rousing postcards, rather than katanas.
    I am not altogether certain I would know which end of a katana pointed upward.

    Reply
  112. We need our comfort reads.
    I am not, just at the moment, looking for Important Literature (with caps) where people puddle into despair.
    I want folks who hit back when times are bad.
    Though I’ll admit my own ‘hitting back’ at this time is pretty much limited to, y’know, rousing postcards, rather than katanas.
    I am not altogether certain I would know which end of a katana pointed upward.

    Reply
  113. We need our comfort reads.
    I am not, just at the moment, looking for Important Literature (with caps) where people puddle into despair.
    I want folks who hit back when times are bad.
    Though I’ll admit my own ‘hitting back’ at this time is pretty much limited to, y’know, rousing postcards, rather than katanas.
    I am not altogether certain I would know which end of a katana pointed upward.

    Reply
  114. We need our comfort reads.
    I am not, just at the moment, looking for Important Literature (with caps) where people puddle into despair.
    I want folks who hit back when times are bad.
    Though I’ll admit my own ‘hitting back’ at this time is pretty much limited to, y’know, rousing postcards, rather than katanas.
    I am not altogether certain I would know which end of a katana pointed upward.

    Reply
  115. We need our comfort reads.
    I am not, just at the moment, looking for Important Literature (with caps) where people puddle into despair.
    I want folks who hit back when times are bad.
    Though I’ll admit my own ‘hitting back’ at this time is pretty much limited to, y’know, rousing postcards, rather than katanas.
    I am not altogether certain I would know which end of a katana pointed upward.

    Reply
  116. There will be also another movie based on A Gift from Bob. Bob actually plays himself (most of the time) in the movies. Sadly, Bob passed away recently because of a hit and run. Poor James was obviously devastated.

    Reply
  117. There will be also another movie based on A Gift from Bob. Bob actually plays himself (most of the time) in the movies. Sadly, Bob passed away recently because of a hit and run. Poor James was obviously devastated.

    Reply
  118. There will be also another movie based on A Gift from Bob. Bob actually plays himself (most of the time) in the movies. Sadly, Bob passed away recently because of a hit and run. Poor James was obviously devastated.

    Reply
  119. There will be also another movie based on A Gift from Bob. Bob actually plays himself (most of the time) in the movies. Sadly, Bob passed away recently because of a hit and run. Poor James was obviously devastated.

    Reply
  120. There will be also another movie based on A Gift from Bob. Bob actually plays himself (most of the time) in the movies. Sadly, Bob passed away recently because of a hit and run. Poor James was obviously devastated.

    Reply
  121. WOW – thanks for all the new books to add to my already ginormous list.
    I read quite a few books in June. Most were good, these 3 were my favorites.
    The Last Single Girl by Bria Quinlan, a novella that made me laugh and remember how life can be such a surprise.
    Murder at Melrose Court by Karen Baugh Menuhin. A first in a series about a man who becomes a detective in spite of himself.
    Finally, Incomparable Lord Meath by Patricia Rice (you may have heard of her). This story is charming and fun and generally made me really like Lord Meath.
    Again, I thank you all for creating a stack of TBR’s which will eventually fall on me and mash me flat.

    Reply
  122. WOW – thanks for all the new books to add to my already ginormous list.
    I read quite a few books in June. Most were good, these 3 were my favorites.
    The Last Single Girl by Bria Quinlan, a novella that made me laugh and remember how life can be such a surprise.
    Murder at Melrose Court by Karen Baugh Menuhin. A first in a series about a man who becomes a detective in spite of himself.
    Finally, Incomparable Lord Meath by Patricia Rice (you may have heard of her). This story is charming and fun and generally made me really like Lord Meath.
    Again, I thank you all for creating a stack of TBR’s which will eventually fall on me and mash me flat.

    Reply
  123. WOW – thanks for all the new books to add to my already ginormous list.
    I read quite a few books in June. Most were good, these 3 were my favorites.
    The Last Single Girl by Bria Quinlan, a novella that made me laugh and remember how life can be such a surprise.
    Murder at Melrose Court by Karen Baugh Menuhin. A first in a series about a man who becomes a detective in spite of himself.
    Finally, Incomparable Lord Meath by Patricia Rice (you may have heard of her). This story is charming and fun and generally made me really like Lord Meath.
    Again, I thank you all for creating a stack of TBR’s which will eventually fall on me and mash me flat.

    Reply
  124. WOW – thanks for all the new books to add to my already ginormous list.
    I read quite a few books in June. Most were good, these 3 were my favorites.
    The Last Single Girl by Bria Quinlan, a novella that made me laugh and remember how life can be such a surprise.
    Murder at Melrose Court by Karen Baugh Menuhin. A first in a series about a man who becomes a detective in spite of himself.
    Finally, Incomparable Lord Meath by Patricia Rice (you may have heard of her). This story is charming and fun and generally made me really like Lord Meath.
    Again, I thank you all for creating a stack of TBR’s which will eventually fall on me and mash me flat.

    Reply
  125. WOW – thanks for all the new books to add to my already ginormous list.
    I read quite a few books in June. Most were good, these 3 were my favorites.
    The Last Single Girl by Bria Quinlan, a novella that made me laugh and remember how life can be such a surprise.
    Murder at Melrose Court by Karen Baugh Menuhin. A first in a series about a man who becomes a detective in spite of himself.
    Finally, Incomparable Lord Meath by Patricia Rice (you may have heard of her). This story is charming and fun and generally made me really like Lord Meath.
    Again, I thank you all for creating a stack of TBR’s which will eventually fall on me and mash me flat.

    Reply
  126. These are some great suggestions. I really have been remiss in not reading Mary Stewart yet, and the Elizabeth St. John book sounds like it’s right up my alley.
    I am almost finished with the latest C.S. Harris book, “Who Speaks For the Damned” and it’s a wonderful read. I love revisiting Sebastian St. Cyr’s world.
    I read about 3/4 of “Network Effect” which is the latest Murderbot book by Martha Wells. Unfortunately I wasn’t paying attention to when my library loan expired, and the e-book got snatched back before I finished it, so now I am on the waiting list to get it back again!
    I am rereading “The Emperor’s Conspiracy” by Michelle Diener, which has a twisty spy plot. I love her historicals which are sort of mystery/suspense.
    And speaking of spies, “The Spymaster’s Lady” is on sale for Kindle for .99! So of course I snatched it up, and I will reread it as soon as I get caught up on all my unfinished books.

    Reply
  127. These are some great suggestions. I really have been remiss in not reading Mary Stewart yet, and the Elizabeth St. John book sounds like it’s right up my alley.
    I am almost finished with the latest C.S. Harris book, “Who Speaks For the Damned” and it’s a wonderful read. I love revisiting Sebastian St. Cyr’s world.
    I read about 3/4 of “Network Effect” which is the latest Murderbot book by Martha Wells. Unfortunately I wasn’t paying attention to when my library loan expired, and the e-book got snatched back before I finished it, so now I am on the waiting list to get it back again!
    I am rereading “The Emperor’s Conspiracy” by Michelle Diener, which has a twisty spy plot. I love her historicals which are sort of mystery/suspense.
    And speaking of spies, “The Spymaster’s Lady” is on sale for Kindle for .99! So of course I snatched it up, and I will reread it as soon as I get caught up on all my unfinished books.

    Reply
  128. These are some great suggestions. I really have been remiss in not reading Mary Stewart yet, and the Elizabeth St. John book sounds like it’s right up my alley.
    I am almost finished with the latest C.S. Harris book, “Who Speaks For the Damned” and it’s a wonderful read. I love revisiting Sebastian St. Cyr’s world.
    I read about 3/4 of “Network Effect” which is the latest Murderbot book by Martha Wells. Unfortunately I wasn’t paying attention to when my library loan expired, and the e-book got snatched back before I finished it, so now I am on the waiting list to get it back again!
    I am rereading “The Emperor’s Conspiracy” by Michelle Diener, which has a twisty spy plot. I love her historicals which are sort of mystery/suspense.
    And speaking of spies, “The Spymaster’s Lady” is on sale for Kindle for .99! So of course I snatched it up, and I will reread it as soon as I get caught up on all my unfinished books.

    Reply
  129. These are some great suggestions. I really have been remiss in not reading Mary Stewart yet, and the Elizabeth St. John book sounds like it’s right up my alley.
    I am almost finished with the latest C.S. Harris book, “Who Speaks For the Damned” and it’s a wonderful read. I love revisiting Sebastian St. Cyr’s world.
    I read about 3/4 of “Network Effect” which is the latest Murderbot book by Martha Wells. Unfortunately I wasn’t paying attention to when my library loan expired, and the e-book got snatched back before I finished it, so now I am on the waiting list to get it back again!
    I am rereading “The Emperor’s Conspiracy” by Michelle Diener, which has a twisty spy plot. I love her historicals which are sort of mystery/suspense.
    And speaking of spies, “The Spymaster’s Lady” is on sale for Kindle for .99! So of course I snatched it up, and I will reread it as soon as I get caught up on all my unfinished books.

    Reply
  130. These are some great suggestions. I really have been remiss in not reading Mary Stewart yet, and the Elizabeth St. John book sounds like it’s right up my alley.
    I am almost finished with the latest C.S. Harris book, “Who Speaks For the Damned” and it’s a wonderful read. I love revisiting Sebastian St. Cyr’s world.
    I read about 3/4 of “Network Effect” which is the latest Murderbot book by Martha Wells. Unfortunately I wasn’t paying attention to when my library loan expired, and the e-book got snatched back before I finished it, so now I am on the waiting list to get it back again!
    I am rereading “The Emperor’s Conspiracy” by Michelle Diener, which has a twisty spy plot. I love her historicals which are sort of mystery/suspense.
    And speaking of spies, “The Spymaster’s Lady” is on sale for Kindle for .99! So of course I snatched it up, and I will reread it as soon as I get caught up on all my unfinished books.

    Reply
  131. I haven’t read as much as usual this month. We had a bit of bad news and it kinda threw me.
    However, I started the month with The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner. Was a quite a good read but not what I expected.
    Then Peril at End House, a Poiret story. I’m working my way through these with my daughter.
    Charity Girl by Georgette Heyer was next. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and we read a book every month. Also at the moment we’re reading Regency World by Jennifer Kloester.
    A reread of Second Sight by David L Williams, a timeslip novel and Fair as a Star by Mimi Matthews, a lovely read.
    Things moved up a gear then with Echoes of the Runes by Christina Courtenay. Fantastic timeslip novel. I won it on this site from Christina.
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo was a wonderful uplifting read. I love the old traditional stories.
    Then I finished off with A Mother’s Journey by Donna Douglas. I could not put this down!! and a reread of One Summer at Deer’s Leap by Elizabeth Elgin.
    I guess I didn’t do too badly after all.

    Reply
  132. I haven’t read as much as usual this month. We had a bit of bad news and it kinda threw me.
    However, I started the month with The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner. Was a quite a good read but not what I expected.
    Then Peril at End House, a Poiret story. I’m working my way through these with my daughter.
    Charity Girl by Georgette Heyer was next. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and we read a book every month. Also at the moment we’re reading Regency World by Jennifer Kloester.
    A reread of Second Sight by David L Williams, a timeslip novel and Fair as a Star by Mimi Matthews, a lovely read.
    Things moved up a gear then with Echoes of the Runes by Christina Courtenay. Fantastic timeslip novel. I won it on this site from Christina.
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo was a wonderful uplifting read. I love the old traditional stories.
    Then I finished off with A Mother’s Journey by Donna Douglas. I could not put this down!! and a reread of One Summer at Deer’s Leap by Elizabeth Elgin.
    I guess I didn’t do too badly after all.

    Reply
  133. I haven’t read as much as usual this month. We had a bit of bad news and it kinda threw me.
    However, I started the month with The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner. Was a quite a good read but not what I expected.
    Then Peril at End House, a Poiret story. I’m working my way through these with my daughter.
    Charity Girl by Georgette Heyer was next. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and we read a book every month. Also at the moment we’re reading Regency World by Jennifer Kloester.
    A reread of Second Sight by David L Williams, a timeslip novel and Fair as a Star by Mimi Matthews, a lovely read.
    Things moved up a gear then with Echoes of the Runes by Christina Courtenay. Fantastic timeslip novel. I won it on this site from Christina.
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo was a wonderful uplifting read. I love the old traditional stories.
    Then I finished off with A Mother’s Journey by Donna Douglas. I could not put this down!! and a reread of One Summer at Deer’s Leap by Elizabeth Elgin.
    I guess I didn’t do too badly after all.

    Reply
  134. I haven’t read as much as usual this month. We had a bit of bad news and it kinda threw me.
    However, I started the month with The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner. Was a quite a good read but not what I expected.
    Then Peril at End House, a Poiret story. I’m working my way through these with my daughter.
    Charity Girl by Georgette Heyer was next. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and we read a book every month. Also at the moment we’re reading Regency World by Jennifer Kloester.
    A reread of Second Sight by David L Williams, a timeslip novel and Fair as a Star by Mimi Matthews, a lovely read.
    Things moved up a gear then with Echoes of the Runes by Christina Courtenay. Fantastic timeslip novel. I won it on this site from Christina.
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo was a wonderful uplifting read. I love the old traditional stories.
    Then I finished off with A Mother’s Journey by Donna Douglas. I could not put this down!! and a reread of One Summer at Deer’s Leap by Elizabeth Elgin.
    I guess I didn’t do too badly after all.

    Reply
  135. I haven’t read as much as usual this month. We had a bit of bad news and it kinda threw me.
    However, I started the month with The Jane Austen Society by Natalie Jenner. Was a quite a good read but not what I expected.
    Then Peril at End House, a Poiret story. I’m working my way through these with my daughter.
    Charity Girl by Georgette Heyer was next. I’m in the Heyer group on GoodReads and we read a book every month. Also at the moment we’re reading Regency World by Jennifer Kloester.
    A reread of Second Sight by David L Williams, a timeslip novel and Fair as a Star by Mimi Matthews, a lovely read.
    Things moved up a gear then with Echoes of the Runes by Christina Courtenay. Fantastic timeslip novel. I won it on this site from Christina.
    The Diabolical Baron by Mary Jo was a wonderful uplifting read. I love the old traditional stories.
    Then I finished off with A Mother’s Journey by Donna Douglas. I could not put this down!! and a reread of One Summer at Deer’s Leap by Elizabeth Elgin.
    I guess I didn’t do too badly after all.

    Reply
  136. Can’t believe I haven’t read The Ivy Tree. Hmmmm. Very low price on Kindle. Here I go!
    I’ve read a couple by Simone St. James – Sundown Motel & The Broken Girls. Page turners both.
    I’m reading The Last Train To Key West by Chanel Cleeton – another page turner.
    Also read Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor & Heather Webb. So good & romantic.

    Reply
  137. Can’t believe I haven’t read The Ivy Tree. Hmmmm. Very low price on Kindle. Here I go!
    I’ve read a couple by Simone St. James – Sundown Motel & The Broken Girls. Page turners both.
    I’m reading The Last Train To Key West by Chanel Cleeton – another page turner.
    Also read Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor & Heather Webb. So good & romantic.

    Reply
  138. Can’t believe I haven’t read The Ivy Tree. Hmmmm. Very low price on Kindle. Here I go!
    I’ve read a couple by Simone St. James – Sundown Motel & The Broken Girls. Page turners both.
    I’m reading The Last Train To Key West by Chanel Cleeton – another page turner.
    Also read Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor & Heather Webb. So good & romantic.

    Reply
  139. Can’t believe I haven’t read The Ivy Tree. Hmmmm. Very low price on Kindle. Here I go!
    I’ve read a couple by Simone St. James – Sundown Motel & The Broken Girls. Page turners both.
    I’m reading The Last Train To Key West by Chanel Cleeton – another page turner.
    Also read Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor & Heather Webb. So good & romantic.

    Reply
  140. Can’t believe I haven’t read The Ivy Tree. Hmmmm. Very low price on Kindle. Here I go!
    I’ve read a couple by Simone St. James – Sundown Motel & The Broken Girls. Page turners both.
    I’m reading The Last Train To Key West by Chanel Cleeton – another page turner.
    Also read Meet Me In Monaco by Hazel Gaynor & Heather Webb. So good & romantic.

    Reply
  141. I well remember my first Terry Pratchett book. I’d come from a long and ridiculous staff meeting, where great swathes of time and argument were spent on topics such as coffee cups. I was fed up and went to my favorite bookshop to put me in a better mood. I picked up Terry Pratchett’s Equal Rites . . . I also remember reading the beginning of Guards Guards in a bookshop and chuckling aloud.
    I don’t know if anyone ever saw the wonderful documentary on dying that he made after being diagnosed with Alzheimers. It explored people’s right to choose their death, and was just amazing, and surprisingly not depressing, but quite uplifting in a way. Some very brave people appeared in it.

    Reply
  142. I well remember my first Terry Pratchett book. I’d come from a long and ridiculous staff meeting, where great swathes of time and argument were spent on topics such as coffee cups. I was fed up and went to my favorite bookshop to put me in a better mood. I picked up Terry Pratchett’s Equal Rites . . . I also remember reading the beginning of Guards Guards in a bookshop and chuckling aloud.
    I don’t know if anyone ever saw the wonderful documentary on dying that he made after being diagnosed with Alzheimers. It explored people’s right to choose their death, and was just amazing, and surprisingly not depressing, but quite uplifting in a way. Some very brave people appeared in it.

    Reply
  143. I well remember my first Terry Pratchett book. I’d come from a long and ridiculous staff meeting, where great swathes of time and argument were spent on topics such as coffee cups. I was fed up and went to my favorite bookshop to put me in a better mood. I picked up Terry Pratchett’s Equal Rites . . . I also remember reading the beginning of Guards Guards in a bookshop and chuckling aloud.
    I don’t know if anyone ever saw the wonderful documentary on dying that he made after being diagnosed with Alzheimers. It explored people’s right to choose their death, and was just amazing, and surprisingly not depressing, but quite uplifting in a way. Some very brave people appeared in it.

    Reply
  144. I well remember my first Terry Pratchett book. I’d come from a long and ridiculous staff meeting, where great swathes of time and argument were spent on topics such as coffee cups. I was fed up and went to my favorite bookshop to put me in a better mood. I picked up Terry Pratchett’s Equal Rites . . . I also remember reading the beginning of Guards Guards in a bookshop and chuckling aloud.
    I don’t know if anyone ever saw the wonderful documentary on dying that he made after being diagnosed with Alzheimers. It explored people’s right to choose their death, and was just amazing, and surprisingly not depressing, but quite uplifting in a way. Some very brave people appeared in it.

    Reply
  145. I well remember my first Terry Pratchett book. I’d come from a long and ridiculous staff meeting, where great swathes of time and argument were spent on topics such as coffee cups. I was fed up and went to my favorite bookshop to put me in a better mood. I picked up Terry Pratchett’s Equal Rites . . . I also remember reading the beginning of Guards Guards in a bookshop and chuckling aloud.
    I don’t know if anyone ever saw the wonderful documentary on dying that he made after being diagnosed with Alzheimers. It explored people’s right to choose their death, and was just amazing, and surprisingly not depressing, but quite uplifting in a way. Some very brave people appeared in it.

    Reply
  146. Thanks for that very kind comment, Quantum. I’ve just been told that Tantor (the audio company) has bought the rights to my first Berkley series, starting with The Perfect Rake. I’m really pleased as so many people have asked for that. Not sure when it will be available — there’s a fair bit of recording to be done yet.

    Reply
  147. Thanks for that very kind comment, Quantum. I’ve just been told that Tantor (the audio company) has bought the rights to my first Berkley series, starting with The Perfect Rake. I’m really pleased as so many people have asked for that. Not sure when it will be available — there’s a fair bit of recording to be done yet.

    Reply
  148. Thanks for that very kind comment, Quantum. I’ve just been told that Tantor (the audio company) has bought the rights to my first Berkley series, starting with The Perfect Rake. I’m really pleased as so many people have asked for that. Not sure when it will be available — there’s a fair bit of recording to be done yet.

    Reply
  149. Thanks for that very kind comment, Quantum. I’ve just been told that Tantor (the audio company) has bought the rights to my first Berkley series, starting with The Perfect Rake. I’m really pleased as so many people have asked for that. Not sure when it will be available — there’s a fair bit of recording to be done yet.

    Reply
  150. Thanks for that very kind comment, Quantum. I’ve just been told that Tantor (the audio company) has bought the rights to my first Berkley series, starting with The Perfect Rake. I’m really pleased as so many people have asked for that. Not sure when it will be available — there’s a fair bit of recording to be done yet.

    Reply
  151. I like to think of Spymaster’s Lady finding a place on a bunch of Kindles and Nooks because it is so very cheap they are almost giving it away.
    CS Harris is one of my favorites. I hate to admit I’m one book behind on reader her. Just saving it to savor, y’know.

    Reply
  152. I like to think of Spymaster’s Lady finding a place on a bunch of Kindles and Nooks because it is so very cheap they are almost giving it away.
    CS Harris is one of my favorites. I hate to admit I’m one book behind on reader her. Just saving it to savor, y’know.

    Reply
  153. I like to think of Spymaster’s Lady finding a place on a bunch of Kindles and Nooks because it is so very cheap they are almost giving it away.
    CS Harris is one of my favorites. I hate to admit I’m one book behind on reader her. Just saving it to savor, y’know.

    Reply
  154. I like to think of Spymaster’s Lady finding a place on a bunch of Kindles and Nooks because it is so very cheap they are almost giving it away.
    CS Harris is one of my favorites. I hate to admit I’m one book behind on reader her. Just saving it to savor, y’know.

    Reply
  155. I like to think of Spymaster’s Lady finding a place on a bunch of Kindles and Nooks because it is so very cheap they are almost giving it away.
    CS Harris is one of my favorites. I hate to admit I’m one book behind on reader her. Just saving it to savor, y’know.

    Reply
  156. I read Lab Girl a few months ago with my book group; I enjoyed it, too. Are you aware, Alice, that she has a newer book? I’ve heard good things about it.

    Reply
  157. I read Lab Girl a few months ago with my book group; I enjoyed it, too. Are you aware, Alice, that she has a newer book? I’ve heard good things about it.

    Reply
  158. I read Lab Girl a few months ago with my book group; I enjoyed it, too. Are you aware, Alice, that she has a newer book? I’ve heard good things about it.

    Reply
  159. I read Lab Girl a few months ago with my book group; I enjoyed it, too. Are you aware, Alice, that she has a newer book? I’ve heard good things about it.

    Reply
  160. I read Lab Girl a few months ago with my book group; I enjoyed it, too. Are you aware, Alice, that she has a newer book? I’ve heard good things about it.

    Reply
  161. After I finish the Vorkosigan series, I hope to move on to the Penric novellas. It’s wonderful to start reading an author who has a large body of work!

    Reply
  162. After I finish the Vorkosigan series, I hope to move on to the Penric novellas. It’s wonderful to start reading an author who has a large body of work!

    Reply
  163. After I finish the Vorkosigan series, I hope to move on to the Penric novellas. It’s wonderful to start reading an author who has a large body of work!

    Reply
  164. After I finish the Vorkosigan series, I hope to move on to the Penric novellas. It’s wonderful to start reading an author who has a large body of work!

    Reply
  165. After I finish the Vorkosigan series, I hope to move on to the Penric novellas. It’s wonderful to start reading an author who has a large body of work!

    Reply
  166. I find Agatha Christie remarkably relaxing. I’m more a fan of Jane Marple than Poiret, though.
    Nosy little old ladies for the win.
    I’m sorry to learn you received bad news this month. Reading helps us get through bad times, I think.

    Reply
  167. I find Agatha Christie remarkably relaxing. I’m more a fan of Jane Marple than Poiret, though.
    Nosy little old ladies for the win.
    I’m sorry to learn you received bad news this month. Reading helps us get through bad times, I think.

    Reply
  168. I find Agatha Christie remarkably relaxing. I’m more a fan of Jane Marple than Poiret, though.
    Nosy little old ladies for the win.
    I’m sorry to learn you received bad news this month. Reading helps us get through bad times, I think.

    Reply
  169. I find Agatha Christie remarkably relaxing. I’m more a fan of Jane Marple than Poiret, though.
    Nosy little old ladies for the win.
    I’m sorry to learn you received bad news this month. Reading helps us get through bad times, I think.

    Reply
  170. I find Agatha Christie remarkably relaxing. I’m more a fan of Jane Marple than Poiret, though.
    Nosy little old ladies for the win.
    I’m sorry to learn you received bad news this month. Reading helps us get through bad times, I think.

    Reply
  171. I am very fond of The Ivy Tree. It’s a little different to most of Stewart’s books. A more complex plot.
    And, for me, the bleak Northumberland landscape is as exotic as France or Austria.

    Reply
  172. I am very fond of The Ivy Tree. It’s a little different to most of Stewart’s books. A more complex plot.
    And, for me, the bleak Northumberland landscape is as exotic as France or Austria.

    Reply
  173. I am very fond of The Ivy Tree. It’s a little different to most of Stewart’s books. A more complex plot.
    And, for me, the bleak Northumberland landscape is as exotic as France or Austria.

    Reply
  174. I am very fond of The Ivy Tree. It’s a little different to most of Stewart’s books. A more complex plot.
    And, for me, the bleak Northumberland landscape is as exotic as France or Austria.

    Reply
  175. I am very fond of The Ivy Tree. It’s a little different to most of Stewart’s books. A more complex plot.
    And, for me, the bleak Northumberland landscape is as exotic as France or Austria.

    Reply
  176. I love everything by Bujold. I go back and reread them every couple years.
    Interestingly, her books that I’m iffy about the first time I read them — I like better and better on the rereads.

    Reply
  177. I love everything by Bujold. I go back and reread them every couple years.
    Interestingly, her books that I’m iffy about the first time I read them — I like better and better on the rereads.

    Reply
  178. I love everything by Bujold. I go back and reread them every couple years.
    Interestingly, her books that I’m iffy about the first time I read them — I like better and better on the rereads.

    Reply
  179. I love everything by Bujold. I go back and reread them every couple years.
    Interestingly, her books that I’m iffy about the first time I read them — I like better and better on the rereads.

    Reply
  180. I love everything by Bujold. I go back and reread them every couple years.
    Interestingly, her books that I’m iffy about the first time I read them — I like better and better on the rereads.

    Reply
  181. Thank you so much, Teresa, I’m really pleased you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes! I too am reading Georgette Heyer, as you probably saw, and I’ve read Jennifer Kloester’s books about her with great interest. I heard Jennifer speak once and she is very knowledgeable!

    Reply
  182. Thank you so much, Teresa, I’m really pleased you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes! I too am reading Georgette Heyer, as you probably saw, and I’ve read Jennifer Kloester’s books about her with great interest. I heard Jennifer speak once and she is very knowledgeable!

    Reply
  183. Thank you so much, Teresa, I’m really pleased you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes! I too am reading Georgette Heyer, as you probably saw, and I’ve read Jennifer Kloester’s books about her with great interest. I heard Jennifer speak once and she is very knowledgeable!

    Reply
  184. Thank you so much, Teresa, I’m really pleased you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes! I too am reading Georgette Heyer, as you probably saw, and I’ve read Jennifer Kloester’s books about her with great interest. I heard Jennifer speak once and she is very knowledgeable!

    Reply
  185. Thank you so much, Teresa, I’m really pleased you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes! I too am reading Georgette Heyer, as you probably saw, and I’ve read Jennifer Kloester’s books about her with great interest. I heard Jennifer speak once and she is very knowledgeable!

    Reply
  186. Read and enjoyed Close-Up by Amanda Quick. Then I went on a Nalini Singh kick. Alpha Night was wonderful. I have to admit to a real weakness for her damaged Arrows. Then I realized that I had the last two Guild Hunter novels on my TBR shelves, so I read Archangel’s Prophecy and Archangels War with great enjoyment. Then I backtracked to reread Venom. Rosalind James’ Kiwi Rules, which has a bit of well-meant family interference to start the relationship was next. I started Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens to end the month. It’s novellas set in the Celta world, and the first story let’s us see what life is like on the Earth from which the pioneers fled.

    Reply
  187. Read and enjoyed Close-Up by Amanda Quick. Then I went on a Nalini Singh kick. Alpha Night was wonderful. I have to admit to a real weakness for her damaged Arrows. Then I realized that I had the last two Guild Hunter novels on my TBR shelves, so I read Archangel’s Prophecy and Archangels War with great enjoyment. Then I backtracked to reread Venom. Rosalind James’ Kiwi Rules, which has a bit of well-meant family interference to start the relationship was next. I started Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens to end the month. It’s novellas set in the Celta world, and the first story let’s us see what life is like on the Earth from which the pioneers fled.

    Reply
  188. Read and enjoyed Close-Up by Amanda Quick. Then I went on a Nalini Singh kick. Alpha Night was wonderful. I have to admit to a real weakness for her damaged Arrows. Then I realized that I had the last two Guild Hunter novels on my TBR shelves, so I read Archangel’s Prophecy and Archangels War with great enjoyment. Then I backtracked to reread Venom. Rosalind James’ Kiwi Rules, which has a bit of well-meant family interference to start the relationship was next. I started Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens to end the month. It’s novellas set in the Celta world, and the first story let’s us see what life is like on the Earth from which the pioneers fled.

    Reply
  189. Read and enjoyed Close-Up by Amanda Quick. Then I went on a Nalini Singh kick. Alpha Night was wonderful. I have to admit to a real weakness for her damaged Arrows. Then I realized that I had the last two Guild Hunter novels on my TBR shelves, so I read Archangel’s Prophecy and Archangels War with great enjoyment. Then I backtracked to reread Venom. Rosalind James’ Kiwi Rules, which has a bit of well-meant family interference to start the relationship was next. I started Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens to end the month. It’s novellas set in the Celta world, and the first story let’s us see what life is like on the Earth from which the pioneers fled.

    Reply
  190. Read and enjoyed Close-Up by Amanda Quick. Then I went on a Nalini Singh kick. Alpha Night was wonderful. I have to admit to a real weakness for her damaged Arrows. Then I realized that I had the last two Guild Hunter novels on my TBR shelves, so I read Archangel’s Prophecy and Archangels War with great enjoyment. Then I backtracked to reread Venom. Rosalind James’ Kiwi Rules, which has a bit of well-meant family interference to start the relationship was next. I started Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens to end the month. It’s novellas set in the Celta world, and the first story let’s us see what life is like on the Earth from which the pioneers fled.

    Reply
  191. I wasn’t aware of Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens though I’ve read all the other Celta books. Thanks for mentioning it, Janet!

    Reply
  192. I wasn’t aware of Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens though I’ve read all the other Celta books. Thanks for mentioning it, Janet!

    Reply
  193. I wasn’t aware of Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens though I’ve read all the other Celta books. Thanks for mentioning it, Janet!

    Reply
  194. I wasn’t aware of Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens though I’ve read all the other Celta books. Thanks for mentioning it, Janet!

    Reply
  195. I wasn’t aware of Hearts and Stones by Robin Owens though I’ve read all the other Celta books. Thanks for mentioning it, Janet!

    Reply
  196. Hi Kareni. Yes I have seen it – it is about climate change. I am going to wait for my library to re-open and borrow their copy as the Kindle one is a bit expensive. My Kindle ‘bill’ is large enough as it is! Although I would have been in dire straights over the past few months without it

    Reply
  197. Hi Kareni. Yes I have seen it – it is about climate change. I am going to wait for my library to re-open and borrow their copy as the Kindle one is a bit expensive. My Kindle ‘bill’ is large enough as it is! Although I would have been in dire straights over the past few months without it

    Reply
  198. Hi Kareni. Yes I have seen it – it is about climate change. I am going to wait for my library to re-open and borrow their copy as the Kindle one is a bit expensive. My Kindle ‘bill’ is large enough as it is! Although I would have been in dire straights over the past few months without it

    Reply
  199. Hi Kareni. Yes I have seen it – it is about climate change. I am going to wait for my library to re-open and borrow their copy as the Kindle one is a bit expensive. My Kindle ‘bill’ is large enough as it is! Although I would have been in dire straights over the past few months without it

    Reply
  200. Hi Kareni. Yes I have seen it – it is about climate change. I am going to wait for my library to re-open and borrow their copy as the Kindle one is a bit expensive. My Kindle ‘bill’ is large enough as it is! Although I would have been in dire straights over the past few months without it

    Reply
  201. Ah ha…no wonder I hadn’t heard of Hearts and Stones either! It came out 6/23/20 as an eBook only. I think there are 5 novellas/short stories in it. I tend to miss out on anything that is issued as eBook only.

    Reply
  202. Ah ha…no wonder I hadn’t heard of Hearts and Stones either! It came out 6/23/20 as an eBook only. I think there are 5 novellas/short stories in it. I tend to miss out on anything that is issued as eBook only.

    Reply
  203. Ah ha…no wonder I hadn’t heard of Hearts and Stones either! It came out 6/23/20 as an eBook only. I think there are 5 novellas/short stories in it. I tend to miss out on anything that is issued as eBook only.

    Reply
  204. Ah ha…no wonder I hadn’t heard of Hearts and Stones either! It came out 6/23/20 as an eBook only. I think there are 5 novellas/short stories in it. I tend to miss out on anything that is issued as eBook only.

    Reply
  205. Ah ha…no wonder I hadn’t heard of Hearts and Stones either! It came out 6/23/20 as an eBook only. I think there are 5 novellas/short stories in it. I tend to miss out on anything that is issued as eBook only.

    Reply
  206. Looks like a good solid paranormal month for you.
    I haven’t read any Nalini Singh in a while. I should go pick some of her later books up and enjoy the interesting world she’s created.

    Reply
  207. Looks like a good solid paranormal month for you.
    I haven’t read any Nalini Singh in a while. I should go pick some of her later books up and enjoy the interesting world she’s created.

    Reply
  208. Looks like a good solid paranormal month for you.
    I haven’t read any Nalini Singh in a while. I should go pick some of her later books up and enjoy the interesting world she’s created.

    Reply
  209. Looks like a good solid paranormal month for you.
    I haven’t read any Nalini Singh in a while. I should go pick some of her later books up and enjoy the interesting world she’s created.

    Reply
  210. Looks like a good solid paranormal month for you.
    I haven’t read any Nalini Singh in a while. I should go pick some of her later books up and enjoy the interesting world she’s created.

    Reply

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