What We’re Reading in July

Woman readingNicola here, introducing the July What We're Reading. We all love this feature as we get so many wonderful book recommendations as a result. We hope you enjoy it too. If, like me, you're going away in a few weeks time and are looking for the next read to take with you, or if you have already been indulging in some holiday reading, this is the place to share!

Joanna:

Only one book to recommend this month. It's been a busy time altogether. The RWA National Conference was a mad, lovely, exciting week. The rest of July was spent madly writing.

Still, I did get to read Robin McKinley's, The Hero Hero and crown
 and the Crown
.
 It's a YA that won the Newberry Medal a few years back. A princess despised and distrusted by her people steps outside their expectations and becomes a strong and magical warrior who saves the kingdom. The book is about choices and strength and what these cost.

McKinley has been a favorite of mine since I read Sunshine, her YA-vampire-not-quite-a-romance. A lovely book.

Pat:

I’ve been cruising the high seas and spending more time in the moment than reading, apparently. And I watched movies on the plane! But here’s a couple of books I can recall.

Axeman’s Jazz, Julie Smith—a mystery rich with gritty New Orleans atmosphere. The heroine is a very good, very determined cop which gives a nice spin on the usual types of humor found in hapless female detective stories. The story includes lovely layers of satire on New Orleans society— the killer is picking off attendants of 12-step programs, which to the detective’s dismay means that half the city is a potential victim.

1395707162001-Fool-Me-TwiceMeredith Duran, Fool Me Twice—I went into this thinking “yawn, another book about a tortured, privileged duke.”  I have a real hard time being sympathetic to dukes who have everything and still manage to whine. But Duran pulls out ALL the stops. She beats this once-decent guy into a puling lump, then torments her innocent heroine beyond reason. Even though I was fully prepared to laugh at the preposterous setup, Duran made me root for both of them. Her emotional and descriptive writing twists the heart and keeps the pages turning.

Off the Reservation, Glen Merzer—if you want a novel that literally goes off the deep end on satirizing politics, try this one. The protag is a Congressman who grabs attention by saying just what he pleases and turns his lunacy into a campaign platform, while claiming over-population is the root of all problems and that there are no solutions. The way to bring honesty back to politics!

Mary Jo:

Creating a long term mystery series isn't easy since the author has to keep coming up with interesting plots that fit the set up, plus grow the characters in ways that are interesting.  (I will not read a series where the author has killed off an important love interest just to give herself something new to work with.  Developing a committed relationship may be more difficult, but it's far more interesting.)

Which is why it's always a pleasure to read a new Daisy Dalrymple mystery by Carola Dunn. (She started her writing life as a Regency writer.)  Her setting is England after WWI, and while her tone is light, she deals with the very real issues of a country rebuilding itself after being fractured into pieces.

The Honourable Daisy Dalrymple was born and raised the daughter of a viscount in the highest levels of society.  The war changes her live irrevocably.  Her fiancé, a pacifist ambulance driver, is killed at the front.  Even more disruptive, her brother, the heir to the viscountcy, is also killed and the title and entailed property go to a cousin.  Daisy faced the choice of living in the dower house with her mother (NOT a good choice!), or striking out on her own as a independent young woman. 

In Death At Wentwater Court the first book of the series, we meet Daisy as a young freelance writer Superfluous women
eking out a living by writing articles about great houses.  Her aristocratic connections give her entrée to such places, where she has an unfortunate tendency to find dead bodies. <G>  With a journalist's curiosity, Daisy starts to investigate.  And so she has continued for twenty-two books. 

Early on she met a handsome Scotland Yard inspector, and their relationship grows into marriage and eventually children—but Daisy's independence and curiosity never fail.  In Superfluous Women, Carola Dunn touches on the harsh reality that the death of a generation of young men left a generation of English women single and unlikely to marry. 

Three such "superfluous women" set up a household together.  One of the three is an old school friend of Daisy's.  Daisy is invited to lunch in the house the women have just moved into–and once again, a body turns up.  She isn't about to see any of her friends convicted of something they didn't do, so she's off again.  <G>   A very entertaining and satisfying read. 

Nicola:

Up closePart of the joys of conference is picking up so many new books by favourite authors or discovering new-to-me writers, so the RNA Annual Conference in London was such a treat. I’ve been a fan of Henriette Gyland’s writing for a while now. Last year I devoured her book The Highwayman’s Daughter, which is a fabulous 18th century historical. One of Henri’s strengths as a writer is her versatility and the book I have just read, Up Close, is a romantic suspense novel, quite dark, but with a gripping storyline, a very attractive hero and a wonderful evocation of the bleak but beautiful Norfolk countryside.

 Also this month I downloaded Isabella Barclay’s A Bachelor Establishment which is a witty, fast-paced and entertaining Regency. It’s a charming and very funny read with a pair of older protagonists, which was refreshing.

Anne:

Because we didn't do fiction last month I have a long list, so I'll try to be brief. These were my standout Raven reads in June and July: C.L.Wilson's The Winter King, Kylie Scott Lead  (strong language warning — it's a series about rock stars — but solid romance with a very strong heroine.) I've been glomming Patricia Briggs's backlist and I've read Raven's  Shadow and Raven's Strike both of which I enjoyed immensely. Next are two crime novels, Elly Griffiths' latest, The Ghost Fields and Deborah Crombie's To Dwell in Darkness, both of which I enjoyed. Both can be read as stand-alones, but I think you'd get more out of each series by starting at the first book.

Trade windsThen, as part of an "author relay" event where UK historical romance authors and Australian historical romance authors interview each other, I was assigned Christina Courtenay. I'd bought one of her books, Trade Winds, when she was Nicola Cornick's guest on the wenches, but never got around to reading it, so I read it. And then bought The Scarlet Kimono and read that. I've now read five of her books and have another one waiting. Lovely adventurous romances set in Scotland, Sweden and the Far East. 

Cara/Andrea:

It’s mid-summer here in my neck of the woods, and I’m feeling languid and lazy, and in the mood for light reading. So no scholarly research books at the moment, just some fun and entertaining reads (though one is a historybook.) I recently read about a mystery series that sounded very interesting—a darkly comic style featuring two quirky octogenarian detectives . . . I couldn’t resist picking up the first one, and am very much enjoying it. Full Dark House, by Christopher Fowler, switches back and forth between present day London and the  Blitz of WWII as John May desperately searches for clues that might tie together a present-day bombing with his very first case. It’s pitched as a YA novel, (a genre which IMO is showcasing some really compelling writing these days for ALL ages) but don’t be put off by that—it’s rich, interesting plotting and writing, and I will definitely be getting the next book in the series.

I’m also very much enjoying George Washington’s Secret Six—The Spy Ring That Saved The American WashingtonRevolution, by Brian Kilmeade. (After all, it was just July 4th! . . . not to rub it in, Jo and Nicola <G>) It’s a fascinating and fun read about the Culper Spy Ring, an ultra secret group of six agents—one of whom was a woman—who infiltrated New York and provided Washington with critical info about the British when the American forces were on their heels, helping the Revolution to survive. The portaits of the spies, whose identities remained a secret until the author and his partner set out to unravel the mystery (the name of the woman is still unknown) It reads like . . . well, a spy novel! It’s the perfect beach read and makes history come alive! (My local beach has two old cannons on it commemorating the landing of British troops, who burned down most of my present town. One house by the harbor, now the oldest house in town, was spared. Local lore said it was owned by a lady who . . . ran a service that provided R&R for the invaders!) 

What has been on your reading list this month? As always, please share whatever has caught your interest!

 

155 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in July”

  1. I need to get back to reading Patricia Briggs. I love her werewolf series, but I haven’t read the rest of her books.
    Argh, my reading has been a mess recently. Even with access to hundreds of review books, it has only been in the last week of the month I’ve found things I actually want to read.
    I’ve just finished Lisa Kleypas’ Brown-Eyed Girl. I have been hugely in love with her historicals ever since she started writing them, but this was the first contemporary of hers I’ve read.
    Everyone is giving it average to fair reviews, saying it’s not as good as the rest in the series, but for me, this was a BRILLIANT book. If this is her not at her best, then I’m looking forward to the others!
    I’m going to have to revise my opinion of her as a historical romance writer who sometimes ventures into contemporaries, because her contemporaries are just as good.

    Reply
  2. I need to get back to reading Patricia Briggs. I love her werewolf series, but I haven’t read the rest of her books.
    Argh, my reading has been a mess recently. Even with access to hundreds of review books, it has only been in the last week of the month I’ve found things I actually want to read.
    I’ve just finished Lisa Kleypas’ Brown-Eyed Girl. I have been hugely in love with her historicals ever since she started writing them, but this was the first contemporary of hers I’ve read.
    Everyone is giving it average to fair reviews, saying it’s not as good as the rest in the series, but for me, this was a BRILLIANT book. If this is her not at her best, then I’m looking forward to the others!
    I’m going to have to revise my opinion of her as a historical romance writer who sometimes ventures into contemporaries, because her contemporaries are just as good.

    Reply
  3. I need to get back to reading Patricia Briggs. I love her werewolf series, but I haven’t read the rest of her books.
    Argh, my reading has been a mess recently. Even with access to hundreds of review books, it has only been in the last week of the month I’ve found things I actually want to read.
    I’ve just finished Lisa Kleypas’ Brown-Eyed Girl. I have been hugely in love with her historicals ever since she started writing them, but this was the first contemporary of hers I’ve read.
    Everyone is giving it average to fair reviews, saying it’s not as good as the rest in the series, but for me, this was a BRILLIANT book. If this is her not at her best, then I’m looking forward to the others!
    I’m going to have to revise my opinion of her as a historical romance writer who sometimes ventures into contemporaries, because her contemporaries are just as good.

    Reply
  4. I need to get back to reading Patricia Briggs. I love her werewolf series, but I haven’t read the rest of her books.
    Argh, my reading has been a mess recently. Even with access to hundreds of review books, it has only been in the last week of the month I’ve found things I actually want to read.
    I’ve just finished Lisa Kleypas’ Brown-Eyed Girl. I have been hugely in love with her historicals ever since she started writing them, but this was the first contemporary of hers I’ve read.
    Everyone is giving it average to fair reviews, saying it’s not as good as the rest in the series, but for me, this was a BRILLIANT book. If this is her not at her best, then I’m looking forward to the others!
    I’m going to have to revise my opinion of her as a historical romance writer who sometimes ventures into contemporaries, because her contemporaries are just as good.

    Reply
  5. I need to get back to reading Patricia Briggs. I love her werewolf series, but I haven’t read the rest of her books.
    Argh, my reading has been a mess recently. Even with access to hundreds of review books, it has only been in the last week of the month I’ve found things I actually want to read.
    I’ve just finished Lisa Kleypas’ Brown-Eyed Girl. I have been hugely in love with her historicals ever since she started writing them, but this was the first contemporary of hers I’ve read.
    Everyone is giving it average to fair reviews, saying it’s not as good as the rest in the series, but for me, this was a BRILLIANT book. If this is her not at her best, then I’m looking forward to the others!
    I’m going to have to revise my opinion of her as a historical romance writer who sometimes ventures into contemporaries, because her contemporaries are just as good.

    Reply
  6. This month I’ve been reading vintage regencies by Madeleine Conway, Sylvia Thorpe, Teresa DesJardien, Donna Simpson, Emily Hendrickson and Laura Paquet. I also read Cotillion for the almacka group discussion, and I’m starting this months’ book, The Foundling.
    In non-genre reading, I read The Fat Lady Sang by Robert Evans (his description of his recovery from a series of devastating strokes, interspersed with more Hollywood stories from back in the day) and Roger Moore’s autobiography My Word Is My Bond, since I have his newest book in the TBR and I ought to do this one first. He tells a lot of good stories too. My bedtime audiobook this week is Midnight in Paris by Alan Furst, with the Silmarillion and a recent BBC version of Twelfth Night with my favorite actor, David Tennant, as Malvolio.

    Reply
  7. This month I’ve been reading vintage regencies by Madeleine Conway, Sylvia Thorpe, Teresa DesJardien, Donna Simpson, Emily Hendrickson and Laura Paquet. I also read Cotillion for the almacka group discussion, and I’m starting this months’ book, The Foundling.
    In non-genre reading, I read The Fat Lady Sang by Robert Evans (his description of his recovery from a series of devastating strokes, interspersed with more Hollywood stories from back in the day) and Roger Moore’s autobiography My Word Is My Bond, since I have his newest book in the TBR and I ought to do this one first. He tells a lot of good stories too. My bedtime audiobook this week is Midnight in Paris by Alan Furst, with the Silmarillion and a recent BBC version of Twelfth Night with my favorite actor, David Tennant, as Malvolio.

    Reply
  8. This month I’ve been reading vintage regencies by Madeleine Conway, Sylvia Thorpe, Teresa DesJardien, Donna Simpson, Emily Hendrickson and Laura Paquet. I also read Cotillion for the almacka group discussion, and I’m starting this months’ book, The Foundling.
    In non-genre reading, I read The Fat Lady Sang by Robert Evans (his description of his recovery from a series of devastating strokes, interspersed with more Hollywood stories from back in the day) and Roger Moore’s autobiography My Word Is My Bond, since I have his newest book in the TBR and I ought to do this one first. He tells a lot of good stories too. My bedtime audiobook this week is Midnight in Paris by Alan Furst, with the Silmarillion and a recent BBC version of Twelfth Night with my favorite actor, David Tennant, as Malvolio.

    Reply
  9. This month I’ve been reading vintage regencies by Madeleine Conway, Sylvia Thorpe, Teresa DesJardien, Donna Simpson, Emily Hendrickson and Laura Paquet. I also read Cotillion for the almacka group discussion, and I’m starting this months’ book, The Foundling.
    In non-genre reading, I read The Fat Lady Sang by Robert Evans (his description of his recovery from a series of devastating strokes, interspersed with more Hollywood stories from back in the day) and Roger Moore’s autobiography My Word Is My Bond, since I have his newest book in the TBR and I ought to do this one first. He tells a lot of good stories too. My bedtime audiobook this week is Midnight in Paris by Alan Furst, with the Silmarillion and a recent BBC version of Twelfth Night with my favorite actor, David Tennant, as Malvolio.

    Reply
  10. This month I’ve been reading vintage regencies by Madeleine Conway, Sylvia Thorpe, Teresa DesJardien, Donna Simpson, Emily Hendrickson and Laura Paquet. I also read Cotillion for the almacka group discussion, and I’m starting this months’ book, The Foundling.
    In non-genre reading, I read The Fat Lady Sang by Robert Evans (his description of his recovery from a series of devastating strokes, interspersed with more Hollywood stories from back in the day) and Roger Moore’s autobiography My Word Is My Bond, since I have his newest book in the TBR and I ought to do this one first. He tells a lot of good stories too. My bedtime audiobook this week is Midnight in Paris by Alan Furst, with the Silmarillion and a recent BBC version of Twelfth Night with my favorite actor, David Tennant, as Malvolio.

    Reply
  11. Hi Sonya! Like you I’ve loved Lisa Kleypas’s historicals for years and recently started reading her contemporaries too. I haven’t read Brown-Eyed Girl yet, though, and will add that to my list.

    Reply
  12. Hi Sonya! Like you I’ve loved Lisa Kleypas’s historicals for years and recently started reading her contemporaries too. I haven’t read Brown-Eyed Girl yet, though, and will add that to my list.

    Reply
  13. Hi Sonya! Like you I’ve loved Lisa Kleypas’s historicals for years and recently started reading her contemporaries too. I haven’t read Brown-Eyed Girl yet, though, and will add that to my list.

    Reply
  14. Hi Sonya! Like you I’ve loved Lisa Kleypas’s historicals for years and recently started reading her contemporaries too. I haven’t read Brown-Eyed Girl yet, though, and will add that to my list.

    Reply
  15. Hi Sonya! Like you I’ve loved Lisa Kleypas’s historicals for years and recently started reading her contemporaries too. I haven’t read Brown-Eyed Girl yet, though, and will add that to my list.

    Reply
  16. Oh how lovely that you read Hero and the Crown! I haven’t picked that up since first discovering McKinley in junior high. Her Beauty and the Beast retelling (Beauty, not Rose Daughter–she’s done two) is one of my all-time favorite books.
    I’m currently bouncing between Farrah Rochon’s contemporary category romance Stay With Me Forever (out August 1) and Julia Ross’s My Dark Prince (2000). The Ross is so dense! It’s nice to take breaks with the more streamlined category.

    Reply
  17. Oh how lovely that you read Hero and the Crown! I haven’t picked that up since first discovering McKinley in junior high. Her Beauty and the Beast retelling (Beauty, not Rose Daughter–she’s done two) is one of my all-time favorite books.
    I’m currently bouncing between Farrah Rochon’s contemporary category romance Stay With Me Forever (out August 1) and Julia Ross’s My Dark Prince (2000). The Ross is so dense! It’s nice to take breaks with the more streamlined category.

    Reply
  18. Oh how lovely that you read Hero and the Crown! I haven’t picked that up since first discovering McKinley in junior high. Her Beauty and the Beast retelling (Beauty, not Rose Daughter–she’s done two) is one of my all-time favorite books.
    I’m currently bouncing between Farrah Rochon’s contemporary category romance Stay With Me Forever (out August 1) and Julia Ross’s My Dark Prince (2000). The Ross is so dense! It’s nice to take breaks with the more streamlined category.

    Reply
  19. Oh how lovely that you read Hero and the Crown! I haven’t picked that up since first discovering McKinley in junior high. Her Beauty and the Beast retelling (Beauty, not Rose Daughter–she’s done two) is one of my all-time favorite books.
    I’m currently bouncing between Farrah Rochon’s contemporary category romance Stay With Me Forever (out August 1) and Julia Ross’s My Dark Prince (2000). The Ross is so dense! It’s nice to take breaks with the more streamlined category.

    Reply
  20. Oh how lovely that you read Hero and the Crown! I haven’t picked that up since first discovering McKinley in junior high. Her Beauty and the Beast retelling (Beauty, not Rose Daughter–she’s done two) is one of my all-time favorite books.
    I’m currently bouncing between Farrah Rochon’s contemporary category romance Stay With Me Forever (out August 1) and Julia Ross’s My Dark Prince (2000). The Ross is so dense! It’s nice to take breaks with the more streamlined category.

    Reply
  21. Thank you so much for the mention, Anne! As I said during the Romance Relay, I love your books and if anyone is looking for a Regency recommendation ‘The Perfect Rake’ (and the others in that series) is wonderful – both romantic and funny! (Made me laugh so much 🙂

    Reply
  22. Thank you so much for the mention, Anne! As I said during the Romance Relay, I love your books and if anyone is looking for a Regency recommendation ‘The Perfect Rake’ (and the others in that series) is wonderful – both romantic and funny! (Made me laugh so much 🙂

    Reply
  23. Thank you so much for the mention, Anne! As I said during the Romance Relay, I love your books and if anyone is looking for a Regency recommendation ‘The Perfect Rake’ (and the others in that series) is wonderful – both romantic and funny! (Made me laugh so much 🙂

    Reply
  24. Thank you so much for the mention, Anne! As I said during the Romance Relay, I love your books and if anyone is looking for a Regency recommendation ‘The Perfect Rake’ (and the others in that series) is wonderful – both romantic and funny! (Made me laugh so much 🙂

    Reply
  25. Thank you so much for the mention, Anne! As I said during the Romance Relay, I love your books and if anyone is looking for a Regency recommendation ‘The Perfect Rake’ (and the others in that series) is wonderful – both romantic and funny! (Made me laugh so much 🙂

    Reply
  26. I have Carola Dunn’s Lord Iverbook’s Heir on my keeper shelf. Have not read it inn a while, but loved the way the heroine stood up to Lord Iverbrook!

    Reply
  27. I have Carola Dunn’s Lord Iverbook’s Heir on my keeper shelf. Have not read it inn a while, but loved the way the heroine stood up to Lord Iverbrook!

    Reply
  28. I have Carola Dunn’s Lord Iverbook’s Heir on my keeper shelf. Have not read it inn a while, but loved the way the heroine stood up to Lord Iverbrook!

    Reply
  29. I have Carola Dunn’s Lord Iverbook’s Heir on my keeper shelf. Have not read it inn a while, but loved the way the heroine stood up to Lord Iverbrook!

    Reply
  30. I have Carola Dunn’s Lord Iverbook’s Heir on my keeper shelf. Have not read it inn a while, but loved the way the heroine stood up to Lord Iverbrook!

    Reply
  31. Many of the books mentioned fascinate me )oh, WOE! more books to look into!
    July 28th saw the issue of “Siren’s Call” by Jayne Castle (Jayne Ann Krentz) and “Perfect Touch” by Elizabeth Lowell. I bought them and have burned through them. Now I will go back and truly read them. (This is my more usual approach to new books. My need to understand plot is overwhelming as I first read a book, but I appreciate good writing and character development, so it takes two passes to really get into a new book.)
    I have been buying old Hiram Potter mysteries (Rae Foley) from used book dealers. They date from the 1950s and 1960s. I read them as they came out and remember them fondly. I’m just starting Hiram Potter #5 “Dangerous to Me” which I amy have missed when it first came our. You can check out the Hiram Potter series at Goodreads.

    Reply
  32. Many of the books mentioned fascinate me )oh, WOE! more books to look into!
    July 28th saw the issue of “Siren’s Call” by Jayne Castle (Jayne Ann Krentz) and “Perfect Touch” by Elizabeth Lowell. I bought them and have burned through them. Now I will go back and truly read them. (This is my more usual approach to new books. My need to understand plot is overwhelming as I first read a book, but I appreciate good writing and character development, so it takes two passes to really get into a new book.)
    I have been buying old Hiram Potter mysteries (Rae Foley) from used book dealers. They date from the 1950s and 1960s. I read them as they came out and remember them fondly. I’m just starting Hiram Potter #5 “Dangerous to Me” which I amy have missed when it first came our. You can check out the Hiram Potter series at Goodreads.

    Reply
  33. Many of the books mentioned fascinate me )oh, WOE! more books to look into!
    July 28th saw the issue of “Siren’s Call” by Jayne Castle (Jayne Ann Krentz) and “Perfect Touch” by Elizabeth Lowell. I bought them and have burned through them. Now I will go back and truly read them. (This is my more usual approach to new books. My need to understand plot is overwhelming as I first read a book, but I appreciate good writing and character development, so it takes two passes to really get into a new book.)
    I have been buying old Hiram Potter mysteries (Rae Foley) from used book dealers. They date from the 1950s and 1960s. I read them as they came out and remember them fondly. I’m just starting Hiram Potter #5 “Dangerous to Me” which I amy have missed when it first came our. You can check out the Hiram Potter series at Goodreads.

    Reply
  34. Many of the books mentioned fascinate me )oh, WOE! more books to look into!
    July 28th saw the issue of “Siren’s Call” by Jayne Castle (Jayne Ann Krentz) and “Perfect Touch” by Elizabeth Lowell. I bought them and have burned through them. Now I will go back and truly read them. (This is my more usual approach to new books. My need to understand plot is overwhelming as I first read a book, but I appreciate good writing and character development, so it takes two passes to really get into a new book.)
    I have been buying old Hiram Potter mysteries (Rae Foley) from used book dealers. They date from the 1950s and 1960s. I read them as they came out and remember them fondly. I’m just starting Hiram Potter #5 “Dangerous to Me” which I amy have missed when it first came our. You can check out the Hiram Potter series at Goodreads.

    Reply
  35. Many of the books mentioned fascinate me )oh, WOE! more books to look into!
    July 28th saw the issue of “Siren’s Call” by Jayne Castle (Jayne Ann Krentz) and “Perfect Touch” by Elizabeth Lowell. I bought them and have burned through them. Now I will go back and truly read them. (This is my more usual approach to new books. My need to understand plot is overwhelming as I first read a book, but I appreciate good writing and character development, so it takes two passes to really get into a new book.)
    I have been buying old Hiram Potter mysteries (Rae Foley) from used book dealers. They date from the 1950s and 1960s. I read them as they came out and remember them fondly. I’m just starting Hiram Potter #5 “Dangerous to Me” which I amy have missed when it first came our. You can check out the Hiram Potter series at Goodreads.

    Reply
  36. The Carola Dunn is in my TBR pile, and the McKinley an old favourite. I always think traveling will give me more reading time, but somehow it doesn’t. Perhaps I should go back to carrying a couple of paperbacks to read. I haven’t opened my e-reader since I left home.

    Reply
  37. The Carola Dunn is in my TBR pile, and the McKinley an old favourite. I always think traveling will give me more reading time, but somehow it doesn’t. Perhaps I should go back to carrying a couple of paperbacks to read. I haven’t opened my e-reader since I left home.

    Reply
  38. The Carola Dunn is in my TBR pile, and the McKinley an old favourite. I always think traveling will give me more reading time, but somehow it doesn’t. Perhaps I should go back to carrying a couple of paperbacks to read. I haven’t opened my e-reader since I left home.

    Reply
  39. The Carola Dunn is in my TBR pile, and the McKinley an old favourite. I always think traveling will give me more reading time, but somehow it doesn’t. Perhaps I should go back to carrying a couple of paperbacks to read. I haven’t opened my e-reader since I left home.

    Reply
  40. The Carola Dunn is in my TBR pile, and the McKinley an old favourite. I always think traveling will give me more reading time, but somehow it doesn’t. Perhaps I should go back to carrying a couple of paperbacks to read. I haven’t opened my e-reader since I left home.

    Reply
  41. Read everything but Robin McKinley. Just do it. Then read them again. I finally read Julia Quinn’s Smythe – Smith quartet, in 48 hours, and loved them. Not a surprise, really. Then I caught up on Grace Burrowes’ contemporary Scottish novellas. Next up will be the new dustbunny book by Jayne Castle and Elizabeth Lowell’s new novel, two authors I also read everything they write.

    Reply
  42. Read everything but Robin McKinley. Just do it. Then read them again. I finally read Julia Quinn’s Smythe – Smith quartet, in 48 hours, and loved them. Not a surprise, really. Then I caught up on Grace Burrowes’ contemporary Scottish novellas. Next up will be the new dustbunny book by Jayne Castle and Elizabeth Lowell’s new novel, two authors I also read everything they write.

    Reply
  43. Read everything but Robin McKinley. Just do it. Then read them again. I finally read Julia Quinn’s Smythe – Smith quartet, in 48 hours, and loved them. Not a surprise, really. Then I caught up on Grace Burrowes’ contemporary Scottish novellas. Next up will be the new dustbunny book by Jayne Castle and Elizabeth Lowell’s new novel, two authors I also read everything they write.

    Reply
  44. Read everything but Robin McKinley. Just do it. Then read them again. I finally read Julia Quinn’s Smythe – Smith quartet, in 48 hours, and loved them. Not a surprise, really. Then I caught up on Grace Burrowes’ contemporary Scottish novellas. Next up will be the new dustbunny book by Jayne Castle and Elizabeth Lowell’s new novel, two authors I also read everything they write.

    Reply
  45. Read everything but Robin McKinley. Just do it. Then read them again. I finally read Julia Quinn’s Smythe – Smith quartet, in 48 hours, and loved them. Not a surprise, really. Then I caught up on Grace Burrowes’ contemporary Scottish novellas. Next up will be the new dustbunny book by Jayne Castle and Elizabeth Lowell’s new novel, two authors I also read everything they write.

    Reply
  46. I don’t think Brown-Eyed Girl is out yet (mine was an ARC), but I guess readers have been spoilt if this is their idea of “not as good”! Don’t know how much better they could be. Now I have to go back and read the others.

    Reply
  47. I don’t think Brown-Eyed Girl is out yet (mine was an ARC), but I guess readers have been spoilt if this is their idea of “not as good”! Don’t know how much better they could be. Now I have to go back and read the others.

    Reply
  48. I don’t think Brown-Eyed Girl is out yet (mine was an ARC), but I guess readers have been spoilt if this is their idea of “not as good”! Don’t know how much better they could be. Now I have to go back and read the others.

    Reply
  49. I don’t think Brown-Eyed Girl is out yet (mine was an ARC), but I guess readers have been spoilt if this is their idea of “not as good”! Don’t know how much better they could be. Now I have to go back and read the others.

    Reply
  50. I don’t think Brown-Eyed Girl is out yet (mine was an ARC), but I guess readers have been spoilt if this is their idea of “not as good”! Don’t know how much better they could be. Now I have to go back and read the others.

    Reply
  51. I have a few of the Hiram Potter books, i.e. It’s Murder Mr. Potter. I would like them all.
    Sue I read new books the same way you do. I am also one of those people who have more than one book going at once – at least three and usually more.

    Reply
  52. I have a few of the Hiram Potter books, i.e. It’s Murder Mr. Potter. I would like them all.
    Sue I read new books the same way you do. I am also one of those people who have more than one book going at once – at least three and usually more.

    Reply
  53. I have a few of the Hiram Potter books, i.e. It’s Murder Mr. Potter. I would like them all.
    Sue I read new books the same way you do. I am also one of those people who have more than one book going at once – at least three and usually more.

    Reply
  54. I have a few of the Hiram Potter books, i.e. It’s Murder Mr. Potter. I would like them all.
    Sue I read new books the same way you do. I am also one of those people who have more than one book going at once – at least three and usually more.

    Reply
  55. I have a few of the Hiram Potter books, i.e. It’s Murder Mr. Potter. I would like them all.
    Sue I read new books the same way you do. I am also one of those people who have more than one book going at once – at least three and usually more.

    Reply
  56. I don’t know where Carola Dunn has been all my life, but after reading her Regency trilogy, the one that starts off with an road trip adventure with the Jewish hero and heroine, “Miss Jacobson’s Journey”, I was hooked. I recently finished the 3rd book in that trilogy, “Captain Ingram’s Inheritance”, and I look forward to trying the Daisy Dalrymple series.
    I read “The Ruin of a Rogue”, by Miranda Neville, wherein a fortune hunter gets his comeuppance. It was quite cleverly done.
    Then I read “An Infamous Marriage” by Susanna Fraser, which was also very good, and included a great scene during the Battle of Waterloo.
    Speaking of Waterloo, I watched a TV documentary about it, and I found myself critiquing it and disagreeing with some of what the narrator said. For instance, he said that the British lost at Quatre Bras, which was wrong! They held their position at the crossroads, but pulled back afterwards to maintain contact with their Prussian allies. I was simultaneously annoyed at the program, but also tickled, because I’ve never read any non-fiction history of Waterloo and all of my knowledge comes from reading several dozen romances that use the battle as a setting. I’ve realize I’ve unknowingly become a Waterloo expert!

    Reply
  57. I don’t know where Carola Dunn has been all my life, but after reading her Regency trilogy, the one that starts off with an road trip adventure with the Jewish hero and heroine, “Miss Jacobson’s Journey”, I was hooked. I recently finished the 3rd book in that trilogy, “Captain Ingram’s Inheritance”, and I look forward to trying the Daisy Dalrymple series.
    I read “The Ruin of a Rogue”, by Miranda Neville, wherein a fortune hunter gets his comeuppance. It was quite cleverly done.
    Then I read “An Infamous Marriage” by Susanna Fraser, which was also very good, and included a great scene during the Battle of Waterloo.
    Speaking of Waterloo, I watched a TV documentary about it, and I found myself critiquing it and disagreeing with some of what the narrator said. For instance, he said that the British lost at Quatre Bras, which was wrong! They held their position at the crossroads, but pulled back afterwards to maintain contact with their Prussian allies. I was simultaneously annoyed at the program, but also tickled, because I’ve never read any non-fiction history of Waterloo and all of my knowledge comes from reading several dozen romances that use the battle as a setting. I’ve realize I’ve unknowingly become a Waterloo expert!

    Reply
  58. I don’t know where Carola Dunn has been all my life, but after reading her Regency trilogy, the one that starts off with an road trip adventure with the Jewish hero and heroine, “Miss Jacobson’s Journey”, I was hooked. I recently finished the 3rd book in that trilogy, “Captain Ingram’s Inheritance”, and I look forward to trying the Daisy Dalrymple series.
    I read “The Ruin of a Rogue”, by Miranda Neville, wherein a fortune hunter gets his comeuppance. It was quite cleverly done.
    Then I read “An Infamous Marriage” by Susanna Fraser, which was also very good, and included a great scene during the Battle of Waterloo.
    Speaking of Waterloo, I watched a TV documentary about it, and I found myself critiquing it and disagreeing with some of what the narrator said. For instance, he said that the British lost at Quatre Bras, which was wrong! They held their position at the crossroads, but pulled back afterwards to maintain contact with their Prussian allies. I was simultaneously annoyed at the program, but also tickled, because I’ve never read any non-fiction history of Waterloo and all of my knowledge comes from reading several dozen romances that use the battle as a setting. I’ve realize I’ve unknowingly become a Waterloo expert!

    Reply
  59. I don’t know where Carola Dunn has been all my life, but after reading her Regency trilogy, the one that starts off with an road trip adventure with the Jewish hero and heroine, “Miss Jacobson’s Journey”, I was hooked. I recently finished the 3rd book in that trilogy, “Captain Ingram’s Inheritance”, and I look forward to trying the Daisy Dalrymple series.
    I read “The Ruin of a Rogue”, by Miranda Neville, wherein a fortune hunter gets his comeuppance. It was quite cleverly done.
    Then I read “An Infamous Marriage” by Susanna Fraser, which was also very good, and included a great scene during the Battle of Waterloo.
    Speaking of Waterloo, I watched a TV documentary about it, and I found myself critiquing it and disagreeing with some of what the narrator said. For instance, he said that the British lost at Quatre Bras, which was wrong! They held their position at the crossroads, but pulled back afterwards to maintain contact with their Prussian allies. I was simultaneously annoyed at the program, but also tickled, because I’ve never read any non-fiction history of Waterloo and all of my knowledge comes from reading several dozen romances that use the battle as a setting. I’ve realize I’ve unknowingly become a Waterloo expert!

    Reply
  60. I don’t know where Carola Dunn has been all my life, but after reading her Regency trilogy, the one that starts off with an road trip adventure with the Jewish hero and heroine, “Miss Jacobson’s Journey”, I was hooked. I recently finished the 3rd book in that trilogy, “Captain Ingram’s Inheritance”, and I look forward to trying the Daisy Dalrymple series.
    I read “The Ruin of a Rogue”, by Miranda Neville, wherein a fortune hunter gets his comeuppance. It was quite cleverly done.
    Then I read “An Infamous Marriage” by Susanna Fraser, which was also very good, and included a great scene during the Battle of Waterloo.
    Speaking of Waterloo, I watched a TV documentary about it, and I found myself critiquing it and disagreeing with some of what the narrator said. For instance, he said that the British lost at Quatre Bras, which was wrong! They held their position at the crossroads, but pulled back afterwards to maintain contact with their Prussian allies. I was simultaneously annoyed at the program, but also tickled, because I’ve never read any non-fiction history of Waterloo and all of my knowledge comes from reading several dozen romances that use the battle as a setting. I’ve realize I’ve unknowingly become a Waterloo expert!

    Reply
  61. I picked up Kristen Callihan’s “Evernight” after it won the RITA for Best Paranormal and, after whipping through that, went to her backlist for the beginning of her Darkest London series. Set in the 1880s, the series follows a group of humans, elementals, demons, shifters and who knows what other types of supernatural beings in their efforts to keep the supernatural world separate, safe and secret from Victorian London. Excellent sexual tension between the main protagonists in each of her books and lovely intricate plots that keep one guessing if there really will be a Happily Ever After.

    Reply
  62. I picked up Kristen Callihan’s “Evernight” after it won the RITA for Best Paranormal and, after whipping through that, went to her backlist for the beginning of her Darkest London series. Set in the 1880s, the series follows a group of humans, elementals, demons, shifters and who knows what other types of supernatural beings in their efforts to keep the supernatural world separate, safe and secret from Victorian London. Excellent sexual tension between the main protagonists in each of her books and lovely intricate plots that keep one guessing if there really will be a Happily Ever After.

    Reply
  63. I picked up Kristen Callihan’s “Evernight” after it won the RITA for Best Paranormal and, after whipping through that, went to her backlist for the beginning of her Darkest London series. Set in the 1880s, the series follows a group of humans, elementals, demons, shifters and who knows what other types of supernatural beings in their efforts to keep the supernatural world separate, safe and secret from Victorian London. Excellent sexual tension between the main protagonists in each of her books and lovely intricate plots that keep one guessing if there really will be a Happily Ever After.

    Reply
  64. I picked up Kristen Callihan’s “Evernight” after it won the RITA for Best Paranormal and, after whipping through that, went to her backlist for the beginning of her Darkest London series. Set in the 1880s, the series follows a group of humans, elementals, demons, shifters and who knows what other types of supernatural beings in their efforts to keep the supernatural world separate, safe and secret from Victorian London. Excellent sexual tension between the main protagonists in each of her books and lovely intricate plots that keep one guessing if there really will be a Happily Ever After.

    Reply
  65. I picked up Kristen Callihan’s “Evernight” after it won the RITA for Best Paranormal and, after whipping through that, went to her backlist for the beginning of her Darkest London series. Set in the 1880s, the series follows a group of humans, elementals, demons, shifters and who knows what other types of supernatural beings in their efforts to keep the supernatural world separate, safe and secret from Victorian London. Excellent sexual tension between the main protagonists in each of her books and lovely intricate plots that keep one guessing if there really will be a Happily Ever After.

    Reply
  66. I read all of Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series – really enjoyed it. One of my favorite aspects of small town series is visiting with the characters from the earlier books throughout the series.

    Reply
  67. I read all of Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series – really enjoyed it. One of my favorite aspects of small town series is visiting with the characters from the earlier books throughout the series.

    Reply
  68. I read all of Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series – really enjoyed it. One of my favorite aspects of small town series is visiting with the characters from the earlier books throughout the series.

    Reply
  69. I read all of Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series – really enjoyed it. One of my favorite aspects of small town series is visiting with the characters from the earlier books throughout the series.

    Reply
  70. I read all of Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series – really enjoyed it. One of my favorite aspects of small town series is visiting with the characters from the earlier books throughout the series.

    Reply
  71. The almost classic description of Waterloo (the first in fiction?) is Thackery in “Vanity Fair.” In the past his description has been used in military studies — if the data handed out to me at school was correct.
    So learning about Waterloo from fiction is almost as old as Waterloo itself.

    Reply
  72. The almost classic description of Waterloo (the first in fiction?) is Thackery in “Vanity Fair.” In the past his description has been used in military studies — if the data handed out to me at school was correct.
    So learning about Waterloo from fiction is almost as old as Waterloo itself.

    Reply
  73. The almost classic description of Waterloo (the first in fiction?) is Thackery in “Vanity Fair.” In the past his description has been used in military studies — if the data handed out to me at school was correct.
    So learning about Waterloo from fiction is almost as old as Waterloo itself.

    Reply
  74. The almost classic description of Waterloo (the first in fiction?) is Thackery in “Vanity Fair.” In the past his description has been used in military studies — if the data handed out to me at school was correct.
    So learning about Waterloo from fiction is almost as old as Waterloo itself.

    Reply
  75. The almost classic description of Waterloo (the first in fiction?) is Thackery in “Vanity Fair.” In the past his description has been used in military studies — if the data handed out to me at school was correct.
    So learning about Waterloo from fiction is almost as old as Waterloo itself.

    Reply
  76. Wow….all these mentions of books I’m waiting to get – Siren’s Call, Brown Eyed Girl. Can’t wait. And to hear someone else mention Grace Burrowes contemporaries being so good…I guess I need to move them to the top of the TBR pile instead of 10 down in the pile.
    As for what I’ve read in July – I reread JoAnn Ross’ Shelter Bay series and I reread Pelican Point by Donna Kauffman. Enjoyed them just as much the 2nd time.
    The new to me author that I’ve enjoyed is Kelly Bowen. First I read A Good Rogue is Hard to Find, then got a copy of I’ve Got My Duke to Keep Me Warm. They are in the same series and you can read them as stand alones. I read them in reverse order since that was how I acquired them.
    I’ll have to try Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series since I love that kind of series for the same reason.
    Funnily enough…the H isn’t a Duke so why it has that in the title I don’t know! The H is the bastard son of a Duke..but not a duke. Well developed characters and lively writing. Very fun to read.

    Reply
  77. Wow….all these mentions of books I’m waiting to get – Siren’s Call, Brown Eyed Girl. Can’t wait. And to hear someone else mention Grace Burrowes contemporaries being so good…I guess I need to move them to the top of the TBR pile instead of 10 down in the pile.
    As for what I’ve read in July – I reread JoAnn Ross’ Shelter Bay series and I reread Pelican Point by Donna Kauffman. Enjoyed them just as much the 2nd time.
    The new to me author that I’ve enjoyed is Kelly Bowen. First I read A Good Rogue is Hard to Find, then got a copy of I’ve Got My Duke to Keep Me Warm. They are in the same series and you can read them as stand alones. I read them in reverse order since that was how I acquired them.
    I’ll have to try Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series since I love that kind of series for the same reason.
    Funnily enough…the H isn’t a Duke so why it has that in the title I don’t know! The H is the bastard son of a Duke..but not a duke. Well developed characters and lively writing. Very fun to read.

    Reply
  78. Wow….all these mentions of books I’m waiting to get – Siren’s Call, Brown Eyed Girl. Can’t wait. And to hear someone else mention Grace Burrowes contemporaries being so good…I guess I need to move them to the top of the TBR pile instead of 10 down in the pile.
    As for what I’ve read in July – I reread JoAnn Ross’ Shelter Bay series and I reread Pelican Point by Donna Kauffman. Enjoyed them just as much the 2nd time.
    The new to me author that I’ve enjoyed is Kelly Bowen. First I read A Good Rogue is Hard to Find, then got a copy of I’ve Got My Duke to Keep Me Warm. They are in the same series and you can read them as stand alones. I read them in reverse order since that was how I acquired them.
    I’ll have to try Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series since I love that kind of series for the same reason.
    Funnily enough…the H isn’t a Duke so why it has that in the title I don’t know! The H is the bastard son of a Duke..but not a duke. Well developed characters and lively writing. Very fun to read.

    Reply
  79. Wow….all these mentions of books I’m waiting to get – Siren’s Call, Brown Eyed Girl. Can’t wait. And to hear someone else mention Grace Burrowes contemporaries being so good…I guess I need to move them to the top of the TBR pile instead of 10 down in the pile.
    As for what I’ve read in July – I reread JoAnn Ross’ Shelter Bay series and I reread Pelican Point by Donna Kauffman. Enjoyed them just as much the 2nd time.
    The new to me author that I’ve enjoyed is Kelly Bowen. First I read A Good Rogue is Hard to Find, then got a copy of I’ve Got My Duke to Keep Me Warm. They are in the same series and you can read them as stand alones. I read them in reverse order since that was how I acquired them.
    I’ll have to try Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series since I love that kind of series for the same reason.
    Funnily enough…the H isn’t a Duke so why it has that in the title I don’t know! The H is the bastard son of a Duke..but not a duke. Well developed characters and lively writing. Very fun to read.

    Reply
  80. Wow….all these mentions of books I’m waiting to get – Siren’s Call, Brown Eyed Girl. Can’t wait. And to hear someone else mention Grace Burrowes contemporaries being so good…I guess I need to move them to the top of the TBR pile instead of 10 down in the pile.
    As for what I’ve read in July – I reread JoAnn Ross’ Shelter Bay series and I reread Pelican Point by Donna Kauffman. Enjoyed them just as much the 2nd time.
    The new to me author that I’ve enjoyed is Kelly Bowen. First I read A Good Rogue is Hard to Find, then got a copy of I’ve Got My Duke to Keep Me Warm. They are in the same series and you can read them as stand alones. I read them in reverse order since that was how I acquired them.
    I’ll have to try Mariah Stewart’s Chesapeake Diaries series since I love that kind of series for the same reason.
    Funnily enough…the H isn’t a Duke so why it has that in the title I don’t know! The H is the bastard son of a Duke..but not a duke. Well developed characters and lively writing. Very fun to read.

    Reply
  81. Oh my goodness, I’ve run out of room on the page of notebook trying to add all the interesting titles mentioned! What a fabulously varied and intriguing list we have this month. As if I need any more things stacked on the TBR pile. But how can any of us avid readers resist! Thanks, everyone for the wonderful suggestions. Please keep them coming!

    Reply
  82. Oh my goodness, I’ve run out of room on the page of notebook trying to add all the interesting titles mentioned! What a fabulously varied and intriguing list we have this month. As if I need any more things stacked on the TBR pile. But how can any of us avid readers resist! Thanks, everyone for the wonderful suggestions. Please keep them coming!

    Reply
  83. Oh my goodness, I’ve run out of room on the page of notebook trying to add all the interesting titles mentioned! What a fabulously varied and intriguing list we have this month. As if I need any more things stacked on the TBR pile. But how can any of us avid readers resist! Thanks, everyone for the wonderful suggestions. Please keep them coming!

    Reply
  84. Oh my goodness, I’ve run out of room on the page of notebook trying to add all the interesting titles mentioned! What a fabulously varied and intriguing list we have this month. As if I need any more things stacked on the TBR pile. But how can any of us avid readers resist! Thanks, everyone for the wonderful suggestions. Please keep them coming!

    Reply
  85. Oh my goodness, I’ve run out of room on the page of notebook trying to add all the interesting titles mentioned! What a fabulously varied and intriguing list we have this month. As if I need any more things stacked on the TBR pile. But how can any of us avid readers resist! Thanks, everyone for the wonderful suggestions. Please keep them coming!

    Reply
  86. I’m so glad you’ve discovered Carola Dunn and are enjoying her books, Karin!
    My favourite sort of historical fiction is where I enjoy the story but also learn lots in the process.

    Reply
  87. I’m so glad you’ve discovered Carola Dunn and are enjoying her books, Karin!
    My favourite sort of historical fiction is where I enjoy the story but also learn lots in the process.

    Reply
  88. I’m so glad you’ve discovered Carola Dunn and are enjoying her books, Karin!
    My favourite sort of historical fiction is where I enjoy the story but also learn lots in the process.

    Reply
  89. I’m so glad you’ve discovered Carola Dunn and are enjoying her books, Karin!
    My favourite sort of historical fiction is where I enjoy the story but also learn lots in the process.

    Reply
  90. I’m so glad you’ve discovered Carola Dunn and are enjoying her books, Karin!
    My favourite sort of historical fiction is where I enjoy the story but also learn lots in the process.

    Reply
  91. A bit late to add on but I was at DisneyWorld and didn’t read much. First for Mary Jo, is J.A. Jance’s Beaumont mystery series. She has beautifully developed her main character, his relationships, and his coming to terms with his alcoholism over the 22 books and counting.
    As far as historical accuracy. I often read about an event in and book and go on to read the non-fiction. I don’t expect my fiction to be really accurate, but I did get really annoyed when a recently read book taking place in the 1100s referred to Acquitaine as being in England. I won’t recommend that book.
    For Cara, Cynthia Wright’s Silver Storm covers the attack on Fort Griswold by Benedict Arnold. I hadn’t realized he was from Connecticut before.

    Reply
  92. A bit late to add on but I was at DisneyWorld and didn’t read much. First for Mary Jo, is J.A. Jance’s Beaumont mystery series. She has beautifully developed her main character, his relationships, and his coming to terms with his alcoholism over the 22 books and counting.
    As far as historical accuracy. I often read about an event in and book and go on to read the non-fiction. I don’t expect my fiction to be really accurate, but I did get really annoyed when a recently read book taking place in the 1100s referred to Acquitaine as being in England. I won’t recommend that book.
    For Cara, Cynthia Wright’s Silver Storm covers the attack on Fort Griswold by Benedict Arnold. I hadn’t realized he was from Connecticut before.

    Reply
  93. A bit late to add on but I was at DisneyWorld and didn’t read much. First for Mary Jo, is J.A. Jance’s Beaumont mystery series. She has beautifully developed her main character, his relationships, and his coming to terms with his alcoholism over the 22 books and counting.
    As far as historical accuracy. I often read about an event in and book and go on to read the non-fiction. I don’t expect my fiction to be really accurate, but I did get really annoyed when a recently read book taking place in the 1100s referred to Acquitaine as being in England. I won’t recommend that book.
    For Cara, Cynthia Wright’s Silver Storm covers the attack on Fort Griswold by Benedict Arnold. I hadn’t realized he was from Connecticut before.

    Reply
  94. A bit late to add on but I was at DisneyWorld and didn’t read much. First for Mary Jo, is J.A. Jance’s Beaumont mystery series. She has beautifully developed her main character, his relationships, and his coming to terms with his alcoholism over the 22 books and counting.
    As far as historical accuracy. I often read about an event in and book and go on to read the non-fiction. I don’t expect my fiction to be really accurate, but I did get really annoyed when a recently read book taking place in the 1100s referred to Acquitaine as being in England. I won’t recommend that book.
    For Cara, Cynthia Wright’s Silver Storm covers the attack on Fort Griswold by Benedict Arnold. I hadn’t realized he was from Connecticut before.

    Reply
  95. A bit late to add on but I was at DisneyWorld and didn’t read much. First for Mary Jo, is J.A. Jance’s Beaumont mystery series. She has beautifully developed her main character, his relationships, and his coming to terms with his alcoholism over the 22 books and counting.
    As far as historical accuracy. I often read about an event in and book and go on to read the non-fiction. I don’t expect my fiction to be really accurate, but I did get really annoyed when a recently read book taking place in the 1100s referred to Acquitaine as being in England. I won’t recommend that book.
    For Cara, Cynthia Wright’s Silver Storm covers the attack on Fort Griswold by Benedict Arnold. I hadn’t realized he was from Connecticut before.

    Reply

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