What We’re Reading in January

CardNicola here, introducing this month's "What We're Reading" feature. We've had a bumper reading month on Word Wenches as a result of the holiday season and we hope you have lots of recommendations for us too, if you've had chance to read in between all the demands of the New Year! So without further ado let's turn to our reading choices.

Anne writes:

I have a fondness for Christmas stories and over Christmas I read and reread a number of Christmas novellas, including some Louise Penny
collections by Mary Balogh and Mary Jo Putney that contained stories I'd never read. Then I embarked on a fantasy glom, Robin Hobb — starting with ASSASSIN'S APPRENTICE and reading them in order up to FOOL'S QUEST. And now I have to wait for the next book to come out. Needless to say, I thoroughly enjoyed them and have no hesitation in recommending them.

Then for a change of pace I read Kristan Higgins's ANYTHING FOR YOU, followed by a reread of some Loretta Chase reissues and a couple of Lisa Kleypas historicals, which I always enjoy.

Lastly I've just finished Louise Penny's THE BEAUTIFUL MYSTERY. I've enjoyed all of Louise Penny's crime novels, and realized when I read this, that I've fallen behind and there are three more new ones I haven't read. A treat in store.

The lost chaliceCara/Andrea:

I’ve been doing my usual hopping between fiction and non-fiction this month, and enjoyed two very different but equally entertaining reads. The Lost Chalice by Vernon Silver, who is an Oxford-trained archeologist and award-winning journalist, is a fascinating, fast-paced account of ancient artifacts, modern looters and the high-stakes trafficking of priceless treasures to the world’s leading museums and cultural institutions. Part Indiana Jones, part Interpol procedural, it highlights a cast of intriguing characters and the complex moral questions involved in preserving history.

Commencement, a novel by J. Courtney Sullivan on women, friendship and choosing a path in life revolves around four BFFs and how they bond at college, then venture into the real world. The story unfolds through the four different POVs, revealing the backstories of each of the women, and their seemingly unlikely friendship, along with how it affects their struggle to establish a sense of self during the first tentative steps as “adults.” Sharp, wise, and funny, the book captures the laughter, the tears and the vulnerabilities of trying to figure out what it means to be female in this day and age.

Pat says:

I’d have to classify The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin as contemporary literary fiction, even though it has two lovely Nicedragon romances much better than anything Nicholas Sparks ever wrote. The ending, while sort of sad, is also witty and upbeat. It’s the story of a bitter, widowed bookstore owner who thought he’d lost everything when his wife died, but learns life has so much more in store for him once he allows love back in his heart. And as he slowly opens up again, many lives are improved because of the generous nature he’d hidden even from himself. It’s one of those stories that break your heart when it ends because you want to keep reading. Any lover of books has to fall in love with this one, really. Tell me if you don’t.

And for a completely different spin try the urban fantasy, Nice Dragons Finish Last by Rachel Aaron. The youngest son of a dragon clan gets sealed into human form for being a lazy game-playing no-account and is flung into the middle of a no-dragon zone in a future world after the earth’s magic has been freed again. Well written, fabulous characterization, non-stop action—and a kick-ass magician heroine who’s more merciless than the Nice Dragon, even if she is human. If you like fun fantasy, try it!

Mary Jo:

Level UpThe most book fun I've had lately is a New Adult romantic comedy called Level Up: A Geek Romance Rom Com (Fandom Hearts 1) by Cathy Yardley.

Here's part of the blurb: "Geeky introvert Tessa Rodriguez will do whatever it takes to get promoted to video game engineer– including create a fandom-based video game in 

just three weeks. The only problem is, she can't do it alone. Now, she needs to strong-arm, cajole, and otherwise socialize with her video game coworkers."

Tessa is working as a coder in a game design company, but she wants to be an engineer. She knows she can do it, but how can she break into the boys' club and prove that she can take what they dish out and play well with others? As a hard working introvert, Tessa has forgotten how to socialize, so acting on the advice of her nice guy landlord, a gamer co-worker, she warily goes to a geek girls gathering–and finds her tribe. By helping her new friends, she expands her world, learns how to be one of the guys–and also makes her landlord realize that she's an actual girl.   <G>

Clearly this is intended to be the first of a series, and there are lots of interesting male and female characters for Yardley to play with. I also liked the way she created a world that was new to me, but very convincing. I can't wait for the next story.  LEVEL UP is free in the US and modestly priced elsewhere, so you might want to give it a try.

Joanna says:

I finished The Last Dragonslayer by Jasper Fforde recently. Loved it. Dragonslayer, with its fifteen-but-I’ll-be-sixteen-in-two-weeks Wenches dragon slayerheroine, is YA but it hits right in my own sweet spot. An adventure book, ​an epic journey, a magical world, huge stakes​, and a ​stalwart female protagonist.

Who will slay the last dragon in the world, and will magic end forever when it dies?

​Reminds me of War for the Oaks (Emma Bull) and The Hero and the Crown (Robin McKinley).

Susan writes:

Bigmagic gilbertSometimes I just want to sit down and read some of the wonderfully tempting books stacking up (especially after the holidays and on snow days lately!) — but life and writing get in the way. Things need done and the reading gets put off. These past few weeks I haven't had much reading time, but I still managed to feed that book hunger here and there, catch as can. I've picked up several books, read a chapter or so and promised myself to get back to them as soon as possible. One of those is Elizabeth Gilbert's Big Magic — how I want to sink into this one. I love Gilbert's voice — Eat Pray Love is one of my favorite nonfictions —  and though I've only read part so far, her insights and wisdom regarding the creative impulse are so relevant and useful, and her writing voice so elegant, that this has the chief spot on the TBR pile, ready to be relished. Another book with a nice heart to it is Janice Kaplan's The Gratitude Diaries: How a Year of Looking on the Bright Side Can Transform Your Life. Well, I'm all for transformation and glad to be reminded to be more mindful and thankful for everything. Breezing through this book over the holidays, I did read quite a bit and promised myself to get back to it to take it in more thoughtfully. It's well written, clearly presented and worth the time – hopefully I will find reading hours in February! But even on a fast reading track lately, I found two wonderful books with quiet wisdom. 

Jo:

I've long enjoyed Carola Dunn's Daisy Dalrymple mysteries set in the 1920s, but I recently chomped down her Cornish ones, set in the Manna 1960s. The first is Manna from Hades, followed by Valley of the Shadow and A Colourful Death. Of course they're well-written and plotted, and the Cornish setting is lovely. The sleuth is Eleanor Trewynn, a widow retired from overseas charity work which often too her into the highest circles, so despite her slight eccentricities, little daunts her. I enjoyed these, but I must say that Cornwall today is not a great deal different, so I kept expecting the characters to whip out a mobile phone, or look something up on the Web. It only goes to show that mysteries can be more entertaining when people have to stumble miles across country to get help, and wait until the library opens to check their facts.

I also recently read Bill Bryson's Neither Here, Nor There: Travels in Europe. This was written in 1991 and he's retracing the steps of a backpacking journey decades earlier. Read in 2015 with Europe's current situation, gives it a particular perspective. I always enjoy Bryson's travel books because he has a gift for finding the quirky, especially the overlooked quirky, and a deep interest in the individuality of people. He starts in the northernmost town in Europe, leaving me and many others wondering how people live there, and ends up in Istanbul, having survived many weird challenges along the way. It's laugh-aloud funny in places, and interesting everywhere.

Nicola:

Josephine TeyI’m dipping into some biography this month with the new book about the life and writing of Josephine Tey. She has been one of my favourite authors since I read The Daughter of Time as a teenager and I love each and every one of her books. Tey was a very private person and details on her life and her work have been scant before now. A Life: Josephine Tey is by Jennifer Morag Henderson and is a fascinating insight into the influences that made Josephine Tey the writer she was. It also analyses Tey's books in detail and throws light on the glamorous life she led as a playright in London mixing with the stars of the theatre from the 1920s to the 1940s. It's out in the UK now and in the US in April.

Alongside that I've been re-reading a Josephine Tey novel, Brat Farrar, which is a wonderful crime and mystery story revolving around the trope of false identity. Tey's writing is so clear and precise and well-observed. I will probably read all of her books again now – and wish she had written more.

Over to you! Have you read any of this month's recommendations? Which books would you like to recommend to us?

190 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in January”

  1. I have been enjoying the romantic ghost stories of Simone St. James, the latest being The Other Side of Midnight, which is set in the 1920s in England. I have also read Thunderbird by Jack McDevitt, and am partway into SPQR by Mary Beard (a popular history book about ancient Rome), and the first of the Max Tudor stories, Wicked Autumn by G. M. Malliet. I have also read some regencies for review by Roseleen Milne, Margaret Summerfield and Emma Jensen.
    And I bingewatched Jessica Jones twice, if that counts 🙂

    Reply
  2. I have been enjoying the romantic ghost stories of Simone St. James, the latest being The Other Side of Midnight, which is set in the 1920s in England. I have also read Thunderbird by Jack McDevitt, and am partway into SPQR by Mary Beard (a popular history book about ancient Rome), and the first of the Max Tudor stories, Wicked Autumn by G. M. Malliet. I have also read some regencies for review by Roseleen Milne, Margaret Summerfield and Emma Jensen.
    And I bingewatched Jessica Jones twice, if that counts 🙂

    Reply
  3. I have been enjoying the romantic ghost stories of Simone St. James, the latest being The Other Side of Midnight, which is set in the 1920s in England. I have also read Thunderbird by Jack McDevitt, and am partway into SPQR by Mary Beard (a popular history book about ancient Rome), and the first of the Max Tudor stories, Wicked Autumn by G. M. Malliet. I have also read some regencies for review by Roseleen Milne, Margaret Summerfield and Emma Jensen.
    And I bingewatched Jessica Jones twice, if that counts 🙂

    Reply
  4. I have been enjoying the romantic ghost stories of Simone St. James, the latest being The Other Side of Midnight, which is set in the 1920s in England. I have also read Thunderbird by Jack McDevitt, and am partway into SPQR by Mary Beard (a popular history book about ancient Rome), and the first of the Max Tudor stories, Wicked Autumn by G. M. Malliet. I have also read some regencies for review by Roseleen Milne, Margaret Summerfield and Emma Jensen.
    And I bingewatched Jessica Jones twice, if that counts 🙂

    Reply
  5. I have been enjoying the romantic ghost stories of Simone St. James, the latest being The Other Side of Midnight, which is set in the 1920s in England. I have also read Thunderbird by Jack McDevitt, and am partway into SPQR by Mary Beard (a popular history book about ancient Rome), and the first of the Max Tudor stories, Wicked Autumn by G. M. Malliet. I have also read some regencies for review by Roseleen Milne, Margaret Summerfield and Emma Jensen.
    And I bingewatched Jessica Jones twice, if that counts 🙂

    Reply
  6. I like the sound of a romantic ghost story, Janice, and will put Simone St James on my list. I enjoy Mary Beard’s writing and presenting as well. Rosaleen Milne – there’s a blast from the past! I have Borrowed Plumes on my Regency shelf!

    Reply
  7. I like the sound of a romantic ghost story, Janice, and will put Simone St James on my list. I enjoy Mary Beard’s writing and presenting as well. Rosaleen Milne – there’s a blast from the past! I have Borrowed Plumes on my Regency shelf!

    Reply
  8. I like the sound of a romantic ghost story, Janice, and will put Simone St James on my list. I enjoy Mary Beard’s writing and presenting as well. Rosaleen Milne – there’s a blast from the past! I have Borrowed Plumes on my Regency shelf!

    Reply
  9. I like the sound of a romantic ghost story, Janice, and will put Simone St James on my list. I enjoy Mary Beard’s writing and presenting as well. Rosaleen Milne – there’s a blast from the past! I have Borrowed Plumes on my Regency shelf!

    Reply
  10. I like the sound of a romantic ghost story, Janice, and will put Simone St James on my list. I enjoy Mary Beard’s writing and presenting as well. Rosaleen Milne – there’s a blast from the past! I have Borrowed Plumes on my Regency shelf!

    Reply
  11. My favourite read so far this year is Jayne Fresina’s How to Rescue a Rake.
    It is shamelessly retelling Jane Austen’s Persuasion, which is precisely why I loved it so much. Angst and humour and (mostly) period-appropriate manners, and – for a change – not a duke in sight.
    RT Magazine had an article about how British-set historical romance is full of American heroines at the moment, and pretty much every other HR I’ve read this month has followed that trend.

    Reply
  12. My favourite read so far this year is Jayne Fresina’s How to Rescue a Rake.
    It is shamelessly retelling Jane Austen’s Persuasion, which is precisely why I loved it so much. Angst and humour and (mostly) period-appropriate manners, and – for a change – not a duke in sight.
    RT Magazine had an article about how British-set historical romance is full of American heroines at the moment, and pretty much every other HR I’ve read this month has followed that trend.

    Reply
  13. My favourite read so far this year is Jayne Fresina’s How to Rescue a Rake.
    It is shamelessly retelling Jane Austen’s Persuasion, which is precisely why I loved it so much. Angst and humour and (mostly) period-appropriate manners, and – for a change – not a duke in sight.
    RT Magazine had an article about how British-set historical romance is full of American heroines at the moment, and pretty much every other HR I’ve read this month has followed that trend.

    Reply
  14. My favourite read so far this year is Jayne Fresina’s How to Rescue a Rake.
    It is shamelessly retelling Jane Austen’s Persuasion, which is precisely why I loved it so much. Angst and humour and (mostly) period-appropriate manners, and – for a change – not a duke in sight.
    RT Magazine had an article about how British-set historical romance is full of American heroines at the moment, and pretty much every other HR I’ve read this month has followed that trend.

    Reply
  15. My favourite read so far this year is Jayne Fresina’s How to Rescue a Rake.
    It is shamelessly retelling Jane Austen’s Persuasion, which is precisely why I loved it so much. Angst and humour and (mostly) period-appropriate manners, and – for a change – not a duke in sight.
    RT Magazine had an article about how British-set historical romance is full of American heroines at the moment, and pretty much every other HR I’ve read this month has followed that trend.

    Reply
  16. I’ve just recently read Simone St James myself. Silence for the Dead is an eerie atmospheric tale set in an asylum for WW1 veterans. I’ve also read Summer’s Secret by Sandra Heath. It’s a Regency time travel which combines my two main loves in reading. I’m now reading Rebel Sisters by Marita Conlon Mckenna. It’s based in Ireland starting in 1901 and continues on to the Easter Rising of 1916. We’re celebrating the centenary of this uprising this year here and there are a lot of things happening around it. So far it’s a great read.

    Reply
  17. I’ve just recently read Simone St James myself. Silence for the Dead is an eerie atmospheric tale set in an asylum for WW1 veterans. I’ve also read Summer’s Secret by Sandra Heath. It’s a Regency time travel which combines my two main loves in reading. I’m now reading Rebel Sisters by Marita Conlon Mckenna. It’s based in Ireland starting in 1901 and continues on to the Easter Rising of 1916. We’re celebrating the centenary of this uprising this year here and there are a lot of things happening around it. So far it’s a great read.

    Reply
  18. I’ve just recently read Simone St James myself. Silence for the Dead is an eerie atmospheric tale set in an asylum for WW1 veterans. I’ve also read Summer’s Secret by Sandra Heath. It’s a Regency time travel which combines my two main loves in reading. I’m now reading Rebel Sisters by Marita Conlon Mckenna. It’s based in Ireland starting in 1901 and continues on to the Easter Rising of 1916. We’re celebrating the centenary of this uprising this year here and there are a lot of things happening around it. So far it’s a great read.

    Reply
  19. I’ve just recently read Simone St James myself. Silence for the Dead is an eerie atmospheric tale set in an asylum for WW1 veterans. I’ve also read Summer’s Secret by Sandra Heath. It’s a Regency time travel which combines my two main loves in reading. I’m now reading Rebel Sisters by Marita Conlon Mckenna. It’s based in Ireland starting in 1901 and continues on to the Easter Rising of 1916. We’re celebrating the centenary of this uprising this year here and there are a lot of things happening around it. So far it’s a great read.

    Reply
  20. I’ve just recently read Simone St James myself. Silence for the Dead is an eerie atmospheric tale set in an asylum for WW1 veterans. I’ve also read Summer’s Secret by Sandra Heath. It’s a Regency time travel which combines my two main loves in reading. I’m now reading Rebel Sisters by Marita Conlon Mckenna. It’s based in Ireland starting in 1901 and continues on to the Easter Rising of 1916. We’re celebrating the centenary of this uprising this year here and there are a lot of things happening around it. So far it’s a great read.

    Reply
  21. St. James dedicated The Other Side of Midnight to Mary Stewart. So we know she’s a woman of taste 🙂
    I have enjoyed all her books so far, and have the last one I haven’t read, The Haunting of Maddy Clare, in the TBR. I would recommend her for her prose style and ambience as well as the woowoo stuff 😉

    Reply
  22. St. James dedicated The Other Side of Midnight to Mary Stewart. So we know she’s a woman of taste 🙂
    I have enjoyed all her books so far, and have the last one I haven’t read, The Haunting of Maddy Clare, in the TBR. I would recommend her for her prose style and ambience as well as the woowoo stuff 😉

    Reply
  23. St. James dedicated The Other Side of Midnight to Mary Stewart. So we know she’s a woman of taste 🙂
    I have enjoyed all her books so far, and have the last one I haven’t read, The Haunting of Maddy Clare, in the TBR. I would recommend her for her prose style and ambience as well as the woowoo stuff 😉

    Reply
  24. St. James dedicated The Other Side of Midnight to Mary Stewart. So we know she’s a woman of taste 🙂
    I have enjoyed all her books so far, and have the last one I haven’t read, The Haunting of Maddy Clare, in the TBR. I would recommend her for her prose style and ambience as well as the woowoo stuff 😉

    Reply
  25. St. James dedicated The Other Side of Midnight to Mary Stewart. So we know she’s a woman of taste 🙂
    I have enjoyed all her books so far, and have the last one I haven’t read, The Haunting of Maddy Clare, in the TBR. I would recommend her for her prose style and ambience as well as the woowoo stuff 😉

    Reply
  26. I enjoy the work of Brandon Sanderson and am reading his latest Mistborn novel, “Bands of Mourning.”
    Hilarious as well as touching. It’s best to read all his earlier books in this series before this one.

    Reply
  27. I enjoy the work of Brandon Sanderson and am reading his latest Mistborn novel, “Bands of Mourning.”
    Hilarious as well as touching. It’s best to read all his earlier books in this series before this one.

    Reply
  28. I enjoy the work of Brandon Sanderson and am reading his latest Mistborn novel, “Bands of Mourning.”
    Hilarious as well as touching. It’s best to read all his earlier books in this series before this one.

    Reply
  29. I enjoy the work of Brandon Sanderson and am reading his latest Mistborn novel, “Bands of Mourning.”
    Hilarious as well as touching. It’s best to read all his earlier books in this series before this one.

    Reply
  30. I enjoy the work of Brandon Sanderson and am reading his latest Mistborn novel, “Bands of Mourning.”
    Hilarious as well as touching. It’s best to read all his earlier books in this series before this one.

    Reply
  31. I’m just finishing a re-read of SILENT MELODY by Mary Balogh – an oldie but a goodie. But I’m looking forward to the next book in my cue, THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER by Julie Klassen.
    I’m not normally a big fan of Christian HR. Nothing wrong with it, I just haven’t found too many authors in that genre who interest me a lot. However, I really enjoy Ms. Klassen’s books. What I especially like about them (besides the fact that she tells a really interesting story) are the historical footnotes that she usually includes with each chapter. I consider them painless history lessons.
    I have read most of her books. THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER is her most recent release, but my favorite of her past releases is LADY OF MILKWEED MANOR. I give it a five hanky rating. Keep a box of Kleenex handy.

    Reply
  32. I’m just finishing a re-read of SILENT MELODY by Mary Balogh – an oldie but a goodie. But I’m looking forward to the next book in my cue, THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER by Julie Klassen.
    I’m not normally a big fan of Christian HR. Nothing wrong with it, I just haven’t found too many authors in that genre who interest me a lot. However, I really enjoy Ms. Klassen’s books. What I especially like about them (besides the fact that she tells a really interesting story) are the historical footnotes that she usually includes with each chapter. I consider them painless history lessons.
    I have read most of her books. THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER is her most recent release, but my favorite of her past releases is LADY OF MILKWEED MANOR. I give it a five hanky rating. Keep a box of Kleenex handy.

    Reply
  33. I’m just finishing a re-read of SILENT MELODY by Mary Balogh – an oldie but a goodie. But I’m looking forward to the next book in my cue, THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER by Julie Klassen.
    I’m not normally a big fan of Christian HR. Nothing wrong with it, I just haven’t found too many authors in that genre who interest me a lot. However, I really enjoy Ms. Klassen’s books. What I especially like about them (besides the fact that she tells a really interesting story) are the historical footnotes that she usually includes with each chapter. I consider them painless history lessons.
    I have read most of her books. THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER is her most recent release, but my favorite of her past releases is LADY OF MILKWEED MANOR. I give it a five hanky rating. Keep a box of Kleenex handy.

    Reply
  34. I’m just finishing a re-read of SILENT MELODY by Mary Balogh – an oldie but a goodie. But I’m looking forward to the next book in my cue, THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER by Julie Klassen.
    I’m not normally a big fan of Christian HR. Nothing wrong with it, I just haven’t found too many authors in that genre who interest me a lot. However, I really enjoy Ms. Klassen’s books. What I especially like about them (besides the fact that she tells a really interesting story) are the historical footnotes that she usually includes with each chapter. I consider them painless history lessons.
    I have read most of her books. THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER is her most recent release, but my favorite of her past releases is LADY OF MILKWEED MANOR. I give it a five hanky rating. Keep a box of Kleenex handy.

    Reply
  35. I’m just finishing a re-read of SILENT MELODY by Mary Balogh – an oldie but a goodie. But I’m looking forward to the next book in my cue, THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER by Julie Klassen.
    I’m not normally a big fan of Christian HR. Nothing wrong with it, I just haven’t found too many authors in that genre who interest me a lot. However, I really enjoy Ms. Klassen’s books. What I especially like about them (besides the fact that she tells a really interesting story) are the historical footnotes that she usually includes with each chapter. I consider them painless history lessons.
    I have read most of her books. THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER is her most recent release, but my favorite of her past releases is LADY OF MILKWEED MANOR. I give it a five hanky rating. Keep a box of Kleenex handy.

    Reply
  36. Thank you for the Kleenex warning, Mary! Perhaps we should introduce hose sort of ratings on all teh recommendations! That’s a good idea about the historical footnotes. I bet the Wenches would like to do that…

    Reply
  37. Thank you for the Kleenex warning, Mary! Perhaps we should introduce hose sort of ratings on all teh recommendations! That’s a good idea about the historical footnotes. I bet the Wenches would like to do that…

    Reply
  38. Thank you for the Kleenex warning, Mary! Perhaps we should introduce hose sort of ratings on all teh recommendations! That’s a good idea about the historical footnotes. I bet the Wenches would like to do that…

    Reply
  39. Thank you for the Kleenex warning, Mary! Perhaps we should introduce hose sort of ratings on all teh recommendations! That’s a good idea about the historical footnotes. I bet the Wenches would like to do that…

    Reply
  40. Thank you for the Kleenex warning, Mary! Perhaps we should introduce hose sort of ratings on all teh recommendations! That’s a good idea about the historical footnotes. I bet the Wenches would like to do that…

    Reply
  41. Look here Ladies! You Don’t Cheat Fair!!! I JUST posted(In the The ABC of Reading Blog) that i am trying to cut back on new authors and here you show up with such a delicious list if new Books! I would resign, if my incurable reading habit didn’t bring me right back!
    The only new book I have read this month is the one Mary Jo mentioned. She had mentioned it earlier on her Facebook group and I investigated it. I agree with her that it is a good read. Otherwise I have been limiting myself to rereads: Julie Czernada’s Trade ALL of Mercedes Lackey’s Valdemar Stories, starting with Arrows of the Queen.
    I word of appreciation here for rereading. I am on a mission to free the floors of our house of an overload of mis-stored overflow. With a job like that on hand, new books entice you away from the task, but old familiars give you a physical rest for a chapter or two, but you avoid being completing swallowed up by the story. And as many of us have said before, it is alway fun to visit old friends.

    Reply
  42. Look here Ladies! You Don’t Cheat Fair!!! I JUST posted(In the The ABC of Reading Blog) that i am trying to cut back on new authors and here you show up with such a delicious list if new Books! I would resign, if my incurable reading habit didn’t bring me right back!
    The only new book I have read this month is the one Mary Jo mentioned. She had mentioned it earlier on her Facebook group and I investigated it. I agree with her that it is a good read. Otherwise I have been limiting myself to rereads: Julie Czernada’s Trade ALL of Mercedes Lackey’s Valdemar Stories, starting with Arrows of the Queen.
    I word of appreciation here for rereading. I am on a mission to free the floors of our house of an overload of mis-stored overflow. With a job like that on hand, new books entice you away from the task, but old familiars give you a physical rest for a chapter or two, but you avoid being completing swallowed up by the story. And as many of us have said before, it is alway fun to visit old friends.

    Reply
  43. Look here Ladies! You Don’t Cheat Fair!!! I JUST posted(In the The ABC of Reading Blog) that i am trying to cut back on new authors and here you show up with such a delicious list if new Books! I would resign, if my incurable reading habit didn’t bring me right back!
    The only new book I have read this month is the one Mary Jo mentioned. She had mentioned it earlier on her Facebook group and I investigated it. I agree with her that it is a good read. Otherwise I have been limiting myself to rereads: Julie Czernada’s Trade ALL of Mercedes Lackey’s Valdemar Stories, starting with Arrows of the Queen.
    I word of appreciation here for rereading. I am on a mission to free the floors of our house of an overload of mis-stored overflow. With a job like that on hand, new books entice you away from the task, but old familiars give you a physical rest for a chapter or two, but you avoid being completing swallowed up by the story. And as many of us have said before, it is alway fun to visit old friends.

    Reply
  44. Look here Ladies! You Don’t Cheat Fair!!! I JUST posted(In the The ABC of Reading Blog) that i am trying to cut back on new authors and here you show up with such a delicious list if new Books! I would resign, if my incurable reading habit didn’t bring me right back!
    The only new book I have read this month is the one Mary Jo mentioned. She had mentioned it earlier on her Facebook group and I investigated it. I agree with her that it is a good read. Otherwise I have been limiting myself to rereads: Julie Czernada’s Trade ALL of Mercedes Lackey’s Valdemar Stories, starting with Arrows of the Queen.
    I word of appreciation here for rereading. I am on a mission to free the floors of our house of an overload of mis-stored overflow. With a job like that on hand, new books entice you away from the task, but old familiars give you a physical rest for a chapter or two, but you avoid being completing swallowed up by the story. And as many of us have said before, it is alway fun to visit old friends.

    Reply
  45. Look here Ladies! You Don’t Cheat Fair!!! I JUST posted(In the The ABC of Reading Blog) that i am trying to cut back on new authors and here you show up with such a delicious list if new Books! I would resign, if my incurable reading habit didn’t bring me right back!
    The only new book I have read this month is the one Mary Jo mentioned. She had mentioned it earlier on her Facebook group and I investigated it. I agree with her that it is a good read. Otherwise I have been limiting myself to rereads: Julie Czernada’s Trade ALL of Mercedes Lackey’s Valdemar Stories, starting with Arrows of the Queen.
    I word of appreciation here for rereading. I am on a mission to free the floors of our house of an overload of mis-stored overflow. With a job like that on hand, new books entice you away from the task, but old familiars give you a physical rest for a chapter or two, but you avoid being completing swallowed up by the story. And as many of us have said before, it is alway fun to visit old friends.

    Reply
  46. Hi Mary. I love Julie Klassen books too. The Christian thing nearly put me off as well but I’m so glad I went ahead and read her books. My favourite so far is The Maid of Fairbourne Hall. Really really enjoyed it. The Painter’s Daughter is sitting on my shelf looking at me as I speak waiting to be read.

    Reply
  47. Hi Mary. I love Julie Klassen books too. The Christian thing nearly put me off as well but I’m so glad I went ahead and read her books. My favourite so far is The Maid of Fairbourne Hall. Really really enjoyed it. The Painter’s Daughter is sitting on my shelf looking at me as I speak waiting to be read.

    Reply
  48. Hi Mary. I love Julie Klassen books too. The Christian thing nearly put me off as well but I’m so glad I went ahead and read her books. My favourite so far is The Maid of Fairbourne Hall. Really really enjoyed it. The Painter’s Daughter is sitting on my shelf looking at me as I speak waiting to be read.

    Reply
  49. Hi Mary. I love Julie Klassen books too. The Christian thing nearly put me off as well but I’m so glad I went ahead and read her books. My favourite so far is The Maid of Fairbourne Hall. Really really enjoyed it. The Painter’s Daughter is sitting on my shelf looking at me as I speak waiting to be read.

    Reply
  50. Hi Mary. I love Julie Klassen books too. The Christian thing nearly put me off as well but I’m so glad I went ahead and read her books. My favourite so far is The Maid of Fairbourne Hall. Really really enjoyed it. The Painter’s Daughter is sitting on my shelf looking at me as I speak waiting to be read.

    Reply
  51. I am a moderate about Klassen; I like some of her books but I couldn’t finish The Painter’s Daughter. I think her best (and least appreciated) is Lady of Milkweed Manor, because it shows a side of regency women’s lives which the fantasy romancers would, I think, prefer to ignore, since it’s about what happens to a girl who has unmarried sex, comes up pregnant and is ruined with a capital R. Because Klassen is a positive writer, we see the heroine make something out of her life and find some value in what happened to her. But it’s not a romance by any means.

    Reply
  52. I am a moderate about Klassen; I like some of her books but I couldn’t finish The Painter’s Daughter. I think her best (and least appreciated) is Lady of Milkweed Manor, because it shows a side of regency women’s lives which the fantasy romancers would, I think, prefer to ignore, since it’s about what happens to a girl who has unmarried sex, comes up pregnant and is ruined with a capital R. Because Klassen is a positive writer, we see the heroine make something out of her life and find some value in what happened to her. But it’s not a romance by any means.

    Reply
  53. I am a moderate about Klassen; I like some of her books but I couldn’t finish The Painter’s Daughter. I think her best (and least appreciated) is Lady of Milkweed Manor, because it shows a side of regency women’s lives which the fantasy romancers would, I think, prefer to ignore, since it’s about what happens to a girl who has unmarried sex, comes up pregnant and is ruined with a capital R. Because Klassen is a positive writer, we see the heroine make something out of her life and find some value in what happened to her. But it’s not a romance by any means.

    Reply
  54. I am a moderate about Klassen; I like some of her books but I couldn’t finish The Painter’s Daughter. I think her best (and least appreciated) is Lady of Milkweed Manor, because it shows a side of regency women’s lives which the fantasy romancers would, I think, prefer to ignore, since it’s about what happens to a girl who has unmarried sex, comes up pregnant and is ruined with a capital R. Because Klassen is a positive writer, we see the heroine make something out of her life and find some value in what happened to her. But it’s not a romance by any means.

    Reply
  55. I am a moderate about Klassen; I like some of her books but I couldn’t finish The Painter’s Daughter. I think her best (and least appreciated) is Lady of Milkweed Manor, because it shows a side of regency women’s lives which the fantasy romancers would, I think, prefer to ignore, since it’s about what happens to a girl who has unmarried sex, comes up pregnant and is ruined with a capital R. Because Klassen is a positive writer, we see the heroine make something out of her life and find some value in what happened to her. But it’s not a romance by any means.

    Reply
  56. The new book I read (and enjoyed) this month was Secret Sisters by Jayne Anne Krentz (published in November I think). It was very good…back to the standard she wrote 5 years back. I got it from the library as it is only out in hardback right now.
    I always read whatever she puts out but the last few were …huh…..kind of flat.
    There were several other brand new books but they were so not fun, they aren’t even making it into my Sister’s Book Swap. Straight to the used bookstore they go.

    Reply
  57. The new book I read (and enjoyed) this month was Secret Sisters by Jayne Anne Krentz (published in November I think). It was very good…back to the standard she wrote 5 years back. I got it from the library as it is only out in hardback right now.
    I always read whatever she puts out but the last few were …huh…..kind of flat.
    There were several other brand new books but they were so not fun, they aren’t even making it into my Sister’s Book Swap. Straight to the used bookstore they go.

    Reply
  58. The new book I read (and enjoyed) this month was Secret Sisters by Jayne Anne Krentz (published in November I think). It was very good…back to the standard she wrote 5 years back. I got it from the library as it is only out in hardback right now.
    I always read whatever she puts out but the last few were …huh…..kind of flat.
    There were several other brand new books but they were so not fun, they aren’t even making it into my Sister’s Book Swap. Straight to the used bookstore they go.

    Reply
  59. The new book I read (and enjoyed) this month was Secret Sisters by Jayne Anne Krentz (published in November I think). It was very good…back to the standard she wrote 5 years back. I got it from the library as it is only out in hardback right now.
    I always read whatever she puts out but the last few were …huh…..kind of flat.
    There were several other brand new books but they were so not fun, they aren’t even making it into my Sister’s Book Swap. Straight to the used bookstore they go.

    Reply
  60. The new book I read (and enjoyed) this month was Secret Sisters by Jayne Anne Krentz (published in November I think). It was very good…back to the standard she wrote 5 years back. I got it from the library as it is only out in hardback right now.
    I always read whatever she puts out but the last few were …huh…..kind of flat.
    There were several other brand new books but they were so not fun, they aren’t even making it into my Sister’s Book Swap. Straight to the used bookstore they go.

    Reply
  61. Janice, I think we all look for different things in books. I especially like books that are character driven. I think that is one of the things I like about Ms. Klassen’s books. She creates characters that I will remember and care about days after I have finished the book.
    I hope I enjoy THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER more than you did, since I have already purchased it (smile).

    Reply
  62. Janice, I think we all look for different things in books. I especially like books that are character driven. I think that is one of the things I like about Ms. Klassen’s books. She creates characters that I will remember and care about days after I have finished the book.
    I hope I enjoy THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER more than you did, since I have already purchased it (smile).

    Reply
  63. Janice, I think we all look for different things in books. I especially like books that are character driven. I think that is one of the things I like about Ms. Klassen’s books. She creates characters that I will remember and care about days after I have finished the book.
    I hope I enjoy THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER more than you did, since I have already purchased it (smile).

    Reply
  64. Janice, I think we all look for different things in books. I especially like books that are character driven. I think that is one of the things I like about Ms. Klassen’s books. She creates characters that I will remember and care about days after I have finished the book.
    I hope I enjoy THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER more than you did, since I have already purchased it (smile).

    Reply
  65. Janice, I think we all look for different things in books. I especially like books that are character driven. I think that is one of the things I like about Ms. Klassen’s books. She creates characters that I will remember and care about days after I have finished the book.
    I hope I enjoy THE PAINTER’S DAUGHTER more than you did, since I have already purchased it (smile).

    Reply
  66. Everybody has an off day, Mary 🙂 I hope you enjoy the book too. I continue to buy Julie Klassen’s books – I know she’s a good author and though most of her books are sold as inspirationals, they’re not over the top for my taste. She’s one of my few autobuys.

    Reply
  67. Everybody has an off day, Mary 🙂 I hope you enjoy the book too. I continue to buy Julie Klassen’s books – I know she’s a good author and though most of her books are sold as inspirationals, they’re not over the top for my taste. She’s one of my few autobuys.

    Reply
  68. Everybody has an off day, Mary 🙂 I hope you enjoy the book too. I continue to buy Julie Klassen’s books – I know she’s a good author and though most of her books are sold as inspirationals, they’re not over the top for my taste. She’s one of my few autobuys.

    Reply
  69. Everybody has an off day, Mary 🙂 I hope you enjoy the book too. I continue to buy Julie Klassen’s books – I know she’s a good author and though most of her books are sold as inspirationals, they’re not over the top for my taste. She’s one of my few autobuys.

    Reply
  70. Everybody has an off day, Mary 🙂 I hope you enjoy the book too. I continue to buy Julie Klassen’s books – I know she’s a good author and though most of her books are sold as inspirationals, they’re not over the top for my taste. She’s one of my few autobuys.

    Reply
  71. LOL, Sue! Sorry to spoil your non-reading plans! I’m the same – I have half a dozen books all ready and set and then I read this and have another long list! Plus there is the re-readimg too. I love my old favourites and frequently add them into the mix.

    Reply
  72. LOL, Sue! Sorry to spoil your non-reading plans! I’m the same – I have half a dozen books all ready and set and then I read this and have another long list! Plus there is the re-readimg too. I love my old favourites and frequently add them into the mix.

    Reply
  73. LOL, Sue! Sorry to spoil your non-reading plans! I’m the same – I have half a dozen books all ready and set and then I read this and have another long list! Plus there is the re-readimg too. I love my old favourites and frequently add them into the mix.

    Reply
  74. LOL, Sue! Sorry to spoil your non-reading plans! I’m the same – I have half a dozen books all ready and set and then I read this and have another long list! Plus there is the re-readimg too. I love my old favourites and frequently add them into the mix.

    Reply
  75. LOL, Sue! Sorry to spoil your non-reading plans! I’m the same – I have half a dozen books all ready and set and then I read this and have another long list! Plus there is the re-readimg too. I love my old favourites and frequently add them into the mix.

    Reply
  76. Sue, I think we’re all book addicts here. My house is also crowded with books, and still I keep buying more. I do enjoy rereading old favorites, but I also love finding new-to-me authors to glom.

    Reply
  77. Sue, I think we’re all book addicts here. My house is also crowded with books, and still I keep buying more. I do enjoy rereading old favorites, but I also love finding new-to-me authors to glom.

    Reply
  78. Sue, I think we’re all book addicts here. My house is also crowded with books, and still I keep buying more. I do enjoy rereading old favorites, but I also love finding new-to-me authors to glom.

    Reply
  79. Sue, I think we’re all book addicts here. My house is also crowded with books, and still I keep buying more. I do enjoy rereading old favorites, but I also love finding new-to-me authors to glom.

    Reply
  80. Sue, I think we’re all book addicts here. My house is also crowded with books, and still I keep buying more. I do enjoy rereading old favorites, but I also love finding new-to-me authors to glom.

    Reply
  81. I’ve been lucky enough to read some great books this month.
    The Parfit Knight by Stella Riley: This was absolutely delightful. I also have the audiobook narrated by Alex Wyndham which I looking forward to listening to.
    Dukes Prefer Blondes by Loretta Chase: another winner from one of my favourite authors and the dialogue was brilliant!
    I’m currently reading and loving The Perfect Rake by our own Anne Gracie. I’ve fallen head over heels in love with the hero, Gideon!

    Reply
  82. I’ve been lucky enough to read some great books this month.
    The Parfit Knight by Stella Riley: This was absolutely delightful. I also have the audiobook narrated by Alex Wyndham which I looking forward to listening to.
    Dukes Prefer Blondes by Loretta Chase: another winner from one of my favourite authors and the dialogue was brilliant!
    I’m currently reading and loving The Perfect Rake by our own Anne Gracie. I’ve fallen head over heels in love with the hero, Gideon!

    Reply
  83. I’ve been lucky enough to read some great books this month.
    The Parfit Knight by Stella Riley: This was absolutely delightful. I also have the audiobook narrated by Alex Wyndham which I looking forward to listening to.
    Dukes Prefer Blondes by Loretta Chase: another winner from one of my favourite authors and the dialogue was brilliant!
    I’m currently reading and loving The Perfect Rake by our own Anne Gracie. I’ve fallen head over heels in love with the hero, Gideon!

    Reply
  84. I’ve been lucky enough to read some great books this month.
    The Parfit Knight by Stella Riley: This was absolutely delightful. I also have the audiobook narrated by Alex Wyndham which I looking forward to listening to.
    Dukes Prefer Blondes by Loretta Chase: another winner from one of my favourite authors and the dialogue was brilliant!
    I’m currently reading and loving The Perfect Rake by our own Anne Gracie. I’ve fallen head over heels in love with the hero, Gideon!

    Reply
  85. I’ve been lucky enough to read some great books this month.
    The Parfit Knight by Stella Riley: This was absolutely delightful. I also have the audiobook narrated by Alex Wyndham which I looking forward to listening to.
    Dukes Prefer Blondes by Loretta Chase: another winner from one of my favourite authors and the dialogue was brilliant!
    I’m currently reading and loving The Perfect Rake by our own Anne Gracie. I’ve fallen head over heels in love with the hero, Gideon!

    Reply
  86. Sigh, I now have to add her to my stack. I love character driven books and I especially love ones based on reality instead of fairy tales. I love wench readers for introducing me to new to me authors!

    Reply
  87. Sigh, I now have to add her to my stack. I love character driven books and I especially love ones based on reality instead of fairy tales. I love wench readers for introducing me to new to me authors!

    Reply
  88. Sigh, I now have to add her to my stack. I love character driven books and I especially love ones based on reality instead of fairy tales. I love wench readers for introducing me to new to me authors!

    Reply
  89. Sigh, I now have to add her to my stack. I love character driven books and I especially love ones based on reality instead of fairy tales. I love wench readers for introducing me to new to me authors!

    Reply
  90. Sigh, I now have to add her to my stack. I love character driven books and I especially love ones based on reality instead of fairy tales. I love wench readers for introducing me to new to me authors!

    Reply
  91. Ah, my TBR pile thanks you for not adding to the overload. 😉 I love Loretta and of course, adore Anne, so I’ve already read these. But your choices make me suspect I might also like the Riley. Oh well, here we go again… thank you!

    Reply
  92. Ah, my TBR pile thanks you for not adding to the overload. 😉 I love Loretta and of course, adore Anne, so I’ve already read these. But your choices make me suspect I might also like the Riley. Oh well, here we go again… thank you!

    Reply
  93. Ah, my TBR pile thanks you for not adding to the overload. 😉 I love Loretta and of course, adore Anne, so I’ve already read these. But your choices make me suspect I might also like the Riley. Oh well, here we go again… thank you!

    Reply
  94. Ah, my TBR pile thanks you for not adding to the overload. 😉 I love Loretta and of course, adore Anne, so I’ve already read these. But your choices make me suspect I might also like the Riley. Oh well, here we go again… thank you!

    Reply
  95. Ah, my TBR pile thanks you for not adding to the overload. 😉 I love Loretta and of course, adore Anne, so I’ve already read these. But your choices make me suspect I might also like the Riley. Oh well, here we go again… thank you!

    Reply
  96. I inherited the love of mysteries from my mother. Josephine Tey was one of her favorites and became one of mine as well. Since I read “Daughter of Time” as a very young and impressionable teenager, it imprinted itself on my psyche and I’ve had a hard time viewing Richard III as a villain ever since.
    My TBR pile includes several of the books mentioned above, but even when I try to be disciplined, new authors tempt me and I find myself falling down the rabbit hole pursuing their books. I love historical mysteries and just discovered the Matthew Shardlake series, which take place in Tudor England. Read the first two and looking forward to checking the rest out of the library as soon as I can.

    Reply
  97. I inherited the love of mysteries from my mother. Josephine Tey was one of her favorites and became one of mine as well. Since I read “Daughter of Time” as a very young and impressionable teenager, it imprinted itself on my psyche and I’ve had a hard time viewing Richard III as a villain ever since.
    My TBR pile includes several of the books mentioned above, but even when I try to be disciplined, new authors tempt me and I find myself falling down the rabbit hole pursuing their books. I love historical mysteries and just discovered the Matthew Shardlake series, which take place in Tudor England. Read the first two and looking forward to checking the rest out of the library as soon as I can.

    Reply
  98. I inherited the love of mysteries from my mother. Josephine Tey was one of her favorites and became one of mine as well. Since I read “Daughter of Time” as a very young and impressionable teenager, it imprinted itself on my psyche and I’ve had a hard time viewing Richard III as a villain ever since.
    My TBR pile includes several of the books mentioned above, but even when I try to be disciplined, new authors tempt me and I find myself falling down the rabbit hole pursuing their books. I love historical mysteries and just discovered the Matthew Shardlake series, which take place in Tudor England. Read the first two and looking forward to checking the rest out of the library as soon as I can.

    Reply
  99. I inherited the love of mysteries from my mother. Josephine Tey was one of her favorites and became one of mine as well. Since I read “Daughter of Time” as a very young and impressionable teenager, it imprinted itself on my psyche and I’ve had a hard time viewing Richard III as a villain ever since.
    My TBR pile includes several of the books mentioned above, but even when I try to be disciplined, new authors tempt me and I find myself falling down the rabbit hole pursuing their books. I love historical mysteries and just discovered the Matthew Shardlake series, which take place in Tudor England. Read the first two and looking forward to checking the rest out of the library as soon as I can.

    Reply
  100. I inherited the love of mysteries from my mother. Josephine Tey was one of her favorites and became one of mine as well. Since I read “Daughter of Time” as a very young and impressionable teenager, it imprinted itself on my psyche and I’ve had a hard time viewing Richard III as a villain ever since.
    My TBR pile includes several of the books mentioned above, but even when I try to be disciplined, new authors tempt me and I find myself falling down the rabbit hole pursuing their books. I love historical mysteries and just discovered the Matthew Shardlake series, which take place in Tudor England. Read the first two and looking forward to checking the rest out of the library as soon as I can.

    Reply

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