What We’re Reading in January

A painting of an open book held on a woman's lap.

Detail of a portrait of Madame Pompadour by François Boucher

Susanna here.

Welcome to our monthly What We're Reading post!

I’ve been reading mostly primary documents and very old letters in indecipherable handwriting, but unfortunately I can’t share any of them here because I don’t have permission to, so instead I’ll share the books that are currently on my nightstand, waiting to be read…


Tbr
Erin Davis, a much-loved radio personality here in Canada, who recently lost her daughter, has written a very personal and uplifting memoir that Olivia Newton-John praises as “a gift of love to others who are seeking solace”. I’m going to be interviewing Erin onstage for two events in February, so her book, Mourning Has Broken, is on the top of my pile.

At the Mountain’s Edge, “a sweeping new historical novel of love, tragedy, and redemption set during the height of the Klondike Gold Rush” from my friend, bestselling Canadian author Genevieve Graham, whose books shine a light on the lives of ordinary people pushed to their limits against the great tapestry of the Canadian landscape.

Another friend, Alyssa Cole, has the third book in her Loyal League series of historical romances coming out in February, and I’m lucky enough to have an advance copy in my hot little hands. I may have peeked at this one already (spoiler: it’s really, really good!). While the Loyal League books are interconnected, you don’t need to read them in order, so you can dive right in with An Unconditional Freedom.

The next book down is an ARC I was sent of an upcoming debut novel by Nathan Makaryk (based on his play of the same name). I’m a longtime fan of the Robin Hood legend, which Nottingham promises to twist in interesting ways, so I’m looking forward to reading it.

Kelli Estes’s first novel, The Girl Who Wrote In Silk, was a beautiful dual-time debut, and I leapt at the chance for an early look at her follow-up novel, Today We Go Home, which intertwines the lives of two military women—one in present day Seattle, and one fighting in disguise as a man during the Civil War in Indiana. I crossed paths with Kelli at the Historical Novel Society conference in Portland while she was doing the research for this novel, and what she told me then about the women who had fought in the Civil War was fascinating.

Finally, I’ve got two novels by Armando Lucas Correa, who I’ll also be interviewing onstage for our local bookstore in May: his internationally bestselling The German Girl, from 2016, and his upcoming novel, The Daughter’s Tale, “an unforgettable family saga of love and redemption during World War II, based on the true story of the Nazi massacre of a French village in 1944.”

And that should keep me busy for awhile.

******

Anne here.

Quiet life in countryA Quiet Life in the Country: I recently discovered the cosy mysteries of T.E. Kinsey, and really enjoyed them. (Referred to by a friend and isn't word of mouth recommendation the best?) This is from T.E. Kinsey's website: "Emily, Lady Hardcastle is an eccentric widow with a secret past. Florence Armstrong, her maid and confidante, is an expert in martial arts. The year is 1908 and they’ve just moved from London to the country, hoping for a quiet life."

The setting is England, the year is 1908, just post-Victorian, and the class barriers of society are still firmly in place. One of the pleasures of the books, apart from the murder mysteries is the relationship between Lady Hardcastle and her small-but-feisty Welsh maid, Flo. Having been through many a dramatic and mysterious foreign adventure in the days before these books start, the two women are very much friends, as well as maid and mistress, and the banter between them is funny and irreverent, and a little bit shocking to the class-conscious other characters in the books. I've read all the books in the series so far and have preordered the next.

Jackie French is an Australian author, multi prize-winning and very prolific and interesting. She's written lots of books for children and young adults, she's written books on ecology and how to keep chickens, and this novel for adults kept me reading far into the night.

Miss Lily's Lovely Ladies is set before, during and after WW1, and is about an Australian girl, "the canned corned beef heiress," who is sent to England before the war, ostensibly to get a bit of polish' from an earl's cousin, known only as Miss Lily, and also to prevent a marriage with a local boy.

This is from the blurb:

Miss lilys lovely ladiesEach year at secluded Shillings Hall, in the snow-crisped English countryside, the mysterious Miss Lily draws around her young women selected from Europe's royal and most influential families. Her girls are taught how to captivate a man – and find a potential husband – at a dinner, in a salon, or at a grouse shoot, and in ways that would surprise outsiders. For in 1914, persuading and charming men is the only true power a woman has.
Sophie Higgs is the daughter of Australia's king of corned beef and the only 'colonial' brought to Shillings Hall. Of all Miss Lily's lovely ladies, however, she is also the only one who suspects Miss Lily's true purpose.
As the chaos of war spreads, women across Europe shrug off etiquette. The lovely ladies and their less privileged sisters become the unacknowledged backbone of the war, creating hospitals, canteens and transport systems where bungling officials fail to cope. And when tens of thousands can die in a single day's battle, Sophie must use the skills Miss Lily taught her to prevent war's most devastating weapon yet.
But is Miss Lily heroine or traitor? And who, exactly, is she?

Jackie French plunges us into this era in a wonderfully intimate and fascinating way. Regency readers will be fascinated and delighted by the detail she provides as Sophie is "polished" by the mysterious and unconventional Miss Lily. More than that, it is a superb portrait of the changing roles of women in this time, how they stepped into the gaps left by the men running the war — at one stage Sophie reflects "Who spent years preparing for war, and yet gave no thought to how to deal with the wounded?"

As well as a wonderful social portrait of the times, it's a rollicking good tale. As I said, I read far into the night, and have thought much about the story ever since. I've also read the sequel and have preordered the third book in the trilogy. But it's not a romance, it's more a social historical novel. Highly recommended.

******

Jo here.

Wench magicJanuary has been full of primer, spackle, paint, joint compound, and prying up miles of those well-nailed wood dohinkies folks pound into the floor to hold wall-to-wall carpets. While this induces in me a pleasant sense of accomplishment, it hasn’t forwarded my reading experience much.

About the only thing I’ve picked up is the latest Ilona Andrews, Magic Triumphs. Lovely. I’m about half-way done and I’m drawing it out for longer enjoyment.

Wench chateletI’m also kicking back with my feet up and delving into Jean Francois Parot who writes historical detective novels in French. They’re set in the Paris of Louis XV and are ferociously French in attitude and also gritty and period accurate.
I am not reading them in French because there is only so much challenge I can undertake at one time.

In the first of these books, Chatelet Apprentice, young Nicolas Le Floch leaves rural Brittany for the dangerous, fascinating world of police work in Paris. There is food involved. Historical food, lovingly described.

It’s all extremely French and good source material for anyone who wants to write in the C18, which luckily I do.

******

Susan here.

Seems like all I've been reading lately is mystery, needing a fast escape with a quick pace when life is just too busy. For a while I've been slowly making my way through Rhys Bowen's Royal Spyness series, and over the holidays that picked up, as I've glommed Heirs and Graces, Queen of Hearts, and Malice at the Palace since we last posted what-we're-reading. I'm onto Crowned and Dangerous at the moment.

Crowned and dangerousI love this series–it's breezy and fun, with marvelous detail and ambience evoking life in Britain, aristocratic and not so much, in the 1930s. Clever, kind, slightly bumbling Lady Georgianna and the sexy Irishman the Hon. Darcy O'Mara, along with other regular characters, keep me coming back. The building relationship between Georgie and Darcy, which has a lovely tension that picks up speed. I very much enjoyed Malice at the Palace, where Georgie assists Princess Marina of Greece, arriving to marry Prince George, brother of the Prince of Wales, and sorts out a little murder at Kensington Palace while she's at it. Darcy has a central role in Crowned and Dangerous, as Georgie and Darcy postpone wedding plans to hurry off to Ireland when his father is accused of murder.

I alternate paper and audio in this series, and spent enough time in the car over the last couple of months to listen to some of these. I truly enjoy and appreciate the late Katherine Kellgren's excellent narration of Bowen's Lady Georgianna series.

******

Pat here.

Gift of ghostsAs regular readers know, I love small towns and ghosts and psychics, so when I saw the description of this one—A Gift of Ghosts, by Sarah Wynde—I couldn’t resist. Usually, I’ll give up after a few chapters, but this book kept me reading.

I’m appalled that my cook from the Crystal Magic series, who knows what food everyone likes, isn’t original, but there really is nothing new under the sun. So I just enjoyed the heck out of this love story about a physicist who can see and talk to ghosts but is utterly terrified—rightfully so—to admit it.

The story is basically the heroine’s journey of discovery, learning that when she opens up and accepts her gift, that she can make a serious difference in the lives of the living, as well as the dead. It’s all romance, so our romance readers who enjoy ghosts and good-looking hunks who accept weird heroines should enjoy it!

******

Andrea here.

Who Slays the WickedI have a very Janus-like reading month: looking ahead with an ARC and looking back to catch up on a classic that I somehow never got to on my towering TBR pile. I was lucky enough to snag an advance copy of C.S. Harris’s upcoming release, Who Slays the Wicked, the latest addition to her Sebastian St. Cyr series. I love this series, as it's developed such interesting, complex characters as it deals with the ongoing theme of Good and Evil, and the gray areas in between.

In this book, Evil is truly personified in the depraved husband of Sebastian’s beloved niece. And though he loathes the man, Sebastian feels compelled to find the killer when the handsome wastrel is found brutally murdered in his bed—because among the many people who have reason to wish him dead is his niece. The investigation into who had motive and opportunity is complicated by the presence of the Tsar of Russia’s sister and her entourage, who may have had political reasons for murder . . . which of course has Sebastian knocking heads with his wife’s father, who’s the power behind the King. It’s a dark and chilling story, but as usual, Harris weaves a compelling story as Sebastian works to unraveling the clues before the investigation upsets too many influential people and leads to his own demise.

OutlanderIn looking back, I finally read Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (yes, I know . . . how did I miss it until now!) Okay, I’m coming a little late to the party. but it’s so well done—a riveting tale of time travel, with rich history, and wonderful characters. It’s actually fun to come on a treasure that you haven’t yet experienced and be able to savor it for the first time. I highly recommend both books. They do just what a book should do and sweep you up into its world.

 

That's it for our reading.

What books have swept you up into their world this month?

35 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in January”

  1. This time of year (gray, gloomy days) I do a lot of re-reads – or comfort reads as I call them. The only two new books that I have read in the last couple of weeks are Mary Balogh’s and Grace Burrowes’ latest – SOMEONE TO TRUST and MY ONE AND ONLY DUKE. Loved them both. Burrowes’ book is the start of a new series and the family involved is not exactly typical. That’s ok with me I like it when characters step out of the box.
    My latest re-reads are Mary Balogh’s SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS, which is still my favorite of all her books, and MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT by Barbara Metzger. Metzger’s books always make me laugh out loud and feel good.
    MISS LILY’S LOVELY LADIES by Jackie French sounds very interesting. Early 20th century/WWI is a time that has always fascinated me.

    Reply
  2. This time of year (gray, gloomy days) I do a lot of re-reads – or comfort reads as I call them. The only two new books that I have read in the last couple of weeks are Mary Balogh’s and Grace Burrowes’ latest – SOMEONE TO TRUST and MY ONE AND ONLY DUKE. Loved them both. Burrowes’ book is the start of a new series and the family involved is not exactly typical. That’s ok with me I like it when characters step out of the box.
    My latest re-reads are Mary Balogh’s SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS, which is still my favorite of all her books, and MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT by Barbara Metzger. Metzger’s books always make me laugh out loud and feel good.
    MISS LILY’S LOVELY LADIES by Jackie French sounds very interesting. Early 20th century/WWI is a time that has always fascinated me.

    Reply
  3. This time of year (gray, gloomy days) I do a lot of re-reads – or comfort reads as I call them. The only two new books that I have read in the last couple of weeks are Mary Balogh’s and Grace Burrowes’ latest – SOMEONE TO TRUST and MY ONE AND ONLY DUKE. Loved them both. Burrowes’ book is the start of a new series and the family involved is not exactly typical. That’s ok with me I like it when characters step out of the box.
    My latest re-reads are Mary Balogh’s SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS, which is still my favorite of all her books, and MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT by Barbara Metzger. Metzger’s books always make me laugh out loud and feel good.
    MISS LILY’S LOVELY LADIES by Jackie French sounds very interesting. Early 20th century/WWI is a time that has always fascinated me.

    Reply
  4. This time of year (gray, gloomy days) I do a lot of re-reads – or comfort reads as I call them. The only two new books that I have read in the last couple of weeks are Mary Balogh’s and Grace Burrowes’ latest – SOMEONE TO TRUST and MY ONE AND ONLY DUKE. Loved them both. Burrowes’ book is the start of a new series and the family involved is not exactly typical. That’s ok with me I like it when characters step out of the box.
    My latest re-reads are Mary Balogh’s SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS, which is still my favorite of all her books, and MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT by Barbara Metzger. Metzger’s books always make me laugh out loud and feel good.
    MISS LILY’S LOVELY LADIES by Jackie French sounds very interesting. Early 20th century/WWI is a time that has always fascinated me.

    Reply
  5. This time of year (gray, gloomy days) I do a lot of re-reads – or comfort reads as I call them. The only two new books that I have read in the last couple of weeks are Mary Balogh’s and Grace Burrowes’ latest – SOMEONE TO TRUST and MY ONE AND ONLY DUKE. Loved them both. Burrowes’ book is the start of a new series and the family involved is not exactly typical. That’s ok with me I like it when characters step out of the box.
    My latest re-reads are Mary Balogh’s SLIGHTLY DANGEROUS, which is still my favorite of all her books, and MISS TREADWELL’S TALENT by Barbara Metzger. Metzger’s books always make me laugh out loud and feel good.
    MISS LILY’S LOVELY LADIES by Jackie French sounds very interesting. Early 20th century/WWI is a time that has always fascinated me.

    Reply
  6. I enjoyed T E Kinsey’s ‘Quiet Life in the country’. the quirky characters amused but I found it a little too cosy for my general reading … have to be in the mood for cosy.
    Sarah Wynde has been on my kindle for several years unread but I now have the audio of ‘A gift for Ghosts’ (cheap offer if you own the kindle edition) so should listen soon. “those who enjoy ghosts and good-looking hunks who accept weird heroines should enjoy it!” …. sounds good!
    I have a taste for fantasy and paranormal and have started the audio of Sarah Maas’s ‘A Court of Thorns and Roses’ series. Finished book 1 and started book 2. Maas has an addictive style of writing with strong interesting characters and many original plot ideas to keep one guessing. It is about the eternal battle of good and evil in the land of the Fae where the heroine Feyre struggles after being kidnapped from the human realm….. highly recommended.
    I also finished the audio of MJP’s ‘Shattered Rainbows’. I really like this blend of romance and adventure … and the narration is also excellent.
    I now have a new equation for my reading experience:
    fav author + fav narrator = bliss. 😊

    Reply
  7. I enjoyed T E Kinsey’s ‘Quiet Life in the country’. the quirky characters amused but I found it a little too cosy for my general reading … have to be in the mood for cosy.
    Sarah Wynde has been on my kindle for several years unread but I now have the audio of ‘A gift for Ghosts’ (cheap offer if you own the kindle edition) so should listen soon. “those who enjoy ghosts and good-looking hunks who accept weird heroines should enjoy it!” …. sounds good!
    I have a taste for fantasy and paranormal and have started the audio of Sarah Maas’s ‘A Court of Thorns and Roses’ series. Finished book 1 and started book 2. Maas has an addictive style of writing with strong interesting characters and many original plot ideas to keep one guessing. It is about the eternal battle of good and evil in the land of the Fae where the heroine Feyre struggles after being kidnapped from the human realm….. highly recommended.
    I also finished the audio of MJP’s ‘Shattered Rainbows’. I really like this blend of romance and adventure … and the narration is also excellent.
    I now have a new equation for my reading experience:
    fav author + fav narrator = bliss. 😊

    Reply
  8. I enjoyed T E Kinsey’s ‘Quiet Life in the country’. the quirky characters amused but I found it a little too cosy for my general reading … have to be in the mood for cosy.
    Sarah Wynde has been on my kindle for several years unread but I now have the audio of ‘A gift for Ghosts’ (cheap offer if you own the kindle edition) so should listen soon. “those who enjoy ghosts and good-looking hunks who accept weird heroines should enjoy it!” …. sounds good!
    I have a taste for fantasy and paranormal and have started the audio of Sarah Maas’s ‘A Court of Thorns and Roses’ series. Finished book 1 and started book 2. Maas has an addictive style of writing with strong interesting characters and many original plot ideas to keep one guessing. It is about the eternal battle of good and evil in the land of the Fae where the heroine Feyre struggles after being kidnapped from the human realm….. highly recommended.
    I also finished the audio of MJP’s ‘Shattered Rainbows’. I really like this blend of romance and adventure … and the narration is also excellent.
    I now have a new equation for my reading experience:
    fav author + fav narrator = bliss. 😊

    Reply
  9. I enjoyed T E Kinsey’s ‘Quiet Life in the country’. the quirky characters amused but I found it a little too cosy for my general reading … have to be in the mood for cosy.
    Sarah Wynde has been on my kindle for several years unread but I now have the audio of ‘A gift for Ghosts’ (cheap offer if you own the kindle edition) so should listen soon. “those who enjoy ghosts and good-looking hunks who accept weird heroines should enjoy it!” …. sounds good!
    I have a taste for fantasy and paranormal and have started the audio of Sarah Maas’s ‘A Court of Thorns and Roses’ series. Finished book 1 and started book 2. Maas has an addictive style of writing with strong interesting characters and many original plot ideas to keep one guessing. It is about the eternal battle of good and evil in the land of the Fae where the heroine Feyre struggles after being kidnapped from the human realm….. highly recommended.
    I also finished the audio of MJP’s ‘Shattered Rainbows’. I really like this blend of romance and adventure … and the narration is also excellent.
    I now have a new equation for my reading experience:
    fav author + fav narrator = bliss. 😊

    Reply
  10. I enjoyed T E Kinsey’s ‘Quiet Life in the country’. the quirky characters amused but I found it a little too cosy for my general reading … have to be in the mood for cosy.
    Sarah Wynde has been on my kindle for several years unread but I now have the audio of ‘A gift for Ghosts’ (cheap offer if you own the kindle edition) so should listen soon. “those who enjoy ghosts and good-looking hunks who accept weird heroines should enjoy it!” …. sounds good!
    I have a taste for fantasy and paranormal and have started the audio of Sarah Maas’s ‘A Court of Thorns and Roses’ series. Finished book 1 and started book 2. Maas has an addictive style of writing with strong interesting characters and many original plot ideas to keep one guessing. It is about the eternal battle of good and evil in the land of the Fae where the heroine Feyre struggles after being kidnapped from the human realm….. highly recommended.
    I also finished the audio of MJP’s ‘Shattered Rainbows’. I really like this blend of romance and adventure … and the narration is also excellent.
    I now have a new equation for my reading experience:
    fav author + fav narrator = bliss. 😊

    Reply
  11. What a fun assortment of books you’ve been reading. And, surprise!, it appears I already own A Gift of Ghosts– happy day.
    Here’s what I’ve read since mid-December ~
    Diamond Fire by Ilona Andrews.
    Talk Sweetly To Me by Courtney Milan.
    Linesman by SK Dunstall.
    Two Ruined Christmas Eves by McHart – okay.
    Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare.
    Picture This by Molly Bang.
    Christmas Visit by Marshall Thornton.
    Flame by Jo Goodman.
    Summerfield’s Angel by Kim Fielding.
    Dangerous by Minerva Spencer.
    The Christmas Curse by Ruby Moone.
    The Other Miss Bridgerton by Julia Quinn
    Alliance by SK Dunstall.
    Tried but did not finish – Stars Now Unclaimed. City of Broken Magic. Girl from Everywhere. Companion to Wolves. Mirror Empire.
    — the graphic novel Luisa Now and Then by Carole Maurel and Mariko Tamaki. It was an intriguing read but the elder Luisa was not the most pleasant of characters.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Confluence for the nth time. I enjoyed it yet again.
    — Detour by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed. It had me laughing aloud several times despite the dark backstory each character had.
    — Nora Roberts’ Of Blood and Bone: Chronicles of The One, Book 2. I found this less dark than the first book in the trilogy, but it’s still not my favourite series by the author. I do intend to read the next volume when it’s released.
    –a reread of the historical romance novella The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl by John Colapinto for my book group; it was a sad read, but we had a lively discussion
    — The dystopian story The Space Between the Stars; I found it easy to read despite its subject.
    — the graphic novel On a Sunbeam by Tillie Walden; overall I enjoyed this, but there were definitely times where I had no clue what was going on.
    — an enjoyable picture book P Is for Pterodactyl: The Worst Alphabet Book Ever by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter.
    — enjoyed Carla Kelly’s historical romance Miss Whittier Makes a List which features a young American Quaker and a British sea captain.
    — Rick R. Reed’s Sky Full of Mysteries. This is a story (a romance?) that kept me guessing as to the resolution.
    — enjoyed rereading Anne Bishops’ Written in Red once again.
    — my first reread of SK Dunstall’s Stars Uncharted. I’d enjoyed the book initially, but my pleasure was dimmed because I had wanted more of the world that the authors had created in their first trilogy. I enjoyed this read more.

    Reply
  12. What a fun assortment of books you’ve been reading. And, surprise!, it appears I already own A Gift of Ghosts– happy day.
    Here’s what I’ve read since mid-December ~
    Diamond Fire by Ilona Andrews.
    Talk Sweetly To Me by Courtney Milan.
    Linesman by SK Dunstall.
    Two Ruined Christmas Eves by McHart – okay.
    Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare.
    Picture This by Molly Bang.
    Christmas Visit by Marshall Thornton.
    Flame by Jo Goodman.
    Summerfield’s Angel by Kim Fielding.
    Dangerous by Minerva Spencer.
    The Christmas Curse by Ruby Moone.
    The Other Miss Bridgerton by Julia Quinn
    Alliance by SK Dunstall.
    Tried but did not finish – Stars Now Unclaimed. City of Broken Magic. Girl from Everywhere. Companion to Wolves. Mirror Empire.
    — the graphic novel Luisa Now and Then by Carole Maurel and Mariko Tamaki. It was an intriguing read but the elder Luisa was not the most pleasant of characters.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Confluence for the nth time. I enjoyed it yet again.
    — Detour by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed. It had me laughing aloud several times despite the dark backstory each character had.
    — Nora Roberts’ Of Blood and Bone: Chronicles of The One, Book 2. I found this less dark than the first book in the trilogy, but it’s still not my favourite series by the author. I do intend to read the next volume when it’s released.
    –a reread of the historical romance novella The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl by John Colapinto for my book group; it was a sad read, but we had a lively discussion
    — The dystopian story The Space Between the Stars; I found it easy to read despite its subject.
    — the graphic novel On a Sunbeam by Tillie Walden; overall I enjoyed this, but there were definitely times where I had no clue what was going on.
    — an enjoyable picture book P Is for Pterodactyl: The Worst Alphabet Book Ever by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter.
    — enjoyed Carla Kelly’s historical romance Miss Whittier Makes a List which features a young American Quaker and a British sea captain.
    — Rick R. Reed’s Sky Full of Mysteries. This is a story (a romance?) that kept me guessing as to the resolution.
    — enjoyed rereading Anne Bishops’ Written in Red once again.
    — my first reread of SK Dunstall’s Stars Uncharted. I’d enjoyed the book initially, but my pleasure was dimmed because I had wanted more of the world that the authors had created in their first trilogy. I enjoyed this read more.

    Reply
  13. What a fun assortment of books you’ve been reading. And, surprise!, it appears I already own A Gift of Ghosts– happy day.
    Here’s what I’ve read since mid-December ~
    Diamond Fire by Ilona Andrews.
    Talk Sweetly To Me by Courtney Milan.
    Linesman by SK Dunstall.
    Two Ruined Christmas Eves by McHart – okay.
    Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare.
    Picture This by Molly Bang.
    Christmas Visit by Marshall Thornton.
    Flame by Jo Goodman.
    Summerfield’s Angel by Kim Fielding.
    Dangerous by Minerva Spencer.
    The Christmas Curse by Ruby Moone.
    The Other Miss Bridgerton by Julia Quinn
    Alliance by SK Dunstall.
    Tried but did not finish – Stars Now Unclaimed. City of Broken Magic. Girl from Everywhere. Companion to Wolves. Mirror Empire.
    — the graphic novel Luisa Now and Then by Carole Maurel and Mariko Tamaki. It was an intriguing read but the elder Luisa was not the most pleasant of characters.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Confluence for the nth time. I enjoyed it yet again.
    — Detour by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed. It had me laughing aloud several times despite the dark backstory each character had.
    — Nora Roberts’ Of Blood and Bone: Chronicles of The One, Book 2. I found this less dark than the first book in the trilogy, but it’s still not my favourite series by the author. I do intend to read the next volume when it’s released.
    –a reread of the historical romance novella The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl by John Colapinto for my book group; it was a sad read, but we had a lively discussion
    — The dystopian story The Space Between the Stars; I found it easy to read despite its subject.
    — the graphic novel On a Sunbeam by Tillie Walden; overall I enjoyed this, but there were definitely times where I had no clue what was going on.
    — an enjoyable picture book P Is for Pterodactyl: The Worst Alphabet Book Ever by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter.
    — enjoyed Carla Kelly’s historical romance Miss Whittier Makes a List which features a young American Quaker and a British sea captain.
    — Rick R. Reed’s Sky Full of Mysteries. This is a story (a romance?) that kept me guessing as to the resolution.
    — enjoyed rereading Anne Bishops’ Written in Red once again.
    — my first reread of SK Dunstall’s Stars Uncharted. I’d enjoyed the book initially, but my pleasure was dimmed because I had wanted more of the world that the authors had created in their first trilogy. I enjoyed this read more.

    Reply
  14. What a fun assortment of books you’ve been reading. And, surprise!, it appears I already own A Gift of Ghosts– happy day.
    Here’s what I’ve read since mid-December ~
    Diamond Fire by Ilona Andrews.
    Talk Sweetly To Me by Courtney Milan.
    Linesman by SK Dunstall.
    Two Ruined Christmas Eves by McHart – okay.
    Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare.
    Picture This by Molly Bang.
    Christmas Visit by Marshall Thornton.
    Flame by Jo Goodman.
    Summerfield’s Angel by Kim Fielding.
    Dangerous by Minerva Spencer.
    The Christmas Curse by Ruby Moone.
    The Other Miss Bridgerton by Julia Quinn
    Alliance by SK Dunstall.
    Tried but did not finish – Stars Now Unclaimed. City of Broken Magic. Girl from Everywhere. Companion to Wolves. Mirror Empire.
    — the graphic novel Luisa Now and Then by Carole Maurel and Mariko Tamaki. It was an intriguing read but the elder Luisa was not the most pleasant of characters.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Confluence for the nth time. I enjoyed it yet again.
    — Detour by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed. It had me laughing aloud several times despite the dark backstory each character had.
    — Nora Roberts’ Of Blood and Bone: Chronicles of The One, Book 2. I found this less dark than the first book in the trilogy, but it’s still not my favourite series by the author. I do intend to read the next volume when it’s released.
    –a reread of the historical romance novella The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl by John Colapinto for my book group; it was a sad read, but we had a lively discussion
    — The dystopian story The Space Between the Stars; I found it easy to read despite its subject.
    — the graphic novel On a Sunbeam by Tillie Walden; overall I enjoyed this, but there were definitely times where I had no clue what was going on.
    — an enjoyable picture book P Is for Pterodactyl: The Worst Alphabet Book Ever by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter.
    — enjoyed Carla Kelly’s historical romance Miss Whittier Makes a List which features a young American Quaker and a British sea captain.
    — Rick R. Reed’s Sky Full of Mysteries. This is a story (a romance?) that kept me guessing as to the resolution.
    — enjoyed rereading Anne Bishops’ Written in Red once again.
    — my first reread of SK Dunstall’s Stars Uncharted. I’d enjoyed the book initially, but my pleasure was dimmed because I had wanted more of the world that the authors had created in their first trilogy. I enjoyed this read more.

    Reply
  15. What a fun assortment of books you’ve been reading. And, surprise!, it appears I already own A Gift of Ghosts– happy day.
    Here’s what I’ve read since mid-December ~
    Diamond Fire by Ilona Andrews.
    Talk Sweetly To Me by Courtney Milan.
    Linesman by SK Dunstall.
    Two Ruined Christmas Eves by McHart – okay.
    Once Upon a Winter’s Eve by Tessa Dare.
    Picture This by Molly Bang.
    Christmas Visit by Marshall Thornton.
    Flame by Jo Goodman.
    Summerfield’s Angel by Kim Fielding.
    Dangerous by Minerva Spencer.
    The Christmas Curse by Ruby Moone.
    The Other Miss Bridgerton by Julia Quinn
    Alliance by SK Dunstall.
    Tried but did not finish – Stars Now Unclaimed. City of Broken Magic. Girl from Everywhere. Companion to Wolves. Mirror Empire.
    — the graphic novel Luisa Now and Then by Carole Maurel and Mariko Tamaki. It was an intriguing read but the elder Luisa was not the most pleasant of characters.
    — Reread SK Dunstall’s Confluence for the nth time. I enjoyed it yet again.
    — Detour by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore was a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed. It had me laughing aloud several times despite the dark backstory each character had.
    — Nora Roberts’ Of Blood and Bone: Chronicles of The One, Book 2. I found this less dark than the first book in the trilogy, but it’s still not my favourite series by the author. I do intend to read the next volume when it’s released.
    –a reread of the historical romance novella The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl by John Colapinto for my book group; it was a sad read, but we had a lively discussion
    — The dystopian story The Space Between the Stars; I found it easy to read despite its subject.
    — the graphic novel On a Sunbeam by Tillie Walden; overall I enjoyed this, but there were definitely times where I had no clue what was going on.
    — an enjoyable picture book P Is for Pterodactyl: The Worst Alphabet Book Ever by Raj Haldar and Chris Carpenter.
    — enjoyed Carla Kelly’s historical romance Miss Whittier Makes a List which features a young American Quaker and a British sea captain.
    — Rick R. Reed’s Sky Full of Mysteries. This is a story (a romance?) that kept me guessing as to the resolution.
    — enjoyed rereading Anne Bishops’ Written in Red once again.
    — my first reread of SK Dunstall’s Stars Uncharted. I’d enjoyed the book initially, but my pleasure was dimmed because I had wanted more of the world that the authors had created in their first trilogy. I enjoyed this read more.

    Reply
  16. Y’all have given me new suggestions for good reads. Thank you.
    I love the T E Kinsey series and the Rhys Bowen series. But, these new to me books sound like they would be right up my alley.
    I have been reading some mysteries – Murder comes by Mail by Ann Gabhard, They Found Him Dead by Geoegette Heyer, and Forgotten Murder by Dolores Gorden-Smith.
    Read quite a few other books which were also good, but these three stand out for me.
    January is a very grey and yucky month here in Texas, so killing something sounds like a good plan.

    Reply
  17. Y’all have given me new suggestions for good reads. Thank you.
    I love the T E Kinsey series and the Rhys Bowen series. But, these new to me books sound like they would be right up my alley.
    I have been reading some mysteries – Murder comes by Mail by Ann Gabhard, They Found Him Dead by Geoegette Heyer, and Forgotten Murder by Dolores Gorden-Smith.
    Read quite a few other books which were also good, but these three stand out for me.
    January is a very grey and yucky month here in Texas, so killing something sounds like a good plan.

    Reply
  18. Y’all have given me new suggestions for good reads. Thank you.
    I love the T E Kinsey series and the Rhys Bowen series. But, these new to me books sound like they would be right up my alley.
    I have been reading some mysteries – Murder comes by Mail by Ann Gabhard, They Found Him Dead by Geoegette Heyer, and Forgotten Murder by Dolores Gorden-Smith.
    Read quite a few other books which were also good, but these three stand out for me.
    January is a very grey and yucky month here in Texas, so killing something sounds like a good plan.

    Reply
  19. Y’all have given me new suggestions for good reads. Thank you.
    I love the T E Kinsey series and the Rhys Bowen series. But, these new to me books sound like they would be right up my alley.
    I have been reading some mysteries – Murder comes by Mail by Ann Gabhard, They Found Him Dead by Geoegette Heyer, and Forgotten Murder by Dolores Gorden-Smith.
    Read quite a few other books which were also good, but these three stand out for me.
    January is a very grey and yucky month here in Texas, so killing something sounds like a good plan.

    Reply
  20. Y’all have given me new suggestions for good reads. Thank you.
    I love the T E Kinsey series and the Rhys Bowen series. But, these new to me books sound like they would be right up my alley.
    I have been reading some mysteries – Murder comes by Mail by Ann Gabhard, They Found Him Dead by Geoegette Heyer, and Forgotten Murder by Dolores Gorden-Smith.
    Read quite a few other books which were also good, but these three stand out for me.
    January is a very grey and yucky month here in Texas, so killing something sounds like a good plan.

    Reply
  21. I’ve read eight books so far. In a bit of a slump the last few days but got a bundle of books in the post today so will get going again.
    My stand out favorites are The Narrowboat Girls by Rosie Archer, A Nightingale Christmas Promise by Donna Douglas and Bold Brilliant and Bad by Marian Broderick (no relation). The third is a factual book about Irish women from all walks of life and their achievements, some dubious ones. It was a great read.
    Got some really good recces from this post. I’m definitely looking up A Gift of Ghosts. Sounds like one I’d like.

    Reply
  22. I’ve read eight books so far. In a bit of a slump the last few days but got a bundle of books in the post today so will get going again.
    My stand out favorites are The Narrowboat Girls by Rosie Archer, A Nightingale Christmas Promise by Donna Douglas and Bold Brilliant and Bad by Marian Broderick (no relation). The third is a factual book about Irish women from all walks of life and their achievements, some dubious ones. It was a great read.
    Got some really good recces from this post. I’m definitely looking up A Gift of Ghosts. Sounds like one I’d like.

    Reply
  23. I’ve read eight books so far. In a bit of a slump the last few days but got a bundle of books in the post today so will get going again.
    My stand out favorites are The Narrowboat Girls by Rosie Archer, A Nightingale Christmas Promise by Donna Douglas and Bold Brilliant and Bad by Marian Broderick (no relation). The third is a factual book about Irish women from all walks of life and their achievements, some dubious ones. It was a great read.
    Got some really good recces from this post. I’m definitely looking up A Gift of Ghosts. Sounds like one I’d like.

    Reply
  24. I’ve read eight books so far. In a bit of a slump the last few days but got a bundle of books in the post today so will get going again.
    My stand out favorites are The Narrowboat Girls by Rosie Archer, A Nightingale Christmas Promise by Donna Douglas and Bold Brilliant and Bad by Marian Broderick (no relation). The third is a factual book about Irish women from all walks of life and their achievements, some dubious ones. It was a great read.
    Got some really good recces from this post. I’m definitely looking up A Gift of Ghosts. Sounds like one I’d like.

    Reply
  25. I’ve read eight books so far. In a bit of a slump the last few days but got a bundle of books in the post today so will get going again.
    My stand out favorites are The Narrowboat Girls by Rosie Archer, A Nightingale Christmas Promise by Donna Douglas and Bold Brilliant and Bad by Marian Broderick (no relation). The third is a factual book about Irish women from all walks of life and their achievements, some dubious ones. It was a great read.
    Got some really good recces from this post. I’m definitely looking up A Gift of Ghosts. Sounds like one I’d like.

    Reply
  26. I spent January reading through Fawcett Coventry novels, one after another, because I got hold of the very first one (The Heartbreak Triangle by Nora Hampton); also I had some unread Mira Stables and Sylvia Thorpe titles and I was curious about some by authors I’ve never heard from before nor since. I suspect some of them were pen names but at this distance of years, it’s almost impossible to find out who they really were. There isn’t much to say about any of them except that I think the writing level was more complex 40 – 50 years ago. They are short, they are not linked series that can drag on & on, and they are tales well told in a writing style I like. (I do track these but it would be a pain to come up with a list.)
    I did read the third and last in Julie Klassen’s Ivy Hill series. Other than that I have been rereading old favorites a lot this month – Emma, Mansfield Park, Georgette Heyer, Marion Chesney and Alan Furst. In the “cloud” TBR pile I have preordered Nicola Cornick’s next book, which I am looking forward to very much.

    Reply
  27. I spent January reading through Fawcett Coventry novels, one after another, because I got hold of the very first one (The Heartbreak Triangle by Nora Hampton); also I had some unread Mira Stables and Sylvia Thorpe titles and I was curious about some by authors I’ve never heard from before nor since. I suspect some of them were pen names but at this distance of years, it’s almost impossible to find out who they really were. There isn’t much to say about any of them except that I think the writing level was more complex 40 – 50 years ago. They are short, they are not linked series that can drag on & on, and they are tales well told in a writing style I like. (I do track these but it would be a pain to come up with a list.)
    I did read the third and last in Julie Klassen’s Ivy Hill series. Other than that I have been rereading old favorites a lot this month – Emma, Mansfield Park, Georgette Heyer, Marion Chesney and Alan Furst. In the “cloud” TBR pile I have preordered Nicola Cornick’s next book, which I am looking forward to very much.

    Reply
  28. I spent January reading through Fawcett Coventry novels, one after another, because I got hold of the very first one (The Heartbreak Triangle by Nora Hampton); also I had some unread Mira Stables and Sylvia Thorpe titles and I was curious about some by authors I’ve never heard from before nor since. I suspect some of them were pen names but at this distance of years, it’s almost impossible to find out who they really were. There isn’t much to say about any of them except that I think the writing level was more complex 40 – 50 years ago. They are short, they are not linked series that can drag on & on, and they are tales well told in a writing style I like. (I do track these but it would be a pain to come up with a list.)
    I did read the third and last in Julie Klassen’s Ivy Hill series. Other than that I have been rereading old favorites a lot this month – Emma, Mansfield Park, Georgette Heyer, Marion Chesney and Alan Furst. In the “cloud” TBR pile I have preordered Nicola Cornick’s next book, which I am looking forward to very much.

    Reply
  29. I spent January reading through Fawcett Coventry novels, one after another, because I got hold of the very first one (The Heartbreak Triangle by Nora Hampton); also I had some unread Mira Stables and Sylvia Thorpe titles and I was curious about some by authors I’ve never heard from before nor since. I suspect some of them were pen names but at this distance of years, it’s almost impossible to find out who they really were. There isn’t much to say about any of them except that I think the writing level was more complex 40 – 50 years ago. They are short, they are not linked series that can drag on & on, and they are tales well told in a writing style I like. (I do track these but it would be a pain to come up with a list.)
    I did read the third and last in Julie Klassen’s Ivy Hill series. Other than that I have been rereading old favorites a lot this month – Emma, Mansfield Park, Georgette Heyer, Marion Chesney and Alan Furst. In the “cloud” TBR pile I have preordered Nicola Cornick’s next book, which I am looking forward to very much.

    Reply
  30. I spent January reading through Fawcett Coventry novels, one after another, because I got hold of the very first one (The Heartbreak Triangle by Nora Hampton); also I had some unread Mira Stables and Sylvia Thorpe titles and I was curious about some by authors I’ve never heard from before nor since. I suspect some of them were pen names but at this distance of years, it’s almost impossible to find out who they really were. There isn’t much to say about any of them except that I think the writing level was more complex 40 – 50 years ago. They are short, they are not linked series that can drag on & on, and they are tales well told in a writing style I like. (I do track these but it would be a pain to come up with a list.)
    I did read the third and last in Julie Klassen’s Ivy Hill series. Other than that I have been rereading old favorites a lot this month – Emma, Mansfield Park, Georgette Heyer, Marion Chesney and Alan Furst. In the “cloud” TBR pile I have preordered Nicola Cornick’s next book, which I am looking forward to very much.

    Reply
  31. My big fun re-read was listening to Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher, narrated by Lisa Burgett. I just love, love listening to that book while doing Christmas stuff.
    My two favorite “paper” books I read were Luke’s Ride by Helen DePrima and Cowboy Honor by Carolyn Brown. They were definitely a cut above most of the “cowboy” romances I’ve read recently. I’ll definitely keep them to read again. Once I get them back from my sister that is.
    Yes….I added more books to my wish list. Y’all make too many books sound very tempting!

    Reply
  32. My big fun re-read was listening to Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher, narrated by Lisa Burgett. I just love, love listening to that book while doing Christmas stuff.
    My two favorite “paper” books I read were Luke’s Ride by Helen DePrima and Cowboy Honor by Carolyn Brown. They were definitely a cut above most of the “cowboy” romances I’ve read recently. I’ll definitely keep them to read again. Once I get them back from my sister that is.
    Yes….I added more books to my wish list. Y’all make too many books sound very tempting!

    Reply
  33. My big fun re-read was listening to Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher, narrated by Lisa Burgett. I just love, love listening to that book while doing Christmas stuff.
    My two favorite “paper” books I read were Luke’s Ride by Helen DePrima and Cowboy Honor by Carolyn Brown. They were definitely a cut above most of the “cowboy” romances I’ve read recently. I’ll definitely keep them to read again. Once I get them back from my sister that is.
    Yes….I added more books to my wish list. Y’all make too many books sound very tempting!

    Reply
  34. My big fun re-read was listening to Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher, narrated by Lisa Burgett. I just love, love listening to that book while doing Christmas stuff.
    My two favorite “paper” books I read were Luke’s Ride by Helen DePrima and Cowboy Honor by Carolyn Brown. They were definitely a cut above most of the “cowboy” romances I’ve read recently. I’ll definitely keep them to read again. Once I get them back from my sister that is.
    Yes….I added more books to my wish list. Y’all make too many books sound very tempting!

    Reply
  35. My big fun re-read was listening to Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher, narrated by Lisa Burgett. I just love, love listening to that book while doing Christmas stuff.
    My two favorite “paper” books I read were Luke’s Ride by Helen DePrima and Cowboy Honor by Carolyn Brown. They were definitely a cut above most of the “cowboy” romances I’ve read recently. I’ll definitely keep them to read again. Once I get them back from my sister that is.
    Yes….I added more books to my wish list. Y’all make too many books sound very tempting!

    Reply

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