What We’re Reading: February

Winter yard

Susan's yard last week.

February! A great time to snuggle up and read, no matter where you are — and the Wenches, scattered around the globe as we are, have had snowstorms, icy blasts, balmy west coast days, and hot southern hemisphere days too while we've done our February reading. We've had some Valentine chocolates, and hot cocoa or iced drinks to comfort that summer/winter vibe–all while contemplating our towering TBR stacks even as we face down deadlines, edits, and all the things that Life can throw at us. No matter what that may be, we always have great books to share.  

Andrea –

I was lucky enough to get an ARC of Lauren Willig’s new book, Band of Sisters, which releases on March 2, and absolutely loved it. Based on a true story, the novel follows the adventures of the Smith College Relief Unit, a band of 18 young recent women graduates—led by an charismatic women professor and two women doctors—who volunteer to head to the front in war-torn France during WWI to help the villagers in several small towns rebuild their lives. Little do they know what lies ahead . . .

Band of SistersWe see the story through the eyes of two best friends in college, who have drifted apart in the couple of years after graduation. Kate is a scholarship girl, ekeing out a living in a teaching job she dislikes, while Emmie—whose mother is a well-known Suffragette—is from a wealthy and privileged family. Kate is more pragmatic, while Emmie is cheerfully idealist . . . and when they arrive in France both soon find their expectations and their resolve tested in ways that defy their imagination. From literally putting together the trucks they need to drive from a pile of parts in crates to buying agricultural supplies and 70 chickens for laying eggs—which turn out to be roosters!— the challenges are both hilarious and poignant. And as Kate and Emmie try to deal with the complexities of their friendship, they and the other women find themselves tested on a far great scale as they realize how many men, women and children are counting on them for survival. The front lines are perilously close, with the danger of attack looming over them every day. The stresses build, the girls bicker . . . but somehow hold everything together.

Willig had access to the original letters written by the real-life Smith College Relief Unit and many of the actual incidents they went through are portrayed in the novel. It’s a wonderful and inspiring story of how “ordinary" people find it in themselves to be heroes. There’s both humor and heartbreak, and in the end it’s a cheer-aloud celebration of the power of friendship and hope against all odds. I highly recommend it!

Christina –

Many years ago, my niece asked me to read Just Listen by Sarah Dessen in order to help her write a paper Just Listen for school about it and I was totally blown away. That book introduced me to YA and it is still one of the best I’ve ever read. Recently I picked up another Sarah Dessen book – The Rest of the Story– and really loved that as well. In fact, the characters have stayed in my head all week and just won’t let go – to me that’s the sign of a truly great book.

Emma Saylor Payne’s mother, a drug addict and alcoholic, died when she was 12 and since then she’s lived with her dad and grandmother. She hasn’t seen any of her mother’s relatives since she was 4, but she remembers the stories her mother told of the magically beautiful lake where she grew up. When Emma is unexpectedly sent to spend the summer there, she has to reconnect with a grandmother, aunt and cousins she never knew she had, and it turns out to be a summer she’ll never forget. Finally, she gets to hear the rest of her mother’s story, the truth about her past, and it changes her perception of everything, including her dad. Emma’s mother came from a working class environment, whereas Emma’s dad had a more privileged background. At the lake, there is a poor area on one side, and a resort for the rich on the other – and the two don’t mix. Except they did when Emma’s parents met. Now she finds there are two sides to her heritage and she has to reconcile them – one family calls her Emma, one calls her Saylor. Which one does she want to be? And then there is Roo, the boy she apparently met aged four and formed a bond with, one she’d forgotten and yet hasn’t, because she feels an instant connection with him. Roo is the kind of boy I wish I’d met at that age. He is just so wonderful I fell in love with him along with Emma.

I don’t know if Wench readers like YA, but if you do, I’d highly recommend both of those (and all Sarah Dessen’s other books as well). They don't just deal with romance, but with real life issues and problems, and there is no sugar-coating whatsoever. The stories are visceral and just pull you in completely. 

Nicola –

Nicola here. I’ve just finished The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths, which I thoroughly enjoyed. A number of Wenches have enthused about her Ruth Galloway series and I adore those too. This book seems to follow something of a trend in the UK of “cosy crime” stories involving older people in retirement homes. It’s funny and Elly Griffiths’ characterisation is wonderful as always as a disparate group of sleuths set out to try and solve a series of murders. It’s also set in the publishing world so there is a road trip to the Aberdeen Literary Festival and lots of cute asides about writing and publishing. If you like crime without too much gore, blood and forensics you might enjoy this although the policewoman in the book makes the point that “there’s nothing cosy about murder.” Absolutely. There’s also a very sweet, unlikely The Duke's Runaway Brideromance in it as well, which had me rooting for the couple. A really engrossing mystery and a great read.

The Duke’s Runaway Bride by Jenni Fletcher had me at the title. It’s the third in the Regency Belles of Bath mini-series but works fine as a standalone story, though I’ll be going back to catch up on the first two books in the series. Beatrix, Duchess of Roxbury, ran away from her arranged marriage shortly after the vows were exchanged and assumed a new identity in Bath. She had her own, excellent reasons for doing this and after a while, writes to her husband asking for an annulment or a divorce. However Quinton Roxbury isn’t inclined to agree; his family is mired in scandal already and he can’t face another one. Quinton and Beatrix strike a bargain, and in the process, learn a lot about each other and themselves… What I particularly liked about this book was the way that the couple communicated openly with each other. It felt grown up and realistic. They started to understand each other and you could see how their emotional relationship developed from there. It was very satisfying and enjoyable.

Anne –

Anne here. One historical romance, one historical novel, and a whole bunch of crime novels for me this month. The historical romance was an oldie — a reread of Georgette Heyer's The Talisman Ring, which I hadn't read in years. I think I enjoyed it more this time around than I had in the past, and laughed out loud —and was in awe of— some of the sparkling dialogue exchanges.

The historical novel was Carla Kelly's new book,  The Necklace.

Not Carla Kelly's usual kind of romance, this is a powerful historical novel, grim and devastating in parts, uplifting in others. Hanneke, the 17 year old daughter of a dutch herring merchant is traded in marriage to a Spanish nobleman — her rich dowry in exchange for valuable fishing rights. Hanneke is given no choice in the matter. She doesn't even get to meet Santiago Gonzalez her husband-to-be.  In Spain she learns that her dowry is to be used to help raise an army to drive the Moors out of Spain. But Hanneke is strong willed and courageous and watching her negotiate the horrors and trials of 13th century Spanish warfare made for a gripping read.

CatherineLloydNext was a light, enjoyable Regency-era mystery series, which a friend recommended to me. Book #1 in the series is Death Comes to the Village, by Catherine Lloyd.

Major Robert Kurland has returned to his home in Kurland St. Mary to recuperate from injuries received at Waterloo. Lucy Harrington, the spinster daughter of the widowed rector has helped care for him — she won't allow him to give up on himself.  When late one night Robert glimpses a suspicious incident from his window, he confides in Lucy — and the investigation of the mystery commences.

They're a fun couple — the gruff, often bad-tempered invalid, and the dutiful but spirited and intelligent spinster. An enjoyable read, and I'm now on book #3 in the series. (Also available in Audible)

Another fun mystery series I began this month is the Amanda Pepper series by Gillian Roberts.  Book #1 is Caught Dead in Philadelphia  by Gillian Roberts.

CaughtDeadInPhillyThese books were first published in the 80's, won awards, went out of print and are now republished as e-books. In the introduction the author explains that she decided not to try to update them to current times — and I think the books are better for it. It's quite interesting to see how much things have changed — our heroine is barely computer literate, there are no mobile phones, etc. And yet her attitudes are refreshing and don't feel at all out of place with our times. There is a romantic interest too, in the person of gorgeous Southern-accented police detective CK MacKenzie, and that rings true to today as well, without being in any way anachronistic. As well as a good and engrossing mystery, there is wonderful humor, and I chuckled a number of times at the clever turns of phrase and the wry observations of the heroine. I thoroughly enjoyed this series. The first book was 99c which tempted me to try it, and I'm now up to book #6.  (Also available in Audible)

Finally another crime story, contemporary and gritty in places — Ahead of the Game by JD Kirk. The latest in his Scottish crime series, I had it on pre-order and gobbled it down as soon as it arrived. I love this series and have the next book on preorder. This is book #10, but if you haven't read him, start with book #1, because the characters and relationships develop through the series. Good crime and dry Scottish humor.

BeginnersluckPat –

BEGINNER’S LUCK (Chance of a Lifetime Book 1) Kate Clayborn

The series opening is three friends jointly winning the lottery, so it’s no spoiler to say Ekaterina (Kit) Averin has enough money to quit her job but doesn’t want to. What she does is buy what she’s always wanted—a home, one near work that needs complete restoration, where she can meet the neighbors and settle in. Kit’s childhood was a series of impoverished apartments in whatever city her alcoholic father landed them in. Now she’s in charge of her life and she wants to settle down, make friends, work where she’s comfortable, and not change.

Until the day corporate Ben walks into her life, offering a fancy job in Houston. Ben’s lived the settled life in this rural nowhere and has no wish to return. His father owns the salvage yard where Kit buys the hardware she needs for her new house. Ben’s painful memories of his messed-up youth are in this hick town. He wants to recruit Kit, make his boss happy, get him and his friends out of their corporate non-compete job, and start his own company—anywhere else but here. (I’m not sure the book ever mentions where “here” is)

This is an unapologetic romance about two different people with different goals who manage to find their souls again, to reach out and dare to love. I’m not a big fan of contemporary romance but the characters, their friends and family, were drawn with such beautiful humanity that I fell in love with them. If you’re into the magic of love, laughter, and tears, give this one a try.

Have you done much reading lately, in snowy or warm weather? What would you recommend we try as we head into March? 

165 thoughts on “What We’re Reading: February”

  1. I’ve read two terrific mysteries just this past week, the latest in Charles Todd’s Ian Rutledge series, A Fatal Lie, and Charlaine Harris’s The Russian Cage, third in her alternate history series set in a world where the US is broken up into smaller countries and what was California is ruled by the young son of Tsar Nicholas, the Russian royal family having escaped execution in this version of history. Probably best to read earlier books first, but not absolutely necessary. In both cases, I’d rate these entries among their authors’ best.

    Reply
  2. I’ve read two terrific mysteries just this past week, the latest in Charles Todd’s Ian Rutledge series, A Fatal Lie, and Charlaine Harris’s The Russian Cage, third in her alternate history series set in a world where the US is broken up into smaller countries and what was California is ruled by the young son of Tsar Nicholas, the Russian royal family having escaped execution in this version of history. Probably best to read earlier books first, but not absolutely necessary. In both cases, I’d rate these entries among their authors’ best.

    Reply
  3. I’ve read two terrific mysteries just this past week, the latest in Charles Todd’s Ian Rutledge series, A Fatal Lie, and Charlaine Harris’s The Russian Cage, third in her alternate history series set in a world where the US is broken up into smaller countries and what was California is ruled by the young son of Tsar Nicholas, the Russian royal family having escaped execution in this version of history. Probably best to read earlier books first, but not absolutely necessary. In both cases, I’d rate these entries among their authors’ best.

    Reply
  4. I’ve read two terrific mysteries just this past week, the latest in Charles Todd’s Ian Rutledge series, A Fatal Lie, and Charlaine Harris’s The Russian Cage, third in her alternate history series set in a world where the US is broken up into smaller countries and what was California is ruled by the young son of Tsar Nicholas, the Russian royal family having escaped execution in this version of history. Probably best to read earlier books first, but not absolutely necessary. In both cases, I’d rate these entries among their authors’ best.

    Reply
  5. I’ve read two terrific mysteries just this past week, the latest in Charles Todd’s Ian Rutledge series, A Fatal Lie, and Charlaine Harris’s The Russian Cage, third in her alternate history series set in a world where the US is broken up into smaller countries and what was California is ruled by the young son of Tsar Nicholas, the Russian royal family having escaped execution in this version of history. Probably best to read earlier books first, but not absolutely necessary. In both cases, I’d rate these entries among their authors’ best.

    Reply
  6. Since last time ~
    — The Dutch House: A Novel by Ann Patchett for my book group. Had I not been reading this for the group, I’d have put it aside early on. However, by the halfway point, I was quite invested and overall I enjoyed it.
    — a prequel novella A Haunting at Midwinter (San Amaro Investigations #0.5) by Kai Butler which I enjoyed. I hope, at some point, to read on in the series.
    — Chuffed (Finnshifters Book 1) by Tia Fielding; this was a pleasant contemporary romance, but I’m not inclined to read on in the series.
    — Fifty in Reverse: A Novel by Bill Flanagan is a book which I quite enjoyed; I’ll recommend it to others who enjoy books with time travel or similar themes. It’s a quick read and I finished it in one evening. It’s a very new book and even mentions COVID-19 in passing. I also found it interesting that one of the cover blurbs was from Salman Rushdie.
    — Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1) by Suzanne Palmer; this was recommended by S.K. Dunstall, the authors of one of my favorite series. I enjoyed it and plan to read on in the series.
    — The Sergeant’s Lady by Susanna Fraser which is the first historical romance that I’ve read in a while. I enjoyed it. It’s unusual in that the heroine is wealthy while the hero is a commoner.
    — Hunting by Andrea K Höst which I quite enjoyed. Unlike the author’s Touchstone series, this was fantasy rather than science fiction. (While I liked this, I don’t imagine this is a book I’ll be quick to reread as I did with the other series.) This book would be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — And All the Stars by Andrea Höst. I enjoyed this science fiction book (which had a surprising revelation at one point), but I also found it less straightforward than some of the author’s other books.
    — reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst; thus far, the Touchstone series is my favorite of the books by Andrea Höst that I’ve read. I enjoyed this once again. (Just a reminder that this book is free to Kindle readers.)
    — The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick. When my group met in December to choose future books, we discussed how many depressing books we’d read. This book was suggested to balance that. It was a pleasure to read a book group book that was not dark and dismal!
    — the science fiction romance Overload Flux: Central Galactic Concordance Book 1 by Carol Van Natta which was a gift from a friend who knows I like space opera and romance; I enjoyed it. Interestingly, it has a pandemic storyline though it was written in 2014.
    — enjoyed the book Mail Me Art: Going Postal with the World’s Best Illustrators and Designers by Darren Di Lieto. It was fun looking at all the different art pieces with their various styles; I also liked reading the included artist interviews.
    — a second gift book: Finders Keepers by Linnea Sinclair. This author’s books often show up on lists of science fiction romances. Interestingly, I’ve tried several of her books in the past with no success; this one I enjoyed.
    — Metal Boxes by Alan Black. The book is silly in parts; however, it definitely kept my attention, and I enjoyed it. I see it’s classified as both space opera and military science fiction.
    — Driving the Deep (The Finder Chronicles Book 2) by Suzanne Palmer. I enjoyed it. I’m glad that I read it fairly soon after the first book as I was already starting to forget some details. If interested, this is a series that absolutely needs to be read in order. Start with Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1).
    — Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate Book 1) by Megan E. O’Keefe. This was definitely a book that kept the reader guessing — who is telling the truth?, what is happening? I hope to read the second book at some point … hopefully before I forget too much of what happened in this book!
    — reread of Alliance and Confluence by S. K. Dunstall; I enjoyed them yet again.
    — plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  7. Since last time ~
    — The Dutch House: A Novel by Ann Patchett for my book group. Had I not been reading this for the group, I’d have put it aside early on. However, by the halfway point, I was quite invested and overall I enjoyed it.
    — a prequel novella A Haunting at Midwinter (San Amaro Investigations #0.5) by Kai Butler which I enjoyed. I hope, at some point, to read on in the series.
    — Chuffed (Finnshifters Book 1) by Tia Fielding; this was a pleasant contemporary romance, but I’m not inclined to read on in the series.
    — Fifty in Reverse: A Novel by Bill Flanagan is a book which I quite enjoyed; I’ll recommend it to others who enjoy books with time travel or similar themes. It’s a quick read and I finished it in one evening. It’s a very new book and even mentions COVID-19 in passing. I also found it interesting that one of the cover blurbs was from Salman Rushdie.
    — Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1) by Suzanne Palmer; this was recommended by S.K. Dunstall, the authors of one of my favorite series. I enjoyed it and plan to read on in the series.
    — The Sergeant’s Lady by Susanna Fraser which is the first historical romance that I’ve read in a while. I enjoyed it. It’s unusual in that the heroine is wealthy while the hero is a commoner.
    — Hunting by Andrea K Höst which I quite enjoyed. Unlike the author’s Touchstone series, this was fantasy rather than science fiction. (While I liked this, I don’t imagine this is a book I’ll be quick to reread as I did with the other series.) This book would be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — And All the Stars by Andrea Höst. I enjoyed this science fiction book (which had a surprising revelation at one point), but I also found it less straightforward than some of the author’s other books.
    — reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst; thus far, the Touchstone series is my favorite of the books by Andrea Höst that I’ve read. I enjoyed this once again. (Just a reminder that this book is free to Kindle readers.)
    — The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick. When my group met in December to choose future books, we discussed how many depressing books we’d read. This book was suggested to balance that. It was a pleasure to read a book group book that was not dark and dismal!
    — the science fiction romance Overload Flux: Central Galactic Concordance Book 1 by Carol Van Natta which was a gift from a friend who knows I like space opera and romance; I enjoyed it. Interestingly, it has a pandemic storyline though it was written in 2014.
    — enjoyed the book Mail Me Art: Going Postal with the World’s Best Illustrators and Designers by Darren Di Lieto. It was fun looking at all the different art pieces with their various styles; I also liked reading the included artist interviews.
    — a second gift book: Finders Keepers by Linnea Sinclair. This author’s books often show up on lists of science fiction romances. Interestingly, I’ve tried several of her books in the past with no success; this one I enjoyed.
    — Metal Boxes by Alan Black. The book is silly in parts; however, it definitely kept my attention, and I enjoyed it. I see it’s classified as both space opera and military science fiction.
    — Driving the Deep (The Finder Chronicles Book 2) by Suzanne Palmer. I enjoyed it. I’m glad that I read it fairly soon after the first book as I was already starting to forget some details. If interested, this is a series that absolutely needs to be read in order. Start with Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1).
    — Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate Book 1) by Megan E. O’Keefe. This was definitely a book that kept the reader guessing — who is telling the truth?, what is happening? I hope to read the second book at some point … hopefully before I forget too much of what happened in this book!
    — reread of Alliance and Confluence by S. K. Dunstall; I enjoyed them yet again.
    — plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  8. Since last time ~
    — The Dutch House: A Novel by Ann Patchett for my book group. Had I not been reading this for the group, I’d have put it aside early on. However, by the halfway point, I was quite invested and overall I enjoyed it.
    — a prequel novella A Haunting at Midwinter (San Amaro Investigations #0.5) by Kai Butler which I enjoyed. I hope, at some point, to read on in the series.
    — Chuffed (Finnshifters Book 1) by Tia Fielding; this was a pleasant contemporary romance, but I’m not inclined to read on in the series.
    — Fifty in Reverse: A Novel by Bill Flanagan is a book which I quite enjoyed; I’ll recommend it to others who enjoy books with time travel or similar themes. It’s a quick read and I finished it in one evening. It’s a very new book and even mentions COVID-19 in passing. I also found it interesting that one of the cover blurbs was from Salman Rushdie.
    — Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1) by Suzanne Palmer; this was recommended by S.K. Dunstall, the authors of one of my favorite series. I enjoyed it and plan to read on in the series.
    — The Sergeant’s Lady by Susanna Fraser which is the first historical romance that I’ve read in a while. I enjoyed it. It’s unusual in that the heroine is wealthy while the hero is a commoner.
    — Hunting by Andrea K Höst which I quite enjoyed. Unlike the author’s Touchstone series, this was fantasy rather than science fiction. (While I liked this, I don’t imagine this is a book I’ll be quick to reread as I did with the other series.) This book would be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — And All the Stars by Andrea Höst. I enjoyed this science fiction book (which had a surprising revelation at one point), but I also found it less straightforward than some of the author’s other books.
    — reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst; thus far, the Touchstone series is my favorite of the books by Andrea Höst that I’ve read. I enjoyed this once again. (Just a reminder that this book is free to Kindle readers.)
    — The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick. When my group met in December to choose future books, we discussed how many depressing books we’d read. This book was suggested to balance that. It was a pleasure to read a book group book that was not dark and dismal!
    — the science fiction romance Overload Flux: Central Galactic Concordance Book 1 by Carol Van Natta which was a gift from a friend who knows I like space opera and romance; I enjoyed it. Interestingly, it has a pandemic storyline though it was written in 2014.
    — enjoyed the book Mail Me Art: Going Postal with the World’s Best Illustrators and Designers by Darren Di Lieto. It was fun looking at all the different art pieces with their various styles; I also liked reading the included artist interviews.
    — a second gift book: Finders Keepers by Linnea Sinclair. This author’s books often show up on lists of science fiction romances. Interestingly, I’ve tried several of her books in the past with no success; this one I enjoyed.
    — Metal Boxes by Alan Black. The book is silly in parts; however, it definitely kept my attention, and I enjoyed it. I see it’s classified as both space opera and military science fiction.
    — Driving the Deep (The Finder Chronicles Book 2) by Suzanne Palmer. I enjoyed it. I’m glad that I read it fairly soon after the first book as I was already starting to forget some details. If interested, this is a series that absolutely needs to be read in order. Start with Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1).
    — Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate Book 1) by Megan E. O’Keefe. This was definitely a book that kept the reader guessing — who is telling the truth?, what is happening? I hope to read the second book at some point … hopefully before I forget too much of what happened in this book!
    — reread of Alliance and Confluence by S. K. Dunstall; I enjoyed them yet again.
    — plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  9. Since last time ~
    — The Dutch House: A Novel by Ann Patchett for my book group. Had I not been reading this for the group, I’d have put it aside early on. However, by the halfway point, I was quite invested and overall I enjoyed it.
    — a prequel novella A Haunting at Midwinter (San Amaro Investigations #0.5) by Kai Butler which I enjoyed. I hope, at some point, to read on in the series.
    — Chuffed (Finnshifters Book 1) by Tia Fielding; this was a pleasant contemporary romance, but I’m not inclined to read on in the series.
    — Fifty in Reverse: A Novel by Bill Flanagan is a book which I quite enjoyed; I’ll recommend it to others who enjoy books with time travel or similar themes. It’s a quick read and I finished it in one evening. It’s a very new book and even mentions COVID-19 in passing. I also found it interesting that one of the cover blurbs was from Salman Rushdie.
    — Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1) by Suzanne Palmer; this was recommended by S.K. Dunstall, the authors of one of my favorite series. I enjoyed it and plan to read on in the series.
    — The Sergeant’s Lady by Susanna Fraser which is the first historical romance that I’ve read in a while. I enjoyed it. It’s unusual in that the heroine is wealthy while the hero is a commoner.
    — Hunting by Andrea K Höst which I quite enjoyed. Unlike the author’s Touchstone series, this was fantasy rather than science fiction. (While I liked this, I don’t imagine this is a book I’ll be quick to reread as I did with the other series.) This book would be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — And All the Stars by Andrea Höst. I enjoyed this science fiction book (which had a surprising revelation at one point), but I also found it less straightforward than some of the author’s other books.
    — reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst; thus far, the Touchstone series is my favorite of the books by Andrea Höst that I’ve read. I enjoyed this once again. (Just a reminder that this book is free to Kindle readers.)
    — The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick. When my group met in December to choose future books, we discussed how many depressing books we’d read. This book was suggested to balance that. It was a pleasure to read a book group book that was not dark and dismal!
    — the science fiction romance Overload Flux: Central Galactic Concordance Book 1 by Carol Van Natta which was a gift from a friend who knows I like space opera and romance; I enjoyed it. Interestingly, it has a pandemic storyline though it was written in 2014.
    — enjoyed the book Mail Me Art: Going Postal with the World’s Best Illustrators and Designers by Darren Di Lieto. It was fun looking at all the different art pieces with their various styles; I also liked reading the included artist interviews.
    — a second gift book: Finders Keepers by Linnea Sinclair. This author’s books often show up on lists of science fiction romances. Interestingly, I’ve tried several of her books in the past with no success; this one I enjoyed.
    — Metal Boxes by Alan Black. The book is silly in parts; however, it definitely kept my attention, and I enjoyed it. I see it’s classified as both space opera and military science fiction.
    — Driving the Deep (The Finder Chronicles Book 2) by Suzanne Palmer. I enjoyed it. I’m glad that I read it fairly soon after the first book as I was already starting to forget some details. If interested, this is a series that absolutely needs to be read in order. Start with Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1).
    — Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate Book 1) by Megan E. O’Keefe. This was definitely a book that kept the reader guessing — who is telling the truth?, what is happening? I hope to read the second book at some point … hopefully before I forget too much of what happened in this book!
    — reread of Alliance and Confluence by S. K. Dunstall; I enjoyed them yet again.
    — plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  10. Since last time ~
    — The Dutch House: A Novel by Ann Patchett for my book group. Had I not been reading this for the group, I’d have put it aside early on. However, by the halfway point, I was quite invested and overall I enjoyed it.
    — a prequel novella A Haunting at Midwinter (San Amaro Investigations #0.5) by Kai Butler which I enjoyed. I hope, at some point, to read on in the series.
    — Chuffed (Finnshifters Book 1) by Tia Fielding; this was a pleasant contemporary romance, but I’m not inclined to read on in the series.
    — Fifty in Reverse: A Novel by Bill Flanagan is a book which I quite enjoyed; I’ll recommend it to others who enjoy books with time travel or similar themes. It’s a quick read and I finished it in one evening. It’s a very new book and even mentions COVID-19 in passing. I also found it interesting that one of the cover blurbs was from Salman Rushdie.
    — Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1) by Suzanne Palmer; this was recommended by S.K. Dunstall, the authors of one of my favorite series. I enjoyed it and plan to read on in the series.
    — The Sergeant’s Lady by Susanna Fraser which is the first historical romance that I’ve read in a while. I enjoyed it. It’s unusual in that the heroine is wealthy while the hero is a commoner.
    — Hunting by Andrea K Höst which I quite enjoyed. Unlike the author’s Touchstone series, this was fantasy rather than science fiction. (While I liked this, I don’t imagine this is a book I’ll be quick to reread as I did with the other series.) This book would be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — And All the Stars by Andrea Höst. I enjoyed this science fiction book (which had a surprising revelation at one point), but I also found it less straightforward than some of the author’s other books.
    — reread Stray (Touchstone Book 1) by Andrea K. Höst; thus far, the Touchstone series is my favorite of the books by Andrea Höst that I’ve read. I enjoyed this once again. (Just a reminder that this book is free to Kindle readers.)
    — The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper by Phaedra Patrick. When my group met in December to choose future books, we discussed how many depressing books we’d read. This book was suggested to balance that. It was a pleasure to read a book group book that was not dark and dismal!
    — the science fiction romance Overload Flux: Central Galactic Concordance Book 1 by Carol Van Natta which was a gift from a friend who knows I like space opera and romance; I enjoyed it. Interestingly, it has a pandemic storyline though it was written in 2014.
    — enjoyed the book Mail Me Art: Going Postal with the World’s Best Illustrators and Designers by Darren Di Lieto. It was fun looking at all the different art pieces with their various styles; I also liked reading the included artist interviews.
    — a second gift book: Finders Keepers by Linnea Sinclair. This author’s books often show up on lists of science fiction romances. Interestingly, I’ve tried several of her books in the past with no success; this one I enjoyed.
    — Metal Boxes by Alan Black. The book is silly in parts; however, it definitely kept my attention, and I enjoyed it. I see it’s classified as both space opera and military science fiction.
    — Driving the Deep (The Finder Chronicles Book 2) by Suzanne Palmer. I enjoyed it. I’m glad that I read it fairly soon after the first book as I was already starting to forget some details. If interested, this is a series that absolutely needs to be read in order. Start with Finder (The Finder Chronicles Book 1).
    — Velocity Weapon (The Protectorate Book 1) by Megan E. O’Keefe. This was definitely a book that kept the reader guessing — who is telling the truth?, what is happening? I hope to read the second book at some point … hopefully before I forget too much of what happened in this book!
    — reread of Alliance and Confluence by S. K. Dunstall; I enjoyed them yet again.
    — plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  11. That sounds great, Kathy Lynn – I love stories where the Tsar’s family (or at least some of them) have managed to escape their awful fate!

    Reply
  12. That sounds great, Kathy Lynn – I love stories where the Tsar’s family (or at least some of them) have managed to escape their awful fate!

    Reply
  13. That sounds great, Kathy Lynn – I love stories where the Tsar’s family (or at least some of them) have managed to escape their awful fate!

    Reply
  14. That sounds great, Kathy Lynn – I love stories where the Tsar’s family (or at least some of them) have managed to escape their awful fate!

    Reply
  15. That sounds great, Kathy Lynn – I love stories where the Tsar’s family (or at least some of them) have managed to escape their awful fate!

    Reply
  16. I started February off strong reading books but petered out because I was too tired at the end of the day. When you drop the book you know you are too tired to read. (grin). When I dropped Dolly that hurt as it was a big heavy book.
    His housekeepers Christmas Wish by Louise Allen. There were a lot of improbable parts to the story but it was fun. A viscount has a Collision with a nun on the street in France yet she turns out not to be a nun. Then it turns out she is illegitimate. Then she is disguised as a housekeeper. Then, then, then…I read the next 3 in the series but they weren’t nearly as good. Some characters became too whiny.
    Dolly Parton – Song Teller, My Life in Lyrics by Dolly Parton and Robert K. Oermann. I had seen a review of it in the paper so got it from the library. That was a fascinating book. Dolly has been writing songs since she was 4 or 5 years old. They used the songs as a way to tell the story of her life. Each song was presented with all the lyrics. Tons of pictures of Dolly through the years. Plus small stories about each song or points of her life. Definitely worth reading as she is an amazing woman. You don’t even have to be a country music fan to enjoy the book.
    I was poking around on Mary Jo’s website and read the bit about why she didn’t continue the series started by The Marriage Spell. When she mentioned that 2 heroes and one heroine were renamed and had their chance at life in the Lost Lord series I just had to figure out who they were. So I reread The Marriage Spell and enjoyed it as usual. Plus figured out who lived on under a different name.
    Then I went on a Dust-Bunny binge and read 3 or 4 of Jayne Castle’s Harmony series books. I’ve read them often enough that when I fell asleep I didn’t lose my place. Nor did I get injured when I dropped the book.
    I’ve already written down several names of books…I’ll see what is available from Interlibrary loan now that it has started back up again.

    Reply
  17. I started February off strong reading books but petered out because I was too tired at the end of the day. When you drop the book you know you are too tired to read. (grin). When I dropped Dolly that hurt as it was a big heavy book.
    His housekeepers Christmas Wish by Louise Allen. There were a lot of improbable parts to the story but it was fun. A viscount has a Collision with a nun on the street in France yet she turns out not to be a nun. Then it turns out she is illegitimate. Then she is disguised as a housekeeper. Then, then, then…I read the next 3 in the series but they weren’t nearly as good. Some characters became too whiny.
    Dolly Parton – Song Teller, My Life in Lyrics by Dolly Parton and Robert K. Oermann. I had seen a review of it in the paper so got it from the library. That was a fascinating book. Dolly has been writing songs since she was 4 or 5 years old. They used the songs as a way to tell the story of her life. Each song was presented with all the lyrics. Tons of pictures of Dolly through the years. Plus small stories about each song or points of her life. Definitely worth reading as she is an amazing woman. You don’t even have to be a country music fan to enjoy the book.
    I was poking around on Mary Jo’s website and read the bit about why she didn’t continue the series started by The Marriage Spell. When she mentioned that 2 heroes and one heroine were renamed and had their chance at life in the Lost Lord series I just had to figure out who they were. So I reread The Marriage Spell and enjoyed it as usual. Plus figured out who lived on under a different name.
    Then I went on a Dust-Bunny binge and read 3 or 4 of Jayne Castle’s Harmony series books. I’ve read them often enough that when I fell asleep I didn’t lose my place. Nor did I get injured when I dropped the book.
    I’ve already written down several names of books…I’ll see what is available from Interlibrary loan now that it has started back up again.

    Reply
  18. I started February off strong reading books but petered out because I was too tired at the end of the day. When you drop the book you know you are too tired to read. (grin). When I dropped Dolly that hurt as it was a big heavy book.
    His housekeepers Christmas Wish by Louise Allen. There were a lot of improbable parts to the story but it was fun. A viscount has a Collision with a nun on the street in France yet she turns out not to be a nun. Then it turns out she is illegitimate. Then she is disguised as a housekeeper. Then, then, then…I read the next 3 in the series but they weren’t nearly as good. Some characters became too whiny.
    Dolly Parton – Song Teller, My Life in Lyrics by Dolly Parton and Robert K. Oermann. I had seen a review of it in the paper so got it from the library. That was a fascinating book. Dolly has been writing songs since she was 4 or 5 years old. They used the songs as a way to tell the story of her life. Each song was presented with all the lyrics. Tons of pictures of Dolly through the years. Plus small stories about each song or points of her life. Definitely worth reading as she is an amazing woman. You don’t even have to be a country music fan to enjoy the book.
    I was poking around on Mary Jo’s website and read the bit about why she didn’t continue the series started by The Marriage Spell. When she mentioned that 2 heroes and one heroine were renamed and had their chance at life in the Lost Lord series I just had to figure out who they were. So I reread The Marriage Spell and enjoyed it as usual. Plus figured out who lived on under a different name.
    Then I went on a Dust-Bunny binge and read 3 or 4 of Jayne Castle’s Harmony series books. I’ve read them often enough that when I fell asleep I didn’t lose my place. Nor did I get injured when I dropped the book.
    I’ve already written down several names of books…I’ll see what is available from Interlibrary loan now that it has started back up again.

    Reply
  19. I started February off strong reading books but petered out because I was too tired at the end of the day. When you drop the book you know you are too tired to read. (grin). When I dropped Dolly that hurt as it was a big heavy book.
    His housekeepers Christmas Wish by Louise Allen. There were a lot of improbable parts to the story but it was fun. A viscount has a Collision with a nun on the street in France yet she turns out not to be a nun. Then it turns out she is illegitimate. Then she is disguised as a housekeeper. Then, then, then…I read the next 3 in the series but they weren’t nearly as good. Some characters became too whiny.
    Dolly Parton – Song Teller, My Life in Lyrics by Dolly Parton and Robert K. Oermann. I had seen a review of it in the paper so got it from the library. That was a fascinating book. Dolly has been writing songs since she was 4 or 5 years old. They used the songs as a way to tell the story of her life. Each song was presented with all the lyrics. Tons of pictures of Dolly through the years. Plus small stories about each song or points of her life. Definitely worth reading as she is an amazing woman. You don’t even have to be a country music fan to enjoy the book.
    I was poking around on Mary Jo’s website and read the bit about why she didn’t continue the series started by The Marriage Spell. When she mentioned that 2 heroes and one heroine were renamed and had their chance at life in the Lost Lord series I just had to figure out who they were. So I reread The Marriage Spell and enjoyed it as usual. Plus figured out who lived on under a different name.
    Then I went on a Dust-Bunny binge and read 3 or 4 of Jayne Castle’s Harmony series books. I’ve read them often enough that when I fell asleep I didn’t lose my place. Nor did I get injured when I dropped the book.
    I’ve already written down several names of books…I’ll see what is available from Interlibrary loan now that it has started back up again.

    Reply
  20. I started February off strong reading books but petered out because I was too tired at the end of the day. When you drop the book you know you are too tired to read. (grin). When I dropped Dolly that hurt as it was a big heavy book.
    His housekeepers Christmas Wish by Louise Allen. There were a lot of improbable parts to the story but it was fun. A viscount has a Collision with a nun on the street in France yet she turns out not to be a nun. Then it turns out she is illegitimate. Then she is disguised as a housekeeper. Then, then, then…I read the next 3 in the series but they weren’t nearly as good. Some characters became too whiny.
    Dolly Parton – Song Teller, My Life in Lyrics by Dolly Parton and Robert K. Oermann. I had seen a review of it in the paper so got it from the library. That was a fascinating book. Dolly has been writing songs since she was 4 or 5 years old. They used the songs as a way to tell the story of her life. Each song was presented with all the lyrics. Tons of pictures of Dolly through the years. Plus small stories about each song or points of her life. Definitely worth reading as she is an amazing woman. You don’t even have to be a country music fan to enjoy the book.
    I was poking around on Mary Jo’s website and read the bit about why she didn’t continue the series started by The Marriage Spell. When she mentioned that 2 heroes and one heroine were renamed and had their chance at life in the Lost Lord series I just had to figure out who they were. So I reread The Marriage Spell and enjoyed it as usual. Plus figured out who lived on under a different name.
    Then I went on a Dust-Bunny binge and read 3 or 4 of Jayne Castle’s Harmony series books. I’ve read them often enough that when I fell asleep I didn’t lose my place. Nor did I get injured when I dropped the book.
    I’ve already written down several names of books…I’ll see what is available from Interlibrary loan now that it has started back up again.

    Reply
  21. Glad you liked the look of some of our suggestions, Kareni. As always, your reading list is amazing, thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  22. Glad you liked the look of some of our suggestions, Kareni. As always, your reading list is amazing, thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  23. Glad you liked the look of some of our suggestions, Kareni. As always, your reading list is amazing, thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  24. Glad you liked the look of some of our suggestions, Kareni. As always, your reading list is amazing, thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  25. Glad you liked the look of some of our suggestions, Kareni. As always, your reading list is amazing, thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  26. Always my favorite blog of the month! First off, Andrea – thanks for the great review on Band of Sisters. I can’t wait to read it. Secondly, Anne – I have the Gillian Roberts series in hardcover from original publication. They are definitely Keepers! To this day I think of some of the storylines. I’m so glad they’ve come back around again for a new audience. I’m reading the latest installment in Sarah J. Maas’ Court of Thorns & Roses series. I enjoy the world & characters she’s created. Also read Holly Black’s How The King of Elfhame Learned To Hate Stories. Just a cute fast read with wonderful illustrations. It features her Faerie Kingdom characters from 3 previous books which is another series I love. Also read The House of Hopes and Dreams by Trisha Ashley which was recommended here. Good Call!

    Reply
  27. Always my favorite blog of the month! First off, Andrea – thanks for the great review on Band of Sisters. I can’t wait to read it. Secondly, Anne – I have the Gillian Roberts series in hardcover from original publication. They are definitely Keepers! To this day I think of some of the storylines. I’m so glad they’ve come back around again for a new audience. I’m reading the latest installment in Sarah J. Maas’ Court of Thorns & Roses series. I enjoy the world & characters she’s created. Also read Holly Black’s How The King of Elfhame Learned To Hate Stories. Just a cute fast read with wonderful illustrations. It features her Faerie Kingdom characters from 3 previous books which is another series I love. Also read The House of Hopes and Dreams by Trisha Ashley which was recommended here. Good Call!

    Reply
  28. Always my favorite blog of the month! First off, Andrea – thanks for the great review on Band of Sisters. I can’t wait to read it. Secondly, Anne – I have the Gillian Roberts series in hardcover from original publication. They are definitely Keepers! To this day I think of some of the storylines. I’m so glad they’ve come back around again for a new audience. I’m reading the latest installment in Sarah J. Maas’ Court of Thorns & Roses series. I enjoy the world & characters she’s created. Also read Holly Black’s How The King of Elfhame Learned To Hate Stories. Just a cute fast read with wonderful illustrations. It features her Faerie Kingdom characters from 3 previous books which is another series I love. Also read The House of Hopes and Dreams by Trisha Ashley which was recommended here. Good Call!

    Reply
  29. Always my favorite blog of the month! First off, Andrea – thanks for the great review on Band of Sisters. I can’t wait to read it. Secondly, Anne – I have the Gillian Roberts series in hardcover from original publication. They are definitely Keepers! To this day I think of some of the storylines. I’m so glad they’ve come back around again for a new audience. I’m reading the latest installment in Sarah J. Maas’ Court of Thorns & Roses series. I enjoy the world & characters she’s created. Also read Holly Black’s How The King of Elfhame Learned To Hate Stories. Just a cute fast read with wonderful illustrations. It features her Faerie Kingdom characters from 3 previous books which is another series I love. Also read The House of Hopes and Dreams by Trisha Ashley which was recommended here. Good Call!

    Reply
  30. Always my favorite blog of the month! First off, Andrea – thanks for the great review on Band of Sisters. I can’t wait to read it. Secondly, Anne – I have the Gillian Roberts series in hardcover from original publication. They are definitely Keepers! To this day I think of some of the storylines. I’m so glad they’ve come back around again for a new audience. I’m reading the latest installment in Sarah J. Maas’ Court of Thorns & Roses series. I enjoy the world & characters she’s created. Also read Holly Black’s How The King of Elfhame Learned To Hate Stories. Just a cute fast read with wonderful illustrations. It features her Faerie Kingdom characters from 3 previous books which is another series I love. Also read The House of Hopes and Dreams by Trisha Ashley which was recommended here. Good Call!

    Reply
  31. House of Hopes and Dreams is on sale for 99 cents on US Amazon. In fact, there are 5 Trisha Ashley books available for 99 cents right now.

    Reply
  32. House of Hopes and Dreams is on sale for 99 cents on US Amazon. In fact, there are 5 Trisha Ashley books available for 99 cents right now.

    Reply
  33. House of Hopes and Dreams is on sale for 99 cents on US Amazon. In fact, there are 5 Trisha Ashley books available for 99 cents right now.

    Reply
  34. House of Hopes and Dreams is on sale for 99 cents on US Amazon. In fact, there are 5 Trisha Ashley books available for 99 cents right now.

    Reply
  35. House of Hopes and Dreams is on sale for 99 cents on US Amazon. In fact, there are 5 Trisha Ashley books available for 99 cents right now.

    Reply
  36. I finished Sherry Thomas’ Murder on Cold Street this month. I love that series. Amazon is telling me I bought Caught Dead in Philadelphia 3 years ago. 🙂 Maybe this weekend is a good time to find it in the depths of my kindle and read it.

    Reply
  37. I finished Sherry Thomas’ Murder on Cold Street this month. I love that series. Amazon is telling me I bought Caught Dead in Philadelphia 3 years ago. 🙂 Maybe this weekend is a good time to find it in the depths of my kindle and read it.

    Reply
  38. I finished Sherry Thomas’ Murder on Cold Street this month. I love that series. Amazon is telling me I bought Caught Dead in Philadelphia 3 years ago. 🙂 Maybe this weekend is a good time to find it in the depths of my kindle and read it.

    Reply
  39. I finished Sherry Thomas’ Murder on Cold Street this month. I love that series. Amazon is telling me I bought Caught Dead in Philadelphia 3 years ago. 🙂 Maybe this weekend is a good time to find it in the depths of my kindle and read it.

    Reply
  40. I finished Sherry Thomas’ Murder on Cold Street this month. I love that series. Amazon is telling me I bought Caught Dead in Philadelphia 3 years ago. 🙂 Maybe this weekend is a good time to find it in the depths of my kindle and read it.

    Reply
  41. I never know whether to laugh with joy or cry when I read the “what we’re reading” blog here because invariably you tempt me to add more authors and books to my already exploding pile. Currently I’m reading Shiver, a chilling thriller by Allie Reynolds. Set in the French Alps, the story sees five friends brought together for a reunion in a remote ski lodge. On arrival they discover that not only are they the only people there but also that they can’t leave. With their phones taken and the radios missing They can’t call for help. One by one they start to disappear, ramping up the fear and suspicion among those remaining. It reminds me of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Gripping reading for sure. I’m also listening to Sarah Maclean’s The Day Of The Duchess. Whip smart dialogue, clever characters and plenty of twists make this historical romance compelling listening.

    Reply
  42. I never know whether to laugh with joy or cry when I read the “what we’re reading” blog here because invariably you tempt me to add more authors and books to my already exploding pile. Currently I’m reading Shiver, a chilling thriller by Allie Reynolds. Set in the French Alps, the story sees five friends brought together for a reunion in a remote ski lodge. On arrival they discover that not only are they the only people there but also that they can’t leave. With their phones taken and the radios missing They can’t call for help. One by one they start to disappear, ramping up the fear and suspicion among those remaining. It reminds me of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Gripping reading for sure. I’m also listening to Sarah Maclean’s The Day Of The Duchess. Whip smart dialogue, clever characters and plenty of twists make this historical romance compelling listening.

    Reply
  43. I never know whether to laugh with joy or cry when I read the “what we’re reading” blog here because invariably you tempt me to add more authors and books to my already exploding pile. Currently I’m reading Shiver, a chilling thriller by Allie Reynolds. Set in the French Alps, the story sees five friends brought together for a reunion in a remote ski lodge. On arrival they discover that not only are they the only people there but also that they can’t leave. With their phones taken and the radios missing They can’t call for help. One by one they start to disappear, ramping up the fear and suspicion among those remaining. It reminds me of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Gripping reading for sure. I’m also listening to Sarah Maclean’s The Day Of The Duchess. Whip smart dialogue, clever characters and plenty of twists make this historical romance compelling listening.

    Reply
  44. I never know whether to laugh with joy or cry when I read the “what we’re reading” blog here because invariably you tempt me to add more authors and books to my already exploding pile. Currently I’m reading Shiver, a chilling thriller by Allie Reynolds. Set in the French Alps, the story sees five friends brought together for a reunion in a remote ski lodge. On arrival they discover that not only are they the only people there but also that they can’t leave. With their phones taken and the radios missing They can’t call for help. One by one they start to disappear, ramping up the fear and suspicion among those remaining. It reminds me of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Gripping reading for sure. I’m also listening to Sarah Maclean’s The Day Of The Duchess. Whip smart dialogue, clever characters and plenty of twists make this historical romance compelling listening.

    Reply
  45. I never know whether to laugh with joy or cry when I read the “what we’re reading” blog here because invariably you tempt me to add more authors and books to my already exploding pile. Currently I’m reading Shiver, a chilling thriller by Allie Reynolds. Set in the French Alps, the story sees five friends brought together for a reunion in a remote ski lodge. On arrival they discover that not only are they the only people there but also that they can’t leave. With their phones taken and the radios missing They can’t call for help. One by one they start to disappear, ramping up the fear and suspicion among those remaining. It reminds me of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. Gripping reading for sure. I’m also listening to Sarah Maclean’s The Day Of The Duchess. Whip smart dialogue, clever characters and plenty of twists make this historical romance compelling listening.

    Reply
  46. I’ve recently finished The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman by Julietta Henderson, which is an absolutely delightful, big-hearted novel. About a boy and his dreams of doing stand-up comedy at the Edinburgh Festival, and also finding his father. The cast gets bigger and bigger as you read along, all imperfect, all fabulously individual and wonderfully quirky. Make you laugh, make you cry. I thoroughly recommend it.

    Reply
  47. I’ve recently finished The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman by Julietta Henderson, which is an absolutely delightful, big-hearted novel. About a boy and his dreams of doing stand-up comedy at the Edinburgh Festival, and also finding his father. The cast gets bigger and bigger as you read along, all imperfect, all fabulously individual and wonderfully quirky. Make you laugh, make you cry. I thoroughly recommend it.

    Reply
  48. I’ve recently finished The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman by Julietta Henderson, which is an absolutely delightful, big-hearted novel. About a boy and his dreams of doing stand-up comedy at the Edinburgh Festival, and also finding his father. The cast gets bigger and bigger as you read along, all imperfect, all fabulously individual and wonderfully quirky. Make you laugh, make you cry. I thoroughly recommend it.

    Reply
  49. I’ve recently finished The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman by Julietta Henderson, which is an absolutely delightful, big-hearted novel. About a boy and his dreams of doing stand-up comedy at the Edinburgh Festival, and also finding his father. The cast gets bigger and bigger as you read along, all imperfect, all fabulously individual and wonderfully quirky. Make you laugh, make you cry. I thoroughly recommend it.

    Reply
  50. I’ve recently finished The Funny Thing About Norman Foreman by Julietta Henderson, which is an absolutely delightful, big-hearted novel. About a boy and his dreams of doing stand-up comedy at the Edinburgh Festival, and also finding his father. The cast gets bigger and bigger as you read along, all imperfect, all fabulously individual and wonderfully quirky. Make you laugh, make you cry. I thoroughly recommend it.

    Reply
  51. I had my second dose of the corona virus vaccine (yay!) but then between side effects (unpleasant but much better than COVID) and serious winter weather was essentially knocked out for a week. Decided to make lemonade out of lemons and read, read, read:
    “Red at the Bone” by Jacqueline Woodson is short and intense, the story of a family told from several different POV. When I finished, I immediately began at the beginning because some things that were confusing or mystifying became clear and made the story even more powerful.
    “If I Never Met You” by Mhairi McFarlane. Two lawyers at a firm in Manchester decide to fake a relationship, Laurie to get back at the boyfriend who’d recently dumped her (also a lawyer at the firm) and Jamie to show he’s settled down so that he will be offered a partnership. The characters feel real, with humor and depth, and I found myself rooting for them and their soon not-so-fake love affair.
    “Miss Benson’s Beetle” by Rachel Joyce is about friendship and adventure and finding our best selves, whether at home or half way round the world. A bit of a fairy tale, with a golden beetle rather than a golden fleece, and Enid and Margery are my new heroes.
    “The Road to Grantchester” by James Runcie. I watched the TV series based on Runcie’s Sidney Chambers mysteries so decided to read the book that is the prequel to the series (but was actually written after the other books). It should be noted, however, that after the first few episodes the TV series doesn’t follow the books at all. The locations, the costumes, the jazz all make a nice alternative to pandemic lockdown. A bit of a tangent: James Norton, who plays Sidney, is Tommy Lee Royce, the sociopathic villain in the British TV series “Happy Valley”, which is as far from the vicar he plays on “Grantchester” as it is possible to be. Despite the grimness of “Happy Valley” there is a humorous touch in that it has an Easter egg for another Norton role: he played Prince Andrei in a BBC miniseries of War & Peace, and we see Tommy Lee carrying a copy of W&P in an episode toward the end of Season 1.
    “A Heart of Blood and Ashes” by Milla Vane. Very intense, as much a quest as a romance, set in an alternative universe with creatures both familiar and fantastical, gods and magic, queens and warriors who are both enemies and lovers. I liked it but found it a bit overwhelming and so am not sure I’ll read the sequels (although I do want to find out if Toric is truly changed so just may read on).
    “Any Rogue Will Do” by Bethany Bennett. The H/h have History, which must be Overcome (as such things must in Romance). Good dialogue, and I like that the hero is “only” a viscount – I’ve rather overdosed on dukes and try to avoid them if possible.

    Reply
  52. I had my second dose of the corona virus vaccine (yay!) but then between side effects (unpleasant but much better than COVID) and serious winter weather was essentially knocked out for a week. Decided to make lemonade out of lemons and read, read, read:
    “Red at the Bone” by Jacqueline Woodson is short and intense, the story of a family told from several different POV. When I finished, I immediately began at the beginning because some things that were confusing or mystifying became clear and made the story even more powerful.
    “If I Never Met You” by Mhairi McFarlane. Two lawyers at a firm in Manchester decide to fake a relationship, Laurie to get back at the boyfriend who’d recently dumped her (also a lawyer at the firm) and Jamie to show he’s settled down so that he will be offered a partnership. The characters feel real, with humor and depth, and I found myself rooting for them and their soon not-so-fake love affair.
    “Miss Benson’s Beetle” by Rachel Joyce is about friendship and adventure and finding our best selves, whether at home or half way round the world. A bit of a fairy tale, with a golden beetle rather than a golden fleece, and Enid and Margery are my new heroes.
    “The Road to Grantchester” by James Runcie. I watched the TV series based on Runcie’s Sidney Chambers mysteries so decided to read the book that is the prequel to the series (but was actually written after the other books). It should be noted, however, that after the first few episodes the TV series doesn’t follow the books at all. The locations, the costumes, the jazz all make a nice alternative to pandemic lockdown. A bit of a tangent: James Norton, who plays Sidney, is Tommy Lee Royce, the sociopathic villain in the British TV series “Happy Valley”, which is as far from the vicar he plays on “Grantchester” as it is possible to be. Despite the grimness of “Happy Valley” there is a humorous touch in that it has an Easter egg for another Norton role: he played Prince Andrei in a BBC miniseries of War & Peace, and we see Tommy Lee carrying a copy of W&P in an episode toward the end of Season 1.
    “A Heart of Blood and Ashes” by Milla Vane. Very intense, as much a quest as a romance, set in an alternative universe with creatures both familiar and fantastical, gods and magic, queens and warriors who are both enemies and lovers. I liked it but found it a bit overwhelming and so am not sure I’ll read the sequels (although I do want to find out if Toric is truly changed so just may read on).
    “Any Rogue Will Do” by Bethany Bennett. The H/h have History, which must be Overcome (as such things must in Romance). Good dialogue, and I like that the hero is “only” a viscount – I’ve rather overdosed on dukes and try to avoid them if possible.

    Reply
  53. I had my second dose of the corona virus vaccine (yay!) but then between side effects (unpleasant but much better than COVID) and serious winter weather was essentially knocked out for a week. Decided to make lemonade out of lemons and read, read, read:
    “Red at the Bone” by Jacqueline Woodson is short and intense, the story of a family told from several different POV. When I finished, I immediately began at the beginning because some things that were confusing or mystifying became clear and made the story even more powerful.
    “If I Never Met You” by Mhairi McFarlane. Two lawyers at a firm in Manchester decide to fake a relationship, Laurie to get back at the boyfriend who’d recently dumped her (also a lawyer at the firm) and Jamie to show he’s settled down so that he will be offered a partnership. The characters feel real, with humor and depth, and I found myself rooting for them and their soon not-so-fake love affair.
    “Miss Benson’s Beetle” by Rachel Joyce is about friendship and adventure and finding our best selves, whether at home or half way round the world. A bit of a fairy tale, with a golden beetle rather than a golden fleece, and Enid and Margery are my new heroes.
    “The Road to Grantchester” by James Runcie. I watched the TV series based on Runcie’s Sidney Chambers mysteries so decided to read the book that is the prequel to the series (but was actually written after the other books). It should be noted, however, that after the first few episodes the TV series doesn’t follow the books at all. The locations, the costumes, the jazz all make a nice alternative to pandemic lockdown. A bit of a tangent: James Norton, who plays Sidney, is Tommy Lee Royce, the sociopathic villain in the British TV series “Happy Valley”, which is as far from the vicar he plays on “Grantchester” as it is possible to be. Despite the grimness of “Happy Valley” there is a humorous touch in that it has an Easter egg for another Norton role: he played Prince Andrei in a BBC miniseries of War & Peace, and we see Tommy Lee carrying a copy of W&P in an episode toward the end of Season 1.
    “A Heart of Blood and Ashes” by Milla Vane. Very intense, as much a quest as a romance, set in an alternative universe with creatures both familiar and fantastical, gods and magic, queens and warriors who are both enemies and lovers. I liked it but found it a bit overwhelming and so am not sure I’ll read the sequels (although I do want to find out if Toric is truly changed so just may read on).
    “Any Rogue Will Do” by Bethany Bennett. The H/h have History, which must be Overcome (as such things must in Romance). Good dialogue, and I like that the hero is “only” a viscount – I’ve rather overdosed on dukes and try to avoid them if possible.

    Reply
  54. I had my second dose of the corona virus vaccine (yay!) but then between side effects (unpleasant but much better than COVID) and serious winter weather was essentially knocked out for a week. Decided to make lemonade out of lemons and read, read, read:
    “Red at the Bone” by Jacqueline Woodson is short and intense, the story of a family told from several different POV. When I finished, I immediately began at the beginning because some things that were confusing or mystifying became clear and made the story even more powerful.
    “If I Never Met You” by Mhairi McFarlane. Two lawyers at a firm in Manchester decide to fake a relationship, Laurie to get back at the boyfriend who’d recently dumped her (also a lawyer at the firm) and Jamie to show he’s settled down so that he will be offered a partnership. The characters feel real, with humor and depth, and I found myself rooting for them and their soon not-so-fake love affair.
    “Miss Benson’s Beetle” by Rachel Joyce is about friendship and adventure and finding our best selves, whether at home or half way round the world. A bit of a fairy tale, with a golden beetle rather than a golden fleece, and Enid and Margery are my new heroes.
    “The Road to Grantchester” by James Runcie. I watched the TV series based on Runcie’s Sidney Chambers mysteries so decided to read the book that is the prequel to the series (but was actually written after the other books). It should be noted, however, that after the first few episodes the TV series doesn’t follow the books at all. The locations, the costumes, the jazz all make a nice alternative to pandemic lockdown. A bit of a tangent: James Norton, who plays Sidney, is Tommy Lee Royce, the sociopathic villain in the British TV series “Happy Valley”, which is as far from the vicar he plays on “Grantchester” as it is possible to be. Despite the grimness of “Happy Valley” there is a humorous touch in that it has an Easter egg for another Norton role: he played Prince Andrei in a BBC miniseries of War & Peace, and we see Tommy Lee carrying a copy of W&P in an episode toward the end of Season 1.
    “A Heart of Blood and Ashes” by Milla Vane. Very intense, as much a quest as a romance, set in an alternative universe with creatures both familiar and fantastical, gods and magic, queens and warriors who are both enemies and lovers. I liked it but found it a bit overwhelming and so am not sure I’ll read the sequels (although I do want to find out if Toric is truly changed so just may read on).
    “Any Rogue Will Do” by Bethany Bennett. The H/h have History, which must be Overcome (as such things must in Romance). Good dialogue, and I like that the hero is “only” a viscount – I’ve rather overdosed on dukes and try to avoid them if possible.

    Reply
  55. I had my second dose of the corona virus vaccine (yay!) but then between side effects (unpleasant but much better than COVID) and serious winter weather was essentially knocked out for a week. Decided to make lemonade out of lemons and read, read, read:
    “Red at the Bone” by Jacqueline Woodson is short and intense, the story of a family told from several different POV. When I finished, I immediately began at the beginning because some things that were confusing or mystifying became clear and made the story even more powerful.
    “If I Never Met You” by Mhairi McFarlane. Two lawyers at a firm in Manchester decide to fake a relationship, Laurie to get back at the boyfriend who’d recently dumped her (also a lawyer at the firm) and Jamie to show he’s settled down so that he will be offered a partnership. The characters feel real, with humor and depth, and I found myself rooting for them and their soon not-so-fake love affair.
    “Miss Benson’s Beetle” by Rachel Joyce is about friendship and adventure and finding our best selves, whether at home or half way round the world. A bit of a fairy tale, with a golden beetle rather than a golden fleece, and Enid and Margery are my new heroes.
    “The Road to Grantchester” by James Runcie. I watched the TV series based on Runcie’s Sidney Chambers mysteries so decided to read the book that is the prequel to the series (but was actually written after the other books). It should be noted, however, that after the first few episodes the TV series doesn’t follow the books at all. The locations, the costumes, the jazz all make a nice alternative to pandemic lockdown. A bit of a tangent: James Norton, who plays Sidney, is Tommy Lee Royce, the sociopathic villain in the British TV series “Happy Valley”, which is as far from the vicar he plays on “Grantchester” as it is possible to be. Despite the grimness of “Happy Valley” there is a humorous touch in that it has an Easter egg for another Norton role: he played Prince Andrei in a BBC miniseries of War & Peace, and we see Tommy Lee carrying a copy of W&P in an episode toward the end of Season 1.
    “A Heart of Blood and Ashes” by Milla Vane. Very intense, as much a quest as a romance, set in an alternative universe with creatures both familiar and fantastical, gods and magic, queens and warriors who are both enemies and lovers. I liked it but found it a bit overwhelming and so am not sure I’ll read the sequels (although I do want to find out if Toric is truly changed so just may read on).
    “Any Rogue Will Do” by Bethany Bennett. The H/h have History, which must be Overcome (as such things must in Romance). Good dialogue, and I like that the hero is “only” a viscount – I’ve rather overdosed on dukes and try to avoid them if possible.

    Reply
  56. I’m a voracious reader, so when I ended up being stuck in a hospital for 5 weeks with only two (print) books with me, life seemed grim. It got even more grim when I tried to read books on my phone and ending up being charged $$$ because the (hacked) hospital had no WiFi available for guests(moi). Fortunately, a friend managed to sneak in a sack of paperbacks. But I didn’t really get back to my usual voraciousness until I was finally back home toward the end of January. That’s when I got to read J. D. Robb’s Shadows In Death. I’m addicted to this series, and this particular book was even more intense than usual. After my sojourn in the world of futuristic police procedural crime/romantic suspense, I re-read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance, from her Westcott series. After that, I re-read Justine Davis’s Operation Alpha, one of the books in her “Cutter’s Code” series. Cutter is a most unusual crime-solving as well as matchmaking Begian Malinois. My latest read, finished yesterday, is Charis Michaels’ historical romance A Duchess A Day, the first book in her Awakened by a Kiss series. She takes the familiar”getting married to the duke” theme and gives it a somewhat unusual twist, She also writes with humor. A Duchess A Day (think an apple a day) is her 7th book. I’ve just ordered her first. BTW – some romance writers may be familiar with Charis, as way back in the day, she was RWA’s media person. My next 3 reads are on my favorite indie bookstore’s shelf, just waiting to be picked up.

    Reply
  57. I’m a voracious reader, so when I ended up being stuck in a hospital for 5 weeks with only two (print) books with me, life seemed grim. It got even more grim when I tried to read books on my phone and ending up being charged $$$ because the (hacked) hospital had no WiFi available for guests(moi). Fortunately, a friend managed to sneak in a sack of paperbacks. But I didn’t really get back to my usual voraciousness until I was finally back home toward the end of January. That’s when I got to read J. D. Robb’s Shadows In Death. I’m addicted to this series, and this particular book was even more intense than usual. After my sojourn in the world of futuristic police procedural crime/romantic suspense, I re-read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance, from her Westcott series. After that, I re-read Justine Davis’s Operation Alpha, one of the books in her “Cutter’s Code” series. Cutter is a most unusual crime-solving as well as matchmaking Begian Malinois. My latest read, finished yesterday, is Charis Michaels’ historical romance A Duchess A Day, the first book in her Awakened by a Kiss series. She takes the familiar”getting married to the duke” theme and gives it a somewhat unusual twist, She also writes with humor. A Duchess A Day (think an apple a day) is her 7th book. I’ve just ordered her first. BTW – some romance writers may be familiar with Charis, as way back in the day, she was RWA’s media person. My next 3 reads are on my favorite indie bookstore’s shelf, just waiting to be picked up.

    Reply
  58. I’m a voracious reader, so when I ended up being stuck in a hospital for 5 weeks with only two (print) books with me, life seemed grim. It got even more grim when I tried to read books on my phone and ending up being charged $$$ because the (hacked) hospital had no WiFi available for guests(moi). Fortunately, a friend managed to sneak in a sack of paperbacks. But I didn’t really get back to my usual voraciousness until I was finally back home toward the end of January. That’s when I got to read J. D. Robb’s Shadows In Death. I’m addicted to this series, and this particular book was even more intense than usual. After my sojourn in the world of futuristic police procedural crime/romantic suspense, I re-read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance, from her Westcott series. After that, I re-read Justine Davis’s Operation Alpha, one of the books in her “Cutter’s Code” series. Cutter is a most unusual crime-solving as well as matchmaking Begian Malinois. My latest read, finished yesterday, is Charis Michaels’ historical romance A Duchess A Day, the first book in her Awakened by a Kiss series. She takes the familiar”getting married to the duke” theme and gives it a somewhat unusual twist, She also writes with humor. A Duchess A Day (think an apple a day) is her 7th book. I’ve just ordered her first. BTW – some romance writers may be familiar with Charis, as way back in the day, she was RWA’s media person. My next 3 reads are on my favorite indie bookstore’s shelf, just waiting to be picked up.

    Reply
  59. I’m a voracious reader, so when I ended up being stuck in a hospital for 5 weeks with only two (print) books with me, life seemed grim. It got even more grim when I tried to read books on my phone and ending up being charged $$$ because the (hacked) hospital had no WiFi available for guests(moi). Fortunately, a friend managed to sneak in a sack of paperbacks. But I didn’t really get back to my usual voraciousness until I was finally back home toward the end of January. That’s when I got to read J. D. Robb’s Shadows In Death. I’m addicted to this series, and this particular book was even more intense than usual. After my sojourn in the world of futuristic police procedural crime/romantic suspense, I re-read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance, from her Westcott series. After that, I re-read Justine Davis’s Operation Alpha, one of the books in her “Cutter’s Code” series. Cutter is a most unusual crime-solving as well as matchmaking Begian Malinois. My latest read, finished yesterday, is Charis Michaels’ historical romance A Duchess A Day, the first book in her Awakened by a Kiss series. She takes the familiar”getting married to the duke” theme and gives it a somewhat unusual twist, She also writes with humor. A Duchess A Day (think an apple a day) is her 7th book. I’ve just ordered her first. BTW – some romance writers may be familiar with Charis, as way back in the day, she was RWA’s media person. My next 3 reads are on my favorite indie bookstore’s shelf, just waiting to be picked up.

    Reply
  60. I’m a voracious reader, so when I ended up being stuck in a hospital for 5 weeks with only two (print) books with me, life seemed grim. It got even more grim when I tried to read books on my phone and ending up being charged $$$ because the (hacked) hospital had no WiFi available for guests(moi). Fortunately, a friend managed to sneak in a sack of paperbacks. But I didn’t really get back to my usual voraciousness until I was finally back home toward the end of January. That’s when I got to read J. D. Robb’s Shadows In Death. I’m addicted to this series, and this particular book was even more intense than usual. After my sojourn in the world of futuristic police procedural crime/romantic suspense, I re-read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance, from her Westcott series. After that, I re-read Justine Davis’s Operation Alpha, one of the books in her “Cutter’s Code” series. Cutter is a most unusual crime-solving as well as matchmaking Begian Malinois. My latest read, finished yesterday, is Charis Michaels’ historical romance A Duchess A Day, the first book in her Awakened by a Kiss series. She takes the familiar”getting married to the duke” theme and gives it a somewhat unusual twist, She also writes with humor. A Duchess A Day (think an apple a day) is her 7th book. I’ve just ordered her first. BTW – some romance writers may be familiar with Charis, as way back in the day, she was RWA’s media person. My next 3 reads are on my favorite indie bookstore’s shelf, just waiting to be picked up.

    Reply
  61. I have enjoyed a number of Agatha Raisin (M C Beaton) mysteries set in the English Cotswolds and Amelia Peabody (Elizabeth Peters) set in Egypt. Feeling like a change I am now looking for humorous mysteries in a similar vein and lo and behold Catherine Loyd and Gillian Roberts appear … thanks for the recommendation!
    This month I have enjoyed Barbara Michaels (aka Elizabeth Peters) gothic mystery ‘Someone in the House’. Two academics go to stay in an old manor house and strange happenings occur. The conventional HEA does not occur but in an odd way the house with it’s strange energy is the recipient of the HEA!
    I also enjoyed a YA by Katharine and Elizabeth Corr ‘The Witches Kiss’. The heroine has to master her magical powers to defeat evil forces from the past. Surprisingly engaging!

    Reply
  62. I have enjoyed a number of Agatha Raisin (M C Beaton) mysteries set in the English Cotswolds and Amelia Peabody (Elizabeth Peters) set in Egypt. Feeling like a change I am now looking for humorous mysteries in a similar vein and lo and behold Catherine Loyd and Gillian Roberts appear … thanks for the recommendation!
    This month I have enjoyed Barbara Michaels (aka Elizabeth Peters) gothic mystery ‘Someone in the House’. Two academics go to stay in an old manor house and strange happenings occur. The conventional HEA does not occur but in an odd way the house with it’s strange energy is the recipient of the HEA!
    I also enjoyed a YA by Katharine and Elizabeth Corr ‘The Witches Kiss’. The heroine has to master her magical powers to defeat evil forces from the past. Surprisingly engaging!

    Reply
  63. I have enjoyed a number of Agatha Raisin (M C Beaton) mysteries set in the English Cotswolds and Amelia Peabody (Elizabeth Peters) set in Egypt. Feeling like a change I am now looking for humorous mysteries in a similar vein and lo and behold Catherine Loyd and Gillian Roberts appear … thanks for the recommendation!
    This month I have enjoyed Barbara Michaels (aka Elizabeth Peters) gothic mystery ‘Someone in the House’. Two academics go to stay in an old manor house and strange happenings occur. The conventional HEA does not occur but in an odd way the house with it’s strange energy is the recipient of the HEA!
    I also enjoyed a YA by Katharine and Elizabeth Corr ‘The Witches Kiss’. The heroine has to master her magical powers to defeat evil forces from the past. Surprisingly engaging!

    Reply
  64. I have enjoyed a number of Agatha Raisin (M C Beaton) mysteries set in the English Cotswolds and Amelia Peabody (Elizabeth Peters) set in Egypt. Feeling like a change I am now looking for humorous mysteries in a similar vein and lo and behold Catherine Loyd and Gillian Roberts appear … thanks for the recommendation!
    This month I have enjoyed Barbara Michaels (aka Elizabeth Peters) gothic mystery ‘Someone in the House’. Two academics go to stay in an old manor house and strange happenings occur. The conventional HEA does not occur but in an odd way the house with it’s strange energy is the recipient of the HEA!
    I also enjoyed a YA by Katharine and Elizabeth Corr ‘The Witches Kiss’. The heroine has to master her magical powers to defeat evil forces from the past. Surprisingly engaging!

    Reply
  65. I have enjoyed a number of Agatha Raisin (M C Beaton) mysteries set in the English Cotswolds and Amelia Peabody (Elizabeth Peters) set in Egypt. Feeling like a change I am now looking for humorous mysteries in a similar vein and lo and behold Catherine Loyd and Gillian Roberts appear … thanks for the recommendation!
    This month I have enjoyed Barbara Michaels (aka Elizabeth Peters) gothic mystery ‘Someone in the House’. Two academics go to stay in an old manor house and strange happenings occur. The conventional HEA does not occur but in an odd way the house with it’s strange energy is the recipient of the HEA!
    I also enjoyed a YA by Katharine and Elizabeth Corr ‘The Witches Kiss’. The heroine has to master her magical powers to defeat evil forces from the past. Surprisingly engaging!

    Reply
  66. This monthly review of books is great and such a reliable source of new authors. Last month the Virgin River series by Robyn Carr were mentioned and I am now on Book 10 so thank you. I have really enjoyed some YA books in the past and learnt about Eva Ibbotson’s lovely books on this site. The Skylarks War by Hilary McKay is wonderful and Ele Fountain writes startling YA books. My TBR list is added to every month – now I just have to find the time to read them all!

    Reply
  67. This monthly review of books is great and such a reliable source of new authors. Last month the Virgin River series by Robyn Carr were mentioned and I am now on Book 10 so thank you. I have really enjoyed some YA books in the past and learnt about Eva Ibbotson’s lovely books on this site. The Skylarks War by Hilary McKay is wonderful and Ele Fountain writes startling YA books. My TBR list is added to every month – now I just have to find the time to read them all!

    Reply
  68. This monthly review of books is great and such a reliable source of new authors. Last month the Virgin River series by Robyn Carr were mentioned and I am now on Book 10 so thank you. I have really enjoyed some YA books in the past and learnt about Eva Ibbotson’s lovely books on this site. The Skylarks War by Hilary McKay is wonderful and Ele Fountain writes startling YA books. My TBR list is added to every month – now I just have to find the time to read them all!

    Reply
  69. This monthly review of books is great and such a reliable source of new authors. Last month the Virgin River series by Robyn Carr were mentioned and I am now on Book 10 so thank you. I have really enjoyed some YA books in the past and learnt about Eva Ibbotson’s lovely books on this site. The Skylarks War by Hilary McKay is wonderful and Ele Fountain writes startling YA books. My TBR list is added to every month – now I just have to find the time to read them all!

    Reply
  70. This monthly review of books is great and such a reliable source of new authors. Last month the Virgin River series by Robyn Carr were mentioned and I am now on Book 10 so thank you. I have really enjoyed some YA books in the past and learnt about Eva Ibbotson’s lovely books on this site. The Skylarks War by Hilary McKay is wonderful and Ele Fountain writes startling YA books. My TBR list is added to every month – now I just have to find the time to read them all!

    Reply
  71. I’ve been struggling with reading slump for a while. For February I’ve had a mixed read.
    I started off the month with The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christe (audio) for a group read on GR. I really enjoyed it. Then onto Dublin’s Girl by Eimear Lawlor. I love books set in Ireland and this had a great premise, however, it fell sadly flat for me. Very disappointing.
    Alma Katsu’s The Deep followed. Again, disappointing. Started off well but kinda petered out and I didn’t like the ending at all.
    A Castaway in Cornwall by Julie Klassen was a brilliant read. Held me from start to finish. I love her books.
    Finally I read a little book about the Titanic. I didn’t realise when I picked it up that it was aimed at a younger audience, however it was just as good for adults. I’ve read many books about Titanic, but I still picked up new information from this one. The layout of the read was excellent too.
    I’m looking forward to Band of Sisters and I’ve just earmarked The Duke’s Runaway Bride.
    Love this blog!! So many new books to add the list every month 🙂

    Reply
  72. I’ve been struggling with reading slump for a while. For February I’ve had a mixed read.
    I started off the month with The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christe (audio) for a group read on GR. I really enjoyed it. Then onto Dublin’s Girl by Eimear Lawlor. I love books set in Ireland and this had a great premise, however, it fell sadly flat for me. Very disappointing.
    Alma Katsu’s The Deep followed. Again, disappointing. Started off well but kinda petered out and I didn’t like the ending at all.
    A Castaway in Cornwall by Julie Klassen was a brilliant read. Held me from start to finish. I love her books.
    Finally I read a little book about the Titanic. I didn’t realise when I picked it up that it was aimed at a younger audience, however it was just as good for adults. I’ve read many books about Titanic, but I still picked up new information from this one. The layout of the read was excellent too.
    I’m looking forward to Band of Sisters and I’ve just earmarked The Duke’s Runaway Bride.
    Love this blog!! So many new books to add the list every month 🙂

    Reply
  73. I’ve been struggling with reading slump for a while. For February I’ve had a mixed read.
    I started off the month with The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christe (audio) for a group read on GR. I really enjoyed it. Then onto Dublin’s Girl by Eimear Lawlor. I love books set in Ireland and this had a great premise, however, it fell sadly flat for me. Very disappointing.
    Alma Katsu’s The Deep followed. Again, disappointing. Started off well but kinda petered out and I didn’t like the ending at all.
    A Castaway in Cornwall by Julie Klassen was a brilliant read. Held me from start to finish. I love her books.
    Finally I read a little book about the Titanic. I didn’t realise when I picked it up that it was aimed at a younger audience, however it was just as good for adults. I’ve read many books about Titanic, but I still picked up new information from this one. The layout of the read was excellent too.
    I’m looking forward to Band of Sisters and I’ve just earmarked The Duke’s Runaway Bride.
    Love this blog!! So many new books to add the list every month 🙂

    Reply
  74. I’ve been struggling with reading slump for a while. For February I’ve had a mixed read.
    I started off the month with The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christe (audio) for a group read on GR. I really enjoyed it. Then onto Dublin’s Girl by Eimear Lawlor. I love books set in Ireland and this had a great premise, however, it fell sadly flat for me. Very disappointing.
    Alma Katsu’s The Deep followed. Again, disappointing. Started off well but kinda petered out and I didn’t like the ending at all.
    A Castaway in Cornwall by Julie Klassen was a brilliant read. Held me from start to finish. I love her books.
    Finally I read a little book about the Titanic. I didn’t realise when I picked it up that it was aimed at a younger audience, however it was just as good for adults. I’ve read many books about Titanic, but I still picked up new information from this one. The layout of the read was excellent too.
    I’m looking forward to Band of Sisters and I’ve just earmarked The Duke’s Runaway Bride.
    Love this blog!! So many new books to add the list every month 🙂

    Reply
  75. I’ve been struggling with reading slump for a while. For February I’ve had a mixed read.
    I started off the month with The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christe (audio) for a group read on GR. I really enjoyed it. Then onto Dublin’s Girl by Eimear Lawlor. I love books set in Ireland and this had a great premise, however, it fell sadly flat for me. Very disappointing.
    Alma Katsu’s The Deep followed. Again, disappointing. Started off well but kinda petered out and I didn’t like the ending at all.
    A Castaway in Cornwall by Julie Klassen was a brilliant read. Held me from start to finish. I love her books.
    Finally I read a little book about the Titanic. I didn’t realise when I picked it up that it was aimed at a younger audience, however it was just as good for adults. I’ve read many books about Titanic, but I still picked up new information from this one. The layout of the read was excellent too.
    I’m looking forward to Band of Sisters and I’ve just earmarked The Duke’s Runaway Bride.
    Love this blog!! So many new books to add the list every month 🙂

    Reply
  76. Forgot to mention that I’m looking forward to reading Kate Clayborn’s latest because I liked “Beginner’s Luck” and adored “Love Lettering” (both for the hero, who was everything a hero should be, and because it was a love letter to the city with lessons about opening our eyes to the world around us).

    Reply
  77. Forgot to mention that I’m looking forward to reading Kate Clayborn’s latest because I liked “Beginner’s Luck” and adored “Love Lettering” (both for the hero, who was everything a hero should be, and because it was a love letter to the city with lessons about opening our eyes to the world around us).

    Reply
  78. Forgot to mention that I’m looking forward to reading Kate Clayborn’s latest because I liked “Beginner’s Luck” and adored “Love Lettering” (both for the hero, who was everything a hero should be, and because it was a love letter to the city with lessons about opening our eyes to the world around us).

    Reply
  79. Forgot to mention that I’m looking forward to reading Kate Clayborn’s latest because I liked “Beginner’s Luck” and adored “Love Lettering” (both for the hero, who was everything a hero should be, and because it was a love letter to the city with lessons about opening our eyes to the world around us).

    Reply
  80. Forgot to mention that I’m looking forward to reading Kate Clayborn’s latest because I liked “Beginner’s Luck” and adored “Love Lettering” (both for the hero, who was everything a hero should be, and because it was a love letter to the city with lessons about opening our eyes to the world around us).

    Reply
  81. As always, you have provided me with a very long list of books I MUST read. I thank you for that.
    I have read books this month and some of them were very enjoyable. For the life of me, I cannot rave about any of them right now.
    I really always appreciate y’all providing me with new directions. That is one of the many things I appreciate about this very special blog. You are responsible for widening my horizons. LOL shame, shame, shame. I will be buried under a stack of books some day and y’all will be responsible for that.
    The headline will read: Woman dies because she could not say no to another new book.
    I hope everyone is staying well.

    Reply
  82. As always, you have provided me with a very long list of books I MUST read. I thank you for that.
    I have read books this month and some of them were very enjoyable. For the life of me, I cannot rave about any of them right now.
    I really always appreciate y’all providing me with new directions. That is one of the many things I appreciate about this very special blog. You are responsible for widening my horizons. LOL shame, shame, shame. I will be buried under a stack of books some day and y’all will be responsible for that.
    The headline will read: Woman dies because she could not say no to another new book.
    I hope everyone is staying well.

    Reply
  83. As always, you have provided me with a very long list of books I MUST read. I thank you for that.
    I have read books this month and some of them were very enjoyable. For the life of me, I cannot rave about any of them right now.
    I really always appreciate y’all providing me with new directions. That is one of the many things I appreciate about this very special blog. You are responsible for widening my horizons. LOL shame, shame, shame. I will be buried under a stack of books some day and y’all will be responsible for that.
    The headline will read: Woman dies because she could not say no to another new book.
    I hope everyone is staying well.

    Reply
  84. As always, you have provided me with a very long list of books I MUST read. I thank you for that.
    I have read books this month and some of them were very enjoyable. For the life of me, I cannot rave about any of them right now.
    I really always appreciate y’all providing me with new directions. That is one of the many things I appreciate about this very special blog. You are responsible for widening my horizons. LOL shame, shame, shame. I will be buried under a stack of books some day and y’all will be responsible for that.
    The headline will read: Woman dies because she could not say no to another new book.
    I hope everyone is staying well.

    Reply
  85. As always, you have provided me with a very long list of books I MUST read. I thank you for that.
    I have read books this month and some of them were very enjoyable. For the life of me, I cannot rave about any of them right now.
    I really always appreciate y’all providing me with new directions. That is one of the many things I appreciate about this very special blog. You are responsible for widening my horizons. LOL shame, shame, shame. I will be buried under a stack of books some day and y’all will be responsible for that.
    The headline will read: Woman dies because she could not say no to another new book.
    I hope everyone is staying well.

    Reply
  86. This month I read Shadows in Death and Faithless in Death by J.D. Robb and Falcon by Susan Grant. At the moment I’m reading In Graywolf’s Hands by Marie Ferrarella.
    I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. Pave was one of my favorite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away last month.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  87. This month I read Shadows in Death and Faithless in Death by J.D. Robb and Falcon by Susan Grant. At the moment I’m reading In Graywolf’s Hands by Marie Ferrarella.
    I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. Pave was one of my favorite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away last month.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  88. This month I read Shadows in Death and Faithless in Death by J.D. Robb and Falcon by Susan Grant. At the moment I’m reading In Graywolf’s Hands by Marie Ferrarella.
    I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. Pave was one of my favorite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away last month.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  89. This month I read Shadows in Death and Faithless in Death by J.D. Robb and Falcon by Susan Grant. At the moment I’m reading In Graywolf’s Hands by Marie Ferrarella.
    I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. Pave was one of my favorite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away last month.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  90. This month I read Shadows in Death and Faithless in Death by J.D. Robb and Falcon by Susan Grant. At the moment I’m reading In Graywolf’s Hands by Marie Ferrarella.
    I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. Pave was one of my favorite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away last month.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  91. So sorry that you were hospitalized, and to also be deprived of books is adding insult to injury! Glad to hear you are back home now.

    Reply
  92. So sorry that you were hospitalized, and to also be deprived of books is adding insult to injury! Glad to hear you are back home now.

    Reply
  93. So sorry that you were hospitalized, and to also be deprived of books is adding insult to injury! Glad to hear you are back home now.

    Reply
  94. So sorry that you were hospitalized, and to also be deprived of books is adding insult to injury! Glad to hear you are back home now.

    Reply
  95. So sorry that you were hospitalized, and to also be deprived of books is adding insult to injury! Glad to hear you are back home now.

    Reply
  96. I read “The Heiress Gets a Duke” by Harper St. George. She’s a new author to me, I think this may be her first historical, and it was very entertaining. The heroine is an American heiress in England, she runs away to escape an arranged marriage, and ends up working as a governess, under an assumed name. Shenanigans ensue, and the plot is not new, but what made it fresh was the Gilded Age setting, charming characters, and the attention paid to her teaching work, which she turned out to be really good at.
    And right now I am reading “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster. I’ve enjoyed her books before, and this one has a murder mystery, and an intriguing hero who is a refugee from Hungary. Unfortunately the editing was hastily done, so I am finding typos like “grizzly” for “grisly”. However it’s enough of a page-turner that I am ignoring the errors.

    Reply
  97. I read “The Heiress Gets a Duke” by Harper St. George. She’s a new author to me, I think this may be her first historical, and it was very entertaining. The heroine is an American heiress in England, she runs away to escape an arranged marriage, and ends up working as a governess, under an assumed name. Shenanigans ensue, and the plot is not new, but what made it fresh was the Gilded Age setting, charming characters, and the attention paid to her teaching work, which she turned out to be really good at.
    And right now I am reading “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster. I’ve enjoyed her books before, and this one has a murder mystery, and an intriguing hero who is a refugee from Hungary. Unfortunately the editing was hastily done, so I am finding typos like “grizzly” for “grisly”. However it’s enough of a page-turner that I am ignoring the errors.

    Reply
  98. I read “The Heiress Gets a Duke” by Harper St. George. She’s a new author to me, I think this may be her first historical, and it was very entertaining. The heroine is an American heiress in England, she runs away to escape an arranged marriage, and ends up working as a governess, under an assumed name. Shenanigans ensue, and the plot is not new, but what made it fresh was the Gilded Age setting, charming characters, and the attention paid to her teaching work, which she turned out to be really good at.
    And right now I am reading “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster. I’ve enjoyed her books before, and this one has a murder mystery, and an intriguing hero who is a refugee from Hungary. Unfortunately the editing was hastily done, so I am finding typos like “grizzly” for “grisly”. However it’s enough of a page-turner that I am ignoring the errors.

    Reply
  99. I read “The Heiress Gets a Duke” by Harper St. George. She’s a new author to me, I think this may be her first historical, and it was very entertaining. The heroine is an American heiress in England, she runs away to escape an arranged marriage, and ends up working as a governess, under an assumed name. Shenanigans ensue, and the plot is not new, but what made it fresh was the Gilded Age setting, charming characters, and the attention paid to her teaching work, which she turned out to be really good at.
    And right now I am reading “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster. I’ve enjoyed her books before, and this one has a murder mystery, and an intriguing hero who is a refugee from Hungary. Unfortunately the editing was hastily done, so I am finding typos like “grizzly” for “grisly”. However it’s enough of a page-turner that I am ignoring the errors.

    Reply
  100. I read “The Heiress Gets a Duke” by Harper St. George. She’s a new author to me, I think this may be her first historical, and it was very entertaining. The heroine is an American heiress in England, she runs away to escape an arranged marriage, and ends up working as a governess, under an assumed name. Shenanigans ensue, and the plot is not new, but what made it fresh was the Gilded Age setting, charming characters, and the attention paid to her teaching work, which she turned out to be really good at.
    And right now I am reading “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster. I’ve enjoyed her books before, and this one has a murder mystery, and an intriguing hero who is a refugee from Hungary. Unfortunately the editing was hastily done, so I am finding typos like “grizzly” for “grisly”. However it’s enough of a page-turner that I am ignoring the errors.

    Reply
  101. Whoops, so sorry, I confused two books with similar plots! The book I described with the heiress who works as a governess is called “Runaway Heiress” by Syrie James, and I also read it recently. Both books have an American heroine and both heroes are British peers who need to marry money. “The Heiress Gets a Duke” was fresh and funny, and the heroine does not run away, but does every possible thing to discourage the hero from marrying her, and the setting is Victorian.

    Reply
  102. Whoops, so sorry, I confused two books with similar plots! The book I described with the heiress who works as a governess is called “Runaway Heiress” by Syrie James, and I also read it recently. Both books have an American heroine and both heroes are British peers who need to marry money. “The Heiress Gets a Duke” was fresh and funny, and the heroine does not run away, but does every possible thing to discourage the hero from marrying her, and the setting is Victorian.

    Reply
  103. Whoops, so sorry, I confused two books with similar plots! The book I described with the heiress who works as a governess is called “Runaway Heiress” by Syrie James, and I also read it recently. Both books have an American heroine and both heroes are British peers who need to marry money. “The Heiress Gets a Duke” was fresh and funny, and the heroine does not run away, but does every possible thing to discourage the hero from marrying her, and the setting is Victorian.

    Reply
  104. Whoops, so sorry, I confused two books with similar plots! The book I described with the heiress who works as a governess is called “Runaway Heiress” by Syrie James, and I also read it recently. Both books have an American heroine and both heroes are British peers who need to marry money. “The Heiress Gets a Duke” was fresh and funny, and the heroine does not run away, but does every possible thing to discourage the hero from marrying her, and the setting is Victorian.

    Reply
  105. Whoops, so sorry, I confused two books with similar plots! The book I described with the heiress who works as a governess is called “Runaway Heiress” by Syrie James, and I also read it recently. Both books have an American heroine and both heroes are British peers who need to marry money. “The Heiress Gets a Duke” was fresh and funny, and the heroine does not run away, but does every possible thing to discourage the hero from marrying her, and the setting is Victorian.

    Reply
  106. Vicki – I loved the Dust Bunnies and hadn’t thought about them for ages — off to find them, and to dig-out The Marriage Spell, too! Very intriguing!

    Reply
  107. Vicki – I loved the Dust Bunnies and hadn’t thought about them for ages — off to find them, and to dig-out The Marriage Spell, too! Very intriguing!

    Reply
  108. Vicki – I loved the Dust Bunnies and hadn’t thought about them for ages — off to find them, and to dig-out The Marriage Spell, too! Very intriguing!

    Reply
  109. Vicki – I loved the Dust Bunnies and hadn’t thought about them for ages — off to find them, and to dig-out The Marriage Spell, too! Very intriguing!

    Reply
  110. Vicki – I loved the Dust Bunnies and hadn’t thought about them for ages — off to find them, and to dig-out The Marriage Spell, too! Very intriguing!

    Reply
  111. Well, now that I’ve just ordered many of the books recommended by Wenches and Commenters, I’ll do my few February reads:
    -The Last Mrs. Summers is the latest Royal Spyness mystery by Rhys Bowen – this was even lighter than usual, but Georgie is as endearing as ever, and if you’re a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, you’ll enjoy the not-so-subtle references. A very quick, fun read.
    -Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley was a Christmas gift I shall cherish. The perfect February read for anyone who loves horses (which Smile clearly does), smart dogs, old women, small boys, or Paris!
    -The first 2 books in the new-ish Magpie Murders series by Anthony Horowitz, The Magpie Murders and Moonflower Murders, were also a gift (don’t I have lovely friends?). Hadn’t read any of his previous books, but will definitely follow this series, as our heroine, Susan, a publisher and then inn owner, is great! Not too gritty, and the first one is a book within a book, which I always love!
    – Finally, after so enjoying the new (to the US) series version of All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot, I am re-reading his books aloud with my husband. He does a much better Yorkshire accent than I,but I’m better at the Scots!
    After my binge of Christmas Regency novellas and full-lengths, which carried well into January, February was a break, but I find myself longing for the early 19th century again, as always!

    Reply
  112. Well, now that I’ve just ordered many of the books recommended by Wenches and Commenters, I’ll do my few February reads:
    -The Last Mrs. Summers is the latest Royal Spyness mystery by Rhys Bowen – this was even lighter than usual, but Georgie is as endearing as ever, and if you’re a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, you’ll enjoy the not-so-subtle references. A very quick, fun read.
    -Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley was a Christmas gift I shall cherish. The perfect February read for anyone who loves horses (which Smile clearly does), smart dogs, old women, small boys, or Paris!
    -The first 2 books in the new-ish Magpie Murders series by Anthony Horowitz, The Magpie Murders and Moonflower Murders, were also a gift (don’t I have lovely friends?). Hadn’t read any of his previous books, but will definitely follow this series, as our heroine, Susan, a publisher and then inn owner, is great! Not too gritty, and the first one is a book within a book, which I always love!
    – Finally, after so enjoying the new (to the US) series version of All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot, I am re-reading his books aloud with my husband. He does a much better Yorkshire accent than I,but I’m better at the Scots!
    After my binge of Christmas Regency novellas and full-lengths, which carried well into January, February was a break, but I find myself longing for the early 19th century again, as always!

    Reply
  113. Well, now that I’ve just ordered many of the books recommended by Wenches and Commenters, I’ll do my few February reads:
    -The Last Mrs. Summers is the latest Royal Spyness mystery by Rhys Bowen – this was even lighter than usual, but Georgie is as endearing as ever, and if you’re a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, you’ll enjoy the not-so-subtle references. A very quick, fun read.
    -Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley was a Christmas gift I shall cherish. The perfect February read for anyone who loves horses (which Smile clearly does), smart dogs, old women, small boys, or Paris!
    -The first 2 books in the new-ish Magpie Murders series by Anthony Horowitz, The Magpie Murders and Moonflower Murders, were also a gift (don’t I have lovely friends?). Hadn’t read any of his previous books, but will definitely follow this series, as our heroine, Susan, a publisher and then inn owner, is great! Not too gritty, and the first one is a book within a book, which I always love!
    – Finally, after so enjoying the new (to the US) series version of All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot, I am re-reading his books aloud with my husband. He does a much better Yorkshire accent than I,but I’m better at the Scots!
    After my binge of Christmas Regency novellas and full-lengths, which carried well into January, February was a break, but I find myself longing for the early 19th century again, as always!

    Reply
  114. Well, now that I’ve just ordered many of the books recommended by Wenches and Commenters, I’ll do my few February reads:
    -The Last Mrs. Summers is the latest Royal Spyness mystery by Rhys Bowen – this was even lighter than usual, but Georgie is as endearing as ever, and if you’re a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, you’ll enjoy the not-so-subtle references. A very quick, fun read.
    -Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley was a Christmas gift I shall cherish. The perfect February read for anyone who loves horses (which Smile clearly does), smart dogs, old women, small boys, or Paris!
    -The first 2 books in the new-ish Magpie Murders series by Anthony Horowitz, The Magpie Murders and Moonflower Murders, were also a gift (don’t I have lovely friends?). Hadn’t read any of his previous books, but will definitely follow this series, as our heroine, Susan, a publisher and then inn owner, is great! Not too gritty, and the first one is a book within a book, which I always love!
    – Finally, after so enjoying the new (to the US) series version of All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot, I am re-reading his books aloud with my husband. He does a much better Yorkshire accent than I,but I’m better at the Scots!
    After my binge of Christmas Regency novellas and full-lengths, which carried well into January, February was a break, but I find myself longing for the early 19th century again, as always!

    Reply
  115. Well, now that I’ve just ordered many of the books recommended by Wenches and Commenters, I’ll do my few February reads:
    -The Last Mrs. Summers is the latest Royal Spyness mystery by Rhys Bowen – this was even lighter than usual, but Georgie is as endearing as ever, and if you’re a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca, you’ll enjoy the not-so-subtle references. A very quick, fun read.
    -Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley was a Christmas gift I shall cherish. The perfect February read for anyone who loves horses (which Smile clearly does), smart dogs, old women, small boys, or Paris!
    -The first 2 books in the new-ish Magpie Murders series by Anthony Horowitz, The Magpie Murders and Moonflower Murders, were also a gift (don’t I have lovely friends?). Hadn’t read any of his previous books, but will definitely follow this series, as our heroine, Susan, a publisher and then inn owner, is great! Not too gritty, and the first one is a book within a book, which I always love!
    – Finally, after so enjoying the new (to the US) series version of All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot, I am re-reading his books aloud with my husband. He does a much better Yorkshire accent than I,but I’m better at the Scots!
    After my binge of Christmas Regency novellas and full-lengths, which carried well into January, February was a break, but I find myself longing for the early 19th century again, as always!

    Reply
  116. Wow, you ladies are amazing – the breadth and variety of your fiction tastes.
    I don’t keep lists (at least not in that form) so I can’t give you a list of books finished (there were several I tossed and one I even wallbanged – it was heavy and good upper body exercise), but here are some I did finish.
    I have been reading Mary Kingswood on ebook for a couple of years now; I like her writing style (not super modernized) and she has quite a backlist to catch up on. I just finished the first of a new series, Stranger at the Dower House, and am happy that the next one will materialize in a couple of weeks. Having the Kindle app on my phone has meant that I make better buying decisions; if I like the sample on Kindle, I’ll likely buy it, possibly in print. I like having print books around because they remind me that I read them, or haven’t read them yet. I tend to forget both those things with ebooks. There are such a plethora of ebook regencies especieally that it can be hard to choose.
    In print I liked The Night Portrait by Laura Morelli, a timeslip tale that shifts between da Vinci’s era and WW2 in Germany, focusing on the Monuments Men and others who tried to preserve, identify and return works of art stolen by the Nazis, including the da Vinci portrait of a young girl turned mistress to the Duke of Milan. The historic ambiance of both eras seemed right and the characters dimensional.
    In genre stuff I reread The Contentious Countess by Irene Saunders, Miss Lacey’s Last Fling by Candice Hern (always a delight), as well as some Emma Lange, Dorothy Mack and Diana Brown titles. I note that Dorothy Mack is now on ebook, which is good because she was always a good storyteller.
    Right not I’m reading The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte, which is not fiction but is written in such a friendly and adventurous style that it reads that way. In these days of virus panic, it’s good for one’s perspective.

    Reply
  117. Wow, you ladies are amazing – the breadth and variety of your fiction tastes.
    I don’t keep lists (at least not in that form) so I can’t give you a list of books finished (there were several I tossed and one I even wallbanged – it was heavy and good upper body exercise), but here are some I did finish.
    I have been reading Mary Kingswood on ebook for a couple of years now; I like her writing style (not super modernized) and she has quite a backlist to catch up on. I just finished the first of a new series, Stranger at the Dower House, and am happy that the next one will materialize in a couple of weeks. Having the Kindle app on my phone has meant that I make better buying decisions; if I like the sample on Kindle, I’ll likely buy it, possibly in print. I like having print books around because they remind me that I read them, or haven’t read them yet. I tend to forget both those things with ebooks. There are such a plethora of ebook regencies especieally that it can be hard to choose.
    In print I liked The Night Portrait by Laura Morelli, a timeslip tale that shifts between da Vinci’s era and WW2 in Germany, focusing on the Monuments Men and others who tried to preserve, identify and return works of art stolen by the Nazis, including the da Vinci portrait of a young girl turned mistress to the Duke of Milan. The historic ambiance of both eras seemed right and the characters dimensional.
    In genre stuff I reread The Contentious Countess by Irene Saunders, Miss Lacey’s Last Fling by Candice Hern (always a delight), as well as some Emma Lange, Dorothy Mack and Diana Brown titles. I note that Dorothy Mack is now on ebook, which is good because she was always a good storyteller.
    Right not I’m reading The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte, which is not fiction but is written in such a friendly and adventurous style that it reads that way. In these days of virus panic, it’s good for one’s perspective.

    Reply
  118. Wow, you ladies are amazing – the breadth and variety of your fiction tastes.
    I don’t keep lists (at least not in that form) so I can’t give you a list of books finished (there were several I tossed and one I even wallbanged – it was heavy and good upper body exercise), but here are some I did finish.
    I have been reading Mary Kingswood on ebook for a couple of years now; I like her writing style (not super modernized) and she has quite a backlist to catch up on. I just finished the first of a new series, Stranger at the Dower House, and am happy that the next one will materialize in a couple of weeks. Having the Kindle app on my phone has meant that I make better buying decisions; if I like the sample on Kindle, I’ll likely buy it, possibly in print. I like having print books around because they remind me that I read them, or haven’t read them yet. I tend to forget both those things with ebooks. There are such a plethora of ebook regencies especieally that it can be hard to choose.
    In print I liked The Night Portrait by Laura Morelli, a timeslip tale that shifts between da Vinci’s era and WW2 in Germany, focusing on the Monuments Men and others who tried to preserve, identify and return works of art stolen by the Nazis, including the da Vinci portrait of a young girl turned mistress to the Duke of Milan. The historic ambiance of both eras seemed right and the characters dimensional.
    In genre stuff I reread The Contentious Countess by Irene Saunders, Miss Lacey’s Last Fling by Candice Hern (always a delight), as well as some Emma Lange, Dorothy Mack and Diana Brown titles. I note that Dorothy Mack is now on ebook, which is good because she was always a good storyteller.
    Right not I’m reading The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte, which is not fiction but is written in such a friendly and adventurous style that it reads that way. In these days of virus panic, it’s good for one’s perspective.

    Reply
  119. Wow, you ladies are amazing – the breadth and variety of your fiction tastes.
    I don’t keep lists (at least not in that form) so I can’t give you a list of books finished (there were several I tossed and one I even wallbanged – it was heavy and good upper body exercise), but here are some I did finish.
    I have been reading Mary Kingswood on ebook for a couple of years now; I like her writing style (not super modernized) and she has quite a backlist to catch up on. I just finished the first of a new series, Stranger at the Dower House, and am happy that the next one will materialize in a couple of weeks. Having the Kindle app on my phone has meant that I make better buying decisions; if I like the sample on Kindle, I’ll likely buy it, possibly in print. I like having print books around because they remind me that I read them, or haven’t read them yet. I tend to forget both those things with ebooks. There are such a plethora of ebook regencies especieally that it can be hard to choose.
    In print I liked The Night Portrait by Laura Morelli, a timeslip tale that shifts between da Vinci’s era and WW2 in Germany, focusing on the Monuments Men and others who tried to preserve, identify and return works of art stolen by the Nazis, including the da Vinci portrait of a young girl turned mistress to the Duke of Milan. The historic ambiance of both eras seemed right and the characters dimensional.
    In genre stuff I reread The Contentious Countess by Irene Saunders, Miss Lacey’s Last Fling by Candice Hern (always a delight), as well as some Emma Lange, Dorothy Mack and Diana Brown titles. I note that Dorothy Mack is now on ebook, which is good because she was always a good storyteller.
    Right not I’m reading The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte, which is not fiction but is written in such a friendly and adventurous style that it reads that way. In these days of virus panic, it’s good for one’s perspective.

    Reply
  120. Wow, you ladies are amazing – the breadth and variety of your fiction tastes.
    I don’t keep lists (at least not in that form) so I can’t give you a list of books finished (there were several I tossed and one I even wallbanged – it was heavy and good upper body exercise), but here are some I did finish.
    I have been reading Mary Kingswood on ebook for a couple of years now; I like her writing style (not super modernized) and she has quite a backlist to catch up on. I just finished the first of a new series, Stranger at the Dower House, and am happy that the next one will materialize in a couple of weeks. Having the Kindle app on my phone has meant that I make better buying decisions; if I like the sample on Kindle, I’ll likely buy it, possibly in print. I like having print books around because they remind me that I read them, or haven’t read them yet. I tend to forget both those things with ebooks. There are such a plethora of ebook regencies especieally that it can be hard to choose.
    In print I liked The Night Portrait by Laura Morelli, a timeslip tale that shifts between da Vinci’s era and WW2 in Germany, focusing on the Monuments Men and others who tried to preserve, identify and return works of art stolen by the Nazis, including the da Vinci portrait of a young girl turned mistress to the Duke of Milan. The historic ambiance of both eras seemed right and the characters dimensional.
    In genre stuff I reread The Contentious Countess by Irene Saunders, Miss Lacey’s Last Fling by Candice Hern (always a delight), as well as some Emma Lange, Dorothy Mack and Diana Brown titles. I note that Dorothy Mack is now on ebook, which is good because she was always a good storyteller.
    Right not I’m reading The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Steve Brusatte, which is not fiction but is written in such a friendly and adventurous style that it reads that way. In these days of virus panic, it’s good for one’s perspective.

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