What We’re Reading: February Edition!

Susan here, with "What We're Reading" for February: a variety of romances, traditional and non-traditional; mysteries, contemporary and historical; classics; post-apocalyptic; paranormal; and a dash of nonfiction. Scroll on down, friends — your wish lists and TBR stacks are about to grow exponentially!

Mary Jo here:

HeadlinersNew Zealand contemporary romance writer Lucy Parker is a great hit with the Word Wenches.  I believe it was Anne Gracie who introduced us to her with Parker's first London Celebrities book, Act Like It.  The wit, banter, and intelligence of this romance between two theater actors in London's West End made the story an instant favorite of mine. 

The stories work fine as standalones, but they all take place in the same general West End milieu so characters wander through each others' stories.  The heroine of book #4, The Austen Playbook, was actor Freddy Carlton.  Her sister, Sabrina Carlton, is the heroine of recently released book #5, Headliners, London Celebrities #5, a sparkling enemies-to-lovers story.  Sabrina appeared in The Jane Austen Playbook, and she's the very successful and popular anchor of a TV evening show.  Nick Davenport is host of a show on a rival network, and he brashly broadcast a Carlton family scandal, earning Sabina's red headed rage. 

Then one of their networks buys the other, there isn't room for two evening shows, and Sabrina and Nick are made co-hosts of the live morning show which has terrible ratings.  If they fail, they'll both be in the market for new jobs or even new careers.

Sparks and much humor ensue!  Highly recommended if you like wit and banter entwined with your romance.  The broadcasting world is convincing, too. 

The Lady's Guide to Celestial MechanicsMy other suggestion is something very different. There is a sizable subgenre of male/male romances, usually abbreviated as m/m and written by women. The Lady's Guide to Celestial Mechanics by Olivia Waite is the first female/female romance I've ever read. A Regency historical, it features Lucy Muchelney, a brilliant young mathematician and astronomer who had worked closely with her father.  After his death, she realizes how trapped she is by a male society that has no use for female scientists and largely refuses to admit they exist. 

Lucy's clueless brother is threatening to sell her telescope when Lucy goes to the widowed Lady Moth, a countess who had supported her husband's scientific endeavors.  Lucy wants to translate an important French astronomical work into English, and she persuades Catherine St. Day, the countess, to become her patron.  Though Lucy has always been aware of her sexual orientation, Catherine has never considered such a thing.  But as they live in the same house and work together, they are drawn together in a deeply romantic way. 

The Lady's Guide to Celestial Mechanics is not only an unusual and powerful romance, but also exploration of the obstacles and politics facing women of science.  And it has a very satisfying ending! Recommended if you'd like to try something different.

 

House by the seaNicola here:

I’ve had two stand out reads this month. The first was The House by the Sea by Louise Douglas, which put me in mind of Mary Stewart with its atmospheric mixture of romance and suspense.

When Edie hears that her mother in law Anna has died, her main emotion is relief. She always blamed Anna for the break-up of her family and wants nothing to do with the will that reunites her with her ex-husband Joe in ownership of the Villa Della Madonna in Sicily. When Edie reluctantly goes to Sicily to meet Joe and arrange to sell the villa, she is drawn into a decades-old mystery. How Edie and Joe find a way forward together and unravel the secrets of the past is told in a beautifully written page-turner that I found completely compelling. There were also welcome touches of humour amongst the mounting tension as well as some thought-provoking emotional elements to the story. If you enjoy a family saga with lots of layers of romance, mystery and suspense, you’ll love this.

Book coverA very different read but equally good was When Adam Met Evie by Guilia Skye. Michael Adams is a Canadian champion swimmer turned reality TV star who decides to escape his complicated life by travelling incognito through the Australian outback. He meets Evie, a cute British backpacker, and they team up on the road. Both Michael and Evie are interesting characters. Evie is getting over a painful breakup and is vulnerable but tough; she’s also a really nice person who would be a great friend. Michael is a bit up himself to start with but once he gets over his celebrity absorption he shows what a good guy he is underneath. The way that their relationship develops, both physically and emotionally, is written really well and has depth, humour, emotion and plenty of chemistry. This is a really good debut from Guilia Skye and I’ll be looking out for her books in future.

Andrea here.

I delved in to a new-to-me mystery author after reading some very good reviews, including its choice as an Edgar Finalist and a New York Times Notable Book some years back. River of Darkness by Rennie Airth introduces John Madden, a Scotland Yard detective who has come back from the trenches of WWI a changed man. He’s quiet, reserved, and clearly scarred, though his eye for detail and insightful analysis remain undamaged. A brutal murder brings him to a rural English River of Darknessvillage, where he disagrees with the local constabulary’s assessment that it was a robbery gone horribly wrong. Added by a raw recruit, who is just learning the ropes, and the village doctor, who turns out to be a woman, Madden sets out to discern the motive—including consulting with a new type of doctor who uses Freud’s therapies to diagnose illnesses of the mind—and thus figure out what sort of person he should be looking for . . . It’s a very well-written mystery, with really interesting psychological cat and mouse twists. Fair warning—it’s quite gritty in terms of violence. I’m not usually a fan of that, but I made an exception because the characters were so well Austenwrought and nuanced. (It’s on special sale on U. S. Amazon for $2.99)

And in honor of the newly released film version of Emma, which I’m planning to see this weekend, I re-read Austen's comedy of manners and marveled yet again at her wickedly sly observations on human nature. It will never displace P&P and Persuasion as my favorite Austen novels, but it’s a delight. (This e-book version on U. S. Amazon has the complete Austen novels for $1.99))

Joanna here.  I’m not generally a fan of the “redeemed villain” trope in Romance books. It’s easy to write and hard to get right. Too often the resolution is “He was never really a villain at all” or “If you say you’re sorry and do a few grovels you are now (magic gesture) a good person.” My reality checker doesn’t like either of these.

But some of my favorite books deal in a gritty way with the pain of self-realization, difficult repayments, and going on to live with guilt. Lord of Scoundrels by Loretta Chase, The Rake by Mary Jo Putney, and Ain’t She Sweet by Susan Wench iron 3Elizabeth Phillips are three such books.

I’ve found another one. Iron and Magic by Ilona Andrews.

I didn’t pick up this book for years because the protagonist was a major villain of the Kate Andrews books —  the despicable Hugh d’Ambray, Preceptor of the Iron Dogs, murderer of innocents, torturer of protagonists and secondary characters, poster child for evil.

The authors were not going to redeem this guy for me. No way.

Weeell  . . . yes. Way.

In post-apocalyptic America, warlord Hugh d’Ambray has been tossed aside by the immortal general he's served all his life. It's a devastating blow, and it breaks him. A small band of his elite corps drag him back from his determined pursuit of suicide by alcohol and set him to saving their lives and his own. Thus begins his journey through overwhelming guilt and what might be described as anger management issues to healing and a future

I was fascinated by the way the authors sell this redemption to the reader. Foreshadowings in earlier books are drawn together. There’s some robust near-villainy lurking in both protagonists’ heads which gives the plot a bit of flavor. In the end, monumental stubbornness , as well as love and sacrifice, conquer all.

An enjoyable adventure read for those who don't mind a bit of violence with their romance.

FlatShareAnne here.

Mary Jo beat me to reviewing Lucy Parker's Headliners, so I won't add anything except to say I loved it too.

A book that's been getting a lot of buzz is The Flat Share — by Beth O'Leary — and I can say the buzz is well deserved. Tiffy, the heroine, needs to escape her obsessive ex-boyfriend and find a flat urgently — one she can afford. She ends up sharing one — a flat with only one bed. The owner, Leon, works nights, Tiffy works days. Leon will spend his weekends at his girlfriend's. The plan is that they will never meet. But slowly, through the leaving of notes in the flat, a friendship develops. I loved this book, it's funny and heartwarming and very entertaining. 

Next I read Helen Hoang – The Kiss Quotient and The Bride Test. When it first LanternMencame out there was a lot of enthusiastic internet talk about The Kiss Quotient and I'd bought it, but hadn't read it. Then recently The Bride Test was on special, which prompted me to read both books. I enjoyed them both very much. In each case a protagonist battles with autism — and since the author is autistic herself, it adds veracity to her portrayal. I should add that both books are pretty sexy, so if that's not your cup of tea, so be it.

I have been glomming the "Others" series by Anne Bishop, starting with Lake Silence.  Paranormal, not so much romance, but good reading.

Lastly I read The Lantern Men, by Elly Griffiths. I'm a huge fan of her Dr. Ruth Galloway murder mystery series, and I gobbled this latest book up and enjoyed it as much as all the others.

Pat here, with The Wedding Bees: A Novel of Honey, Love, and Manners, by Sarah-Kate Lynch

WeddingbeesThis is women’s fiction with a love story, the kind of love story that actually has a happy ending and not a tragic one. But mostly, it’s about people and manners and life and bees. I assume it’s called magical realism, so many bee books are, but Sugar, the protagonist, will wrap you in warm honey, and you’ll slide right into this book like coming home to your hive. Really, I can tell you the story and talk about all the quirky characters and mention Sugar’s terrible secret, but the plot simply doesn’t matter. Sugar simply walks into your living room just as she walks into her new home at the beginning and settles down to making herself at home. She’s happy anywhere she goes, but you know, deep down, that there’s an unhappiness she’s covering up. And that’s why her love interest is such a gem, because even if he is a little crazy, he gets her and gets what she needs and makes her face up to it.

That said, if I had a neighbor like Sugar, I’d probably lock the door and pull the blinds every time I heard her coming my way. But that’s my problem, not hers.

And Susan here. I haven't done much reading, honestly, in the past few weeks thanks to three eye surgeries, but things are better now and I'll be catching up on my waiting (and growing) stack of books soon. I did read an excellent historical Howards endnovel that I can't talk about yet, as I was providing an author quote for a book that isn't released yet. It's early medieval, richly realized, and focuses on a unique queen in a fascinating time. 

And I made my way leisurely through an entertaining, thought-provoking, compelling read–Susan Hill's Howards End Is On the Landing.  Hill, an author herself (Woman in Black), writes here of her experience, one day, of looking everywhere for a specific book among the many bookshelves and reading stacks in her home in England–which sets off her year-long journey through the books in her home, the ones she's treasured, studied, revered, forgotten about, lost, always meant to read and never got to, all the books she rediscovers, one by one. The reading tour of the bookshelves in her home becomes an adventure, an exploration, a delve and discovery that is at times nostalgic, scholarly, amusing, fascinating–and always tantalizing if you're as much of a bibliophile as she is (and I think I am that far gone!). As she endeavors to set her hands on every book in her home, it becomes part autobiography–the books as gifts and purchases and great finds form the framework of her life from childhood to present day–and part travelogue, of a sort, past the shelves and collections in her keeping. Her book inspires me to try what I've always wanted to do, if I ever found real time–to lay my hands on every book in my home, take stock of it all, rediscover, catch up, savor, as Hill does here to such great effect. 

What have you been reading lately? We're always eager to add new titles to our own wish lists and to-be-reads! 

155 thoughts on “What We’re Reading: February Edition!”

  1. No new books this month, and mostly skimming books to see if they’re keepers. I’m sure you’ve read somewhere by now that we are downsizing our library. We have managed to discard 100 books so far this calendar year! Some titles we can just look at and discard, but for some authors you remember that you loved some, but others were duds. It’s necessary to skim book by book to find the keepers. This will probably go on all year.
    But in February I came across a book I bought when we visited the Boston area about 30 years ago. Somehow, I had never read it. The Book of Abigail and John is a wonderful colllection of the letters between Abigail Smith Adams and John Adams. The primary editor is L. H. Butterfield. If you like history, I recommend this book. I suggest you read it more slowly than I did; it’s a good idea to let the letters sink in.
    I also found and am slowly rereading the poems in Book of Americans by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benét. I read one or two poems a day, and just let the fun and the history sink in.

    Reply
  2. No new books this month, and mostly skimming books to see if they’re keepers. I’m sure you’ve read somewhere by now that we are downsizing our library. We have managed to discard 100 books so far this calendar year! Some titles we can just look at and discard, but for some authors you remember that you loved some, but others were duds. It’s necessary to skim book by book to find the keepers. This will probably go on all year.
    But in February I came across a book I bought when we visited the Boston area about 30 years ago. Somehow, I had never read it. The Book of Abigail and John is a wonderful colllection of the letters between Abigail Smith Adams and John Adams. The primary editor is L. H. Butterfield. If you like history, I recommend this book. I suggest you read it more slowly than I did; it’s a good idea to let the letters sink in.
    I also found and am slowly rereading the poems in Book of Americans by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benét. I read one or two poems a day, and just let the fun and the history sink in.

    Reply
  3. No new books this month, and mostly skimming books to see if they’re keepers. I’m sure you’ve read somewhere by now that we are downsizing our library. We have managed to discard 100 books so far this calendar year! Some titles we can just look at and discard, but for some authors you remember that you loved some, but others were duds. It’s necessary to skim book by book to find the keepers. This will probably go on all year.
    But in February I came across a book I bought when we visited the Boston area about 30 years ago. Somehow, I had never read it. The Book of Abigail and John is a wonderful colllection of the letters between Abigail Smith Adams and John Adams. The primary editor is L. H. Butterfield. If you like history, I recommend this book. I suggest you read it more slowly than I did; it’s a good idea to let the letters sink in.
    I also found and am slowly rereading the poems in Book of Americans by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benét. I read one or two poems a day, and just let the fun and the history sink in.

    Reply
  4. No new books this month, and mostly skimming books to see if they’re keepers. I’m sure you’ve read somewhere by now that we are downsizing our library. We have managed to discard 100 books so far this calendar year! Some titles we can just look at and discard, but for some authors you remember that you loved some, but others were duds. It’s necessary to skim book by book to find the keepers. This will probably go on all year.
    But in February I came across a book I bought when we visited the Boston area about 30 years ago. Somehow, I had never read it. The Book of Abigail and John is a wonderful colllection of the letters between Abigail Smith Adams and John Adams. The primary editor is L. H. Butterfield. If you like history, I recommend this book. I suggest you read it more slowly than I did; it’s a good idea to let the letters sink in.
    I also found and am slowly rereading the poems in Book of Americans by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benét. I read one or two poems a day, and just let the fun and the history sink in.

    Reply
  5. No new books this month, and mostly skimming books to see if they’re keepers. I’m sure you’ve read somewhere by now that we are downsizing our library. We have managed to discard 100 books so far this calendar year! Some titles we can just look at and discard, but for some authors you remember that you loved some, but others were duds. It’s necessary to skim book by book to find the keepers. This will probably go on all year.
    But in February I came across a book I bought when we visited the Boston area about 30 years ago. Somehow, I had never read it. The Book of Abigail and John is a wonderful colllection of the letters between Abigail Smith Adams and John Adams. The primary editor is L. H. Butterfield. If you like history, I recommend this book. I suggest you read it more slowly than I did; it’s a good idea to let the letters sink in.
    I also found and am slowly rereading the poems in Book of Americans by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benét. I read one or two poems a day, and just let the fun and the history sink in.

    Reply
  6. I read Paper Girls by Alex Smith and then promptly bought the next two and preorderd the fourth. Then I read his The Harder They Fall which started out as a stand alone but now, there’s book two in the works. I also A Litter of Bones by JD Kirk and then the other three in the series and am waiting for number five to be announced. The writing and unexpected humor is wonderful. I just finished Whisky in Small Glasses by Denzil Mayreck and have bought the second but I’m not sure yet about this series.
    And…I bought River of Darkness! 🙂

    Reply
  7. I read Paper Girls by Alex Smith and then promptly bought the next two and preorderd the fourth. Then I read his The Harder They Fall which started out as a stand alone but now, there’s book two in the works. I also A Litter of Bones by JD Kirk and then the other three in the series and am waiting for number five to be announced. The writing and unexpected humor is wonderful. I just finished Whisky in Small Glasses by Denzil Mayreck and have bought the second but I’m not sure yet about this series.
    And…I bought River of Darkness! 🙂

    Reply
  8. I read Paper Girls by Alex Smith and then promptly bought the next two and preorderd the fourth. Then I read his The Harder They Fall which started out as a stand alone but now, there’s book two in the works. I also A Litter of Bones by JD Kirk and then the other three in the series and am waiting for number five to be announced. The writing and unexpected humor is wonderful. I just finished Whisky in Small Glasses by Denzil Mayreck and have bought the second but I’m not sure yet about this series.
    And…I bought River of Darkness! 🙂

    Reply
  9. I read Paper Girls by Alex Smith and then promptly bought the next two and preorderd the fourth. Then I read his The Harder They Fall which started out as a stand alone but now, there’s book two in the works. I also A Litter of Bones by JD Kirk and then the other three in the series and am waiting for number five to be announced. The writing and unexpected humor is wonderful. I just finished Whisky in Small Glasses by Denzil Mayreck and have bought the second but I’m not sure yet about this series.
    And…I bought River of Darkness! 🙂

    Reply
  10. I read Paper Girls by Alex Smith and then promptly bought the next two and preorderd the fourth. Then I read his The Harder They Fall which started out as a stand alone but now, there’s book two in the works. I also A Litter of Bones by JD Kirk and then the other three in the series and am waiting for number five to be announced. The writing and unexpected humor is wonderful. I just finished Whisky in Small Glasses by Denzil Mayreck and have bought the second but I’m not sure yet about this series.
    And…I bought River of Darkness! 🙂

    Reply
  11. I LOVED the JD Kirk books! The Alex Smith are pretty gritty too, but they were really excellent reads. At least for me. He started as a YA author, award winning, and branched out. I’m really glad he did. I hope you like them as much as I did 🙂

    Reply
  12. I LOVED the JD Kirk books! The Alex Smith are pretty gritty too, but they were really excellent reads. At least for me. He started as a YA author, award winning, and branched out. I’m really glad he did. I hope you like them as much as I did 🙂

    Reply
  13. I LOVED the JD Kirk books! The Alex Smith are pretty gritty too, but they were really excellent reads. At least for me. He started as a YA author, award winning, and branched out. I’m really glad he did. I hope you like them as much as I did 🙂

    Reply
  14. I LOVED the JD Kirk books! The Alex Smith are pretty gritty too, but they were really excellent reads. At least for me. He started as a YA author, award winning, and branched out. I’m really glad he did. I hope you like them as much as I did 🙂

    Reply
  15. I LOVED the JD Kirk books! The Alex Smith are pretty gritty too, but they were really excellent reads. At least for me. He started as a YA author, award winning, and branched out. I’m really glad he did. I hope you like them as much as I did 🙂

    Reply
  16. Interesting list to consider, though I really must quell the urge to keep buying books, maybe wait until I finish a book before adding a new one! Anyway, following the wenches reviews I have added 3 audio books to my list for investigation:
    1) I particularly like historicals where female scientists battle against prejudice and conventions. There aren’t that many around so I am attracted to ‘Lady’s guide to celestial mechanics’. Not sure about the lesbian love interest though. However the audio is not available until July so I have time to adjust!
    2)I’m also a fan of detective stories and ‘River of Darkness’ is from a new-to-me author. The audio is well reviewed with a good narrator so looking forward to starting a new series.
    3)’The Flat Share’ has been favorably compared with Jojo Moyes (me before you), a fav author, so I have to add this one.
    For my own reading I have continued with the Agatha Raisin Cotswold mystery series. I am now at book 7 ‘The wellspring of death’. They all make very entertaining listening and Penelope Keith is outstanding with the narration. It is best to read them in order so that Agatha’s romantic adventures are in kept in sequence.
    I also started Val McDermid’s Karen Piri series with ‘The Distant Echo’. Very good audio and story. Piri does not enter until quite late. The final twist to reveal the murderer took me by surprise. Definitely want to continue the series.
    Finally I would mention Tracy Chevalier’s ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’. I so enjoyed ‘Remarkable Creatures’ and this book has had rave reviews so I just had to try the audio. The book is certainly well written and worth a listen but for me the action dragged a bit. Though if she writes another featuring a scientist rather than an artist I will definitely buy.

    Reply
  17. Interesting list to consider, though I really must quell the urge to keep buying books, maybe wait until I finish a book before adding a new one! Anyway, following the wenches reviews I have added 3 audio books to my list for investigation:
    1) I particularly like historicals where female scientists battle against prejudice and conventions. There aren’t that many around so I am attracted to ‘Lady’s guide to celestial mechanics’. Not sure about the lesbian love interest though. However the audio is not available until July so I have time to adjust!
    2)I’m also a fan of detective stories and ‘River of Darkness’ is from a new-to-me author. The audio is well reviewed with a good narrator so looking forward to starting a new series.
    3)’The Flat Share’ has been favorably compared with Jojo Moyes (me before you), a fav author, so I have to add this one.
    For my own reading I have continued with the Agatha Raisin Cotswold mystery series. I am now at book 7 ‘The wellspring of death’. They all make very entertaining listening and Penelope Keith is outstanding with the narration. It is best to read them in order so that Agatha’s romantic adventures are in kept in sequence.
    I also started Val McDermid’s Karen Piri series with ‘The Distant Echo’. Very good audio and story. Piri does not enter until quite late. The final twist to reveal the murderer took me by surprise. Definitely want to continue the series.
    Finally I would mention Tracy Chevalier’s ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’. I so enjoyed ‘Remarkable Creatures’ and this book has had rave reviews so I just had to try the audio. The book is certainly well written and worth a listen but for me the action dragged a bit. Though if she writes another featuring a scientist rather than an artist I will definitely buy.

    Reply
  18. Interesting list to consider, though I really must quell the urge to keep buying books, maybe wait until I finish a book before adding a new one! Anyway, following the wenches reviews I have added 3 audio books to my list for investigation:
    1) I particularly like historicals where female scientists battle against prejudice and conventions. There aren’t that many around so I am attracted to ‘Lady’s guide to celestial mechanics’. Not sure about the lesbian love interest though. However the audio is not available until July so I have time to adjust!
    2)I’m also a fan of detective stories and ‘River of Darkness’ is from a new-to-me author. The audio is well reviewed with a good narrator so looking forward to starting a new series.
    3)’The Flat Share’ has been favorably compared with Jojo Moyes (me before you), a fav author, so I have to add this one.
    For my own reading I have continued with the Agatha Raisin Cotswold mystery series. I am now at book 7 ‘The wellspring of death’. They all make very entertaining listening and Penelope Keith is outstanding with the narration. It is best to read them in order so that Agatha’s romantic adventures are in kept in sequence.
    I also started Val McDermid’s Karen Piri series with ‘The Distant Echo’. Very good audio and story. Piri does not enter until quite late. The final twist to reveal the murderer took me by surprise. Definitely want to continue the series.
    Finally I would mention Tracy Chevalier’s ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’. I so enjoyed ‘Remarkable Creatures’ and this book has had rave reviews so I just had to try the audio. The book is certainly well written and worth a listen but for me the action dragged a bit. Though if she writes another featuring a scientist rather than an artist I will definitely buy.

    Reply
  19. Interesting list to consider, though I really must quell the urge to keep buying books, maybe wait until I finish a book before adding a new one! Anyway, following the wenches reviews I have added 3 audio books to my list for investigation:
    1) I particularly like historicals where female scientists battle against prejudice and conventions. There aren’t that many around so I am attracted to ‘Lady’s guide to celestial mechanics’. Not sure about the lesbian love interest though. However the audio is not available until July so I have time to adjust!
    2)I’m also a fan of detective stories and ‘River of Darkness’ is from a new-to-me author. The audio is well reviewed with a good narrator so looking forward to starting a new series.
    3)’The Flat Share’ has been favorably compared with Jojo Moyes (me before you), a fav author, so I have to add this one.
    For my own reading I have continued with the Agatha Raisin Cotswold mystery series. I am now at book 7 ‘The wellspring of death’. They all make very entertaining listening and Penelope Keith is outstanding with the narration. It is best to read them in order so that Agatha’s romantic adventures are in kept in sequence.
    I also started Val McDermid’s Karen Piri series with ‘The Distant Echo’. Very good audio and story. Piri does not enter until quite late. The final twist to reveal the murderer took me by surprise. Definitely want to continue the series.
    Finally I would mention Tracy Chevalier’s ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’. I so enjoyed ‘Remarkable Creatures’ and this book has had rave reviews so I just had to try the audio. The book is certainly well written and worth a listen but for me the action dragged a bit. Though if she writes another featuring a scientist rather than an artist I will definitely buy.

    Reply
  20. Interesting list to consider, though I really must quell the urge to keep buying books, maybe wait until I finish a book before adding a new one! Anyway, following the wenches reviews I have added 3 audio books to my list for investigation:
    1) I particularly like historicals where female scientists battle against prejudice and conventions. There aren’t that many around so I am attracted to ‘Lady’s guide to celestial mechanics’. Not sure about the lesbian love interest though. However the audio is not available until July so I have time to adjust!
    2)I’m also a fan of detective stories and ‘River of Darkness’ is from a new-to-me author. The audio is well reviewed with a good narrator so looking forward to starting a new series.
    3)’The Flat Share’ has been favorably compared with Jojo Moyes (me before you), a fav author, so I have to add this one.
    For my own reading I have continued with the Agatha Raisin Cotswold mystery series. I am now at book 7 ‘The wellspring of death’. They all make very entertaining listening and Penelope Keith is outstanding with the narration. It is best to read them in order so that Agatha’s romantic adventures are in kept in sequence.
    I also started Val McDermid’s Karen Piri series with ‘The Distant Echo’. Very good audio and story. Piri does not enter until quite late. The final twist to reveal the murderer took me by surprise. Definitely want to continue the series.
    Finally I would mention Tracy Chevalier’s ‘Girl with a Pearl Earring’. I so enjoyed ‘Remarkable Creatures’ and this book has had rave reviews so I just had to try the audio. The book is certainly well written and worth a listen but for me the action dragged a bit. Though if she writes another featuring a scientist rather than an artist I will definitely buy.

    Reply
  21. The last few days I’ve been working my way back through all the “What We’ve Been Reading” posts. First because I was looking for something and then because it was rather fascinating. I’d see a book recommendation and go AH HA!! So that is why I’ve got that book on my wish list. (grin). Or why I read it I’m back to June 2014 now. As well I’ve found a few books that interest me now that didn’t previously.
    As to what I’ve been reading, I’ve been working on new reads trying to lower the TBR mountain before working the library book sale next month.
    Victoria’s Daughters by Jerrold M. Packard. Biography of the lives of Victoria’s 5 daughters. It was kind of snarky and I got the impression he didn’t much like Queen Victoria or Vicky, the oldest daughter. I did learn tons and only feel pity for all of those girls tossed out into the world with no real understanding of how non-English royalty lived. In Vicky’s case, she had a super inflated sense of superiority and ego instilled by her father which didn’t serve her well.
    One of the most interesting things I picked up on was how the various marriages (sons, daughters, grandchildren) put the various siblings and grandchildren on the opposite side of all the various wars and disputes. (Read for Reading Challenge and got it off my Mt. TBR).
    Pretty Face – Lucy Parker. Very good book and enjoyed it very much. It had gotten buried in my Mt TBR. London theater scene, etc.
    Local Custom – Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. Sci Fi, Liaden universe. Read for Reading challenge. I’m not sure who recommended it but for whatever reason it just didn’t work for me. I did find the foreword by Anne McCaffrey fascinating, as in how much she loved all the Liaden universe books.
    Love in Plain Sight by Jeanie London. A very satisfying story with 3 excellent Happy endings. Set in New Orleans with a stop in Nashville. Involves the after effects of Hurricane Katrina as well as families split by Family Deportations. No violence, a good mystery involving searching for a missing child. Lots of good character growth and of course a good romance.
    Her Scandalous Pursuit – Candace Camp. Regency. Excellent ending. Finally Ms. Camp has written the story of Thisbee & Desmond’s romance. Tad too much angst and self sacrifice but they finally came to their senses. A fun little mystery thrown in as well.
    Lady Osbaldestones Plum Pudding – Stephanie Laurens. Excellent fun book. I’ve very much enjoyed the Lady Osbaldestones Christmas books. Always a fun little mystery as well as a romance. Characters ranging in age from 7 to 70!
    A Picture of Murder by T.E. Kinsey. Almost a cozy murder mystery. Set in 1909 England in a small village. Didn’t fall in love with the characters so won’t continue the series.
    Crooked Adam – D.E. Stevenson. Written in 1942 so it was a contemporary book at the time. Set in rural England. Main character is Adam. Has German spies, the angst of not serving because of a physical handicap, small love interest. Mostly an adventure story.
    A Single Thread – Tracy Chevalier. Interestingly enough my hold came through several days after the interview here with the author. I’d never heard the term “surplus women” but I had known of the problem as it pertained to France under and after Napoleon as well as after the US Civil War.
    Murder on a Girls Night Out – Anne George. A continuation of my listening to all her books on audio. Another in the Southern Sister’s cozy mystery series. Loved it as always since it made me laugh frequently.
    Twelve Days of Christmas – Trisha Ashley. Absolutely loved it and see why it has been so highly recommended by so many Wenches over the last 6 years! I finally had gotten a copy and didn’t want to wait 10 months so read it now. It has been one of the best of her books that I’ve read. Extremely satisfying banter and HEA.
    A Leap of Faith (also known as The Urge to Jump) by Trisha Ashley. Every one was a quirky character – the h/H as well as all the secondary ones. I could tell it was written earlier in her career but it was a fun book. A nice HEA ending. Set in rural small town England/Wales.
    There were other books I read that were fine. But I don’t feel the love enough to write about them!

    Reply
  22. The last few days I’ve been working my way back through all the “What We’ve Been Reading” posts. First because I was looking for something and then because it was rather fascinating. I’d see a book recommendation and go AH HA!! So that is why I’ve got that book on my wish list. (grin). Or why I read it I’m back to June 2014 now. As well I’ve found a few books that interest me now that didn’t previously.
    As to what I’ve been reading, I’ve been working on new reads trying to lower the TBR mountain before working the library book sale next month.
    Victoria’s Daughters by Jerrold M. Packard. Biography of the lives of Victoria’s 5 daughters. It was kind of snarky and I got the impression he didn’t much like Queen Victoria or Vicky, the oldest daughter. I did learn tons and only feel pity for all of those girls tossed out into the world with no real understanding of how non-English royalty lived. In Vicky’s case, she had a super inflated sense of superiority and ego instilled by her father which didn’t serve her well.
    One of the most interesting things I picked up on was how the various marriages (sons, daughters, grandchildren) put the various siblings and grandchildren on the opposite side of all the various wars and disputes. (Read for Reading Challenge and got it off my Mt. TBR).
    Pretty Face – Lucy Parker. Very good book and enjoyed it very much. It had gotten buried in my Mt TBR. London theater scene, etc.
    Local Custom – Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. Sci Fi, Liaden universe. Read for Reading challenge. I’m not sure who recommended it but for whatever reason it just didn’t work for me. I did find the foreword by Anne McCaffrey fascinating, as in how much she loved all the Liaden universe books.
    Love in Plain Sight by Jeanie London. A very satisfying story with 3 excellent Happy endings. Set in New Orleans with a stop in Nashville. Involves the after effects of Hurricane Katrina as well as families split by Family Deportations. No violence, a good mystery involving searching for a missing child. Lots of good character growth and of course a good romance.
    Her Scandalous Pursuit – Candace Camp. Regency. Excellent ending. Finally Ms. Camp has written the story of Thisbee & Desmond’s romance. Tad too much angst and self sacrifice but they finally came to their senses. A fun little mystery thrown in as well.
    Lady Osbaldestones Plum Pudding – Stephanie Laurens. Excellent fun book. I’ve very much enjoyed the Lady Osbaldestones Christmas books. Always a fun little mystery as well as a romance. Characters ranging in age from 7 to 70!
    A Picture of Murder by T.E. Kinsey. Almost a cozy murder mystery. Set in 1909 England in a small village. Didn’t fall in love with the characters so won’t continue the series.
    Crooked Adam – D.E. Stevenson. Written in 1942 so it was a contemporary book at the time. Set in rural England. Main character is Adam. Has German spies, the angst of not serving because of a physical handicap, small love interest. Mostly an adventure story.
    A Single Thread – Tracy Chevalier. Interestingly enough my hold came through several days after the interview here with the author. I’d never heard the term “surplus women” but I had known of the problem as it pertained to France under and after Napoleon as well as after the US Civil War.
    Murder on a Girls Night Out – Anne George. A continuation of my listening to all her books on audio. Another in the Southern Sister’s cozy mystery series. Loved it as always since it made me laugh frequently.
    Twelve Days of Christmas – Trisha Ashley. Absolutely loved it and see why it has been so highly recommended by so many Wenches over the last 6 years! I finally had gotten a copy and didn’t want to wait 10 months so read it now. It has been one of the best of her books that I’ve read. Extremely satisfying banter and HEA.
    A Leap of Faith (also known as The Urge to Jump) by Trisha Ashley. Every one was a quirky character – the h/H as well as all the secondary ones. I could tell it was written earlier in her career but it was a fun book. A nice HEA ending. Set in rural small town England/Wales.
    There were other books I read that were fine. But I don’t feel the love enough to write about them!

    Reply
  23. The last few days I’ve been working my way back through all the “What We’ve Been Reading” posts. First because I was looking for something and then because it was rather fascinating. I’d see a book recommendation and go AH HA!! So that is why I’ve got that book on my wish list. (grin). Or why I read it I’m back to June 2014 now. As well I’ve found a few books that interest me now that didn’t previously.
    As to what I’ve been reading, I’ve been working on new reads trying to lower the TBR mountain before working the library book sale next month.
    Victoria’s Daughters by Jerrold M. Packard. Biography of the lives of Victoria’s 5 daughters. It was kind of snarky and I got the impression he didn’t much like Queen Victoria or Vicky, the oldest daughter. I did learn tons and only feel pity for all of those girls tossed out into the world with no real understanding of how non-English royalty lived. In Vicky’s case, she had a super inflated sense of superiority and ego instilled by her father which didn’t serve her well.
    One of the most interesting things I picked up on was how the various marriages (sons, daughters, grandchildren) put the various siblings and grandchildren on the opposite side of all the various wars and disputes. (Read for Reading Challenge and got it off my Mt. TBR).
    Pretty Face – Lucy Parker. Very good book and enjoyed it very much. It had gotten buried in my Mt TBR. London theater scene, etc.
    Local Custom – Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. Sci Fi, Liaden universe. Read for Reading challenge. I’m not sure who recommended it but for whatever reason it just didn’t work for me. I did find the foreword by Anne McCaffrey fascinating, as in how much she loved all the Liaden universe books.
    Love in Plain Sight by Jeanie London. A very satisfying story with 3 excellent Happy endings. Set in New Orleans with a stop in Nashville. Involves the after effects of Hurricane Katrina as well as families split by Family Deportations. No violence, a good mystery involving searching for a missing child. Lots of good character growth and of course a good romance.
    Her Scandalous Pursuit – Candace Camp. Regency. Excellent ending. Finally Ms. Camp has written the story of Thisbee & Desmond’s romance. Tad too much angst and self sacrifice but they finally came to their senses. A fun little mystery thrown in as well.
    Lady Osbaldestones Plum Pudding – Stephanie Laurens. Excellent fun book. I’ve very much enjoyed the Lady Osbaldestones Christmas books. Always a fun little mystery as well as a romance. Characters ranging in age from 7 to 70!
    A Picture of Murder by T.E. Kinsey. Almost a cozy murder mystery. Set in 1909 England in a small village. Didn’t fall in love with the characters so won’t continue the series.
    Crooked Adam – D.E. Stevenson. Written in 1942 so it was a contemporary book at the time. Set in rural England. Main character is Adam. Has German spies, the angst of not serving because of a physical handicap, small love interest. Mostly an adventure story.
    A Single Thread – Tracy Chevalier. Interestingly enough my hold came through several days after the interview here with the author. I’d never heard the term “surplus women” but I had known of the problem as it pertained to France under and after Napoleon as well as after the US Civil War.
    Murder on a Girls Night Out – Anne George. A continuation of my listening to all her books on audio. Another in the Southern Sister’s cozy mystery series. Loved it as always since it made me laugh frequently.
    Twelve Days of Christmas – Trisha Ashley. Absolutely loved it and see why it has been so highly recommended by so many Wenches over the last 6 years! I finally had gotten a copy and didn’t want to wait 10 months so read it now. It has been one of the best of her books that I’ve read. Extremely satisfying banter and HEA.
    A Leap of Faith (also known as The Urge to Jump) by Trisha Ashley. Every one was a quirky character – the h/H as well as all the secondary ones. I could tell it was written earlier in her career but it was a fun book. A nice HEA ending. Set in rural small town England/Wales.
    There were other books I read that were fine. But I don’t feel the love enough to write about them!

    Reply
  24. The last few days I’ve been working my way back through all the “What We’ve Been Reading” posts. First because I was looking for something and then because it was rather fascinating. I’d see a book recommendation and go AH HA!! So that is why I’ve got that book on my wish list. (grin). Or why I read it I’m back to June 2014 now. As well I’ve found a few books that interest me now that didn’t previously.
    As to what I’ve been reading, I’ve been working on new reads trying to lower the TBR mountain before working the library book sale next month.
    Victoria’s Daughters by Jerrold M. Packard. Biography of the lives of Victoria’s 5 daughters. It was kind of snarky and I got the impression he didn’t much like Queen Victoria or Vicky, the oldest daughter. I did learn tons and only feel pity for all of those girls tossed out into the world with no real understanding of how non-English royalty lived. In Vicky’s case, she had a super inflated sense of superiority and ego instilled by her father which didn’t serve her well.
    One of the most interesting things I picked up on was how the various marriages (sons, daughters, grandchildren) put the various siblings and grandchildren on the opposite side of all the various wars and disputes. (Read for Reading Challenge and got it off my Mt. TBR).
    Pretty Face – Lucy Parker. Very good book and enjoyed it very much. It had gotten buried in my Mt TBR. London theater scene, etc.
    Local Custom – Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. Sci Fi, Liaden universe. Read for Reading challenge. I’m not sure who recommended it but for whatever reason it just didn’t work for me. I did find the foreword by Anne McCaffrey fascinating, as in how much she loved all the Liaden universe books.
    Love in Plain Sight by Jeanie London. A very satisfying story with 3 excellent Happy endings. Set in New Orleans with a stop in Nashville. Involves the after effects of Hurricane Katrina as well as families split by Family Deportations. No violence, a good mystery involving searching for a missing child. Lots of good character growth and of course a good romance.
    Her Scandalous Pursuit – Candace Camp. Regency. Excellent ending. Finally Ms. Camp has written the story of Thisbee & Desmond’s romance. Tad too much angst and self sacrifice but they finally came to their senses. A fun little mystery thrown in as well.
    Lady Osbaldestones Plum Pudding – Stephanie Laurens. Excellent fun book. I’ve very much enjoyed the Lady Osbaldestones Christmas books. Always a fun little mystery as well as a romance. Characters ranging in age from 7 to 70!
    A Picture of Murder by T.E. Kinsey. Almost a cozy murder mystery. Set in 1909 England in a small village. Didn’t fall in love with the characters so won’t continue the series.
    Crooked Adam – D.E. Stevenson. Written in 1942 so it was a contemporary book at the time. Set in rural England. Main character is Adam. Has German spies, the angst of not serving because of a physical handicap, small love interest. Mostly an adventure story.
    A Single Thread – Tracy Chevalier. Interestingly enough my hold came through several days after the interview here with the author. I’d never heard the term “surplus women” but I had known of the problem as it pertained to France under and after Napoleon as well as after the US Civil War.
    Murder on a Girls Night Out – Anne George. A continuation of my listening to all her books on audio. Another in the Southern Sister’s cozy mystery series. Loved it as always since it made me laugh frequently.
    Twelve Days of Christmas – Trisha Ashley. Absolutely loved it and see why it has been so highly recommended by so many Wenches over the last 6 years! I finally had gotten a copy and didn’t want to wait 10 months so read it now. It has been one of the best of her books that I’ve read. Extremely satisfying banter and HEA.
    A Leap of Faith (also known as The Urge to Jump) by Trisha Ashley. Every one was a quirky character – the h/H as well as all the secondary ones. I could tell it was written earlier in her career but it was a fun book. A nice HEA ending. Set in rural small town England/Wales.
    There were other books I read that were fine. But I don’t feel the love enough to write about them!

    Reply
  25. The last few days I’ve been working my way back through all the “What We’ve Been Reading” posts. First because I was looking for something and then because it was rather fascinating. I’d see a book recommendation and go AH HA!! So that is why I’ve got that book on my wish list. (grin). Or why I read it I’m back to June 2014 now. As well I’ve found a few books that interest me now that didn’t previously.
    As to what I’ve been reading, I’ve been working on new reads trying to lower the TBR mountain before working the library book sale next month.
    Victoria’s Daughters by Jerrold M. Packard. Biography of the lives of Victoria’s 5 daughters. It was kind of snarky and I got the impression he didn’t much like Queen Victoria or Vicky, the oldest daughter. I did learn tons and only feel pity for all of those girls tossed out into the world with no real understanding of how non-English royalty lived. In Vicky’s case, she had a super inflated sense of superiority and ego instilled by her father which didn’t serve her well.
    One of the most interesting things I picked up on was how the various marriages (sons, daughters, grandchildren) put the various siblings and grandchildren on the opposite side of all the various wars and disputes. (Read for Reading Challenge and got it off my Mt. TBR).
    Pretty Face – Lucy Parker. Very good book and enjoyed it very much. It had gotten buried in my Mt TBR. London theater scene, etc.
    Local Custom – Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. Sci Fi, Liaden universe. Read for Reading challenge. I’m not sure who recommended it but for whatever reason it just didn’t work for me. I did find the foreword by Anne McCaffrey fascinating, as in how much she loved all the Liaden universe books.
    Love in Plain Sight by Jeanie London. A very satisfying story with 3 excellent Happy endings. Set in New Orleans with a stop in Nashville. Involves the after effects of Hurricane Katrina as well as families split by Family Deportations. No violence, a good mystery involving searching for a missing child. Lots of good character growth and of course a good romance.
    Her Scandalous Pursuit – Candace Camp. Regency. Excellent ending. Finally Ms. Camp has written the story of Thisbee & Desmond’s romance. Tad too much angst and self sacrifice but they finally came to their senses. A fun little mystery thrown in as well.
    Lady Osbaldestones Plum Pudding – Stephanie Laurens. Excellent fun book. I’ve very much enjoyed the Lady Osbaldestones Christmas books. Always a fun little mystery as well as a romance. Characters ranging in age from 7 to 70!
    A Picture of Murder by T.E. Kinsey. Almost a cozy murder mystery. Set in 1909 England in a small village. Didn’t fall in love with the characters so won’t continue the series.
    Crooked Adam – D.E. Stevenson. Written in 1942 so it was a contemporary book at the time. Set in rural England. Main character is Adam. Has German spies, the angst of not serving because of a physical handicap, small love interest. Mostly an adventure story.
    A Single Thread – Tracy Chevalier. Interestingly enough my hold came through several days after the interview here with the author. I’d never heard the term “surplus women” but I had known of the problem as it pertained to France under and after Napoleon as well as after the US Civil War.
    Murder on a Girls Night Out – Anne George. A continuation of my listening to all her books on audio. Another in the Southern Sister’s cozy mystery series. Loved it as always since it made me laugh frequently.
    Twelve Days of Christmas – Trisha Ashley. Absolutely loved it and see why it has been so highly recommended by so many Wenches over the last 6 years! I finally had gotten a copy and didn’t want to wait 10 months so read it now. It has been one of the best of her books that I’ve read. Extremely satisfying banter and HEA.
    A Leap of Faith (also known as The Urge to Jump) by Trisha Ashley. Every one was a quirky character – the h/H as well as all the secondary ones. I could tell it was written earlier in her career but it was a fun book. A nice HEA ending. Set in rural small town England/Wales.
    There were other books I read that were fine. But I don’t feel the love enough to write about them!

    Reply
  26. I’ve actually read a number of the books you listed above. Anne Bishop’s The Others is one of my favorite series; I’ve also enjoyed The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics, The Flat Share, the Helen Hoang books, and Howards End Is On the Landing.

    Reply
  27. I’ve actually read a number of the books you listed above. Anne Bishop’s The Others is one of my favorite series; I’ve also enjoyed The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics, The Flat Share, the Helen Hoang books, and Howards End Is On the Landing.

    Reply
  28. I’ve actually read a number of the books you listed above. Anne Bishop’s The Others is one of my favorite series; I’ve also enjoyed The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics, The Flat Share, the Helen Hoang books, and Howards End Is On the Landing.

    Reply
  29. I’ve actually read a number of the books you listed above. Anne Bishop’s The Others is one of my favorite series; I’ve also enjoyed The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics, The Flat Share, the Helen Hoang books, and Howards End Is On the Landing.

    Reply
  30. I’ve actually read a number of the books you listed above. Anne Bishop’s The Others is one of my favorite series; I’ve also enjoyed The Lady’s Guide to Celestial Mechanics, The Flat Share, the Helen Hoang books, and Howards End Is On the Landing.

    Reply
  31. Since January ~
    — How to Draw Inky Wonderlands: Create and Color Your Own Magical Adventure by Johanna Basford. It did not take long to read; however, it would take quite some time to do all the projects. I enjoyed it.
    — reread with pleasure Written in Red by Anne Bishop which I enjoyed once again.
    — My book group chose to read a TOME this month … I generally start a book group book the weekend before we meet on a Thursday; however, I decided it behooved me to start this book much sooner. The book is Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art by Mary Gabriel. I think this book would most interest those who like Art History, the study of women, US history from 1930 to 1960, or New York history. The book was incredibly well researched; it has 716 pages of text and almost 140 pages of dense endnotes. It was easy to read; it just went on…and on…and on! I definitely learned about five women of whom I’d been unaware.
    — read/skimmed Paperbacks from Hell by Grady Hendrix. Horror is a genre that I generally avoid; however, I was doing gift giving research for a friend who does read horror. The book was quite enjoyable and not intrinsically scary; I learned quite a bit! At heart, it’s a book about books which is something I do like.
    — reread, with pleasure, two favorite novellas: His Road Home by Anna Richland and The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — Enjoyed Two Man Station by Lisa Henry which is a contemporary male/male romance set in Australia.
    — Principles of Spookology (The Spectral Files Book 2) by S.E. Harmon which is a contemporary paranormal mystery romance; I enjoyed it.
    — Granddad’s Cup of Tea by Amy Rae Durreson is a short novella (longish short story) which I quite enjoyed; it’s a romance between two older men.
    — Stars Beyond (Stars Uncharted Book 2) by SK Dunstall. I enjoyed this; however, the Linesman series is still my favorite Dunstall work.
    — the historical romance A Wicked Kind of Husband (Longhope Abbey) by Mia Vincy; this had some amusing dialogue that had me laughing aloud. I’ll definitely be happy to read more by this author.
    — enjoyed reading/browsing Drawing and Painting Beautiful Faces: A Mixed-Media Portrait Workshop by Jane Davenport though I did not do any of the projects. I did take away some ideas.
    — a new book Kingdomtide by Rye Curtis. This was an interesting and relatively quick read; it had many dysfunctional characters and an abundance of merlot … much merlot … megaliters of merlot.
    — Hello Forever by Sarina Bowen which is a contemporary male/male romance; I enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Transformation by Kim Fielding though it was light compared to some of her longer works.
    — slowly read Three Parts Dead (Craft Sequence Book 1) by Max Gladstone over the past two weeks. The world in the book is complex with magic, gods, gargoyles, and law firms. It’s definitely not this world which made the presence of vodka, cigarettes, and business cards rather anachronistic. I may continue on with the series at some point.
    — enjoyed Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore which is a historical romance set in Victorian era England. I’ll happily read more in the series.

    Reply
  32. Since January ~
    — How to Draw Inky Wonderlands: Create and Color Your Own Magical Adventure by Johanna Basford. It did not take long to read; however, it would take quite some time to do all the projects. I enjoyed it.
    — reread with pleasure Written in Red by Anne Bishop which I enjoyed once again.
    — My book group chose to read a TOME this month … I generally start a book group book the weekend before we meet on a Thursday; however, I decided it behooved me to start this book much sooner. The book is Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art by Mary Gabriel. I think this book would most interest those who like Art History, the study of women, US history from 1930 to 1960, or New York history. The book was incredibly well researched; it has 716 pages of text and almost 140 pages of dense endnotes. It was easy to read; it just went on…and on…and on! I definitely learned about five women of whom I’d been unaware.
    — read/skimmed Paperbacks from Hell by Grady Hendrix. Horror is a genre that I generally avoid; however, I was doing gift giving research for a friend who does read horror. The book was quite enjoyable and not intrinsically scary; I learned quite a bit! At heart, it’s a book about books which is something I do like.
    — reread, with pleasure, two favorite novellas: His Road Home by Anna Richland and The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — Enjoyed Two Man Station by Lisa Henry which is a contemporary male/male romance set in Australia.
    — Principles of Spookology (The Spectral Files Book 2) by S.E. Harmon which is a contemporary paranormal mystery romance; I enjoyed it.
    — Granddad’s Cup of Tea by Amy Rae Durreson is a short novella (longish short story) which I quite enjoyed; it’s a romance between two older men.
    — Stars Beyond (Stars Uncharted Book 2) by SK Dunstall. I enjoyed this; however, the Linesman series is still my favorite Dunstall work.
    — the historical romance A Wicked Kind of Husband (Longhope Abbey) by Mia Vincy; this had some amusing dialogue that had me laughing aloud. I’ll definitely be happy to read more by this author.
    — enjoyed reading/browsing Drawing and Painting Beautiful Faces: A Mixed-Media Portrait Workshop by Jane Davenport though I did not do any of the projects. I did take away some ideas.
    — a new book Kingdomtide by Rye Curtis. This was an interesting and relatively quick read; it had many dysfunctional characters and an abundance of merlot … much merlot … megaliters of merlot.
    — Hello Forever by Sarina Bowen which is a contemporary male/male romance; I enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Transformation by Kim Fielding though it was light compared to some of her longer works.
    — slowly read Three Parts Dead (Craft Sequence Book 1) by Max Gladstone over the past two weeks. The world in the book is complex with magic, gods, gargoyles, and law firms. It’s definitely not this world which made the presence of vodka, cigarettes, and business cards rather anachronistic. I may continue on with the series at some point.
    — enjoyed Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore which is a historical romance set in Victorian era England. I’ll happily read more in the series.

    Reply
  33. Since January ~
    — How to Draw Inky Wonderlands: Create and Color Your Own Magical Adventure by Johanna Basford. It did not take long to read; however, it would take quite some time to do all the projects. I enjoyed it.
    — reread with pleasure Written in Red by Anne Bishop which I enjoyed once again.
    — My book group chose to read a TOME this month … I generally start a book group book the weekend before we meet on a Thursday; however, I decided it behooved me to start this book much sooner. The book is Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art by Mary Gabriel. I think this book would most interest those who like Art History, the study of women, US history from 1930 to 1960, or New York history. The book was incredibly well researched; it has 716 pages of text and almost 140 pages of dense endnotes. It was easy to read; it just went on…and on…and on! I definitely learned about five women of whom I’d been unaware.
    — read/skimmed Paperbacks from Hell by Grady Hendrix. Horror is a genre that I generally avoid; however, I was doing gift giving research for a friend who does read horror. The book was quite enjoyable and not intrinsically scary; I learned quite a bit! At heart, it’s a book about books which is something I do like.
    — reread, with pleasure, two favorite novellas: His Road Home by Anna Richland and The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — Enjoyed Two Man Station by Lisa Henry which is a contemporary male/male romance set in Australia.
    — Principles of Spookology (The Spectral Files Book 2) by S.E. Harmon which is a contemporary paranormal mystery romance; I enjoyed it.
    — Granddad’s Cup of Tea by Amy Rae Durreson is a short novella (longish short story) which I quite enjoyed; it’s a romance between two older men.
    — Stars Beyond (Stars Uncharted Book 2) by SK Dunstall. I enjoyed this; however, the Linesman series is still my favorite Dunstall work.
    — the historical romance A Wicked Kind of Husband (Longhope Abbey) by Mia Vincy; this had some amusing dialogue that had me laughing aloud. I’ll definitely be happy to read more by this author.
    — enjoyed reading/browsing Drawing and Painting Beautiful Faces: A Mixed-Media Portrait Workshop by Jane Davenport though I did not do any of the projects. I did take away some ideas.
    — a new book Kingdomtide by Rye Curtis. This was an interesting and relatively quick read; it had many dysfunctional characters and an abundance of merlot … much merlot … megaliters of merlot.
    — Hello Forever by Sarina Bowen which is a contemporary male/male romance; I enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Transformation by Kim Fielding though it was light compared to some of her longer works.
    — slowly read Three Parts Dead (Craft Sequence Book 1) by Max Gladstone over the past two weeks. The world in the book is complex with magic, gods, gargoyles, and law firms. It’s definitely not this world which made the presence of vodka, cigarettes, and business cards rather anachronistic. I may continue on with the series at some point.
    — enjoyed Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore which is a historical romance set in Victorian era England. I’ll happily read more in the series.

    Reply
  34. Since January ~
    — How to Draw Inky Wonderlands: Create and Color Your Own Magical Adventure by Johanna Basford. It did not take long to read; however, it would take quite some time to do all the projects. I enjoyed it.
    — reread with pleasure Written in Red by Anne Bishop which I enjoyed once again.
    — My book group chose to read a TOME this month … I generally start a book group book the weekend before we meet on a Thursday; however, I decided it behooved me to start this book much sooner. The book is Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art by Mary Gabriel. I think this book would most interest those who like Art History, the study of women, US history from 1930 to 1960, or New York history. The book was incredibly well researched; it has 716 pages of text and almost 140 pages of dense endnotes. It was easy to read; it just went on…and on…and on! I definitely learned about five women of whom I’d been unaware.
    — read/skimmed Paperbacks from Hell by Grady Hendrix. Horror is a genre that I generally avoid; however, I was doing gift giving research for a friend who does read horror. The book was quite enjoyable and not intrinsically scary; I learned quite a bit! At heart, it’s a book about books which is something I do like.
    — reread, with pleasure, two favorite novellas: His Road Home by Anna Richland and The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — Enjoyed Two Man Station by Lisa Henry which is a contemporary male/male romance set in Australia.
    — Principles of Spookology (The Spectral Files Book 2) by S.E. Harmon which is a contemporary paranormal mystery romance; I enjoyed it.
    — Granddad’s Cup of Tea by Amy Rae Durreson is a short novella (longish short story) which I quite enjoyed; it’s a romance between two older men.
    — Stars Beyond (Stars Uncharted Book 2) by SK Dunstall. I enjoyed this; however, the Linesman series is still my favorite Dunstall work.
    — the historical romance A Wicked Kind of Husband (Longhope Abbey) by Mia Vincy; this had some amusing dialogue that had me laughing aloud. I’ll definitely be happy to read more by this author.
    — enjoyed reading/browsing Drawing and Painting Beautiful Faces: A Mixed-Media Portrait Workshop by Jane Davenport though I did not do any of the projects. I did take away some ideas.
    — a new book Kingdomtide by Rye Curtis. This was an interesting and relatively quick read; it had many dysfunctional characters and an abundance of merlot … much merlot … megaliters of merlot.
    — Hello Forever by Sarina Bowen which is a contemporary male/male romance; I enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Transformation by Kim Fielding though it was light compared to some of her longer works.
    — slowly read Three Parts Dead (Craft Sequence Book 1) by Max Gladstone over the past two weeks. The world in the book is complex with magic, gods, gargoyles, and law firms. It’s definitely not this world which made the presence of vodka, cigarettes, and business cards rather anachronistic. I may continue on with the series at some point.
    — enjoyed Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore which is a historical romance set in Victorian era England. I’ll happily read more in the series.

    Reply
  35. Since January ~
    — How to Draw Inky Wonderlands: Create and Color Your Own Magical Adventure by Johanna Basford. It did not take long to read; however, it would take quite some time to do all the projects. I enjoyed it.
    — reread with pleasure Written in Red by Anne Bishop which I enjoyed once again.
    — My book group chose to read a TOME this month … I generally start a book group book the weekend before we meet on a Thursday; however, I decided it behooved me to start this book much sooner. The book is Ninth Street Women: Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Helen Frankenthaler: Five Painters and the Movement That Changed Modern Art by Mary Gabriel. I think this book would most interest those who like Art History, the study of women, US history from 1930 to 1960, or New York history. The book was incredibly well researched; it has 716 pages of text and almost 140 pages of dense endnotes. It was easy to read; it just went on…and on…and on! I definitely learned about five women of whom I’d been unaware.
    — read/skimmed Paperbacks from Hell by Grady Hendrix. Horror is a genre that I generally avoid; however, I was doing gift giving research for a friend who does read horror. The book was quite enjoyable and not intrinsically scary; I learned quite a bit! At heart, it’s a book about books which is something I do like.
    — reread, with pleasure, two favorite novellas: His Road Home by Anna Richland and The Governess Affair by Courtney Milan.
    — Enjoyed Two Man Station by Lisa Henry which is a contemporary male/male romance set in Australia.
    — Principles of Spookology (The Spectral Files Book 2) by S.E. Harmon which is a contemporary paranormal mystery romance; I enjoyed it.
    — Granddad’s Cup of Tea by Amy Rae Durreson is a short novella (longish short story) which I quite enjoyed; it’s a romance between two older men.
    — Stars Beyond (Stars Uncharted Book 2) by SK Dunstall. I enjoyed this; however, the Linesman series is still my favorite Dunstall work.
    — the historical romance A Wicked Kind of Husband (Longhope Abbey) by Mia Vincy; this had some amusing dialogue that had me laughing aloud. I’ll definitely be happy to read more by this author.
    — enjoyed reading/browsing Drawing and Painting Beautiful Faces: A Mixed-Media Portrait Workshop by Jane Davenport though I did not do any of the projects. I did take away some ideas.
    — a new book Kingdomtide by Rye Curtis. This was an interesting and relatively quick read; it had many dysfunctional characters and an abundance of merlot … much merlot … megaliters of merlot.
    — Hello Forever by Sarina Bowen which is a contemporary male/male romance; I enjoyed it.
    — enjoyed the historical romance novella Transformation by Kim Fielding though it was light compared to some of her longer works.
    — slowly read Three Parts Dead (Craft Sequence Book 1) by Max Gladstone over the past two weeks. The world in the book is complex with magic, gods, gargoyles, and law firms. It’s definitely not this world which made the presence of vodka, cigarettes, and business cards rather anachronistic. I may continue on with the series at some point.
    — enjoyed Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore which is a historical romance set in Victorian era England. I’ll happily read more in the series.

    Reply
  36. – I know I saw them recommended online somewhere but can’t remember where, but I read Graham Swift’s “Mothering Sunday” and Anne Youngson’s “Meet Me at the Museum” earlier this month and liked them both. Very different books, and neither a romance, although the latter is an epistolary novel with a developing relationship that has a more than fair chance of becoming a romantic one.
    – Also read Jonathan Weiner’s “Beak of the Finch” for my trip to the Galapagos. Frankly, it dragged in the middle and could easily have been shorter, but the overall tale of Darwin’s theory of evolution and how it’s been proved through careful work by a number of scientists is fascinating.
    – An old book that was in my bookcase for years, unread, was finally pulled out and gobbled up like the treat it was: “Lady Gallant” by Suzanne Robinson. A reread of an even older book was also rewarding: “Double Indemnity” by James M. Cain.
    – Read several Jenny Colgan books. I like her contemporary romances, as I like her characters and the way she evokes the Scottish settings. Act Like It”, the first of the Lucy Parker London theatre books, is in turns smart, funny, a bit sad, but always VG.
    – Loved the hero of Kate Clayborn’s “Love Lettering”. He is a quant, intense and focused, and when he focuses on the heroine it is heart meltingly romantic.
    – And now for something completely different: “Good Talk” by Mira Jacob is a graphic memoir about talking to her son about race in America. Her family is from India, her husband is Jewish, so there’s a lot to discuss. It’s often funny as well, and even I, who am sometimes visually confused by graphic work, found it easy to follow.

    Reply
  37. – I know I saw them recommended online somewhere but can’t remember where, but I read Graham Swift’s “Mothering Sunday” and Anne Youngson’s “Meet Me at the Museum” earlier this month and liked them both. Very different books, and neither a romance, although the latter is an epistolary novel with a developing relationship that has a more than fair chance of becoming a romantic one.
    – Also read Jonathan Weiner’s “Beak of the Finch” for my trip to the Galapagos. Frankly, it dragged in the middle and could easily have been shorter, but the overall tale of Darwin’s theory of evolution and how it’s been proved through careful work by a number of scientists is fascinating.
    – An old book that was in my bookcase for years, unread, was finally pulled out and gobbled up like the treat it was: “Lady Gallant” by Suzanne Robinson. A reread of an even older book was also rewarding: “Double Indemnity” by James M. Cain.
    – Read several Jenny Colgan books. I like her contemporary romances, as I like her characters and the way she evokes the Scottish settings. Act Like It”, the first of the Lucy Parker London theatre books, is in turns smart, funny, a bit sad, but always VG.
    – Loved the hero of Kate Clayborn’s “Love Lettering”. He is a quant, intense and focused, and when he focuses on the heroine it is heart meltingly romantic.
    – And now for something completely different: “Good Talk” by Mira Jacob is a graphic memoir about talking to her son about race in America. Her family is from India, her husband is Jewish, so there’s a lot to discuss. It’s often funny as well, and even I, who am sometimes visually confused by graphic work, found it easy to follow.

    Reply
  38. – I know I saw them recommended online somewhere but can’t remember where, but I read Graham Swift’s “Mothering Sunday” and Anne Youngson’s “Meet Me at the Museum” earlier this month and liked them both. Very different books, and neither a romance, although the latter is an epistolary novel with a developing relationship that has a more than fair chance of becoming a romantic one.
    – Also read Jonathan Weiner’s “Beak of the Finch” for my trip to the Galapagos. Frankly, it dragged in the middle and could easily have been shorter, but the overall tale of Darwin’s theory of evolution and how it’s been proved through careful work by a number of scientists is fascinating.
    – An old book that was in my bookcase for years, unread, was finally pulled out and gobbled up like the treat it was: “Lady Gallant” by Suzanne Robinson. A reread of an even older book was also rewarding: “Double Indemnity” by James M. Cain.
    – Read several Jenny Colgan books. I like her contemporary romances, as I like her characters and the way she evokes the Scottish settings. Act Like It”, the first of the Lucy Parker London theatre books, is in turns smart, funny, a bit sad, but always VG.
    – Loved the hero of Kate Clayborn’s “Love Lettering”. He is a quant, intense and focused, and when he focuses on the heroine it is heart meltingly romantic.
    – And now for something completely different: “Good Talk” by Mira Jacob is a graphic memoir about talking to her son about race in America. Her family is from India, her husband is Jewish, so there’s a lot to discuss. It’s often funny as well, and even I, who am sometimes visually confused by graphic work, found it easy to follow.

    Reply
  39. – I know I saw them recommended online somewhere but can’t remember where, but I read Graham Swift’s “Mothering Sunday” and Anne Youngson’s “Meet Me at the Museum” earlier this month and liked them both. Very different books, and neither a romance, although the latter is an epistolary novel with a developing relationship that has a more than fair chance of becoming a romantic one.
    – Also read Jonathan Weiner’s “Beak of the Finch” for my trip to the Galapagos. Frankly, it dragged in the middle and could easily have been shorter, but the overall tale of Darwin’s theory of evolution and how it’s been proved through careful work by a number of scientists is fascinating.
    – An old book that was in my bookcase for years, unread, was finally pulled out and gobbled up like the treat it was: “Lady Gallant” by Suzanne Robinson. A reread of an even older book was also rewarding: “Double Indemnity” by James M. Cain.
    – Read several Jenny Colgan books. I like her contemporary romances, as I like her characters and the way she evokes the Scottish settings. Act Like It”, the first of the Lucy Parker London theatre books, is in turns smart, funny, a bit sad, but always VG.
    – Loved the hero of Kate Clayborn’s “Love Lettering”. He is a quant, intense and focused, and when he focuses on the heroine it is heart meltingly romantic.
    – And now for something completely different: “Good Talk” by Mira Jacob is a graphic memoir about talking to her son about race in America. Her family is from India, her husband is Jewish, so there’s a lot to discuss. It’s often funny as well, and even I, who am sometimes visually confused by graphic work, found it easy to follow.

    Reply
  40. – I know I saw them recommended online somewhere but can’t remember where, but I read Graham Swift’s “Mothering Sunday” and Anne Youngson’s “Meet Me at the Museum” earlier this month and liked them both. Very different books, and neither a romance, although the latter is an epistolary novel with a developing relationship that has a more than fair chance of becoming a romantic one.
    – Also read Jonathan Weiner’s “Beak of the Finch” for my trip to the Galapagos. Frankly, it dragged in the middle and could easily have been shorter, but the overall tale of Darwin’s theory of evolution and how it’s been proved through careful work by a number of scientists is fascinating.
    – An old book that was in my bookcase for years, unread, was finally pulled out and gobbled up like the treat it was: “Lady Gallant” by Suzanne Robinson. A reread of an even older book was also rewarding: “Double Indemnity” by James M. Cain.
    – Read several Jenny Colgan books. I like her contemporary romances, as I like her characters and the way she evokes the Scottish settings. Act Like It”, the first of the Lucy Parker London theatre books, is in turns smart, funny, a bit sad, but always VG.
    – Loved the hero of Kate Clayborn’s “Love Lettering”. He is a quant, intense and focused, and when he focuses on the heroine it is heart meltingly romantic.
    – And now for something completely different: “Good Talk” by Mira Jacob is a graphic memoir about talking to her son about race in America. Her family is from India, her husband is Jewish, so there’s a lot to discuss. It’s often funny as well, and even I, who am sometimes visually confused by graphic work, found it easy to follow.

    Reply
  41. I think you’re convincing me to but the Agatha Raisin books, Quantum. I’ve only seen the TV version. And you and Nicola have also convinced me to buy the Tracy Chevalier books — The Girl With the Pearl Earring is on an e-book special at the moment. I hope you enjoy the Flat Share.
    Thanks for sharing your suggestions — and maybe one day you can list some of your favourite female scientist stories. I don’t suppose you count the Deanna Raybourne Veronica Speedwell series — she’s a lepidopterist. And then there’s the delightful Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase where the heroine is a secret archaeologist. Hmm, am wondering, what counts as a scientist?

    Reply
  42. I think you’re convincing me to but the Agatha Raisin books, Quantum. I’ve only seen the TV version. And you and Nicola have also convinced me to buy the Tracy Chevalier books — The Girl With the Pearl Earring is on an e-book special at the moment. I hope you enjoy the Flat Share.
    Thanks for sharing your suggestions — and maybe one day you can list some of your favourite female scientist stories. I don’t suppose you count the Deanna Raybourne Veronica Speedwell series — she’s a lepidopterist. And then there’s the delightful Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase where the heroine is a secret archaeologist. Hmm, am wondering, what counts as a scientist?

    Reply
  43. I think you’re convincing me to but the Agatha Raisin books, Quantum. I’ve only seen the TV version. And you and Nicola have also convinced me to buy the Tracy Chevalier books — The Girl With the Pearl Earring is on an e-book special at the moment. I hope you enjoy the Flat Share.
    Thanks for sharing your suggestions — and maybe one day you can list some of your favourite female scientist stories. I don’t suppose you count the Deanna Raybourne Veronica Speedwell series — she’s a lepidopterist. And then there’s the delightful Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase where the heroine is a secret archaeologist. Hmm, am wondering, what counts as a scientist?

    Reply
  44. I think you’re convincing me to but the Agatha Raisin books, Quantum. I’ve only seen the TV version. And you and Nicola have also convinced me to buy the Tracy Chevalier books — The Girl With the Pearl Earring is on an e-book special at the moment. I hope you enjoy the Flat Share.
    Thanks for sharing your suggestions — and maybe one day you can list some of your favourite female scientist stories. I don’t suppose you count the Deanna Raybourne Veronica Speedwell series — she’s a lepidopterist. And then there’s the delightful Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase where the heroine is a secret archaeologist. Hmm, am wondering, what counts as a scientist?

    Reply
  45. I think you’re convincing me to but the Agatha Raisin books, Quantum. I’ve only seen the TV version. And you and Nicola have also convinced me to buy the Tracy Chevalier books — The Girl With the Pearl Earring is on an e-book special at the moment. I hope you enjoy the Flat Share.
    Thanks for sharing your suggestions — and maybe one day you can list some of your favourite female scientist stories. I don’t suppose you count the Deanna Raybourne Veronica Speedwell series — she’s a lepidopterist. And then there’s the delightful Mr Impossible by Loretta Chase where the heroine is a secret archaeologist. Hmm, am wondering, what counts as a scientist?

    Reply
  46. At the moment I’m reading Golden in Death by J.D. Robb and next I’ll be reading Her Scandalous Pursuit by Candace Camp (The Mad Morelands series).

    Reply
  47. At the moment I’m reading Golden in Death by J.D. Robb and next I’ll be reading Her Scandalous Pursuit by Candace Camp (The Mad Morelands series).

    Reply
  48. At the moment I’m reading Golden in Death by J.D. Robb and next I’ll be reading Her Scandalous Pursuit by Candace Camp (The Mad Morelands series).

    Reply
  49. At the moment I’m reading Golden in Death by J.D. Robb and next I’ll be reading Her Scandalous Pursuit by Candace Camp (The Mad Morelands series).

    Reply
  50. At the moment I’m reading Golden in Death by J.D. Robb and next I’ll be reading Her Scandalous Pursuit by Candace Camp (The Mad Morelands series).

    Reply
  51. Anne I think that I would use a very liberal interpretation of ‘scientist’. I’m looking for stories where the heroine has a scholarly obsession with the natural world but has to confront barriers of male prejudice to pursue that passion. The Veronica Speedwell books look interesting but alas no audio version is available in the UK. The Loretta Chase book could fit the bill if the archaeology interest plays a prominent role (the synopsis on Amazon only mentions that Daphne is a scholar) … thanks I will look into that.
    Three books that come immediately to mind:
    Elizabeth Gilbert ‘signature of all things’ … botany and evolution
    Amanda Quick ‘Ravished’ …. fossil collecting
    Tracy Chevallier ‘Remarkable Creatures’ … fossils

    Reply
  52. Anne I think that I would use a very liberal interpretation of ‘scientist’. I’m looking for stories where the heroine has a scholarly obsession with the natural world but has to confront barriers of male prejudice to pursue that passion. The Veronica Speedwell books look interesting but alas no audio version is available in the UK. The Loretta Chase book could fit the bill if the archaeology interest plays a prominent role (the synopsis on Amazon only mentions that Daphne is a scholar) … thanks I will look into that.
    Three books that come immediately to mind:
    Elizabeth Gilbert ‘signature of all things’ … botany and evolution
    Amanda Quick ‘Ravished’ …. fossil collecting
    Tracy Chevallier ‘Remarkable Creatures’ … fossils

    Reply
  53. Anne I think that I would use a very liberal interpretation of ‘scientist’. I’m looking for stories where the heroine has a scholarly obsession with the natural world but has to confront barriers of male prejudice to pursue that passion. The Veronica Speedwell books look interesting but alas no audio version is available in the UK. The Loretta Chase book could fit the bill if the archaeology interest plays a prominent role (the synopsis on Amazon only mentions that Daphne is a scholar) … thanks I will look into that.
    Three books that come immediately to mind:
    Elizabeth Gilbert ‘signature of all things’ … botany and evolution
    Amanda Quick ‘Ravished’ …. fossil collecting
    Tracy Chevallier ‘Remarkable Creatures’ … fossils

    Reply
  54. Anne I think that I would use a very liberal interpretation of ‘scientist’. I’m looking for stories where the heroine has a scholarly obsession with the natural world but has to confront barriers of male prejudice to pursue that passion. The Veronica Speedwell books look interesting but alas no audio version is available in the UK. The Loretta Chase book could fit the bill if the archaeology interest plays a prominent role (the synopsis on Amazon only mentions that Daphne is a scholar) … thanks I will look into that.
    Three books that come immediately to mind:
    Elizabeth Gilbert ‘signature of all things’ … botany and evolution
    Amanda Quick ‘Ravished’ …. fossil collecting
    Tracy Chevallier ‘Remarkable Creatures’ … fossils

    Reply
  55. Anne I think that I would use a very liberal interpretation of ‘scientist’. I’m looking for stories where the heroine has a scholarly obsession with the natural world but has to confront barriers of male prejudice to pursue that passion. The Veronica Speedwell books look interesting but alas no audio version is available in the UK. The Loretta Chase book could fit the bill if the archaeology interest plays a prominent role (the synopsis on Amazon only mentions that Daphne is a scholar) … thanks I will look into that.
    Three books that come immediately to mind:
    Elizabeth Gilbert ‘signature of all things’ … botany and evolution
    Amanda Quick ‘Ravished’ …. fossil collecting
    Tracy Chevallier ‘Remarkable Creatures’ … fossils

    Reply
  56. I am reading a fascinating non-fiction book – The Ravenmaster, my life with the ravens at the Tower of London by Christopher Skaife, Yeoman Warder.
    Just what it is purported to be. Very well done.
    – The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor. This is a fictionalized version of the real life story of how Conan Doyle was duped back at the turn of the century but with a new twist thrown in.Have read all books by Elly Griffiths and all of Rennie Airth’s John Madden. Wonderful stuff!

    Reply
  57. I am reading a fascinating non-fiction book – The Ravenmaster, my life with the ravens at the Tower of London by Christopher Skaife, Yeoman Warder.
    Just what it is purported to be. Very well done.
    – The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor. This is a fictionalized version of the real life story of how Conan Doyle was duped back at the turn of the century but with a new twist thrown in.Have read all books by Elly Griffiths and all of Rennie Airth’s John Madden. Wonderful stuff!

    Reply
  58. I am reading a fascinating non-fiction book – The Ravenmaster, my life with the ravens at the Tower of London by Christopher Skaife, Yeoman Warder.
    Just what it is purported to be. Very well done.
    – The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor. This is a fictionalized version of the real life story of how Conan Doyle was duped back at the turn of the century but with a new twist thrown in.Have read all books by Elly Griffiths and all of Rennie Airth’s John Madden. Wonderful stuff!

    Reply
  59. I am reading a fascinating non-fiction book – The Ravenmaster, my life with the ravens at the Tower of London by Christopher Skaife, Yeoman Warder.
    Just what it is purported to be. Very well done.
    – The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor. This is a fictionalized version of the real life story of how Conan Doyle was duped back at the turn of the century but with a new twist thrown in.Have read all books by Elly Griffiths and all of Rennie Airth’s John Madden. Wonderful stuff!

    Reply
  60. I am reading a fascinating non-fiction book – The Ravenmaster, my life with the ravens at the Tower of London by Christopher Skaife, Yeoman Warder.
    Just what it is purported to be. Very well done.
    – The Cottingley Secret by Hazel Gaynor. This is a fictionalized version of the real life story of how Conan Doyle was duped back at the turn of the century but with a new twist thrown in.Have read all books by Elly Griffiths and all of Rennie Airth’s John Madden. Wonderful stuff!

    Reply
  61. I always find such wonderful books to add to my already-teetering TBR pile here! “Headliners” is already there, since I’ve read all the others in the series, thanks to this blog. Now I’me adding “The Flat Share” — the basic plot sounds just a bit like “Box and Cox”, a play by W.S. Gilbert of Gilbert & Sullivan fame. I’m in the process of rereading “Little Women” a chapter a day, after seeing the movie (though I had already planned on reading it again). Now I might also reread “Emma” which was my first Austen, when I needed something to read while staying at my aunt’s one summer, when I was about twelve.

    Reply
  62. I always find such wonderful books to add to my already-teetering TBR pile here! “Headliners” is already there, since I’ve read all the others in the series, thanks to this blog. Now I’me adding “The Flat Share” — the basic plot sounds just a bit like “Box and Cox”, a play by W.S. Gilbert of Gilbert & Sullivan fame. I’m in the process of rereading “Little Women” a chapter a day, after seeing the movie (though I had already planned on reading it again). Now I might also reread “Emma” which was my first Austen, when I needed something to read while staying at my aunt’s one summer, when I was about twelve.

    Reply
  63. I always find such wonderful books to add to my already-teetering TBR pile here! “Headliners” is already there, since I’ve read all the others in the series, thanks to this blog. Now I’me adding “The Flat Share” — the basic plot sounds just a bit like “Box and Cox”, a play by W.S. Gilbert of Gilbert & Sullivan fame. I’m in the process of rereading “Little Women” a chapter a day, after seeing the movie (though I had already planned on reading it again). Now I might also reread “Emma” which was my first Austen, when I needed something to read while staying at my aunt’s one summer, when I was about twelve.

    Reply
  64. I always find such wonderful books to add to my already-teetering TBR pile here! “Headliners” is already there, since I’ve read all the others in the series, thanks to this blog. Now I’me adding “The Flat Share” — the basic plot sounds just a bit like “Box and Cox”, a play by W.S. Gilbert of Gilbert & Sullivan fame. I’m in the process of rereading “Little Women” a chapter a day, after seeing the movie (though I had already planned on reading it again). Now I might also reread “Emma” which was my first Austen, when I needed something to read while staying at my aunt’s one summer, when I was about twelve.

    Reply
  65. I always find such wonderful books to add to my already-teetering TBR pile here! “Headliners” is already there, since I’ve read all the others in the series, thanks to this blog. Now I’me adding “The Flat Share” — the basic plot sounds just a bit like “Box and Cox”, a play by W.S. Gilbert of Gilbert & Sullivan fame. I’m in the process of rereading “Little Women” a chapter a day, after seeing the movie (though I had already planned on reading it again). Now I might also reread “Emma” which was my first Austen, when I needed something to read while staying at my aunt’s one summer, when I was about twelve.

    Reply
  66. Donna H – I follow The Ravenmaster on Twitter and have seen him on TV as well, he has the most fascinating job! I would love to own a raven 🙂
    Regarding reading, some great recommendations in this post! If anyone likes stories set in the Australian outback, I can really recommend Janet Gover’s “The Lawson Sisters” which I’ve just read. (Well, all Janet’s books really!) She makes you feel like you’re really there, great stuff!

    Reply
  67. Donna H – I follow The Ravenmaster on Twitter and have seen him on TV as well, he has the most fascinating job! I would love to own a raven 🙂
    Regarding reading, some great recommendations in this post! If anyone likes stories set in the Australian outback, I can really recommend Janet Gover’s “The Lawson Sisters” which I’ve just read. (Well, all Janet’s books really!) She makes you feel like you’re really there, great stuff!

    Reply
  68. Donna H – I follow The Ravenmaster on Twitter and have seen him on TV as well, he has the most fascinating job! I would love to own a raven 🙂
    Regarding reading, some great recommendations in this post! If anyone likes stories set in the Australian outback, I can really recommend Janet Gover’s “The Lawson Sisters” which I’ve just read. (Well, all Janet’s books really!) She makes you feel like you’re really there, great stuff!

    Reply
  69. Donna H – I follow The Ravenmaster on Twitter and have seen him on TV as well, he has the most fascinating job! I would love to own a raven 🙂
    Regarding reading, some great recommendations in this post! If anyone likes stories set in the Australian outback, I can really recommend Janet Gover’s “The Lawson Sisters” which I’ve just read. (Well, all Janet’s books really!) She makes you feel like you’re really there, great stuff!

    Reply
  70. Donna H – I follow The Ravenmaster on Twitter and have seen him on TV as well, he has the most fascinating job! I would love to own a raven 🙂
    Regarding reading, some great recommendations in this post! If anyone likes stories set in the Australian outback, I can really recommend Janet Gover’s “The Lawson Sisters” which I’ve just read. (Well, all Janet’s books really!) She makes you feel like you’re really there, great stuff!

    Reply
  71. First, allow me to admit, I am a book addict. So, it can’t possibly be that when I see a long list of suggested reading here, it is your fault for me falling into a frenzy of desire.
    Not anyone’s fault but mine. I
    Every month it is the same….I reckon I need to stop reading right after the headline “What we’re Reading.”

    Reply
  72. First, allow me to admit, I am a book addict. So, it can’t possibly be that when I see a long list of suggested reading here, it is your fault for me falling into a frenzy of desire.
    Not anyone’s fault but mine. I
    Every month it is the same….I reckon I need to stop reading right after the headline “What we’re Reading.”

    Reply
  73. First, allow me to admit, I am a book addict. So, it can’t possibly be that when I see a long list of suggested reading here, it is your fault for me falling into a frenzy of desire.
    Not anyone’s fault but mine. I
    Every month it is the same….I reckon I need to stop reading right after the headline “What we’re Reading.”

    Reply
  74. First, allow me to admit, I am a book addict. So, it can’t possibly be that when I see a long list of suggested reading here, it is your fault for me falling into a frenzy of desire.
    Not anyone’s fault but mine. I
    Every month it is the same….I reckon I need to stop reading right after the headline “What we’re Reading.”

    Reply
  75. First, allow me to admit, I am a book addict. So, it can’t possibly be that when I see a long list of suggested reading here, it is your fault for me falling into a frenzy of desire.
    Not anyone’s fault but mine. I
    Every month it is the same….I reckon I need to stop reading right after the headline “What we’re Reading.”

    Reply
  76. Quantum — and anyone else who can’t get audio versions of popular books, can I suggest you write to the authors? Readers did that to me — I had no idea my audio books weren’t available in the UK — and when I spoke to my agent and editor about it, it was relatively easy to address.
    Re the scientific ladies, yes, Amanda Quick’s Fossil hunter heroine did come to mind. I’ll give it some thought and see if I can recommend some.

    Reply
  77. Quantum — and anyone else who can’t get audio versions of popular books, can I suggest you write to the authors? Readers did that to me — I had no idea my audio books weren’t available in the UK — and when I spoke to my agent and editor about it, it was relatively easy to address.
    Re the scientific ladies, yes, Amanda Quick’s Fossil hunter heroine did come to mind. I’ll give it some thought and see if I can recommend some.

    Reply
  78. Quantum — and anyone else who can’t get audio versions of popular books, can I suggest you write to the authors? Readers did that to me — I had no idea my audio books weren’t available in the UK — and when I spoke to my agent and editor about it, it was relatively easy to address.
    Re the scientific ladies, yes, Amanda Quick’s Fossil hunter heroine did come to mind. I’ll give it some thought and see if I can recommend some.

    Reply
  79. Quantum — and anyone else who can’t get audio versions of popular books, can I suggest you write to the authors? Readers did that to me — I had no idea my audio books weren’t available in the UK — and when I spoke to my agent and editor about it, it was relatively easy to address.
    Re the scientific ladies, yes, Amanda Quick’s Fossil hunter heroine did come to mind. I’ll give it some thought and see if I can recommend some.

    Reply
  80. Quantum — and anyone else who can’t get audio versions of popular books, can I suggest you write to the authors? Readers did that to me — I had no idea my audio books weren’t available in the UK — and when I spoke to my agent and editor about it, it was relatively easy to address.
    Re the scientific ladies, yes, Amanda Quick’s Fossil hunter heroine did come to mind. I’ll give it some thought and see if I can recommend some.

    Reply
  81. LOL Annette, we wenches are much the same. First my credit card gets a workout when the wenches are sending in their monthly reading recommendations, and then again, when the blog goes up and all the reader recommendations pop up.

    Reply
  82. LOL Annette, we wenches are much the same. First my credit card gets a workout when the wenches are sending in their monthly reading recommendations, and then again, when the blog goes up and all the reader recommendations pop up.

    Reply
  83. LOL Annette, we wenches are much the same. First my credit card gets a workout when the wenches are sending in their monthly reading recommendations, and then again, when the blog goes up and all the reader recommendations pop up.

    Reply
  84. LOL Annette, we wenches are much the same. First my credit card gets a workout when the wenches are sending in their monthly reading recommendations, and then again, when the blog goes up and all the reader recommendations pop up.

    Reply
  85. LOL Annette, we wenches are much the same. First my credit card gets a workout when the wenches are sending in their monthly reading recommendations, and then again, when the blog goes up and all the reader recommendations pop up.

    Reply
  86. Quantum, “A Week To Be Wicked” by Tessa Dare comes to mind, the heroine is an aspiring paleontologist. I think it is the author’s homage to the movie “Bringing Up Baby” with the sexes reversed, because there is a road trip with a dinosaur fossil, and the style is very much screwball comedy. Really laugh out loud funny.
    And so is Chase’s “Mr. Impossible”. Yes, the archeology is a prominent part of the story.
    And “Lady Elizabeth’s Comet” by Sheila Simonson is an older romance with a scientific minded heroine(astronomy).

    Reply
  87. Quantum, “A Week To Be Wicked” by Tessa Dare comes to mind, the heroine is an aspiring paleontologist. I think it is the author’s homage to the movie “Bringing Up Baby” with the sexes reversed, because there is a road trip with a dinosaur fossil, and the style is very much screwball comedy. Really laugh out loud funny.
    And so is Chase’s “Mr. Impossible”. Yes, the archeology is a prominent part of the story.
    And “Lady Elizabeth’s Comet” by Sheila Simonson is an older romance with a scientific minded heroine(astronomy).

    Reply
  88. Quantum, “A Week To Be Wicked” by Tessa Dare comes to mind, the heroine is an aspiring paleontologist. I think it is the author’s homage to the movie “Bringing Up Baby” with the sexes reversed, because there is a road trip with a dinosaur fossil, and the style is very much screwball comedy. Really laugh out loud funny.
    And so is Chase’s “Mr. Impossible”. Yes, the archeology is a prominent part of the story.
    And “Lady Elizabeth’s Comet” by Sheila Simonson is an older romance with a scientific minded heroine(astronomy).

    Reply
  89. Quantum, “A Week To Be Wicked” by Tessa Dare comes to mind, the heroine is an aspiring paleontologist. I think it is the author’s homage to the movie “Bringing Up Baby” with the sexes reversed, because there is a road trip with a dinosaur fossil, and the style is very much screwball comedy. Really laugh out loud funny.
    And so is Chase’s “Mr. Impossible”. Yes, the archeology is a prominent part of the story.
    And “Lady Elizabeth’s Comet” by Sheila Simonson is an older romance with a scientific minded heroine(astronomy).

    Reply
  90. Quantum, “A Week To Be Wicked” by Tessa Dare comes to mind, the heroine is an aspiring paleontologist. I think it is the author’s homage to the movie “Bringing Up Baby” with the sexes reversed, because there is a road trip with a dinosaur fossil, and the style is very much screwball comedy. Really laugh out loud funny.
    And so is Chase’s “Mr. Impossible”. Yes, the archeology is a prominent part of the story.
    And “Lady Elizabeth’s Comet” by Sheila Simonson is an older romance with a scientific minded heroine(astronomy).

    Reply
  91. The internet ate my comment on the What We’re Reading post last month, so now I’m trying to remember what I’ve read for the past 2 months. I gobbled up the first 5 books in Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Mystery series, set in Gilded Age NYC. There main characters are a midwife and an Irish cop, and there is a very, very, slow burn romance. Quite addictive, but after 5 of them I need to take a break for a while.
    I adored Julie Anne Long’s 2 recent historical romances, and I’m so happy she’s back in that genre! “Lady Derring Takes a Lover” and “Angel in a Devil’s Arms” were both absolutely wonderful. She’s such a good writer, and every character had so much personality. The heroines of the 2 books are business partners, running a boarding house near the London docks.
    I had never read D.E. Stevenson’s “Miss Buncle’s Book”, and it was a delight, so I am now reading the sequel, “Miss Buncle Married”.
    And I don’t remember if I previously mentioned “This Earl of Mine” by Kate Bateman, a new-to-me author I’ll be happy to read more of. The heroine is an heiress who decides being an independent widow would be much more convenient than being an unmarried young lady, so she arranges to marry a condemned prisoner, but of course he inconveniently does not get executed after all, because he was actually in prison working under cover for Bow Street.
    Next up is “A Dangerous Duet”, a mystery by Karen Odden set in Victorian London. I very much enjoyed a previous book by this author. I’ll also be reading “Loving the Lost Duke” by Louise Allen, an author I’ve always enjoyed.

    Reply
  92. The internet ate my comment on the What We’re Reading post last month, so now I’m trying to remember what I’ve read for the past 2 months. I gobbled up the first 5 books in Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Mystery series, set in Gilded Age NYC. There main characters are a midwife and an Irish cop, and there is a very, very, slow burn romance. Quite addictive, but after 5 of them I need to take a break for a while.
    I adored Julie Anne Long’s 2 recent historical romances, and I’m so happy she’s back in that genre! “Lady Derring Takes a Lover” and “Angel in a Devil’s Arms” were both absolutely wonderful. She’s such a good writer, and every character had so much personality. The heroines of the 2 books are business partners, running a boarding house near the London docks.
    I had never read D.E. Stevenson’s “Miss Buncle’s Book”, and it was a delight, so I am now reading the sequel, “Miss Buncle Married”.
    And I don’t remember if I previously mentioned “This Earl of Mine” by Kate Bateman, a new-to-me author I’ll be happy to read more of. The heroine is an heiress who decides being an independent widow would be much more convenient than being an unmarried young lady, so she arranges to marry a condemned prisoner, but of course he inconveniently does not get executed after all, because he was actually in prison working under cover for Bow Street.
    Next up is “A Dangerous Duet”, a mystery by Karen Odden set in Victorian London. I very much enjoyed a previous book by this author. I’ll also be reading “Loving the Lost Duke” by Louise Allen, an author I’ve always enjoyed.

    Reply
  93. The internet ate my comment on the What We’re Reading post last month, so now I’m trying to remember what I’ve read for the past 2 months. I gobbled up the first 5 books in Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Mystery series, set in Gilded Age NYC. There main characters are a midwife and an Irish cop, and there is a very, very, slow burn romance. Quite addictive, but after 5 of them I need to take a break for a while.
    I adored Julie Anne Long’s 2 recent historical romances, and I’m so happy she’s back in that genre! “Lady Derring Takes a Lover” and “Angel in a Devil’s Arms” were both absolutely wonderful. She’s such a good writer, and every character had so much personality. The heroines of the 2 books are business partners, running a boarding house near the London docks.
    I had never read D.E. Stevenson’s “Miss Buncle’s Book”, and it was a delight, so I am now reading the sequel, “Miss Buncle Married”.
    And I don’t remember if I previously mentioned “This Earl of Mine” by Kate Bateman, a new-to-me author I’ll be happy to read more of. The heroine is an heiress who decides being an independent widow would be much more convenient than being an unmarried young lady, so she arranges to marry a condemned prisoner, but of course he inconveniently does not get executed after all, because he was actually in prison working under cover for Bow Street.
    Next up is “A Dangerous Duet”, a mystery by Karen Odden set in Victorian London. I very much enjoyed a previous book by this author. I’ll also be reading “Loving the Lost Duke” by Louise Allen, an author I’ve always enjoyed.

    Reply
  94. The internet ate my comment on the What We’re Reading post last month, so now I’m trying to remember what I’ve read for the past 2 months. I gobbled up the first 5 books in Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Mystery series, set in Gilded Age NYC. There main characters are a midwife and an Irish cop, and there is a very, very, slow burn romance. Quite addictive, but after 5 of them I need to take a break for a while.
    I adored Julie Anne Long’s 2 recent historical romances, and I’m so happy she’s back in that genre! “Lady Derring Takes a Lover” and “Angel in a Devil’s Arms” were both absolutely wonderful. She’s such a good writer, and every character had so much personality. The heroines of the 2 books are business partners, running a boarding house near the London docks.
    I had never read D.E. Stevenson’s “Miss Buncle’s Book”, and it was a delight, so I am now reading the sequel, “Miss Buncle Married”.
    And I don’t remember if I previously mentioned “This Earl of Mine” by Kate Bateman, a new-to-me author I’ll be happy to read more of. The heroine is an heiress who decides being an independent widow would be much more convenient than being an unmarried young lady, so she arranges to marry a condemned prisoner, but of course he inconveniently does not get executed after all, because he was actually in prison working under cover for Bow Street.
    Next up is “A Dangerous Duet”, a mystery by Karen Odden set in Victorian London. I very much enjoyed a previous book by this author. I’ll also be reading “Loving the Lost Duke” by Louise Allen, an author I’ve always enjoyed.

    Reply
  95. The internet ate my comment on the What We’re Reading post last month, so now I’m trying to remember what I’ve read for the past 2 months. I gobbled up the first 5 books in Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Mystery series, set in Gilded Age NYC. There main characters are a midwife and an Irish cop, and there is a very, very, slow burn romance. Quite addictive, but after 5 of them I need to take a break for a while.
    I adored Julie Anne Long’s 2 recent historical romances, and I’m so happy she’s back in that genre! “Lady Derring Takes a Lover” and “Angel in a Devil’s Arms” were both absolutely wonderful. She’s such a good writer, and every character had so much personality. The heroines of the 2 books are business partners, running a boarding house near the London docks.
    I had never read D.E. Stevenson’s “Miss Buncle’s Book”, and it was a delight, so I am now reading the sequel, “Miss Buncle Married”.
    And I don’t remember if I previously mentioned “This Earl of Mine” by Kate Bateman, a new-to-me author I’ll be happy to read more of. The heroine is an heiress who decides being an independent widow would be much more convenient than being an unmarried young lady, so she arranges to marry a condemned prisoner, but of course he inconveniently does not get executed after all, because he was actually in prison working under cover for Bow Street.
    Next up is “A Dangerous Duet”, a mystery by Karen Odden set in Victorian London. I very much enjoyed a previous book by this author. I’ll also be reading “Loving the Lost Duke” by Louise Allen, an author I’ve always enjoyed.

    Reply
  96. this is a far better way to weed out the shelves than my method. I didn’t have time to carefully cull but had to say keep it or leave it with thousands of volumes over a few weeks. Your method allows you to enjoy your library as you work your way through it!

    Reply
  97. this is a far better way to weed out the shelves than my method. I didn’t have time to carefully cull but had to say keep it or leave it with thousands of volumes over a few weeks. Your method allows you to enjoy your library as you work your way through it!

    Reply
  98. this is a far better way to weed out the shelves than my method. I didn’t have time to carefully cull but had to say keep it or leave it with thousands of volumes over a few weeks. Your method allows you to enjoy your library as you work your way through it!

    Reply
  99. this is a far better way to weed out the shelves than my method. I didn’t have time to carefully cull but had to say keep it or leave it with thousands of volumes over a few weeks. Your method allows you to enjoy your library as you work your way through it!

    Reply
  100. this is a far better way to weed out the shelves than my method. I didn’t have time to carefully cull but had to say keep it or leave it with thousands of volumes over a few weeks. Your method allows you to enjoy your library as you work your way through it!

    Reply
  101. Thanks Karin. That’s really helpful. I think I first encountered Tessa Dare on the old Eloisa James blog site, competing in the flash fiction competitions. I’m intrigued by Sheila Simonson’s ‘Lady Elizabeth’s comet’, though no UK audio. I might make my own audio using computer voices or follow Anne’s suggestion by writing to her.

    Reply
  102. Thanks Karin. That’s really helpful. I think I first encountered Tessa Dare on the old Eloisa James blog site, competing in the flash fiction competitions. I’m intrigued by Sheila Simonson’s ‘Lady Elizabeth’s comet’, though no UK audio. I might make my own audio using computer voices or follow Anne’s suggestion by writing to her.

    Reply
  103. Thanks Karin. That’s really helpful. I think I first encountered Tessa Dare on the old Eloisa James blog site, competing in the flash fiction competitions. I’m intrigued by Sheila Simonson’s ‘Lady Elizabeth’s comet’, though no UK audio. I might make my own audio using computer voices or follow Anne’s suggestion by writing to her.

    Reply
  104. Thanks Karin. That’s really helpful. I think I first encountered Tessa Dare on the old Eloisa James blog site, competing in the flash fiction competitions. I’m intrigued by Sheila Simonson’s ‘Lady Elizabeth’s comet’, though no UK audio. I might make my own audio using computer voices or follow Anne’s suggestion by writing to her.

    Reply
  105. Thanks Karin. That’s really helpful. I think I first encountered Tessa Dare on the old Eloisa James blog site, competing in the flash fiction competitions. I’m intrigued by Sheila Simonson’s ‘Lady Elizabeth’s comet’, though no UK audio. I might make my own audio using computer voices or follow Anne’s suggestion by writing to her.

    Reply
  106. I had a mixed month with reading. The Surplus Girls by Polly Heron, Girls on the Home Front and Heroes on the Home Front were so so reads. Also Secrets of the Mist by Kate Ryder was in this group too.
    Then I hit the jackpot. The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate, The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elizabeth Gifford and The Hungry Road by Marita Conlon-McKenna were brilliant reads. The Lost Lights of St Kilda is heartbreaking in parts. It deals with the last people to live on St Kilda and what ensued with the charaters.
    The Hungry Road is set in Ireland at the time of the Famine. Very emotional and not an easy read. Wonderful story though.
    At the present I’m reading Georgette Heyer’s Frederica for a GR book group.
    There is a lot of diverse reading in this post. I love these and find (too many) great books to my tottering TBR pile.

    Reply
  107. I had a mixed month with reading. The Surplus Girls by Polly Heron, Girls on the Home Front and Heroes on the Home Front were so so reads. Also Secrets of the Mist by Kate Ryder was in this group too.
    Then I hit the jackpot. The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate, The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elizabeth Gifford and The Hungry Road by Marita Conlon-McKenna were brilliant reads. The Lost Lights of St Kilda is heartbreaking in parts. It deals with the last people to live on St Kilda and what ensued with the charaters.
    The Hungry Road is set in Ireland at the time of the Famine. Very emotional and not an easy read. Wonderful story though.
    At the present I’m reading Georgette Heyer’s Frederica for a GR book group.
    There is a lot of diverse reading in this post. I love these and find (too many) great books to my tottering TBR pile.

    Reply
  108. I had a mixed month with reading. The Surplus Girls by Polly Heron, Girls on the Home Front and Heroes on the Home Front were so so reads. Also Secrets of the Mist by Kate Ryder was in this group too.
    Then I hit the jackpot. The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate, The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elizabeth Gifford and The Hungry Road by Marita Conlon-McKenna were brilliant reads. The Lost Lights of St Kilda is heartbreaking in parts. It deals with the last people to live on St Kilda and what ensued with the charaters.
    The Hungry Road is set in Ireland at the time of the Famine. Very emotional and not an easy read. Wonderful story though.
    At the present I’m reading Georgette Heyer’s Frederica for a GR book group.
    There is a lot of diverse reading in this post. I love these and find (too many) great books to my tottering TBR pile.

    Reply
  109. I had a mixed month with reading. The Surplus Girls by Polly Heron, Girls on the Home Front and Heroes on the Home Front were so so reads. Also Secrets of the Mist by Kate Ryder was in this group too.
    Then I hit the jackpot. The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate, The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elizabeth Gifford and The Hungry Road by Marita Conlon-McKenna were brilliant reads. The Lost Lights of St Kilda is heartbreaking in parts. It deals with the last people to live on St Kilda and what ensued with the charaters.
    The Hungry Road is set in Ireland at the time of the Famine. Very emotional and not an easy read. Wonderful story though.
    At the present I’m reading Georgette Heyer’s Frederica for a GR book group.
    There is a lot of diverse reading in this post. I love these and find (too many) great books to my tottering TBR pile.

    Reply
  110. I had a mixed month with reading. The Surplus Girls by Polly Heron, Girls on the Home Front and Heroes on the Home Front were so so reads. Also Secrets of the Mist by Kate Ryder was in this group too.
    Then I hit the jackpot. The Shooting Party by Isabel Colegate, The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elizabeth Gifford and The Hungry Road by Marita Conlon-McKenna were brilliant reads. The Lost Lights of St Kilda is heartbreaking in parts. It deals with the last people to live on St Kilda and what ensued with the charaters.
    The Hungry Road is set in Ireland at the time of the Famine. Very emotional and not an easy read. Wonderful story though.
    At the present I’m reading Georgette Heyer’s Frederica for a GR book group.
    There is a lot of diverse reading in this post. I love these and find (too many) great books to my tottering TBR pile.

    Reply
  111. The Bateman book (woman needs to be married but doesn’t really want a husband so finds someone expected to die soon) sounds a bit like one of MJP’s classic Regencies: “The Bargain”. I loved that book so may just have to see how a different author takes the same basic scaffolding and builds a new and different work around it.

    Reply
  112. The Bateman book (woman needs to be married but doesn’t really want a husband so finds someone expected to die soon) sounds a bit like one of MJP’s classic Regencies: “The Bargain”. I loved that book so may just have to see how a different author takes the same basic scaffolding and builds a new and different work around it.

    Reply
  113. The Bateman book (woman needs to be married but doesn’t really want a husband so finds someone expected to die soon) sounds a bit like one of MJP’s classic Regencies: “The Bargain”. I loved that book so may just have to see how a different author takes the same basic scaffolding and builds a new and different work around it.

    Reply
  114. The Bateman book (woman needs to be married but doesn’t really want a husband so finds someone expected to die soon) sounds a bit like one of MJP’s classic Regencies: “The Bargain”. I loved that book so may just have to see how a different author takes the same basic scaffolding and builds a new and different work around it.

    Reply
  115. The Bateman book (woman needs to be married but doesn’t really want a husband so finds someone expected to die soon) sounds a bit like one of MJP’s classic Regencies: “The Bargain”. I loved that book so may just have to see how a different author takes the same basic scaffolding and builds a new and different work around it.

    Reply
  116. Hmmmm. If I set out to touch every book in my house, I’d probably never read another word before expiring. It will be good to be dead when my husband and I die, cause otherwise, our children would murder us. But that aside, I’ve been fortunate to read some wonderful books this last month. Among them were:
    – I Found You by Lisa Jewell. This was my first of her books, and I loved both the mystery and the quietly developed romance.
    – How to Stop Time by Matt Haig. An intriguing take on the Methuselah theme, it was an interesting trip primarily through London’s history with another slow, quiet romance.
    – The Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar – a mystical exploration of two Syrian women separated by decades. Lyrically written and thought-provoking.
    – The Ghostly Father by Sue Barnard – a delightful new take on Romeo and Juliet from Friar Lorenzo’s perspective.
    – Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger. Absolutely beautiful. This was also my first reading of this apparently renowned mystery writer, but this stand-alone was both a well-crafted mystery and a beautiful meditation on family life and loss.
    – and finally, there’s been unending discussion about this book, but I found American Dirt to be informative, thought-provoking, well-written, and a novel that presents a story and cast of characters that stay in your consciousness long after you finish the book (is there a word for that? there really should be, and if we don’t have one in English I’m sure the Germans have a perfectly good multi-syllabic word that says it all). Anyway, kinda what we want from fiction, in my humble opinion.

    Reply
  117. Hmmmm. If I set out to touch every book in my house, I’d probably never read another word before expiring. It will be good to be dead when my husband and I die, cause otherwise, our children would murder us. But that aside, I’ve been fortunate to read some wonderful books this last month. Among them were:
    – I Found You by Lisa Jewell. This was my first of her books, and I loved both the mystery and the quietly developed romance.
    – How to Stop Time by Matt Haig. An intriguing take on the Methuselah theme, it was an interesting trip primarily through London’s history with another slow, quiet romance.
    – The Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar – a mystical exploration of two Syrian women separated by decades. Lyrically written and thought-provoking.
    – The Ghostly Father by Sue Barnard – a delightful new take on Romeo and Juliet from Friar Lorenzo’s perspective.
    – Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger. Absolutely beautiful. This was also my first reading of this apparently renowned mystery writer, but this stand-alone was both a well-crafted mystery and a beautiful meditation on family life and loss.
    – and finally, there’s been unending discussion about this book, but I found American Dirt to be informative, thought-provoking, well-written, and a novel that presents a story and cast of characters that stay in your consciousness long after you finish the book (is there a word for that? there really should be, and if we don’t have one in English I’m sure the Germans have a perfectly good multi-syllabic word that says it all). Anyway, kinda what we want from fiction, in my humble opinion.

    Reply
  118. Hmmmm. If I set out to touch every book in my house, I’d probably never read another word before expiring. It will be good to be dead when my husband and I die, cause otherwise, our children would murder us. But that aside, I’ve been fortunate to read some wonderful books this last month. Among them were:
    – I Found You by Lisa Jewell. This was my first of her books, and I loved both the mystery and the quietly developed romance.
    – How to Stop Time by Matt Haig. An intriguing take on the Methuselah theme, it was an interesting trip primarily through London’s history with another slow, quiet romance.
    – The Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar – a mystical exploration of two Syrian women separated by decades. Lyrically written and thought-provoking.
    – The Ghostly Father by Sue Barnard – a delightful new take on Romeo and Juliet from Friar Lorenzo’s perspective.
    – Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger. Absolutely beautiful. This was also my first reading of this apparently renowned mystery writer, but this stand-alone was both a well-crafted mystery and a beautiful meditation on family life and loss.
    – and finally, there’s been unending discussion about this book, but I found American Dirt to be informative, thought-provoking, well-written, and a novel that presents a story and cast of characters that stay in your consciousness long after you finish the book (is there a word for that? there really should be, and if we don’t have one in English I’m sure the Germans have a perfectly good multi-syllabic word that says it all). Anyway, kinda what we want from fiction, in my humble opinion.

    Reply
  119. Hmmmm. If I set out to touch every book in my house, I’d probably never read another word before expiring. It will be good to be dead when my husband and I die, cause otherwise, our children would murder us. But that aside, I’ve been fortunate to read some wonderful books this last month. Among them were:
    – I Found You by Lisa Jewell. This was my first of her books, and I loved both the mystery and the quietly developed romance.
    – How to Stop Time by Matt Haig. An intriguing take on the Methuselah theme, it was an interesting trip primarily through London’s history with another slow, quiet romance.
    – The Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar – a mystical exploration of two Syrian women separated by decades. Lyrically written and thought-provoking.
    – The Ghostly Father by Sue Barnard – a delightful new take on Romeo and Juliet from Friar Lorenzo’s perspective.
    – Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger. Absolutely beautiful. This was also my first reading of this apparently renowned mystery writer, but this stand-alone was both a well-crafted mystery and a beautiful meditation on family life and loss.
    – and finally, there’s been unending discussion about this book, but I found American Dirt to be informative, thought-provoking, well-written, and a novel that presents a story and cast of characters that stay in your consciousness long after you finish the book (is there a word for that? there really should be, and if we don’t have one in English I’m sure the Germans have a perfectly good multi-syllabic word that says it all). Anyway, kinda what we want from fiction, in my humble opinion.

    Reply
  120. Hmmmm. If I set out to touch every book in my house, I’d probably never read another word before expiring. It will be good to be dead when my husband and I die, cause otherwise, our children would murder us. But that aside, I’ve been fortunate to read some wonderful books this last month. Among them were:
    – I Found You by Lisa Jewell. This was my first of her books, and I loved both the mystery and the quietly developed romance.
    – How to Stop Time by Matt Haig. An intriguing take on the Methuselah theme, it was an interesting trip primarily through London’s history with another slow, quiet romance.
    – The Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar – a mystical exploration of two Syrian women separated by decades. Lyrically written and thought-provoking.
    – The Ghostly Father by Sue Barnard – a delightful new take on Romeo and Juliet from Friar Lorenzo’s perspective.
    – Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger. Absolutely beautiful. This was also my first reading of this apparently renowned mystery writer, but this stand-alone was both a well-crafted mystery and a beautiful meditation on family life and loss.
    – and finally, there’s been unending discussion about this book, but I found American Dirt to be informative, thought-provoking, well-written, and a novel that presents a story and cast of characters that stay in your consciousness long after you finish the book (is there a word for that? there really should be, and if we don’t have one in English I’m sure the Germans have a perfectly good multi-syllabic word that says it all). Anyway, kinda what we want from fiction, in my humble opinion.

    Reply

Leave a Comment