What We’re Reading: August 2020

Summer’s heat (and winter’s chill down under), along with continued distancing, has led to more reading for some – certainly the Wenches found plenty of books to their liking in August. Romance, mystery, monsters, history, witches – and two books about hockey (!!) – read on to find out what we’ve been reading!

Mary Jo says:

51FwkQojA2LHere I am talking about Jasmine Guillory again!  Her most recent book, Party of Twois another smart, funny romantic comedy with interesting depths. The heroine, Olivia Monroe, is a native Californian who went east to get a law degree from Harvard, worked at a high pressure New York law firm for several years, and then decided to return to California to start a law firm with her best friend, Ellie, because they are both tired of dealing with condescending and worse male colleagues. 

Just back from New York and staying at a hotel while waiting to move into her house, she falls into a conversation with guy at the hotel bar. He's wearing a baseball cap, is really good looking, and has a great sense of humor.  She wouldn't mind going up to his hotel room for a little stress relief, but nothing happens and she goes back to her room–and sees on the TV that the bar guy is Max Powell, the hot junior senator of California. 

She tells her sister so they can both laugh about it and moves on, but Max was fascinated by her and kicking himself for not getting her phone number. When he sees her in the audience at an event a couple of weeks later, the chase is one. Max falls for her hard, but Olivia is starting a new law office and soooo not interested in a relationship. 

The attraction is strong and mutual, but the conflicts are powerful when both of them are ultra-busy and he lives a very public life. Major and negotiations and adjustment may be required! That, and a lot of cake. <G>

Here's Nicola: 

Headliners (1)The Wenches are big fans of Lucy Parker and this month I treated myself to Headliners, the latest in her London Celebrities series. When Sabrina Carlton and Nick Davenport are forced to work together to host a live morning TV show their past feuding threatens to derail their professional partnership. Sparks certainly fly! I’ve loved all of the series but this enemies-to-lovers story could be my favourite yet. It’s completely convincing, the barriers between the two of them aren’t minimised and the emotion is really profound. Plus, the chemistry is amazing and it’s hot, even when they are stuck together in the Alpine wine cellar! I also loved the celebration of families and friendship in its different forms. The English Civil Wars

Completely different but a very welcome birthday present was The Face of War by Angus Haldane which is a collection of portraits from the English Civil Wars, each with a fascinating commentary. Many of the portraits of both the Royalists and Parliamentarians were painted during the conflict and show the character and loyalties of the sitter. It’s a fascinating insight into a tumultuous period and if you enjoy art history and the seventeenth century, it’s a must. It’s not just men in armour, though some of those look pretty good, and both Prince Rupert and his brother Maurice are included. There are a number of prominent women from the era who are featured and also a beautiful family portrait of William Lenthall, the Speaker of the House of Commons, holding the hand of his wife. A fascinating book on many levels.

Pat read Broken For You by Stephanie Kallos:

Once upon a time I gobbled up literary fiction—the good stuff, the Vonnegut and Gunter Grass and Joseph Heller. But too much of it turned into mournful paeans to shattered society and everybody dies, and I got bored. I turned to genre fiction Brokenforyouwhere people found love and justice and the world made sense and lived happily ever after.

But for whatever reason, I recently bought this book, the author’s debut novel. I can see why it was a bestseller. I am in awe. Yes, there is death and birth, but mostly, there is universal love. It starts out so slowly that I almost gave up,  but unlike most books, I could see no predictable ending, so I kept reading. And then the story of an older woman with a tumor living in an enormous house with wall-to-wall fragile objects intersects with the story of a younger woman who has made a life of fixing things, and the book becomes compelling. It’s an insane, completely improbable book, but see my list of literary authors above and you’ll understand that insane and improbable appeal to me. Reciting the story summary is useless. I’ll just say that the ending is joyous and uplifting and leave you to decide if it’s worth the journey.

Christina says:

Recently I’ve had a total Wench reading fest as I’ve been lucky enough to read three new and/or upcoming releases. They have all immersed me in the Regency period – one of my absolute favourites – and I have really enjoyed the different angles the authors take. First there was Anne Gracie’s Marry in Scarlet, the final book in her Marriage of Convenience series which I’d so been looking forward to. There is always something extremely satisfying about a series being concluded in exactly the way you wanted it to, and this one definitely did not disappoint! It is Lady George’s story – George being a tomboy, very unconventional and determined never to marry and lose her freedom. It was extremely satisfying to watch her finding out that things don’t always go to plan, especially when love is involved. As for the hero, I already had a soft spot for him as he’d appeared briefly in one of the other books in the series and I thoroughly enjoyed finding out how he was going to persuade George to marry him, not for convenience as he had thought, but for love. I’m really going to miss these characters! Murder

Then there was an ARC of Once Dishonored by Mary Jo Putney – I decided to have a quick glance at the first chapter of this book at bedtime and I was still reading three hours later! Literally couldn’t put it down and I was instantly engaged in both the hero and heroine’s lives. They are both considered ‘dishonoured’, and although this takes a different form for each of them, their shared experiences and feelings of being outside society draw them to each other. I loved the way they battled each other’s enemies and stood up for one another, and it is always immensely satisfying when a truly horrible villain gets his comeuppance. Add a couple of delightful children, a whole host of protective and helpful friends, and you have a wonderful story!

Last but not least, I read an ARC of Murder at Queen’s Landing by Andrea Penrose. I had been eagerly awaiting this continuation of Andrea’s Regency murder/mystery series and I absolutely loved it! It had everything I was looking for – adventure, romance, unshakeable friendships and a perfect ending. I love the characters, including the ever-growing cast of secondary characters, and I really like how they have all developed from book one through to this one. The reader is drawn into their lives in a way that makes it difficult to stop thinking about them when the book is finished. Although the story can be read as a standalone, I would advise anyone wanting to read this series to start with book one – you won’t regret it and it will make reading this one even more amazing!

ReignI have read other books this month, but most of them failed to enthrall me, although for anyone who wants a very unusual YA romance, I can recommend Reign of Shadows and Rise of Fire by Sophie Jordan. The heroine is truly special, but I won’t say in what way as that is part of the plot. She is a fascinating character though and I very much enjoyed the blossoming romance between her and the hero, with him fighting his feelings all the way. He was great too, and the emotional baggage he carried made him very interesting. They live in a world which is dark for most of the time as there has been an eclipse of the sun that seems semi-permanent, and everyone has had to adapt to spending most of their time in darkness. This has also allowed certain species to thrive to the point where they threaten everyone else … An intriguing premise, but be warned – you have to read both books in order to find out how the story ends.

Joanna here:

I’m reading two (two !) new books by the husband-and-wife writing team Ilona Andrews. One is a brand new, just released book from the Hidden Legacy Series, Emerald Blaze.

Prime Catalina Baylor is plunged into deep water by the first challenges she has to face as new Head of Wenches emeraldHouse Baylor. There’s hordes of murderous metal-and-plant hybrid monsters coming at her out of the swamp; there’s intrigue, Texas-style, facing down the rich and powerful of Houston; a mysterious murder to sort for her client at Baylor Investigations; her warm, nosy, extensive, and interfering multi-generational family to keep secrets from; there’s her insane, powerful, frankly evil grandmother … and, of course, Alessandro Sagredo, the man who broke her heart and skedaddled off to parts unknown.

He’s back and he says he loves her. Oookay. But they’re both going to get killed by a (jo checks her notes) huge, telepathic all-powerful, doomsday monster that can read minds and has fallen obsessively in love with her.

Talk about awkward.

I’m also reading Blood Heir, a work-in-progress by Ilona Andrews. It's a spin off from the Kate Daniels world.

This one’s the further adventures of Julie Lennart-Olsen after she left Atlanta for good.

The problem with this book is that it isn’t finished.

You get to read along with Ilona Andrews as they work on it.  Here.

I find the construction work interesting but it might drive you nuts not to know what comes next,

so I’d say to approach with caution.

IfWallsCouldTalkAnne here:

Last month I was on a reading glom of Juliet Blackwell's "witch" mystery series. Now I'm onto the Juliet Blackwell's haunted house/renovation series, which is the series Pat recommended a couple of months ago. I'm enjoying them very much. It stars Melanie Turner, who has taken over her family building company, specializing in renovating gorgeous historic houses. The only trouble is that there are ghosts in them there houses, and Mel seems to have a talent for seeing them. However dealing with them is another matter, especially when dead bodies turn up. Lighthearted, fun cosy crime. The first book is If Walls Could Talk, and it's currently on special.

In between I've been rereading Sarina Bowen's contemporary "hockey" romance series, which follows the players and the ensemble of people that support the team. This is a favorite series of mine, hence the LitterOfBonesrereading. The first in the series is Rookie Move. I also read The Big Man Upstairs, the latest in JD Kirk's Scottish crime series. It's a contemporary crime series, a bit gritty, and all from the perspective of the police detective investigating the crime. I've read all of the series, and recommend they be read in order, as the relationships between the various characters develop over time.  Start with A Litter of Bones.

Here's Andrea:

I very rarely read psychological suspense, so it may weird that I chose such a stressful time to delve into a chilling book. But I had read such interesting reviews about The Hunting Party by Lucy Foley that I was intrigued enough to try it. The story sounded so interesting—a group of 30-somethings, best friends from their Oxford days, have a ritual of going away to some really fabulous over-the-top New Year’s getaway.

Unnamed (1)Each year, one of the group finds the spot and organizes the sumptuous food and memorable entertainment experiences. This year, the recent girlfriend of one of the inner circle of friends has found a magnificent and exclusive—and very remote—Scottish hunting lodge that rents itself out for private parties. The girlfriend is a fabulous cook, and she’s had the lodge stock the kitchen for her to cook amazing meals. There are only three staff to serve the group, including a surly gamekeeper who assigned to take them stag hunting on the 50,000 acres surrounding acres. As they arrive by train at the tiny station and are picked up by the gamekeeper, it begins to snow. By the next day, it’s still snowing and the roads are impassable. No one can get in or out.

That’s fine with everyone—in fact, they’re delighted. They’re all best friends with plenty of premium booze and wonderful food. The partying begins . . . and suddenly the perfect marriages and close friendships begin to show some tiny cracks . . .

The story is told from multiple points of view, including that of the estate concierge, a woman who has fled her own dark past. And in the very beginning you learn that one of the people has ended up dead. The chapters go back and forth from the group’s arrival, to several days later when the body is first discovered. So who did it? The killer has to be one of the people at the lodge. It’s really well done, and riveting, even if, like me, you’re squeamish and don’t like being scared. The unraveling of the relationships and the revelation of secrets within secrets is so well-done. I highly recommend it! 

And Susan:

In high school, I didn’t play sports (well, not willingly!), and I never thought years later I would love a book 41t62F72R5L about girls’ field hockey, but I am here to testify! And what a fun, quirky, wildly enjoyable book it is. We Ride Upon Sticks by Quan Barry mixes girls’ high school field hockey in 1989, witchy magic, comedy and pathos in brilliant combination. It’s whip-smart on every page, laugh-out-loud funny (really, I mean that), unpredictable, and at times a little dark. The girls of the Danvers High School field hockey team are on serious losing streak until one of them invites the help of team dark, essentially, not unlike their historical teen sisters in the nearby town of Salem in 1692, to rise up the team rankings. They write pledges in a spiral notebook with their celebrity crush, Emilio Estevez, on the cover. As the pledges to Emilio get more complicated, the consequences pile up, ranging from ominous to poignant to comical.

Quan Barry played field hockey herself in the 1980s, and it shows—her conjuring of the ‘80s vibe is spot on, from bodacious language to girls discovering spitfire feminism, to questionable fashion choices and wild hairstyles (one girl’s teased bangs, called “It,” is a wacky barometer of its owner’s feelings). As the spells and repercussions mount, and the girls and their dark-but-innocent magic hurtle toward the championship game, the story never flags and the characters are fully real—they become your own teammates, every quirky, vulnerable one of them. It’s masterfully constructed, brilliantly written, and the ending finds perfect resolution. Can you tell how much I loved it? Duh, totally!

What have you all been reading lately? Do you find yourself reading more books during these long, strange months of keeping your distance from normal life? 

90 thoughts on “What We’re Reading: August 2020”

  1. My reading in August slowed way down for some reason. I did just finish Ilona Andrews’ Emerald Blaze and I loved it. I also read Driving the Deep, which is the 2nd book of the Finder Chronicles series by Suzanne Palmer, which was really good. I rarely read science fiction but I have really enjoyed this series so far.
    There are at least 10 books I will be buying in September (Murder at Queen’s Landing being one of them) and I’m really looking forward to some reading as my favorite time of year comes.

    Reply
  2. My reading in August slowed way down for some reason. I did just finish Ilona Andrews’ Emerald Blaze and I loved it. I also read Driving the Deep, which is the 2nd book of the Finder Chronicles series by Suzanne Palmer, which was really good. I rarely read science fiction but I have really enjoyed this series so far.
    There are at least 10 books I will be buying in September (Murder at Queen’s Landing being one of them) and I’m really looking forward to some reading as my favorite time of year comes.

    Reply
  3. My reading in August slowed way down for some reason. I did just finish Ilona Andrews’ Emerald Blaze and I loved it. I also read Driving the Deep, which is the 2nd book of the Finder Chronicles series by Suzanne Palmer, which was really good. I rarely read science fiction but I have really enjoyed this series so far.
    There are at least 10 books I will be buying in September (Murder at Queen’s Landing being one of them) and I’m really looking forward to some reading as my favorite time of year comes.

    Reply
  4. My reading in August slowed way down for some reason. I did just finish Ilona Andrews’ Emerald Blaze and I loved it. I also read Driving the Deep, which is the 2nd book of the Finder Chronicles series by Suzanne Palmer, which was really good. I rarely read science fiction but I have really enjoyed this series so far.
    There are at least 10 books I will be buying in September (Murder at Queen’s Landing being one of them) and I’m really looking forward to some reading as my favorite time of year comes.

    Reply
  5. My reading in August slowed way down for some reason. I did just finish Ilona Andrews’ Emerald Blaze and I loved it. I also read Driving the Deep, which is the 2nd book of the Finder Chronicles series by Suzanne Palmer, which was really good. I rarely read science fiction but I have really enjoyed this series so far.
    There are at least 10 books I will be buying in September (Murder at Queen’s Landing being one of them) and I’m really looking forward to some reading as my favorite time of year comes.

    Reply
  6. Since last time ~
    — Burn by Patrick Ness. This was a book that went in directions that I did not anticipate. It’s a new young adult book; if a sequel were to magically appear, I’d read it.
    — enjoyed Beyond the Sea by Keira Andrews which is a contemporary male/male romance that takes place on a small island after a plane crash.
    — a lovely historical romance story, ‘The Mender’ by Carla Kelly which was in the All Regency Collection (A Timeless Romance Anthology Book 10) by various authors.
    — The Fantastic Fluke by Sam Burns; this is a contemporary male/male paranormal romance which I enjoyed.
    — a reread of For Real (Spires Book 3) by Alexis Hall which I enjoyed once again.
    — Our Child of the Stars by Stephen Cox; I found this to be a rather engaging read.
    — The Enforcer Enigma: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger; this was a pleasant read, but I don’t think this is a book I’ll be rereading anytime soon.
    — enjoyed The Right Sort of Man: A Sparks & Bainbridge Mystery by Allison Montclair which might find other fans here. It’s set in post world war II London and features two women who have started a marriage bureau. I will happily read on in this series (of two books thus far).
    — The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey by Candice Millard for my book group. Last month’s book (A Primate’s Memoir) left me with no desire to go to Africa; this book has left me with no desire to go to the Amazon. Clearly, reading book group nonfiction books is dangerous to my travel bucket list! That said, the story was compelling … though not quite as compelling as the author’s Destiny of the Republic which I read a year or so ago.
    — a young adult paranormal romance, The Midnight Gardener by R. G. Thomas. It was a pleasant story; however, it ended on a cliffhanger and I’m not compelled to read on in the series. I will say that it’s the first time I’ve encountered a major character who was a … Spoiler … garden gnome.
    — Heated Rivalry (Game Changers) by Rachel Reid. I can imagine rereading this male/male contemporary hockey romance.
    — Game Changer by Rachel Reid, the first in the same hockey series, which I also enjoyed.
    — a reread of Linesman (A Linesman Novel) by SK Dunstall which I enjoyed once more.
    — the audio version of The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold. The narrator is Lloyd James who does an excellent job with the many voices. My husband and I both enjoyed it. It was my husband’s first exposure to the book while I read it for the first time some months ago.

    Reply
  7. Since last time ~
    — Burn by Patrick Ness. This was a book that went in directions that I did not anticipate. It’s a new young adult book; if a sequel were to magically appear, I’d read it.
    — enjoyed Beyond the Sea by Keira Andrews which is a contemporary male/male romance that takes place on a small island after a plane crash.
    — a lovely historical romance story, ‘The Mender’ by Carla Kelly which was in the All Regency Collection (A Timeless Romance Anthology Book 10) by various authors.
    — The Fantastic Fluke by Sam Burns; this is a contemporary male/male paranormal romance which I enjoyed.
    — a reread of For Real (Spires Book 3) by Alexis Hall which I enjoyed once again.
    — Our Child of the Stars by Stephen Cox; I found this to be a rather engaging read.
    — The Enforcer Enigma: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger; this was a pleasant read, but I don’t think this is a book I’ll be rereading anytime soon.
    — enjoyed The Right Sort of Man: A Sparks & Bainbridge Mystery by Allison Montclair which might find other fans here. It’s set in post world war II London and features two women who have started a marriage bureau. I will happily read on in this series (of two books thus far).
    — The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey by Candice Millard for my book group. Last month’s book (A Primate’s Memoir) left me with no desire to go to Africa; this book has left me with no desire to go to the Amazon. Clearly, reading book group nonfiction books is dangerous to my travel bucket list! That said, the story was compelling … though not quite as compelling as the author’s Destiny of the Republic which I read a year or so ago.
    — a young adult paranormal romance, The Midnight Gardener by R. G. Thomas. It was a pleasant story; however, it ended on a cliffhanger and I’m not compelled to read on in the series. I will say that it’s the first time I’ve encountered a major character who was a … Spoiler … garden gnome.
    — Heated Rivalry (Game Changers) by Rachel Reid. I can imagine rereading this male/male contemporary hockey romance.
    — Game Changer by Rachel Reid, the first in the same hockey series, which I also enjoyed.
    — a reread of Linesman (A Linesman Novel) by SK Dunstall which I enjoyed once more.
    — the audio version of The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold. The narrator is Lloyd James who does an excellent job with the many voices. My husband and I both enjoyed it. It was my husband’s first exposure to the book while I read it for the first time some months ago.

    Reply
  8. Since last time ~
    — Burn by Patrick Ness. This was a book that went in directions that I did not anticipate. It’s a new young adult book; if a sequel were to magically appear, I’d read it.
    — enjoyed Beyond the Sea by Keira Andrews which is a contemporary male/male romance that takes place on a small island after a plane crash.
    — a lovely historical romance story, ‘The Mender’ by Carla Kelly which was in the All Regency Collection (A Timeless Romance Anthology Book 10) by various authors.
    — The Fantastic Fluke by Sam Burns; this is a contemporary male/male paranormal romance which I enjoyed.
    — a reread of For Real (Spires Book 3) by Alexis Hall which I enjoyed once again.
    — Our Child of the Stars by Stephen Cox; I found this to be a rather engaging read.
    — The Enforcer Enigma: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger; this was a pleasant read, but I don’t think this is a book I’ll be rereading anytime soon.
    — enjoyed The Right Sort of Man: A Sparks & Bainbridge Mystery by Allison Montclair which might find other fans here. It’s set in post world war II London and features two women who have started a marriage bureau. I will happily read on in this series (of two books thus far).
    — The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey by Candice Millard for my book group. Last month’s book (A Primate’s Memoir) left me with no desire to go to Africa; this book has left me with no desire to go to the Amazon. Clearly, reading book group nonfiction books is dangerous to my travel bucket list! That said, the story was compelling … though not quite as compelling as the author’s Destiny of the Republic which I read a year or so ago.
    — a young adult paranormal romance, The Midnight Gardener by R. G. Thomas. It was a pleasant story; however, it ended on a cliffhanger and I’m not compelled to read on in the series. I will say that it’s the first time I’ve encountered a major character who was a … Spoiler … garden gnome.
    — Heated Rivalry (Game Changers) by Rachel Reid. I can imagine rereading this male/male contemporary hockey romance.
    — Game Changer by Rachel Reid, the first in the same hockey series, which I also enjoyed.
    — a reread of Linesman (A Linesman Novel) by SK Dunstall which I enjoyed once more.
    — the audio version of The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold. The narrator is Lloyd James who does an excellent job with the many voices. My husband and I both enjoyed it. It was my husband’s first exposure to the book while I read it for the first time some months ago.

    Reply
  9. Since last time ~
    — Burn by Patrick Ness. This was a book that went in directions that I did not anticipate. It’s a new young adult book; if a sequel were to magically appear, I’d read it.
    — enjoyed Beyond the Sea by Keira Andrews which is a contemporary male/male romance that takes place on a small island after a plane crash.
    — a lovely historical romance story, ‘The Mender’ by Carla Kelly which was in the All Regency Collection (A Timeless Romance Anthology Book 10) by various authors.
    — The Fantastic Fluke by Sam Burns; this is a contemporary male/male paranormal romance which I enjoyed.
    — a reread of For Real (Spires Book 3) by Alexis Hall which I enjoyed once again.
    — Our Child of the Stars by Stephen Cox; I found this to be a rather engaging read.
    — The Enforcer Enigma: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger; this was a pleasant read, but I don’t think this is a book I’ll be rereading anytime soon.
    — enjoyed The Right Sort of Man: A Sparks & Bainbridge Mystery by Allison Montclair which might find other fans here. It’s set in post world war II London and features two women who have started a marriage bureau. I will happily read on in this series (of two books thus far).
    — The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey by Candice Millard for my book group. Last month’s book (A Primate’s Memoir) left me with no desire to go to Africa; this book has left me with no desire to go to the Amazon. Clearly, reading book group nonfiction books is dangerous to my travel bucket list! That said, the story was compelling … though not quite as compelling as the author’s Destiny of the Republic which I read a year or so ago.
    — a young adult paranormal romance, The Midnight Gardener by R. G. Thomas. It was a pleasant story; however, it ended on a cliffhanger and I’m not compelled to read on in the series. I will say that it’s the first time I’ve encountered a major character who was a … Spoiler … garden gnome.
    — Heated Rivalry (Game Changers) by Rachel Reid. I can imagine rereading this male/male contemporary hockey romance.
    — Game Changer by Rachel Reid, the first in the same hockey series, which I also enjoyed.
    — a reread of Linesman (A Linesman Novel) by SK Dunstall which I enjoyed once more.
    — the audio version of The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold. The narrator is Lloyd James who does an excellent job with the many voices. My husband and I both enjoyed it. It was my husband’s first exposure to the book while I read it for the first time some months ago.

    Reply
  10. Since last time ~
    — Burn by Patrick Ness. This was a book that went in directions that I did not anticipate. It’s a new young adult book; if a sequel were to magically appear, I’d read it.
    — enjoyed Beyond the Sea by Keira Andrews which is a contemporary male/male romance that takes place on a small island after a plane crash.
    — a lovely historical romance story, ‘The Mender’ by Carla Kelly which was in the All Regency Collection (A Timeless Romance Anthology Book 10) by various authors.
    — The Fantastic Fluke by Sam Burns; this is a contemporary male/male paranormal romance which I enjoyed.
    — a reread of For Real (Spires Book 3) by Alexis Hall which I enjoyed once again.
    — Our Child of the Stars by Stephen Cox; I found this to be a rather engaging read.
    — The Enforcer Enigma: The San Andreas Shifters by G. L. Carriger; this was a pleasant read, but I don’t think this is a book I’ll be rereading anytime soon.
    — enjoyed The Right Sort of Man: A Sparks & Bainbridge Mystery by Allison Montclair which might find other fans here. It’s set in post world war II London and features two women who have started a marriage bureau. I will happily read on in this series (of two books thus far).
    — The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt’s Darkest Journey by Candice Millard for my book group. Last month’s book (A Primate’s Memoir) left me with no desire to go to Africa; this book has left me with no desire to go to the Amazon. Clearly, reading book group nonfiction books is dangerous to my travel bucket list! That said, the story was compelling … though not quite as compelling as the author’s Destiny of the Republic which I read a year or so ago.
    — a young adult paranormal romance, The Midnight Gardener by R. G. Thomas. It was a pleasant story; however, it ended on a cliffhanger and I’m not compelled to read on in the series. I will say that it’s the first time I’ve encountered a major character who was a … Spoiler … garden gnome.
    — Heated Rivalry (Game Changers) by Rachel Reid. I can imagine rereading this male/male contemporary hockey romance.
    — Game Changer by Rachel Reid, the first in the same hockey series, which I also enjoyed.
    — a reread of Linesman (A Linesman Novel) by SK Dunstall which I enjoyed once more.
    — the audio version of The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold. The narrator is Lloyd James who does an excellent job with the many voices. My husband and I both enjoyed it. It was my husband’s first exposure to the book while I read it for the first time some months ago.

    Reply
  11. I only read one book this month, Mary Balogh’s “Someone to Romance,” the most recent book in her Westcott series. I started reading last night at 8pm and surprised myself that I finished it at 7am this morning. Lady Jessica Archer the daughter and sister of the Duke of Netherby is twenty-five and looking forward to another season. Her family is notorious for all their love-matches and crisis management. She has decided that this year, she will marry. She has a chance encounter in an inn on her way to London with Gabriel Thorne whom she mistakes for a cit.
    Gabriel has returned to England after thirteen years in Boston where he made a life for himself to take up his title when he discovers his cousin has taken up residence at his family estate, and is treating the tenants, servants, and worst of all the one person he has kept in touch with, horribly and already styling himself as the Earl of Lidale before Gabriel has been declared dead. Had his cousin been treating the people he was responsible for well, he would have gladly stayed in Boston where he had made a life for himself and prospered as a merchant. After his encounter with the haughty aristocratic perfection of Lady Jessica Archer,he decided he will marry her. Gabriel travels to London to gain himself a secretary who will investigate what is really going on at the estate, a valet, and appointments with a barber, habadaher, bootmaker, and at Tattersalls to fit himself in the the role of aristocrat that he had left long ago. He meets Jessica again at the first ball of the season, and discovers his cousin’s son, Anthony Rochford, is set on taking Jessica as his wife.
    Jessica is appalled that Gabriel has decided to marry her after a very brief meeting and demands that if he wants her, he must get to know the woman she is, not the persona she projects in public, and wants to be romanced. Gabriel is not one for the grand gesture, but manages to break through her cool exterior and manages to convince her to join his cause. She is discovering that this unpolished man is igniting feelings with in her that seem suspiciously like the feelings the other women in her family have felt for the men they married.
    Next month I hope to read Andrea Penrose’s new mystery as well as Mary Jo Putney’s new Once” book. September looks to be another month where my TBR will be gathering dust.

    Reply
  12. I only read one book this month, Mary Balogh’s “Someone to Romance,” the most recent book in her Westcott series. I started reading last night at 8pm and surprised myself that I finished it at 7am this morning. Lady Jessica Archer the daughter and sister of the Duke of Netherby is twenty-five and looking forward to another season. Her family is notorious for all their love-matches and crisis management. She has decided that this year, she will marry. She has a chance encounter in an inn on her way to London with Gabriel Thorne whom she mistakes for a cit.
    Gabriel has returned to England after thirteen years in Boston where he made a life for himself to take up his title when he discovers his cousin has taken up residence at his family estate, and is treating the tenants, servants, and worst of all the one person he has kept in touch with, horribly and already styling himself as the Earl of Lidale before Gabriel has been declared dead. Had his cousin been treating the people he was responsible for well, he would have gladly stayed in Boston where he had made a life for himself and prospered as a merchant. After his encounter with the haughty aristocratic perfection of Lady Jessica Archer,he decided he will marry her. Gabriel travels to London to gain himself a secretary who will investigate what is really going on at the estate, a valet, and appointments with a barber, habadaher, bootmaker, and at Tattersalls to fit himself in the the role of aristocrat that he had left long ago. He meets Jessica again at the first ball of the season, and discovers his cousin’s son, Anthony Rochford, is set on taking Jessica as his wife.
    Jessica is appalled that Gabriel has decided to marry her after a very brief meeting and demands that if he wants her, he must get to know the woman she is, not the persona she projects in public, and wants to be romanced. Gabriel is not one for the grand gesture, but manages to break through her cool exterior and manages to convince her to join his cause. She is discovering that this unpolished man is igniting feelings with in her that seem suspiciously like the feelings the other women in her family have felt for the men they married.
    Next month I hope to read Andrea Penrose’s new mystery as well as Mary Jo Putney’s new Once” book. September looks to be another month where my TBR will be gathering dust.

    Reply
  13. I only read one book this month, Mary Balogh’s “Someone to Romance,” the most recent book in her Westcott series. I started reading last night at 8pm and surprised myself that I finished it at 7am this morning. Lady Jessica Archer the daughter and sister of the Duke of Netherby is twenty-five and looking forward to another season. Her family is notorious for all their love-matches and crisis management. She has decided that this year, she will marry. She has a chance encounter in an inn on her way to London with Gabriel Thorne whom she mistakes for a cit.
    Gabriel has returned to England after thirteen years in Boston where he made a life for himself to take up his title when he discovers his cousin has taken up residence at his family estate, and is treating the tenants, servants, and worst of all the one person he has kept in touch with, horribly and already styling himself as the Earl of Lidale before Gabriel has been declared dead. Had his cousin been treating the people he was responsible for well, he would have gladly stayed in Boston where he had made a life for himself and prospered as a merchant. After his encounter with the haughty aristocratic perfection of Lady Jessica Archer,he decided he will marry her. Gabriel travels to London to gain himself a secretary who will investigate what is really going on at the estate, a valet, and appointments with a barber, habadaher, bootmaker, and at Tattersalls to fit himself in the the role of aristocrat that he had left long ago. He meets Jessica again at the first ball of the season, and discovers his cousin’s son, Anthony Rochford, is set on taking Jessica as his wife.
    Jessica is appalled that Gabriel has decided to marry her after a very brief meeting and demands that if he wants her, he must get to know the woman she is, not the persona she projects in public, and wants to be romanced. Gabriel is not one for the grand gesture, but manages to break through her cool exterior and manages to convince her to join his cause. She is discovering that this unpolished man is igniting feelings with in her that seem suspiciously like the feelings the other women in her family have felt for the men they married.
    Next month I hope to read Andrea Penrose’s new mystery as well as Mary Jo Putney’s new Once” book. September looks to be another month where my TBR will be gathering dust.

    Reply
  14. I only read one book this month, Mary Balogh’s “Someone to Romance,” the most recent book in her Westcott series. I started reading last night at 8pm and surprised myself that I finished it at 7am this morning. Lady Jessica Archer the daughter and sister of the Duke of Netherby is twenty-five and looking forward to another season. Her family is notorious for all their love-matches and crisis management. She has decided that this year, she will marry. She has a chance encounter in an inn on her way to London with Gabriel Thorne whom she mistakes for a cit.
    Gabriel has returned to England after thirteen years in Boston where he made a life for himself to take up his title when he discovers his cousin has taken up residence at his family estate, and is treating the tenants, servants, and worst of all the one person he has kept in touch with, horribly and already styling himself as the Earl of Lidale before Gabriel has been declared dead. Had his cousin been treating the people he was responsible for well, he would have gladly stayed in Boston where he had made a life for himself and prospered as a merchant. After his encounter with the haughty aristocratic perfection of Lady Jessica Archer,he decided he will marry her. Gabriel travels to London to gain himself a secretary who will investigate what is really going on at the estate, a valet, and appointments with a barber, habadaher, bootmaker, and at Tattersalls to fit himself in the the role of aristocrat that he had left long ago. He meets Jessica again at the first ball of the season, and discovers his cousin’s son, Anthony Rochford, is set on taking Jessica as his wife.
    Jessica is appalled that Gabriel has decided to marry her after a very brief meeting and demands that if he wants her, he must get to know the woman she is, not the persona she projects in public, and wants to be romanced. Gabriel is not one for the grand gesture, but manages to break through her cool exterior and manages to convince her to join his cause. She is discovering that this unpolished man is igniting feelings with in her that seem suspiciously like the feelings the other women in her family have felt for the men they married.
    Next month I hope to read Andrea Penrose’s new mystery as well as Mary Jo Putney’s new Once” book. September looks to be another month where my TBR will be gathering dust.

    Reply
  15. I only read one book this month, Mary Balogh’s “Someone to Romance,” the most recent book in her Westcott series. I started reading last night at 8pm and surprised myself that I finished it at 7am this morning. Lady Jessica Archer the daughter and sister of the Duke of Netherby is twenty-five and looking forward to another season. Her family is notorious for all their love-matches and crisis management. She has decided that this year, she will marry. She has a chance encounter in an inn on her way to London with Gabriel Thorne whom she mistakes for a cit.
    Gabriel has returned to England after thirteen years in Boston where he made a life for himself to take up his title when he discovers his cousin has taken up residence at his family estate, and is treating the tenants, servants, and worst of all the one person he has kept in touch with, horribly and already styling himself as the Earl of Lidale before Gabriel has been declared dead. Had his cousin been treating the people he was responsible for well, he would have gladly stayed in Boston where he had made a life for himself and prospered as a merchant. After his encounter with the haughty aristocratic perfection of Lady Jessica Archer,he decided he will marry her. Gabriel travels to London to gain himself a secretary who will investigate what is really going on at the estate, a valet, and appointments with a barber, habadaher, bootmaker, and at Tattersalls to fit himself in the the role of aristocrat that he had left long ago. He meets Jessica again at the first ball of the season, and discovers his cousin’s son, Anthony Rochford, is set on taking Jessica as his wife.
    Jessica is appalled that Gabriel has decided to marry her after a very brief meeting and demands that if he wants her, he must get to know the woman she is, not the persona she projects in public, and wants to be romanced. Gabriel is not one for the grand gesture, but manages to break through her cool exterior and manages to convince her to join his cause. She is discovering that this unpolished man is igniting feelings with in her that seem suspiciously like the feelings the other women in her family have felt for the men they married.
    Next month I hope to read Andrea Penrose’s new mystery as well as Mary Jo Putney’s new Once” book. September looks to be another month where my TBR will be gathering dust.

    Reply
  16. Funny about Pamela G. mentioning that her TBR will be gathering dust because that is indeed all that mine did. For whatever reason I did not feel like reading anything new and therefore went on a massive reread of Stephanie Laurens. Bastion Club led to the original Cynsters. Which led to the Black Cobra and finally ended with the Frobisher series.
    Interestingly enough, in the midst of the Bastion Club series I read a post by Elizabeth Hawksley about the Clergy during Jane Austen times that tied into 3 of the Bastion Club books. Very fascinating! I learned a lot. Love her posts because they go everywhere.
    http://elizabethhawksley.com/jane-austen-and-the-clergy-how-the-system-worked/
    Anyway, then I turned to rereading stuff off my keeper shelves to see if I still wanted them or not so read Donna Kauffman, Alexis Morgan, Christie Ridgeway, etc etc.
    Also Tiger Magic by Jennifer Ashley which yes…I will keep because well…Tiger…love that man. It is a shifter story and a very involved universe.
    Then my library books came in and I read the last 7 Miss Fisher Books and the Miss Fisher short story book. They were new to me but I knew my funky mood wouldn’t destroy my enjoyment of them because I knew the cast of characters. There would be clues, mysteries and all would end well. They were Lovely as always. I just wish there were still more to read!
    Hopefully this weird not wanting to read new stuff funk will arise since there are a number of enticing books just sitting here waiting for me to enjoy them. But with the weird funk on the brain, I hadn’t felt like letting that spoil my enjoyment of the goodness awaiting me. Grin.

    Reply
  17. Funny about Pamela G. mentioning that her TBR will be gathering dust because that is indeed all that mine did. For whatever reason I did not feel like reading anything new and therefore went on a massive reread of Stephanie Laurens. Bastion Club led to the original Cynsters. Which led to the Black Cobra and finally ended with the Frobisher series.
    Interestingly enough, in the midst of the Bastion Club series I read a post by Elizabeth Hawksley about the Clergy during Jane Austen times that tied into 3 of the Bastion Club books. Very fascinating! I learned a lot. Love her posts because they go everywhere.
    http://elizabethhawksley.com/jane-austen-and-the-clergy-how-the-system-worked/
    Anyway, then I turned to rereading stuff off my keeper shelves to see if I still wanted them or not so read Donna Kauffman, Alexis Morgan, Christie Ridgeway, etc etc.
    Also Tiger Magic by Jennifer Ashley which yes…I will keep because well…Tiger…love that man. It is a shifter story and a very involved universe.
    Then my library books came in and I read the last 7 Miss Fisher Books and the Miss Fisher short story book. They were new to me but I knew my funky mood wouldn’t destroy my enjoyment of them because I knew the cast of characters. There would be clues, mysteries and all would end well. They were Lovely as always. I just wish there were still more to read!
    Hopefully this weird not wanting to read new stuff funk will arise since there are a number of enticing books just sitting here waiting for me to enjoy them. But with the weird funk on the brain, I hadn’t felt like letting that spoil my enjoyment of the goodness awaiting me. Grin.

    Reply
  18. Funny about Pamela G. mentioning that her TBR will be gathering dust because that is indeed all that mine did. For whatever reason I did not feel like reading anything new and therefore went on a massive reread of Stephanie Laurens. Bastion Club led to the original Cynsters. Which led to the Black Cobra and finally ended with the Frobisher series.
    Interestingly enough, in the midst of the Bastion Club series I read a post by Elizabeth Hawksley about the Clergy during Jane Austen times that tied into 3 of the Bastion Club books. Very fascinating! I learned a lot. Love her posts because they go everywhere.
    http://elizabethhawksley.com/jane-austen-and-the-clergy-how-the-system-worked/
    Anyway, then I turned to rereading stuff off my keeper shelves to see if I still wanted them or not so read Donna Kauffman, Alexis Morgan, Christie Ridgeway, etc etc.
    Also Tiger Magic by Jennifer Ashley which yes…I will keep because well…Tiger…love that man. It is a shifter story and a very involved universe.
    Then my library books came in and I read the last 7 Miss Fisher Books and the Miss Fisher short story book. They were new to me but I knew my funky mood wouldn’t destroy my enjoyment of them because I knew the cast of characters. There would be clues, mysteries and all would end well. They were Lovely as always. I just wish there were still more to read!
    Hopefully this weird not wanting to read new stuff funk will arise since there are a number of enticing books just sitting here waiting for me to enjoy them. But with the weird funk on the brain, I hadn’t felt like letting that spoil my enjoyment of the goodness awaiting me. Grin.

    Reply
  19. Funny about Pamela G. mentioning that her TBR will be gathering dust because that is indeed all that mine did. For whatever reason I did not feel like reading anything new and therefore went on a massive reread of Stephanie Laurens. Bastion Club led to the original Cynsters. Which led to the Black Cobra and finally ended with the Frobisher series.
    Interestingly enough, in the midst of the Bastion Club series I read a post by Elizabeth Hawksley about the Clergy during Jane Austen times that tied into 3 of the Bastion Club books. Very fascinating! I learned a lot. Love her posts because they go everywhere.
    http://elizabethhawksley.com/jane-austen-and-the-clergy-how-the-system-worked/
    Anyway, then I turned to rereading stuff off my keeper shelves to see if I still wanted them or not so read Donna Kauffman, Alexis Morgan, Christie Ridgeway, etc etc.
    Also Tiger Magic by Jennifer Ashley which yes…I will keep because well…Tiger…love that man. It is a shifter story and a very involved universe.
    Then my library books came in and I read the last 7 Miss Fisher Books and the Miss Fisher short story book. They were new to me but I knew my funky mood wouldn’t destroy my enjoyment of them because I knew the cast of characters. There would be clues, mysteries and all would end well. They were Lovely as always. I just wish there were still more to read!
    Hopefully this weird not wanting to read new stuff funk will arise since there are a number of enticing books just sitting here waiting for me to enjoy them. But with the weird funk on the brain, I hadn’t felt like letting that spoil my enjoyment of the goodness awaiting me. Grin.

    Reply
  20. Funny about Pamela G. mentioning that her TBR will be gathering dust because that is indeed all that mine did. For whatever reason I did not feel like reading anything new and therefore went on a massive reread of Stephanie Laurens. Bastion Club led to the original Cynsters. Which led to the Black Cobra and finally ended with the Frobisher series.
    Interestingly enough, in the midst of the Bastion Club series I read a post by Elizabeth Hawksley about the Clergy during Jane Austen times that tied into 3 of the Bastion Club books. Very fascinating! I learned a lot. Love her posts because they go everywhere.
    http://elizabethhawksley.com/jane-austen-and-the-clergy-how-the-system-worked/
    Anyway, then I turned to rereading stuff off my keeper shelves to see if I still wanted them or not so read Donna Kauffman, Alexis Morgan, Christie Ridgeway, etc etc.
    Also Tiger Magic by Jennifer Ashley which yes…I will keep because well…Tiger…love that man. It is a shifter story and a very involved universe.
    Then my library books came in and I read the last 7 Miss Fisher Books and the Miss Fisher short story book. They were new to me but I knew my funky mood wouldn’t destroy my enjoyment of them because I knew the cast of characters. There would be clues, mysteries and all would end well. They were Lovely as always. I just wish there were still more to read!
    Hopefully this weird not wanting to read new stuff funk will arise since there are a number of enticing books just sitting here waiting for me to enjoy them. But with the weird funk on the brain, I hadn’t felt like letting that spoil my enjoyment of the goodness awaiting me. Grin.

    Reply
  21. Pamela, I read Someone To Romance the other night — after we’d all sent off our WWR posts, so I’ll be talking about this next month. It’s a lovely story, isn’t it?
    And I’m lucky enough to have read an advanced version of MJP’s new book and it’s a cracker.

    Reply
  22. Pamela, I read Someone To Romance the other night — after we’d all sent off our WWR posts, so I’ll be talking about this next month. It’s a lovely story, isn’t it?
    And I’m lucky enough to have read an advanced version of MJP’s new book and it’s a cracker.

    Reply
  23. Pamela, I read Someone To Romance the other night — after we’d all sent off our WWR posts, so I’ll be talking about this next month. It’s a lovely story, isn’t it?
    And I’m lucky enough to have read an advanced version of MJP’s new book and it’s a cracker.

    Reply
  24. Pamela, I read Someone To Romance the other night — after we’d all sent off our WWR posts, so I’ll be talking about this next month. It’s a lovely story, isn’t it?
    And I’m lucky enough to have read an advanced version of MJP’s new book and it’s a cracker.

    Reply
  25. Pamela, I read Someone To Romance the other night — after we’d all sent off our WWR posts, so I’ll be talking about this next month. It’s a lovely story, isn’t it?
    And I’m lucky enough to have read an advanced version of MJP’s new book and it’s a cracker.

    Reply
  26. Vicki, I’ve been doing a lot of rereading too, as well as some new books. Tiger is one of my favorites, too, and I suspect a lot of readers agree, because he keeps showing up in the other books. As for the Miss Fisher books, I saw recently that there are 20+ of them, which was a surprise.
    Thanks for that Clergy link — I think a lot of our readers will find it interesting.

    Reply
  27. Vicki, I’ve been doing a lot of rereading too, as well as some new books. Tiger is one of my favorites, too, and I suspect a lot of readers agree, because he keeps showing up in the other books. As for the Miss Fisher books, I saw recently that there are 20+ of them, which was a surprise.
    Thanks for that Clergy link — I think a lot of our readers will find it interesting.

    Reply
  28. Vicki, I’ve been doing a lot of rereading too, as well as some new books. Tiger is one of my favorites, too, and I suspect a lot of readers agree, because he keeps showing up in the other books. As for the Miss Fisher books, I saw recently that there are 20+ of them, which was a surprise.
    Thanks for that Clergy link — I think a lot of our readers will find it interesting.

    Reply
  29. Vicki, I’ve been doing a lot of rereading too, as well as some new books. Tiger is one of my favorites, too, and I suspect a lot of readers agree, because he keeps showing up in the other books. As for the Miss Fisher books, I saw recently that there are 20+ of them, which was a surprise.
    Thanks for that Clergy link — I think a lot of our readers will find it interesting.

    Reply
  30. Vicki, I’ve been doing a lot of rereading too, as well as some new books. Tiger is one of my favorites, too, and I suspect a lot of readers agree, because he keeps showing up in the other books. As for the Miss Fisher books, I saw recently that there are 20+ of them, which was a surprise.
    Thanks for that Clergy link — I think a lot of our readers will find it interesting.

    Reply
  31. I think sometimes we just crave the safety of rereads because we know we won’t be disappointed. I’ve been trying to tackle my TBR pile but I keep getting sidetracked … Love Elizabeth Hawksley’s blog posts too! Have you read any of her books? Frost Fair was great!

    Reply
  32. I think sometimes we just crave the safety of rereads because we know we won’t be disappointed. I’ve been trying to tackle my TBR pile but I keep getting sidetracked … Love Elizabeth Hawksley’s blog posts too! Have you read any of her books? Frost Fair was great!

    Reply
  33. I think sometimes we just crave the safety of rereads because we know we won’t be disappointed. I’ve been trying to tackle my TBR pile but I keep getting sidetracked … Love Elizabeth Hawksley’s blog posts too! Have you read any of her books? Frost Fair was great!

    Reply
  34. I think sometimes we just crave the safety of rereads because we know we won’t be disappointed. I’ve been trying to tackle my TBR pile but I keep getting sidetracked … Love Elizabeth Hawksley’s blog posts too! Have you read any of her books? Frost Fair was great!

    Reply
  35. I think sometimes we just crave the safety of rereads because we know we won’t be disappointed. I’ve been trying to tackle my TBR pile but I keep getting sidetracked … Love Elizabeth Hawksley’s blog posts too! Have you read any of her books? Frost Fair was great!

    Reply
  36. I love all the Westcott books. From the first book and the upheaval of a bigamous marriage and watching how the family recovered and became closer. Then seeing how that crisis affected each family member in how they picked up the pieces of their lives and discovering their partners in life. The shattering of their social expectations allows them to open their hearts to people who are outside of the norm of the Ton. I’m looking forward to reading Harry’s story.

    Reply
  37. I love all the Westcott books. From the first book and the upheaval of a bigamous marriage and watching how the family recovered and became closer. Then seeing how that crisis affected each family member in how they picked up the pieces of their lives and discovering their partners in life. The shattering of their social expectations allows them to open their hearts to people who are outside of the norm of the Ton. I’m looking forward to reading Harry’s story.

    Reply
  38. I love all the Westcott books. From the first book and the upheaval of a bigamous marriage and watching how the family recovered and became closer. Then seeing how that crisis affected each family member in how they picked up the pieces of their lives and discovering their partners in life. The shattering of their social expectations allows them to open their hearts to people who are outside of the norm of the Ton. I’m looking forward to reading Harry’s story.

    Reply
  39. I love all the Westcott books. From the first book and the upheaval of a bigamous marriage and watching how the family recovered and became closer. Then seeing how that crisis affected each family member in how they picked up the pieces of their lives and discovering their partners in life. The shattering of their social expectations allows them to open their hearts to people who are outside of the norm of the Ton. I’m looking forward to reading Harry’s story.

    Reply
  40. I love all the Westcott books. From the first book and the upheaval of a bigamous marriage and watching how the family recovered and became closer. Then seeing how that crisis affected each family member in how they picked up the pieces of their lives and discovering their partners in life. The shattering of their social expectations allows them to open their hearts to people who are outside of the norm of the Ton. I’m looking forward to reading Harry’s story.

    Reply
  41. As always, Kareni, an impressive and varied list. Most of the authors are new to me. I’ll keep a look out for those you’ve recommended.
    How nice to be sharing the audio version of The Curse of Chalion with your husband.

    Reply
  42. As always, Kareni, an impressive and varied list. Most of the authors are new to me. I’ll keep a look out for those you’ve recommended.
    How nice to be sharing the audio version of The Curse of Chalion with your husband.

    Reply
  43. As always, Kareni, an impressive and varied list. Most of the authors are new to me. I’ll keep a look out for those you’ve recommended.
    How nice to be sharing the audio version of The Curse of Chalion with your husband.

    Reply
  44. As always, Kareni, an impressive and varied list. Most of the authors are new to me. I’ll keep a look out for those you’ve recommended.
    How nice to be sharing the audio version of The Curse of Chalion with your husband.

    Reply
  45. As always, Kareni, an impressive and varied list. Most of the authors are new to me. I’ll keep a look out for those you’ve recommended.
    How nice to be sharing the audio version of The Curse of Chalion with your husband.

    Reply
  46. Me too Pamela. It’s a great premise for the series, isn’t it? And each member of the family takes a very different — and transformative— journey.
    I too am looking forward to Harry’s story.

    Reply
  47. Me too Pamela. It’s a great premise for the series, isn’t it? And each member of the family takes a very different — and transformative— journey.
    I too am looking forward to Harry’s story.

    Reply
  48. Me too Pamela. It’s a great premise for the series, isn’t it? And each member of the family takes a very different — and transformative— journey.
    I too am looking forward to Harry’s story.

    Reply
  49. Me too Pamela. It’s a great premise for the series, isn’t it? And each member of the family takes a very different — and transformative— journey.
    I too am looking forward to Harry’s story.

    Reply
  50. Me too Pamela. It’s a great premise for the series, isn’t it? And each member of the family takes a very different — and transformative— journey.
    I too am looking forward to Harry’s story.

    Reply
  51. My outstanding read this month was Kate Andersen Brower’s Team of Five, about our most recent five ex-Presidents and how they’ve banded together to do good for our nation as well as established virtual family ties across political and personal lines. Very interesting and heartening. It didn’t hurt that I’d previously read Julie Hyzy’s complete White House Chef series, which gave me a lot of context for Team of Five.

    Reply
  52. My outstanding read this month was Kate Andersen Brower’s Team of Five, about our most recent five ex-Presidents and how they’ve banded together to do good for our nation as well as established virtual family ties across political and personal lines. Very interesting and heartening. It didn’t hurt that I’d previously read Julie Hyzy’s complete White House Chef series, which gave me a lot of context for Team of Five.

    Reply
  53. My outstanding read this month was Kate Andersen Brower’s Team of Five, about our most recent five ex-Presidents and how they’ve banded together to do good for our nation as well as established virtual family ties across political and personal lines. Very interesting and heartening. It didn’t hurt that I’d previously read Julie Hyzy’s complete White House Chef series, which gave me a lot of context for Team of Five.

    Reply
  54. My outstanding read this month was Kate Andersen Brower’s Team of Five, about our most recent five ex-Presidents and how they’ve banded together to do good for our nation as well as established virtual family ties across political and personal lines. Very interesting and heartening. It didn’t hurt that I’d previously read Julie Hyzy’s complete White House Chef series, which gave me a lot of context for Team of Five.

    Reply
  55. My outstanding read this month was Kate Andersen Brower’s Team of Five, about our most recent five ex-Presidents and how they’ve banded together to do good for our nation as well as established virtual family ties across political and personal lines. Very interesting and heartening. It didn’t hurt that I’d previously read Julie Hyzy’s complete White House Chef series, which gave me a lot of context for Team of Five.

    Reply
  56. I too have been doing a lot of re-reads lately – or comfort reads as I call them. The times have been so depressing lately that I feel like I need that “sure thing.” Mary Balogh, Anne Gracie, Grace Burrows, Caroline Warfield, Barbara Metzger, Joan Smith and really too many more to mention.
    I have 4 or 5 brand new books on my kindle that I haven’t even opened yet. But I just started reading Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO ROMANCE and it is so good that I think it has “jump started” me to want to read the rest of my unread books.
    I always read everyone else’s suggestions. I find this blog so interesting. Maybe I’ll have something to report next month (smile).

    Reply
  57. I too have been doing a lot of re-reads lately – or comfort reads as I call them. The times have been so depressing lately that I feel like I need that “sure thing.” Mary Balogh, Anne Gracie, Grace Burrows, Caroline Warfield, Barbara Metzger, Joan Smith and really too many more to mention.
    I have 4 or 5 brand new books on my kindle that I haven’t even opened yet. But I just started reading Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO ROMANCE and it is so good that I think it has “jump started” me to want to read the rest of my unread books.
    I always read everyone else’s suggestions. I find this blog so interesting. Maybe I’ll have something to report next month (smile).

    Reply
  58. I too have been doing a lot of re-reads lately – or comfort reads as I call them. The times have been so depressing lately that I feel like I need that “sure thing.” Mary Balogh, Anne Gracie, Grace Burrows, Caroline Warfield, Barbara Metzger, Joan Smith and really too many more to mention.
    I have 4 or 5 brand new books on my kindle that I haven’t even opened yet. But I just started reading Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO ROMANCE and it is so good that I think it has “jump started” me to want to read the rest of my unread books.
    I always read everyone else’s suggestions. I find this blog so interesting. Maybe I’ll have something to report next month (smile).

    Reply
  59. I too have been doing a lot of re-reads lately – or comfort reads as I call them. The times have been so depressing lately that I feel like I need that “sure thing.” Mary Balogh, Anne Gracie, Grace Burrows, Caroline Warfield, Barbara Metzger, Joan Smith and really too many more to mention.
    I have 4 or 5 brand new books on my kindle that I haven’t even opened yet. But I just started reading Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO ROMANCE and it is so good that I think it has “jump started” me to want to read the rest of my unread books.
    I always read everyone else’s suggestions. I find this blog so interesting. Maybe I’ll have something to report next month (smile).

    Reply
  60. I too have been doing a lot of re-reads lately – or comfort reads as I call them. The times have been so depressing lately that I feel like I need that “sure thing.” Mary Balogh, Anne Gracie, Grace Burrows, Caroline Warfield, Barbara Metzger, Joan Smith and really too many more to mention.
    I have 4 or 5 brand new books on my kindle that I haven’t even opened yet. But I just started reading Mary Balogh’s SOMEONE TO ROMANCE and it is so good that I think it has “jump started” me to want to read the rest of my unread books.
    I always read everyone else’s suggestions. I find this blog so interesting. Maybe I’ll have something to report next month (smile).

    Reply
  61. August was an interesting month for me…..I read two series in order – Valerie Bowman’s Footmen series and Anne Gracie’s Marry In series….I think Marry in Scarlet was one of the best books I have read in 2020. But, each of the books in these two series were interesting.
    I read some other books too. Some I liked – Nancy Naigle’s A Heartfelt Christmas Promise. I love Christmas books.
    Others were disappointing for me. I will not name those.
    I am grateful to each of you for your lists of books. I am a book addict and it is always good to find new titles, new authors and new ideas.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  62. August was an interesting month for me…..I read two series in order – Valerie Bowman’s Footmen series and Anne Gracie’s Marry In series….I think Marry in Scarlet was one of the best books I have read in 2020. But, each of the books in these two series were interesting.
    I read some other books too. Some I liked – Nancy Naigle’s A Heartfelt Christmas Promise. I love Christmas books.
    Others were disappointing for me. I will not name those.
    I am grateful to each of you for your lists of books. I am a book addict and it is always good to find new titles, new authors and new ideas.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  63. August was an interesting month for me…..I read two series in order – Valerie Bowman’s Footmen series and Anne Gracie’s Marry In series….I think Marry in Scarlet was one of the best books I have read in 2020. But, each of the books in these two series were interesting.
    I read some other books too. Some I liked – Nancy Naigle’s A Heartfelt Christmas Promise. I love Christmas books.
    Others were disappointing for me. I will not name those.
    I am grateful to each of you for your lists of books. I am a book addict and it is always good to find new titles, new authors and new ideas.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  64. August was an interesting month for me…..I read two series in order – Valerie Bowman’s Footmen series and Anne Gracie’s Marry In series….I think Marry in Scarlet was one of the best books I have read in 2020. But, each of the books in these two series were interesting.
    I read some other books too. Some I liked – Nancy Naigle’s A Heartfelt Christmas Promise. I love Christmas books.
    Others were disappointing for me. I will not name those.
    I am grateful to each of you for your lists of books. I am a book addict and it is always good to find new titles, new authors and new ideas.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  65. August was an interesting month for me…..I read two series in order – Valerie Bowman’s Footmen series and Anne Gracie’s Marry In series….I think Marry in Scarlet was one of the best books I have read in 2020. But, each of the books in these two series were interesting.
    I read some other books too. Some I liked – Nancy Naigle’s A Heartfelt Christmas Promise. I love Christmas books.
    Others were disappointing for me. I will not name those.
    I am grateful to each of you for your lists of books. I am a book addict and it is always good to find new titles, new authors and new ideas.
    I hope everyone is staying safe and taking care.

    Reply
  66. Well – I read Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. Very interesting and creepy. Loved the 1950’s Mexico setting and the heroine. Now I’m on the latest Kendra Donovan mystery by Julie McElwain – Shadows In Time. So good I can’t put it down. Also read Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng for book club. That was good too and certainly inspired a lot of discussion in our Zoom meeting!

    Reply
  67. Well – I read Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. Very interesting and creepy. Loved the 1950’s Mexico setting and the heroine. Now I’m on the latest Kendra Donovan mystery by Julie McElwain – Shadows In Time. So good I can’t put it down. Also read Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng for book club. That was good too and certainly inspired a lot of discussion in our Zoom meeting!

    Reply
  68. Well – I read Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. Very interesting and creepy. Loved the 1950’s Mexico setting and the heroine. Now I’m on the latest Kendra Donovan mystery by Julie McElwain – Shadows In Time. So good I can’t put it down. Also read Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng for book club. That was good too and certainly inspired a lot of discussion in our Zoom meeting!

    Reply
  69. Well – I read Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. Very interesting and creepy. Loved the 1950’s Mexico setting and the heroine. Now I’m on the latest Kendra Donovan mystery by Julie McElwain – Shadows In Time. So good I can’t put it down. Also read Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng for book club. That was good too and certainly inspired a lot of discussion in our Zoom meeting!

    Reply
  70. Well – I read Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. Very interesting and creepy. Loved the 1950’s Mexico setting and the heroine. Now I’m on the latest Kendra Donovan mystery by Julie McElwain – Shadows In Time. So good I can’t put it down. Also read Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng for book club. That was good too and certainly inspired a lot of discussion in our Zoom meeting!

    Reply
  71. I got quite a bit of reading done in August and made a slight dent in the TBR list! I read a number of books from series I’ve been following: the last 2 books of Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series: Duke of Pleasure and Duke of Desire. I loved Duke of Pleasure, but I thought the plot of the last book was a bit over the top.
    I also reread an older Hoyt book, “To Taste Temptation” because I picked up a Kindle version on sale. That led me to reread the book after it in the same series, “To Seduce a Sinner” which is one of my all time favorites. I’ve probably read it half a dozen times. It’s such a comfort read for me. The hero and heroine are described as just average looking, not beautiful or handsome. It’s a marriage of convenience where the heroine has had a crush on the hero for quite some time, but once they are married, she realizes he has feet of clay, and she finds their first time in bed together to be a big disappointment! The development of their love story is so down to earth and beautifully done.
    I read “Murder in the East End” the 4th in the Below Stairs mystery series by Jennifer Ashley. The main character is a cook, and to be honest, I enjoy the descriptions of her cooking as much as the mystery. It is great to have a heroine who is a member of the servant class rather than nobility.
    I read “A Royal Affair”, the 2nd Sparks & Bainbridge mystery, the series than Kareni mentioned above. It’s so hard to find books that capture the World War II era in a way I find believable, but I love the writing of these books, and I love the 2 main characters.
    I read “The Girl From the Diadem” by Jean Merrill, which someone here recommended last month. It’s an Edwardian romantic comedy, with a real Jeeves & Wooster feel to it. It was an absolute delight, and I’ve already passed on the book to another follower of this blog.
    I read two old Mary Balogh books, Signet Regency editions. A hit and a near miss. “Courting Julia” was just OK, but “Snow Angel” was an excellent read, quite memorable.
    I also reread Jo Beverly’s “Tempting Fortune”, which I picked up in a Kindle .99 cent sale. I had forgotten how long and meaty those Malloren books were, with so much plot!
    I’m now reading “A Brush With Shadows”, the 6th in the Lady Darby mystery series by Anna Lee Huber. The characters continue to develop and I will continue to read these as long as she writes them.

    Reply
  72. I got quite a bit of reading done in August and made a slight dent in the TBR list! I read a number of books from series I’ve been following: the last 2 books of Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series: Duke of Pleasure and Duke of Desire. I loved Duke of Pleasure, but I thought the plot of the last book was a bit over the top.
    I also reread an older Hoyt book, “To Taste Temptation” because I picked up a Kindle version on sale. That led me to reread the book after it in the same series, “To Seduce a Sinner” which is one of my all time favorites. I’ve probably read it half a dozen times. It’s such a comfort read for me. The hero and heroine are described as just average looking, not beautiful or handsome. It’s a marriage of convenience where the heroine has had a crush on the hero for quite some time, but once they are married, she realizes he has feet of clay, and she finds their first time in bed together to be a big disappointment! The development of their love story is so down to earth and beautifully done.
    I read “Murder in the East End” the 4th in the Below Stairs mystery series by Jennifer Ashley. The main character is a cook, and to be honest, I enjoy the descriptions of her cooking as much as the mystery. It is great to have a heroine who is a member of the servant class rather than nobility.
    I read “A Royal Affair”, the 2nd Sparks & Bainbridge mystery, the series than Kareni mentioned above. It’s so hard to find books that capture the World War II era in a way I find believable, but I love the writing of these books, and I love the 2 main characters.
    I read “The Girl From the Diadem” by Jean Merrill, which someone here recommended last month. It’s an Edwardian romantic comedy, with a real Jeeves & Wooster feel to it. It was an absolute delight, and I’ve already passed on the book to another follower of this blog.
    I read two old Mary Balogh books, Signet Regency editions. A hit and a near miss. “Courting Julia” was just OK, but “Snow Angel” was an excellent read, quite memorable.
    I also reread Jo Beverly’s “Tempting Fortune”, which I picked up in a Kindle .99 cent sale. I had forgotten how long and meaty those Malloren books were, with so much plot!
    I’m now reading “A Brush With Shadows”, the 6th in the Lady Darby mystery series by Anna Lee Huber. The characters continue to develop and I will continue to read these as long as she writes them.

    Reply
  73. I got quite a bit of reading done in August and made a slight dent in the TBR list! I read a number of books from series I’ve been following: the last 2 books of Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series: Duke of Pleasure and Duke of Desire. I loved Duke of Pleasure, but I thought the plot of the last book was a bit over the top.
    I also reread an older Hoyt book, “To Taste Temptation” because I picked up a Kindle version on sale. That led me to reread the book after it in the same series, “To Seduce a Sinner” which is one of my all time favorites. I’ve probably read it half a dozen times. It’s such a comfort read for me. The hero and heroine are described as just average looking, not beautiful or handsome. It’s a marriage of convenience where the heroine has had a crush on the hero for quite some time, but once they are married, she realizes he has feet of clay, and she finds their first time in bed together to be a big disappointment! The development of their love story is so down to earth and beautifully done.
    I read “Murder in the East End” the 4th in the Below Stairs mystery series by Jennifer Ashley. The main character is a cook, and to be honest, I enjoy the descriptions of her cooking as much as the mystery. It is great to have a heroine who is a member of the servant class rather than nobility.
    I read “A Royal Affair”, the 2nd Sparks & Bainbridge mystery, the series than Kareni mentioned above. It’s so hard to find books that capture the World War II era in a way I find believable, but I love the writing of these books, and I love the 2 main characters.
    I read “The Girl From the Diadem” by Jean Merrill, which someone here recommended last month. It’s an Edwardian romantic comedy, with a real Jeeves & Wooster feel to it. It was an absolute delight, and I’ve already passed on the book to another follower of this blog.
    I read two old Mary Balogh books, Signet Regency editions. A hit and a near miss. “Courting Julia” was just OK, but “Snow Angel” was an excellent read, quite memorable.
    I also reread Jo Beverly’s “Tempting Fortune”, which I picked up in a Kindle .99 cent sale. I had forgotten how long and meaty those Malloren books were, with so much plot!
    I’m now reading “A Brush With Shadows”, the 6th in the Lady Darby mystery series by Anna Lee Huber. The characters continue to develop and I will continue to read these as long as she writes them.

    Reply
  74. I got quite a bit of reading done in August and made a slight dent in the TBR list! I read a number of books from series I’ve been following: the last 2 books of Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series: Duke of Pleasure and Duke of Desire. I loved Duke of Pleasure, but I thought the plot of the last book was a bit over the top.
    I also reread an older Hoyt book, “To Taste Temptation” because I picked up a Kindle version on sale. That led me to reread the book after it in the same series, “To Seduce a Sinner” which is one of my all time favorites. I’ve probably read it half a dozen times. It’s such a comfort read for me. The hero and heroine are described as just average looking, not beautiful or handsome. It’s a marriage of convenience where the heroine has had a crush on the hero for quite some time, but once they are married, she realizes he has feet of clay, and she finds their first time in bed together to be a big disappointment! The development of their love story is so down to earth and beautifully done.
    I read “Murder in the East End” the 4th in the Below Stairs mystery series by Jennifer Ashley. The main character is a cook, and to be honest, I enjoy the descriptions of her cooking as much as the mystery. It is great to have a heroine who is a member of the servant class rather than nobility.
    I read “A Royal Affair”, the 2nd Sparks & Bainbridge mystery, the series than Kareni mentioned above. It’s so hard to find books that capture the World War II era in a way I find believable, but I love the writing of these books, and I love the 2 main characters.
    I read “The Girl From the Diadem” by Jean Merrill, which someone here recommended last month. It’s an Edwardian romantic comedy, with a real Jeeves & Wooster feel to it. It was an absolute delight, and I’ve already passed on the book to another follower of this blog.
    I read two old Mary Balogh books, Signet Regency editions. A hit and a near miss. “Courting Julia” was just OK, but “Snow Angel” was an excellent read, quite memorable.
    I also reread Jo Beverly’s “Tempting Fortune”, which I picked up in a Kindle .99 cent sale. I had forgotten how long and meaty those Malloren books were, with so much plot!
    I’m now reading “A Brush With Shadows”, the 6th in the Lady Darby mystery series by Anna Lee Huber. The characters continue to develop and I will continue to read these as long as she writes them.

    Reply
  75. I got quite a bit of reading done in August and made a slight dent in the TBR list! I read a number of books from series I’ve been following: the last 2 books of Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series: Duke of Pleasure and Duke of Desire. I loved Duke of Pleasure, but I thought the plot of the last book was a bit over the top.
    I also reread an older Hoyt book, “To Taste Temptation” because I picked up a Kindle version on sale. That led me to reread the book after it in the same series, “To Seduce a Sinner” which is one of my all time favorites. I’ve probably read it half a dozen times. It’s such a comfort read for me. The hero and heroine are described as just average looking, not beautiful or handsome. It’s a marriage of convenience where the heroine has had a crush on the hero for quite some time, but once they are married, she realizes he has feet of clay, and she finds their first time in bed together to be a big disappointment! The development of their love story is so down to earth and beautifully done.
    I read “Murder in the East End” the 4th in the Below Stairs mystery series by Jennifer Ashley. The main character is a cook, and to be honest, I enjoy the descriptions of her cooking as much as the mystery. It is great to have a heroine who is a member of the servant class rather than nobility.
    I read “A Royal Affair”, the 2nd Sparks & Bainbridge mystery, the series than Kareni mentioned above. It’s so hard to find books that capture the World War II era in a way I find believable, but I love the writing of these books, and I love the 2 main characters.
    I read “The Girl From the Diadem” by Jean Merrill, which someone here recommended last month. It’s an Edwardian romantic comedy, with a real Jeeves & Wooster feel to it. It was an absolute delight, and I’ve already passed on the book to another follower of this blog.
    I read two old Mary Balogh books, Signet Regency editions. A hit and a near miss. “Courting Julia” was just OK, but “Snow Angel” was an excellent read, quite memorable.
    I also reread Jo Beverly’s “Tempting Fortune”, which I picked up in a Kindle .99 cent sale. I had forgotten how long and meaty those Malloren books were, with so much plot!
    I’m now reading “A Brush With Shadows”, the 6th in the Lady Darby mystery series by Anna Lee Huber. The characters continue to develop and I will continue to read these as long as she writes them.

    Reply
  76. Mary Balogh was interviewed on Smart Podcast, Trashy Books several months ago. My fellow fans of the Westcotts will be happy to know that for the time being, she is going to continue expanding and doing spinoffs of the Westcott series, rather than start something brand new. First of all, she said she didn’t know if she wanted to embark on a lengthy new series at her age! And secondly, she agreed with the interviewer that during this pandemic people enjoy going back into a familiar world; you are expending less mental energy, and it’s comforting to revisit characters you already know and love. Her huge backlist is also being rereleased at a pretty good clip; eventually they will all be available as ebooks, great news for readers!

    Reply
  77. Mary Balogh was interviewed on Smart Podcast, Trashy Books several months ago. My fellow fans of the Westcotts will be happy to know that for the time being, she is going to continue expanding and doing spinoffs of the Westcott series, rather than start something brand new. First of all, she said she didn’t know if she wanted to embark on a lengthy new series at her age! And secondly, she agreed with the interviewer that during this pandemic people enjoy going back into a familiar world; you are expending less mental energy, and it’s comforting to revisit characters you already know and love. Her huge backlist is also being rereleased at a pretty good clip; eventually they will all be available as ebooks, great news for readers!

    Reply
  78. Mary Balogh was interviewed on Smart Podcast, Trashy Books several months ago. My fellow fans of the Westcotts will be happy to know that for the time being, she is going to continue expanding and doing spinoffs of the Westcott series, rather than start something brand new. First of all, she said she didn’t know if she wanted to embark on a lengthy new series at her age! And secondly, she agreed with the interviewer that during this pandemic people enjoy going back into a familiar world; you are expending less mental energy, and it’s comforting to revisit characters you already know and love. Her huge backlist is also being rereleased at a pretty good clip; eventually they will all be available as ebooks, great news for readers!

    Reply
  79. Mary Balogh was interviewed on Smart Podcast, Trashy Books several months ago. My fellow fans of the Westcotts will be happy to know that for the time being, she is going to continue expanding and doing spinoffs of the Westcott series, rather than start something brand new. First of all, she said she didn’t know if she wanted to embark on a lengthy new series at her age! And secondly, she agreed with the interviewer that during this pandemic people enjoy going back into a familiar world; you are expending less mental energy, and it’s comforting to revisit characters you already know and love. Her huge backlist is also being rereleased at a pretty good clip; eventually they will all be available as ebooks, great news for readers!

    Reply
  80. Mary Balogh was interviewed on Smart Podcast, Trashy Books several months ago. My fellow fans of the Westcotts will be happy to know that for the time being, she is going to continue expanding and doing spinoffs of the Westcott series, rather than start something brand new. First of all, she said she didn’t know if she wanted to embark on a lengthy new series at her age! And secondly, she agreed with the interviewer that during this pandemic people enjoy going back into a familiar world; you are expending less mental energy, and it’s comforting to revisit characters you already know and love. Her huge backlist is also being rereleased at a pretty good clip; eventually they will all be available as ebooks, great news for readers!

    Reply
  81. I too read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance. I am sorry to say that though I finished it, I had trouble doing so. The central love story wasn’t very compelling and the plot (returning heir) is pretty common — and there are all those people to remember! My brain isn’t up to memorization these days. But as always her prose is impeccable.
    Kindle has grouped a bunch of old Marion Chesney Edwardians for a ridiculously low price and I’ve been reading those. They’re not much different from her regencies, actually, except the Edwardian era doesn’t seem as interesting, but as there are some I’d never read before, the collections were $3 each well spent.
    I reread Under Occupation by Alan Furst, which is one of his WW2 French Occupation novels. It wasn’t praised as much as some of his others, but I liked it, although I wonder (as I do with many regencies) why nobody seems to be concerned with reputation or birth control. Do practicalities spoil the fantasy?
    I have got to page 66 of War and Peace, which I find useful mostly because a few pages a day of that makes me eager to read other stuff.
    Other than that, I can’t come up with anything I have read that would be of interest to this group. It’s been a slow month.

    Reply
  82. I too read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance. I am sorry to say that though I finished it, I had trouble doing so. The central love story wasn’t very compelling and the plot (returning heir) is pretty common — and there are all those people to remember! My brain isn’t up to memorization these days. But as always her prose is impeccable.
    Kindle has grouped a bunch of old Marion Chesney Edwardians for a ridiculously low price and I’ve been reading those. They’re not much different from her regencies, actually, except the Edwardian era doesn’t seem as interesting, but as there are some I’d never read before, the collections were $3 each well spent.
    I reread Under Occupation by Alan Furst, which is one of his WW2 French Occupation novels. It wasn’t praised as much as some of his others, but I liked it, although I wonder (as I do with many regencies) why nobody seems to be concerned with reputation or birth control. Do practicalities spoil the fantasy?
    I have got to page 66 of War and Peace, which I find useful mostly because a few pages a day of that makes me eager to read other stuff.
    Other than that, I can’t come up with anything I have read that would be of interest to this group. It’s been a slow month.

    Reply
  83. I too read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance. I am sorry to say that though I finished it, I had trouble doing so. The central love story wasn’t very compelling and the plot (returning heir) is pretty common — and there are all those people to remember! My brain isn’t up to memorization these days. But as always her prose is impeccable.
    Kindle has grouped a bunch of old Marion Chesney Edwardians for a ridiculously low price and I’ve been reading those. They’re not much different from her regencies, actually, except the Edwardian era doesn’t seem as interesting, but as there are some I’d never read before, the collections were $3 each well spent.
    I reread Under Occupation by Alan Furst, which is one of his WW2 French Occupation novels. It wasn’t praised as much as some of his others, but I liked it, although I wonder (as I do with many regencies) why nobody seems to be concerned with reputation or birth control. Do practicalities spoil the fantasy?
    I have got to page 66 of War and Peace, which I find useful mostly because a few pages a day of that makes me eager to read other stuff.
    Other than that, I can’t come up with anything I have read that would be of interest to this group. It’s been a slow month.

    Reply
  84. I too read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance. I am sorry to say that though I finished it, I had trouble doing so. The central love story wasn’t very compelling and the plot (returning heir) is pretty common — and there are all those people to remember! My brain isn’t up to memorization these days. But as always her prose is impeccable.
    Kindle has grouped a bunch of old Marion Chesney Edwardians for a ridiculously low price and I’ve been reading those. They’re not much different from her regencies, actually, except the Edwardian era doesn’t seem as interesting, but as there are some I’d never read before, the collections were $3 each well spent.
    I reread Under Occupation by Alan Furst, which is one of his WW2 French Occupation novels. It wasn’t praised as much as some of his others, but I liked it, although I wonder (as I do with many regencies) why nobody seems to be concerned with reputation or birth control. Do practicalities spoil the fantasy?
    I have got to page 66 of War and Peace, which I find useful mostly because a few pages a day of that makes me eager to read other stuff.
    Other than that, I can’t come up with anything I have read that would be of interest to this group. It’s been a slow month.

    Reply
  85. I too read Mary Balogh’s Someone to Romance. I am sorry to say that though I finished it, I had trouble doing so. The central love story wasn’t very compelling and the plot (returning heir) is pretty common — and there are all those people to remember! My brain isn’t up to memorization these days. But as always her prose is impeccable.
    Kindle has grouped a bunch of old Marion Chesney Edwardians for a ridiculously low price and I’ve been reading those. They’re not much different from her regencies, actually, except the Edwardian era doesn’t seem as interesting, but as there are some I’d never read before, the collections were $3 each well spent.
    I reread Under Occupation by Alan Furst, which is one of his WW2 French Occupation novels. It wasn’t praised as much as some of his others, but I liked it, although I wonder (as I do with many regencies) why nobody seems to be concerned with reputation or birth control. Do practicalities spoil the fantasy?
    I have got to page 66 of War and Peace, which I find useful mostly because a few pages a day of that makes me eager to read other stuff.
    Other than that, I can’t come up with anything I have read that would be of interest to this group. It’s been a slow month.

    Reply

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