What We’re Reading

GirlwithKaleidoscopeEyesPat here:

 Starting off this month’s What We’re Reading blog with something a little different, The Girl with the Kaleidoscope Eyes by David Handler. 

This book is a murder mystery that made me grin, not because of silly hi-jinks but because of the author’s voice—or the protagonist’s voice since it’s in first person. It really needs to be read with tongue firmly in cheek. It’s set in the 1990s, when cell phones are huge clunky things, before the internet and social media. But the entire tone is gritty, cynical noir, as if it were an old time 1940’s film with James Cagney or Humphrey Bogart. The protagonist is a ghost writer for celebrities, one who once had a brilliant literary tome and could never write a second. So he talks cynically of literary and Hollywood agents, of his affairs with Hollywood and literary stars, gives sound advice to teenagers who never asked for it, and is—and I use this phrase in all its nuances—cocksure of himself. And while he’s doing all that talking, he’s solving a closed-door murder case.

For those of you who remember the 1970s, read this just for fun. He strews famous names, music, and film right and left. If you don’t remember the 70’s, read it anyway, and try to imagine seamy Hollywood without Twitter.

Anne here:

As usual, I've read quite a few books in the last month. Reading is, for me, an "unwind" activity that helps distract my mind and give it a break from the current story before I go to sleep, so TellWolvesHomeeven when I'm writing hard, I'm also powering through books. 

The standout read for me this month was Tell The Wolves I'm Home, by Carol Rifka Brunt — which isn't about wolves or even shape-shifters. It's a coming of age story set in New York in the 1980's, about a 14 year old girl whose beloved uncle is dying of a mysterious illness. (The reader soon realizes it's aids.) Sounds grim, I know, but it's wonderful. After his death, she begins to sort out what is truth and what is fable, and what is important in life. I read it on the BleakMidwinterrecommendation of a friend and have been urging people to read it ever since. 

I've also read a lot of crime novels this month. I finished the more lighthearted "bookbinder" series by Kate Carlisle that I mentioned last month. And then I went onto a series by Julia Spencer Fleming, starting with the first one, In the Bleak Midwinter. I liked it a lot, although I got annoyed with the heroine once or twice, but only in that first book. I read the second one and was hooked. I'm now up to book #8 in the series. The characterization is excellent and the plots are terrific. I would definitely read the books in order as things — relationships, characters, situations etc — develop through the series. The books are darker than the Kate Carlisle ones, but not too dark. If you like Louise Penny or Elly Griffiths, I think you'll enjoy these books too. 

 

Andrea:

I’ve been on a nerdy history reading phase lately. Having enjoyed American Eden so much (the story of David Hosack, early medicine in the U.S. and the founding of the country’s first botanical garden) I dove right in to The Promise of the Grand Canyon: John Wesley Powell's Perilous Journey and His Vision for the American West by John F. Ross. Don’t be intimidated by the long title—it’s not a dry, scholarly tome (though there’s clearly a great deal of scholarship The Promise of the Grand Canyonbehind the story.) Rather, it’s a really fascinating portrait of both a remarkable individual and the vast America West  as it changed from unexplored wilderness to an area that has shaped so many national debates to this day—who are we as a people and how do we treat our natural resources? Combining thrilling adventure as Powell and his fellow explorers make the first perilous journey through the Grand Canyon with a sensitive narrative of how Powell saw native peoples, the beauty of the landscape and the problems created by homesteading in a land that had precious little water, the book paints a compelling picture of late 19th century America and the clash between preservation and development. Readers also get a riveting look at what life was like west of the Mississippi as they follow Powell from a a mostly self-taught boy curious about the world around him to becoming a college professor, the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey, which helped map the West , and the first Head of Ethnology at the Smithsonian. An engaging and enlightening read.

For the current WIP in my Lady Arianna mystery series, I’ve also been reading some European history, albeit on the lighter side. Dancing Into Battle: A Social History to the Battle of Waterloo by Nick Foulkes is a highly entertaining look at the personalities (and peccadilloes) of the Allied forces gathered in Brussels as they frantically tried to cobble together a way to counter Napoleon’s reseizing of the French throne. From the prominent but penniless grand families who came to the city because it was far cheaper than living in London, to the various military Dancing into Battlecommanders, both competent and otherwise, it brings the British expatriate high society into sharp—sometimes too sharp—focus as they prepared for one of the great battles in history. (though as Wellington said it was “ . . . the nearest run thing you ever saw in your life.”) The love affairs, the hi-jinks—and of course Lady Richmond’s famous ball—come wonderfully alive. It’s a fun slice of history for any Regency aficionado.

 

Susan:

Thanks to Pat Rice's recommendation of Christina Lauren, I picked up one of her books—Roomies was a delight, start to finish. Holland has a mad crush on a talented, attractive subway busker–and when her uncle needs a skilled musician for his hit Broadway show, she suggests the mysterious guitarist, only to find out he's an Irishman whose Roomiesgreen card has expired. She agrees to marry him to save the show, while secretly ratcheting up her fantasy crush. Calvin is not just hot, Irish and brilliantly talented–he has a good heart. But as their faked relationship begins to feel real, Holland isn't sure if he's falling in love with her, or pretending just to stay on the Broadway stage. The story is clever, funny, touching, and intelligently crafted–and Christina and Lauren, a BFF writing duo, are gifted and smart writers. I loved it, and I'll be looking for more of their stories. 

I'm also reading Educated by Tara Westover—her intense and detailed memoir growing up as the youngest child of a Mormon fundamentalist and a natural healer, raised without a formal education, knowing very little of the world beyond their mountain. Desperately wanting an education, she teaches herself what she needs to know and enters a university at age 17—not even knowing what the Holocaust or a simple essay is—yet she makes it all the way to a PhD from Cambridge, and by the way, develops into a gifted writer. An astonishing book, powerful, beautifully written, compelling, it sharpens a focus on a determined, independent girl breaking away from a tough lifestyle that few of us can imagine, yet it exists just around the bend of the mountain. 

Mary Jo here:

 I have a certain fondness for royal romances–one of my very favorite books is To Marry a Prince by Sophia Page, which is based on an alternative line of descent from Regency Princess Charlotte instead of Queen Victoria.  A great read.

But Alyssa Cole takes a very different tack in A Princess in Theory .  Alyssa Cole  is a relatively PrincessInTheory.AlyssaCole new and extremely talented and versatile writer.  An African American, her first book was a Civil War espionage romance with a heroine who was a former slave and now spied for the Union, and a Pinkerton detective hero.  It won MASSES of awards and accolades!

A Princess in Theory is light-hearted and funny, but also addresses serious topics.  Naledi Smith was orphaned very young and grew up in the New York foster care system.  When we meet her, she is a very overworked graduate student in epidemiology and is barely scraping by even with two part time jobs. She does not have time for emails telling her she is betrothed to an African prince and please send scans of her passport, driver's license, and her social security number. Yeah, right! 

Except that she actually was betrothed as a toddler to Prince Thabiso of Thesolo, an African kingdom rather like the Wakanda of the Black Panther movie.  Since he has to be in New York on business, he decides to look her up. She's working at her part time waitress job, thinks he's the temporary help assigned, and he decides to go along with it because he likes the idea of being perceived as a regular person, not a prince.  And so the fun begins.  He is a terrible waiter. <G>  The overall shape of the romance is not unexpected, but the Cole's twists make this story unique and powerful as well as enjoyable. 

Joanna here, talking about a sort of fantasy, I suppose.

Lost in a Good Book is the volume you want transformed into a person and seated on your right at a long diplomatic dinner when the person on your left side needs to speak at length and privately to the Plavotkin Underminister for Finance. Like a good diplomat – or, really, any excellent companion over dinner – Lost is cynical, intelligent, and funny.

Lost in a good bookLost brings us the second installment in the adventures of Thursday Next, intrepid Time Agent and paradox wrangler extraordinaire.  It’s sneakiness and brains versus The Powers of Evil and the somewhat more ubiquitous Powers of Obnoxious Greed. It is, in short, a Book For Our Times.

Lost is Book Two of Seven in Jasper Fforde’s series. Other Word Wenches have recommended these, but not just recently, so here I am doing it again. Lost is neither the first nor the most recent of Fforde’s excellent books, but it's the one I just reread and I want to hold the whole set up and wave it around so everyone can see it.

Really, you should probably read The Eyre Affair first.

 

~~~~~~

So now the wenches are waiting impatiently—what joy have you found in books lately?

115 thoughts on “What We’re Reading”

  1. Tonight’s read was Once a Scoundrel by Mary Jo Putney, which I found very entertaining, and not forgetting Spook the ship’s rodent control officer.
    Of late I’ve not been reading much of interest to anybody here, I think, but I did read Belgravia by Julian Fellowes, which starts at the Duchess of Richmond’s ball and (for good and ill) has much of the Downton Abbey flavor to it. I also ran across a romance by Mary V. Garratt called The Duchess of Asherwood, which was rather odd. It was done pre-internet and I could find nothing definitive about the author; she seems to have done only two regencies, this book and a sequel, and I am curious about her and some of the slang she used. Maybe someone in this crowd knows something of her.

    Reply
  2. Tonight’s read was Once a Scoundrel by Mary Jo Putney, which I found very entertaining, and not forgetting Spook the ship’s rodent control officer.
    Of late I’ve not been reading much of interest to anybody here, I think, but I did read Belgravia by Julian Fellowes, which starts at the Duchess of Richmond’s ball and (for good and ill) has much of the Downton Abbey flavor to it. I also ran across a romance by Mary V. Garratt called The Duchess of Asherwood, which was rather odd. It was done pre-internet and I could find nothing definitive about the author; she seems to have done only two regencies, this book and a sequel, and I am curious about her and some of the slang she used. Maybe someone in this crowd knows something of her.

    Reply
  3. Tonight’s read was Once a Scoundrel by Mary Jo Putney, which I found very entertaining, and not forgetting Spook the ship’s rodent control officer.
    Of late I’ve not been reading much of interest to anybody here, I think, but I did read Belgravia by Julian Fellowes, which starts at the Duchess of Richmond’s ball and (for good and ill) has much of the Downton Abbey flavor to it. I also ran across a romance by Mary V. Garratt called The Duchess of Asherwood, which was rather odd. It was done pre-internet and I could find nothing definitive about the author; she seems to have done only two regencies, this book and a sequel, and I am curious about her and some of the slang she used. Maybe someone in this crowd knows something of her.

    Reply
  4. Tonight’s read was Once a Scoundrel by Mary Jo Putney, which I found very entertaining, and not forgetting Spook the ship’s rodent control officer.
    Of late I’ve not been reading much of interest to anybody here, I think, but I did read Belgravia by Julian Fellowes, which starts at the Duchess of Richmond’s ball and (for good and ill) has much of the Downton Abbey flavor to it. I also ran across a romance by Mary V. Garratt called The Duchess of Asherwood, which was rather odd. It was done pre-internet and I could find nothing definitive about the author; she seems to have done only two regencies, this book and a sequel, and I am curious about her and some of the slang she used. Maybe someone in this crowd knows something of her.

    Reply
  5. Tonight’s read was Once a Scoundrel by Mary Jo Putney, which I found very entertaining, and not forgetting Spook the ship’s rodent control officer.
    Of late I’ve not been reading much of interest to anybody here, I think, but I did read Belgravia by Julian Fellowes, which starts at the Duchess of Richmond’s ball and (for good and ill) has much of the Downton Abbey flavor to it. I also ran across a romance by Mary V. Garratt called The Duchess of Asherwood, which was rather odd. It was done pre-internet and I could find nothing definitive about the author; she seems to have done only two regencies, this book and a sequel, and I am curious about her and some of the slang she used. Maybe someone in this crowd knows something of her.

    Reply
  6. If I remember correctly, Mary A. Garratt died after writing just those two books. I’ve never run across the sequel but now that I know it is a hardback I’ll try watching for it at the next library sale. You never know… I’ve had the Duchess of Asherwood for years and it is one of the books I wouldn’t be able to give up because it is a fun story.
    As for what I’ve read….Nothing is a stand out book. Though I did just get the Georgette Heyer biography by Jennifer Kloester. Having only read 16 pages I don’t think it really counts for September!

    Reply
  7. If I remember correctly, Mary A. Garratt died after writing just those two books. I’ve never run across the sequel but now that I know it is a hardback I’ll try watching for it at the next library sale. You never know… I’ve had the Duchess of Asherwood for years and it is one of the books I wouldn’t be able to give up because it is a fun story.
    As for what I’ve read….Nothing is a stand out book. Though I did just get the Georgette Heyer biography by Jennifer Kloester. Having only read 16 pages I don’t think it really counts for September!

    Reply
  8. If I remember correctly, Mary A. Garratt died after writing just those two books. I’ve never run across the sequel but now that I know it is a hardback I’ll try watching for it at the next library sale. You never know… I’ve had the Duchess of Asherwood for years and it is one of the books I wouldn’t be able to give up because it is a fun story.
    As for what I’ve read….Nothing is a stand out book. Though I did just get the Georgette Heyer biography by Jennifer Kloester. Having only read 16 pages I don’t think it really counts for September!

    Reply
  9. If I remember correctly, Mary A. Garratt died after writing just those two books. I’ve never run across the sequel but now that I know it is a hardback I’ll try watching for it at the next library sale. You never know… I’ve had the Duchess of Asherwood for years and it is one of the books I wouldn’t be able to give up because it is a fun story.
    As for what I’ve read….Nothing is a stand out book. Though I did just get the Georgette Heyer biography by Jennifer Kloester. Having only read 16 pages I don’t think it really counts for September!

    Reply
  10. If I remember correctly, Mary A. Garratt died after writing just those two books. I’ve never run across the sequel but now that I know it is a hardback I’ll try watching for it at the next library sale. You never know… I’ve had the Duchess of Asherwood for years and it is one of the books I wouldn’t be able to give up because it is a fun story.
    As for what I’ve read….Nothing is a stand out book. Though I did just get the Georgette Heyer biography by Jennifer Kloester. Having only read 16 pages I don’t think it really counts for September!

    Reply
  11. Wasn’t Scoundrel marvelous? I don’t know how she does it-so simple but so emotional!
    And I think your suggestions will probably appeal to quite a few people. It’s finding the time to hunt them down and read them that’s my problem. I’m sorry, though, I don’t recognize Mary Garratt at all!

    Reply
  12. Wasn’t Scoundrel marvelous? I don’t know how she does it-so simple but so emotional!
    And I think your suggestions will probably appeal to quite a few people. It’s finding the time to hunt them down and read them that’s my problem. I’m sorry, though, I don’t recognize Mary Garratt at all!

    Reply
  13. Wasn’t Scoundrel marvelous? I don’t know how she does it-so simple but so emotional!
    And I think your suggestions will probably appeal to quite a few people. It’s finding the time to hunt them down and read them that’s my problem. I’m sorry, though, I don’t recognize Mary Garratt at all!

    Reply
  14. Wasn’t Scoundrel marvelous? I don’t know how she does it-so simple but so emotional!
    And I think your suggestions will probably appeal to quite a few people. It’s finding the time to hunt them down and read them that’s my problem. I’m sorry, though, I don’t recognize Mary Garratt at all!

    Reply
  15. Wasn’t Scoundrel marvelous? I don’t know how she does it-so simple but so emotional!
    And I think your suggestions will probably appeal to quite a few people. It’s finding the time to hunt them down and read them that’s my problem. I’m sorry, though, I don’t recognize Mary Garratt at all!

    Reply
  16. It seems there will be one more book in the series, Call It Magic and according to Goodreads, the expected publication date will be January 4th 2019.

    Reply
  17. It seems there will be one more book in the series, Call It Magic and according to Goodreads, the expected publication date will be January 4th 2019.

    Reply
  18. It seems there will be one more book in the series, Call It Magic and according to Goodreads, the expected publication date will be January 4th 2019.

    Reply
  19. It seems there will be one more book in the series, Call It Magic and according to Goodreads, the expected publication date will be January 4th 2019.

    Reply
  20. It seems there will be one more book in the series, Call It Magic and according to Goodreads, the expected publication date will be January 4th 2019.

    Reply
  21. Oh YAY….I’ve been watching and watching to see if they were going to be able to finish that book. Will go looking on Amazon… Love all her books and end up re-reading them every 12 to 18 months.

    Reply
  22. Oh YAY….I’ve been watching and watching to see if they were going to be able to finish that book. Will go looking on Amazon… Love all her books and end up re-reading them every 12 to 18 months.

    Reply
  23. Oh YAY….I’ve been watching and watching to see if they were going to be able to finish that book. Will go looking on Amazon… Love all her books and end up re-reading them every 12 to 18 months.

    Reply
  24. Oh YAY….I’ve been watching and watching to see if they were going to be able to finish that book. Will go looking on Amazon… Love all her books and end up re-reading them every 12 to 18 months.

    Reply
  25. Oh YAY….I’ve been watching and watching to see if they were going to be able to finish that book. Will go looking on Amazon… Love all her books and end up re-reading them every 12 to 18 months.

    Reply
  26. That would explain why there were just the two Garratt books then. Now I want to know where she got some of her slang usages and what her sources were. I did find reference to a Mary Garratt Besant who was married to a Victorian history author considered an expert on the 18th century
    . It makes me wonder if this Mary Garratt inherited some old family papers from that Mary Garratt (we know this almost always happens because so many historical authors use that as their takeoff point!)

    Reply
  27. That would explain why there were just the two Garratt books then. Now I want to know where she got some of her slang usages and what her sources were. I did find reference to a Mary Garratt Besant who was married to a Victorian history author considered an expert on the 18th century
    . It makes me wonder if this Mary Garratt inherited some old family papers from that Mary Garratt (we know this almost always happens because so many historical authors use that as their takeoff point!)

    Reply
  28. That would explain why there were just the two Garratt books then. Now I want to know where she got some of her slang usages and what her sources were. I did find reference to a Mary Garratt Besant who was married to a Victorian history author considered an expert on the 18th century
    . It makes me wonder if this Mary Garratt inherited some old family papers from that Mary Garratt (we know this almost always happens because so many historical authors use that as their takeoff point!)

    Reply
  29. That would explain why there were just the two Garratt books then. Now I want to know where she got some of her slang usages and what her sources were. I did find reference to a Mary Garratt Besant who was married to a Victorian history author considered an expert on the 18th century
    . It makes me wonder if this Mary Garratt inherited some old family papers from that Mary Garratt (we know this almost always happens because so many historical authors use that as their takeoff point!)

    Reply
  30. That would explain why there were just the two Garratt books then. Now I want to know where she got some of her slang usages and what her sources were. I did find reference to a Mary Garratt Besant who was married to a Victorian history author considered an expert on the 18th century
    . It makes me wonder if this Mary Garratt inherited some old family papers from that Mary Garratt (we know this almost always happens because so many historical authors use that as their takeoff point!)

    Reply
  31. I think Amazon may be glitching. It’s been doing that a lot lately. I put the title and author name in the search screen and it goes to a page, then it reverts to someone else’s book. And now it’s frozen.

    Reply
  32. I think Amazon may be glitching. It’s been doing that a lot lately. I put the title and author name in the search screen and it goes to a page, then it reverts to someone else’s book. And now it’s frozen.

    Reply
  33. I think Amazon may be glitching. It’s been doing that a lot lately. I put the title and author name in the search screen and it goes to a page, then it reverts to someone else’s book. And now it’s frozen.

    Reply
  34. I think Amazon may be glitching. It’s been doing that a lot lately. I put the title and author name in the search screen and it goes to a page, then it reverts to someone else’s book. And now it’s frozen.

    Reply
  35. I think Amazon may be glitching. It’s been doing that a lot lately. I put the title and author name in the search screen and it goes to a page, then it reverts to someone else’s book. And now it’s frozen.

    Reply
  36. Glad you like the Julia Spenser Fleming series Anne. I loved them. I’ve been in a reading slump (ridiculous really, since I have so many unread books on my Kindke) so I’m re-reading Loretta Chase’s Carsington Brothers. Such fun.

    Reply
  37. Glad you like the Julia Spenser Fleming series Anne. I loved them. I’ve been in a reading slump (ridiculous really, since I have so many unread books on my Kindke) so I’m re-reading Loretta Chase’s Carsington Brothers. Such fun.

    Reply
  38. Glad you like the Julia Spenser Fleming series Anne. I loved them. I’ve been in a reading slump (ridiculous really, since I have so many unread books on my Kindke) so I’m re-reading Loretta Chase’s Carsington Brothers. Such fun.

    Reply
  39. Glad you like the Julia Spenser Fleming series Anne. I loved them. I’ve been in a reading slump (ridiculous really, since I have so many unread books on my Kindke) so I’m re-reading Loretta Chase’s Carsington Brothers. Such fun.

    Reply
  40. Glad you like the Julia Spenser Fleming series Anne. I loved them. I’ve been in a reading slump (ridiculous really, since I have so many unread books on my Kindke) so I’m re-reading Loretta Chase’s Carsington Brothers. Such fun.

    Reply
  41. I read Charles Todd’s latest Bess Crawford book,A Forgotten Place. I really love these books and am curious about where they’re going to take Bess now that WWI is over.
    Then I got Rebel Hard by Nalini Singh which was amusing and interesting because the h/h are New Zealanders of Indian origin.

    Reply
  42. I read Charles Todd’s latest Bess Crawford book,A Forgotten Place. I really love these books and am curious about where they’re going to take Bess now that WWI is over.
    Then I got Rebel Hard by Nalini Singh which was amusing and interesting because the h/h are New Zealanders of Indian origin.

    Reply
  43. I read Charles Todd’s latest Bess Crawford book,A Forgotten Place. I really love these books and am curious about where they’re going to take Bess now that WWI is over.
    Then I got Rebel Hard by Nalini Singh which was amusing and interesting because the h/h are New Zealanders of Indian origin.

    Reply
  44. I read Charles Todd’s latest Bess Crawford book,A Forgotten Place. I really love these books and am curious about where they’re going to take Bess now that WWI is over.
    Then I got Rebel Hard by Nalini Singh which was amusing and interesting because the h/h are New Zealanders of Indian origin.

    Reply
  45. I read Charles Todd’s latest Bess Crawford book,A Forgotten Place. I really love these books and am curious about where they’re going to take Bess now that WWI is over.
    Then I got Rebel Hard by Nalini Singh which was amusing and interesting because the h/h are New Zealanders of Indian origin.

    Reply
  46. Only two new books this month: Mary Jo’s Once a Scoundrel and Pat’s The Wedding Gift. I thoroughly enjoyed both.
    I’m struggling to make sense of my DNA tests in reference to genealogy. I’m being overwhelmed by data but under connected through the contact mechanics. I doubt that I’ll be reading much new fiction until I learn my way through this particular forest.

    Reply
  47. Only two new books this month: Mary Jo’s Once a Scoundrel and Pat’s The Wedding Gift. I thoroughly enjoyed both.
    I’m struggling to make sense of my DNA tests in reference to genealogy. I’m being overwhelmed by data but under connected through the contact mechanics. I doubt that I’ll be reading much new fiction until I learn my way through this particular forest.

    Reply
  48. Only two new books this month: Mary Jo’s Once a Scoundrel and Pat’s The Wedding Gift. I thoroughly enjoyed both.
    I’m struggling to make sense of my DNA tests in reference to genealogy. I’m being overwhelmed by data but under connected through the contact mechanics. I doubt that I’ll be reading much new fiction until I learn my way through this particular forest.

    Reply
  49. Only two new books this month: Mary Jo’s Once a Scoundrel and Pat’s The Wedding Gift. I thoroughly enjoyed both.
    I’m struggling to make sense of my DNA tests in reference to genealogy. I’m being overwhelmed by data but under connected through the contact mechanics. I doubt that I’ll be reading much new fiction until I learn my way through this particular forest.

    Reply
  50. Only two new books this month: Mary Jo’s Once a Scoundrel and Pat’s The Wedding Gift. I thoroughly enjoyed both.
    I’m struggling to make sense of my DNA tests in reference to genealogy. I’m being overwhelmed by data but under connected through the contact mechanics. I doubt that I’ll be reading much new fiction until I learn my way through this particular forest.

    Reply
  51. Feeling in need of a bit of consolation, I started rereading Jo Beverley’s An Unlikely Countess. It’s one of my favorites of her books, thought I’m not sure why. I think it’s because I really like the hero and heroine, Cate and Prudence. But I think really liking the characters is why any book is a favorite, and why we don’t all have the same favorite books. After all, we don’t all like the same people—thank goodness. Imagine if everyone wanted to marry the same person.

    Reply
  52. Feeling in need of a bit of consolation, I started rereading Jo Beverley’s An Unlikely Countess. It’s one of my favorites of her books, thought I’m not sure why. I think it’s because I really like the hero and heroine, Cate and Prudence. But I think really liking the characters is why any book is a favorite, and why we don’t all have the same favorite books. After all, we don’t all like the same people—thank goodness. Imagine if everyone wanted to marry the same person.

    Reply
  53. Feeling in need of a bit of consolation, I started rereading Jo Beverley’s An Unlikely Countess. It’s one of my favorites of her books, thought I’m not sure why. I think it’s because I really like the hero and heroine, Cate and Prudence. But I think really liking the characters is why any book is a favorite, and why we don’t all have the same favorite books. After all, we don’t all like the same people—thank goodness. Imagine if everyone wanted to marry the same person.

    Reply
  54. Feeling in need of a bit of consolation, I started rereading Jo Beverley’s An Unlikely Countess. It’s one of my favorites of her books, thought I’m not sure why. I think it’s because I really like the hero and heroine, Cate and Prudence. But I think really liking the characters is why any book is a favorite, and why we don’t all have the same favorite books. After all, we don’t all like the same people—thank goodness. Imagine if everyone wanted to marry the same person.

    Reply
  55. Feeling in need of a bit of consolation, I started rereading Jo Beverley’s An Unlikely Countess. It’s one of my favorites of her books, thought I’m not sure why. I think it’s because I really like the hero and heroine, Cate and Prudence. But I think really liking the characters is why any book is a favorite, and why we don’t all have the same favorite books. After all, we don’t all like the same people—thank goodness. Imagine if everyone wanted to marry the same person.

    Reply
  56. I have Call it Magic on Goodreads marked as “want to read”. At least I’ll be able to find it there until it’s actually available on Amazon or somewhere else.

    Reply
  57. I have Call it Magic on Goodreads marked as “want to read”. At least I’ll be able to find it there until it’s actually available on Amazon or somewhere else.

    Reply
  58. I have Call it Magic on Goodreads marked as “want to read”. At least I’ll be able to find it there until it’s actually available on Amazon or somewhere else.

    Reply
  59. I have Call it Magic on Goodreads marked as “want to read”. At least I’ll be able to find it there until it’s actually available on Amazon or somewhere else.

    Reply
  60. I have Call it Magic on Goodreads marked as “want to read”. At least I’ll be able to find it there until it’s actually available on Amazon or somewhere else.

    Reply
  61. LOL on everyone wanting to marry the same person! That’s a good observation. And I think certain situations appeal to different people. I find marrying a prince or billionaire a big yawn, but show me a poor person working his way to the big time, and I’m all over it.

    Reply
  62. LOL on everyone wanting to marry the same person! That’s a good observation. And I think certain situations appeal to different people. I find marrying a prince or billionaire a big yawn, but show me a poor person working his way to the big time, and I’m all over it.

    Reply
  63. LOL on everyone wanting to marry the same person! That’s a good observation. And I think certain situations appeal to different people. I find marrying a prince or billionaire a big yawn, but show me a poor person working his way to the big time, and I’m all over it.

    Reply
  64. LOL on everyone wanting to marry the same person! That’s a good observation. And I think certain situations appeal to different people. I find marrying a prince or billionaire a big yawn, but show me a poor person working his way to the big time, and I’m all over it.

    Reply
  65. LOL on everyone wanting to marry the same person! That’s a good observation. And I think certain situations appeal to different people. I find marrying a prince or billionaire a big yawn, but show me a poor person working his way to the big time, and I’m all over it.

    Reply
  66. I’ve read and enjoyed a number of the books that you mentioned in your monthly round-up and have added a couple to my library hold list.
    Lots of reading here in the past month ~
    — Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad for my book group. I found it a dismal story which likely means that the author did a good job. My group had a lively discussion.
    — Leta Blake’s Any Given Lifetime which I quite enjoyed despite the story aspects that strained credulity. It’s a male/male romance with a reincarnation theme. I’ll likely re-read it.
    — Jackie North’s Heroes for Ghosts: A Love Across Time Story. This was (surprise!) a time travel romance set in WWI era and present day France featuring a student of history working on his thesis and a doughboy (an American soldier). I have a fondness for time travel stories, and I enjoyed this one despite having a few quibbles. It’s the first in a time travel series by the author and I look forward to reading the next book which features different characters.
    — Would it Be Okay to Love You? by Amy Tasukada which was a pleasant m/m story set in Japan featuring two very different characters: a voice actor and an accountant (a salaryman). I thought the story did well at giving a sense of place through food, celebrations, even bathing. That said, I don’t have an interest in continuing the series.
    — two books that the authors describe as “…essentially Regency Romances set on alien world — Space Regencies, if you will, and our bow to Georgette Heyer ….” They are set in what is known as the Liaden Universe; I enjoyed them both. They are Local Custom and Scout’s Progress.
    — One of my favorite series last year was a science fiction trilogy by author (a pair of Australian sisters) S. K. Dunstall, so I’d been eagerly anticipating their new book which I read with pleasure. Now I get to look forward to the next book. This book is set in a totally different universe from that of the first trilogy, but it is equally intriguing. It’s Stars Uncharted by S. K. Dunstall.
    — I was then inspired to go back and re-read Dunstall’s earlier trilogy. I enjoyed re-reading Linesman, Alliance, and Confluence. Fans of Patricia Briggs might be interested to know that these books have her recommendation.
    — read Idyll Threats: A Thomas Lynch Novel by Stephanie Gayle which was a mystery which I enjoyed. It’s the first in a series, and I plan to continue on.
    — also read Fields of Gold (Tarnished Souls Book 2) by Dev Bentham which was a pleasant m/m contemporary romance.
    — read an enjoyable children’s book with lovely illustrations, The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet.
    — I read Anna Butler’s book Gyrfalcon (Taking Shield Book 1) (which is currently free for Kindle readers). I’d classify it as futuristic military science fiction. I enjoyed this book and will happily read on.
    — I also read Seasonal Sentiments: NineStar Press 2016 Holiday Stories which introduced me to many new authors. As with all anthologies, some stories appealed more than others. I particularly liked Stone and Shell by Lloyd A. Meeker, Hearts Alight by Elliot Cooper, Ibiza on Ice by Gillian St. Kevern, and A Christmas for Oscar by Alex Whitehall
    — I read the novella Different Names for the Same Thing by Francis Gideon. This featured a writer pre- and post-transition and his connection with a fan both in the current day and five years earlier.
    — I read E.M. Lindsey’s Time and Tide. The story begins in 1890s Baltimore and features William, an American with an exceedingly domineering mother, and Theodore, an author and Frenchman who has almost no vision. I didn’t care for the book initially as William, a new lawyer, is bullied by his mother into marriage and into defending a wealthy criminal. Ultimately, I grew to enjoy the book though certain events strained credulity.
    — I also re-read Dev Bentham’s Learning from Isaac (Tarnished Souls Book 1) which I enjoyed once again.
    — Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Spite (The Doyle & Acton murder series Book 8). This mystery, unlike the first seven, primarily takes place in Dublin. This series should definitely be read in order; if interested, start with Murder in Thrall.
    — (hmm, another book eight though it’s actually the third in this 20 plus book series that I’ve read) Conflict of Honors (Liaden Universe Book 8) by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. The author note I read says this book is their tribute to “Peter Wimsey, who did what duty demanded, and was never afraid to cry.” [That might mean more to me had I ever read books with Peter Wimsey!] Nonetheless, I enjoyed the book and may read more Liaden Universe books at some point.
    — enjoyed Jackie North’s time travel romance Honey From the Lion: A Love Across Time Story. Admittedly, it did leave me with some questions for example, I can’t figure out the significance of the title (though I believe it’s biblical). Unlike the last book I read by this author, here a character travels back in time rather than forward.
    — Sight Unseen by Hunter Raines. I had a few quibbles with the characters and storyline in this male/male romance, but overall I enjoyed it.
    — High Lonesome by Tanya Chris was an enjoyable story (currently FREE for Kindle readers) that featured three men – Joe, Pyotr, and Tanner. Most of the story takes place in a high altitude hut on a mountain during a snowstorm. There’s Joe (the hut attendant), Tanner (an addict who is on the verge of committing treason), and Pyotr (who is a Russian agent or maybe CIA or ….) This has a suspense element as well as a three way romance.
    — quite enjoyed The Music of the Spheres by Chase Potter which showed the relationship of Ryan and Adam who first connected due to a high school assignment. They become friends and then move to a deeper attachment over the course of years. The reader also gets to know Ryan’s father and sister. Expect to cry if you read this.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance ~ The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang. I’ll likely re-read this at some point.
    — enjoyed the London set male/male mystery ~ Pressure Head (The Plumber’s Mate Book 1) by JL Merrow. I hope to read more in this series.

    Reply
  67. I’ve read and enjoyed a number of the books that you mentioned in your monthly round-up and have added a couple to my library hold list.
    Lots of reading here in the past month ~
    — Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad for my book group. I found it a dismal story which likely means that the author did a good job. My group had a lively discussion.
    — Leta Blake’s Any Given Lifetime which I quite enjoyed despite the story aspects that strained credulity. It’s a male/male romance with a reincarnation theme. I’ll likely re-read it.
    — Jackie North’s Heroes for Ghosts: A Love Across Time Story. This was (surprise!) a time travel romance set in WWI era and present day France featuring a student of history working on his thesis and a doughboy (an American soldier). I have a fondness for time travel stories, and I enjoyed this one despite having a few quibbles. It’s the first in a time travel series by the author and I look forward to reading the next book which features different characters.
    — Would it Be Okay to Love You? by Amy Tasukada which was a pleasant m/m story set in Japan featuring two very different characters: a voice actor and an accountant (a salaryman). I thought the story did well at giving a sense of place through food, celebrations, even bathing. That said, I don’t have an interest in continuing the series.
    — two books that the authors describe as “…essentially Regency Romances set on alien world — Space Regencies, if you will, and our bow to Georgette Heyer ….” They are set in what is known as the Liaden Universe; I enjoyed them both. They are Local Custom and Scout’s Progress.
    — One of my favorite series last year was a science fiction trilogy by author (a pair of Australian sisters) S. K. Dunstall, so I’d been eagerly anticipating their new book which I read with pleasure. Now I get to look forward to the next book. This book is set in a totally different universe from that of the first trilogy, but it is equally intriguing. It’s Stars Uncharted by S. K. Dunstall.
    — I was then inspired to go back and re-read Dunstall’s earlier trilogy. I enjoyed re-reading Linesman, Alliance, and Confluence. Fans of Patricia Briggs might be interested to know that these books have her recommendation.
    — read Idyll Threats: A Thomas Lynch Novel by Stephanie Gayle which was a mystery which I enjoyed. It’s the first in a series, and I plan to continue on.
    — also read Fields of Gold (Tarnished Souls Book 2) by Dev Bentham which was a pleasant m/m contemporary romance.
    — read an enjoyable children’s book with lovely illustrations, The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet.
    — I read Anna Butler’s book Gyrfalcon (Taking Shield Book 1) (which is currently free for Kindle readers). I’d classify it as futuristic military science fiction. I enjoyed this book and will happily read on.
    — I also read Seasonal Sentiments: NineStar Press 2016 Holiday Stories which introduced me to many new authors. As with all anthologies, some stories appealed more than others. I particularly liked Stone and Shell by Lloyd A. Meeker, Hearts Alight by Elliot Cooper, Ibiza on Ice by Gillian St. Kevern, and A Christmas for Oscar by Alex Whitehall
    — I read the novella Different Names for the Same Thing by Francis Gideon. This featured a writer pre- and post-transition and his connection with a fan both in the current day and five years earlier.
    — I read E.M. Lindsey’s Time and Tide. The story begins in 1890s Baltimore and features William, an American with an exceedingly domineering mother, and Theodore, an author and Frenchman who has almost no vision. I didn’t care for the book initially as William, a new lawyer, is bullied by his mother into marriage and into defending a wealthy criminal. Ultimately, I grew to enjoy the book though certain events strained credulity.
    — I also re-read Dev Bentham’s Learning from Isaac (Tarnished Souls Book 1) which I enjoyed once again.
    — Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Spite (The Doyle & Acton murder series Book 8). This mystery, unlike the first seven, primarily takes place in Dublin. This series should definitely be read in order; if interested, start with Murder in Thrall.
    — (hmm, another book eight though it’s actually the third in this 20 plus book series that I’ve read) Conflict of Honors (Liaden Universe Book 8) by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. The author note I read says this book is their tribute to “Peter Wimsey, who did what duty demanded, and was never afraid to cry.” [That might mean more to me had I ever read books with Peter Wimsey!] Nonetheless, I enjoyed the book and may read more Liaden Universe books at some point.
    — enjoyed Jackie North’s time travel romance Honey From the Lion: A Love Across Time Story. Admittedly, it did leave me with some questions for example, I can’t figure out the significance of the title (though I believe it’s biblical). Unlike the last book I read by this author, here a character travels back in time rather than forward.
    — Sight Unseen by Hunter Raines. I had a few quibbles with the characters and storyline in this male/male romance, but overall I enjoyed it.
    — High Lonesome by Tanya Chris was an enjoyable story (currently FREE for Kindle readers) that featured three men – Joe, Pyotr, and Tanner. Most of the story takes place in a high altitude hut on a mountain during a snowstorm. There’s Joe (the hut attendant), Tanner (an addict who is on the verge of committing treason), and Pyotr (who is a Russian agent or maybe CIA or ….) This has a suspense element as well as a three way romance.
    — quite enjoyed The Music of the Spheres by Chase Potter which showed the relationship of Ryan and Adam who first connected due to a high school assignment. They become friends and then move to a deeper attachment over the course of years. The reader also gets to know Ryan’s father and sister. Expect to cry if you read this.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance ~ The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang. I’ll likely re-read this at some point.
    — enjoyed the London set male/male mystery ~ Pressure Head (The Plumber’s Mate Book 1) by JL Merrow. I hope to read more in this series.

    Reply
  68. I’ve read and enjoyed a number of the books that you mentioned in your monthly round-up and have added a couple to my library hold list.
    Lots of reading here in the past month ~
    — Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad for my book group. I found it a dismal story which likely means that the author did a good job. My group had a lively discussion.
    — Leta Blake’s Any Given Lifetime which I quite enjoyed despite the story aspects that strained credulity. It’s a male/male romance with a reincarnation theme. I’ll likely re-read it.
    — Jackie North’s Heroes for Ghosts: A Love Across Time Story. This was (surprise!) a time travel romance set in WWI era and present day France featuring a student of history working on his thesis and a doughboy (an American soldier). I have a fondness for time travel stories, and I enjoyed this one despite having a few quibbles. It’s the first in a time travel series by the author and I look forward to reading the next book which features different characters.
    — Would it Be Okay to Love You? by Amy Tasukada which was a pleasant m/m story set in Japan featuring two very different characters: a voice actor and an accountant (a salaryman). I thought the story did well at giving a sense of place through food, celebrations, even bathing. That said, I don’t have an interest in continuing the series.
    — two books that the authors describe as “…essentially Regency Romances set on alien world — Space Regencies, if you will, and our bow to Georgette Heyer ….” They are set in what is known as the Liaden Universe; I enjoyed them both. They are Local Custom and Scout’s Progress.
    — One of my favorite series last year was a science fiction trilogy by author (a pair of Australian sisters) S. K. Dunstall, so I’d been eagerly anticipating their new book which I read with pleasure. Now I get to look forward to the next book. This book is set in a totally different universe from that of the first trilogy, but it is equally intriguing. It’s Stars Uncharted by S. K. Dunstall.
    — I was then inspired to go back and re-read Dunstall’s earlier trilogy. I enjoyed re-reading Linesman, Alliance, and Confluence. Fans of Patricia Briggs might be interested to know that these books have her recommendation.
    — read Idyll Threats: A Thomas Lynch Novel by Stephanie Gayle which was a mystery which I enjoyed. It’s the first in a series, and I plan to continue on.
    — also read Fields of Gold (Tarnished Souls Book 2) by Dev Bentham which was a pleasant m/m contemporary romance.
    — read an enjoyable children’s book with lovely illustrations, The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet.
    — I read Anna Butler’s book Gyrfalcon (Taking Shield Book 1) (which is currently free for Kindle readers). I’d classify it as futuristic military science fiction. I enjoyed this book and will happily read on.
    — I also read Seasonal Sentiments: NineStar Press 2016 Holiday Stories which introduced me to many new authors. As with all anthologies, some stories appealed more than others. I particularly liked Stone and Shell by Lloyd A. Meeker, Hearts Alight by Elliot Cooper, Ibiza on Ice by Gillian St. Kevern, and A Christmas for Oscar by Alex Whitehall
    — I read the novella Different Names for the Same Thing by Francis Gideon. This featured a writer pre- and post-transition and his connection with a fan both in the current day and five years earlier.
    — I read E.M. Lindsey’s Time and Tide. The story begins in 1890s Baltimore and features William, an American with an exceedingly domineering mother, and Theodore, an author and Frenchman who has almost no vision. I didn’t care for the book initially as William, a new lawyer, is bullied by his mother into marriage and into defending a wealthy criminal. Ultimately, I grew to enjoy the book though certain events strained credulity.
    — I also re-read Dev Bentham’s Learning from Isaac (Tarnished Souls Book 1) which I enjoyed once again.
    — Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Spite (The Doyle & Acton murder series Book 8). This mystery, unlike the first seven, primarily takes place in Dublin. This series should definitely be read in order; if interested, start with Murder in Thrall.
    — (hmm, another book eight though it’s actually the third in this 20 plus book series that I’ve read) Conflict of Honors (Liaden Universe Book 8) by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. The author note I read says this book is their tribute to “Peter Wimsey, who did what duty demanded, and was never afraid to cry.” [That might mean more to me had I ever read books with Peter Wimsey!] Nonetheless, I enjoyed the book and may read more Liaden Universe books at some point.
    — enjoyed Jackie North’s time travel romance Honey From the Lion: A Love Across Time Story. Admittedly, it did leave me with some questions for example, I can’t figure out the significance of the title (though I believe it’s biblical). Unlike the last book I read by this author, here a character travels back in time rather than forward.
    — Sight Unseen by Hunter Raines. I had a few quibbles with the characters and storyline in this male/male romance, but overall I enjoyed it.
    — High Lonesome by Tanya Chris was an enjoyable story (currently FREE for Kindle readers) that featured three men – Joe, Pyotr, and Tanner. Most of the story takes place in a high altitude hut on a mountain during a snowstorm. There’s Joe (the hut attendant), Tanner (an addict who is on the verge of committing treason), and Pyotr (who is a Russian agent or maybe CIA or ….) This has a suspense element as well as a three way romance.
    — quite enjoyed The Music of the Spheres by Chase Potter which showed the relationship of Ryan and Adam who first connected due to a high school assignment. They become friends and then move to a deeper attachment over the course of years. The reader also gets to know Ryan’s father and sister. Expect to cry if you read this.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance ~ The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang. I’ll likely re-read this at some point.
    — enjoyed the London set male/male mystery ~ Pressure Head (The Plumber’s Mate Book 1) by JL Merrow. I hope to read more in this series.

    Reply
  69. I’ve read and enjoyed a number of the books that you mentioned in your monthly round-up and have added a couple to my library hold list.
    Lots of reading here in the past month ~
    — Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad for my book group. I found it a dismal story which likely means that the author did a good job. My group had a lively discussion.
    — Leta Blake’s Any Given Lifetime which I quite enjoyed despite the story aspects that strained credulity. It’s a male/male romance with a reincarnation theme. I’ll likely re-read it.
    — Jackie North’s Heroes for Ghosts: A Love Across Time Story. This was (surprise!) a time travel romance set in WWI era and present day France featuring a student of history working on his thesis and a doughboy (an American soldier). I have a fondness for time travel stories, and I enjoyed this one despite having a few quibbles. It’s the first in a time travel series by the author and I look forward to reading the next book which features different characters.
    — Would it Be Okay to Love You? by Amy Tasukada which was a pleasant m/m story set in Japan featuring two very different characters: a voice actor and an accountant (a salaryman). I thought the story did well at giving a sense of place through food, celebrations, even bathing. That said, I don’t have an interest in continuing the series.
    — two books that the authors describe as “…essentially Regency Romances set on alien world — Space Regencies, if you will, and our bow to Georgette Heyer ….” They are set in what is known as the Liaden Universe; I enjoyed them both. They are Local Custom and Scout’s Progress.
    — One of my favorite series last year was a science fiction trilogy by author (a pair of Australian sisters) S. K. Dunstall, so I’d been eagerly anticipating their new book which I read with pleasure. Now I get to look forward to the next book. This book is set in a totally different universe from that of the first trilogy, but it is equally intriguing. It’s Stars Uncharted by S. K. Dunstall.
    — I was then inspired to go back and re-read Dunstall’s earlier trilogy. I enjoyed re-reading Linesman, Alliance, and Confluence. Fans of Patricia Briggs might be interested to know that these books have her recommendation.
    — read Idyll Threats: A Thomas Lynch Novel by Stephanie Gayle which was a mystery which I enjoyed. It’s the first in a series, and I plan to continue on.
    — also read Fields of Gold (Tarnished Souls Book 2) by Dev Bentham which was a pleasant m/m contemporary romance.
    — read an enjoyable children’s book with lovely illustrations, The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet.
    — I read Anna Butler’s book Gyrfalcon (Taking Shield Book 1) (which is currently free for Kindle readers). I’d classify it as futuristic military science fiction. I enjoyed this book and will happily read on.
    — I also read Seasonal Sentiments: NineStar Press 2016 Holiday Stories which introduced me to many new authors. As with all anthologies, some stories appealed more than others. I particularly liked Stone and Shell by Lloyd A. Meeker, Hearts Alight by Elliot Cooper, Ibiza on Ice by Gillian St. Kevern, and A Christmas for Oscar by Alex Whitehall
    — I read the novella Different Names for the Same Thing by Francis Gideon. This featured a writer pre- and post-transition and his connection with a fan both in the current day and five years earlier.
    — I read E.M. Lindsey’s Time and Tide. The story begins in 1890s Baltimore and features William, an American with an exceedingly domineering mother, and Theodore, an author and Frenchman who has almost no vision. I didn’t care for the book initially as William, a new lawyer, is bullied by his mother into marriage and into defending a wealthy criminal. Ultimately, I grew to enjoy the book though certain events strained credulity.
    — I also re-read Dev Bentham’s Learning from Isaac (Tarnished Souls Book 1) which I enjoyed once again.
    — Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Spite (The Doyle & Acton murder series Book 8). This mystery, unlike the first seven, primarily takes place in Dublin. This series should definitely be read in order; if interested, start with Murder in Thrall.
    — (hmm, another book eight though it’s actually the third in this 20 plus book series that I’ve read) Conflict of Honors (Liaden Universe Book 8) by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. The author note I read says this book is their tribute to “Peter Wimsey, who did what duty demanded, and was never afraid to cry.” [That might mean more to me had I ever read books with Peter Wimsey!] Nonetheless, I enjoyed the book and may read more Liaden Universe books at some point.
    — enjoyed Jackie North’s time travel romance Honey From the Lion: A Love Across Time Story. Admittedly, it did leave me with some questions for example, I can’t figure out the significance of the title (though I believe it’s biblical). Unlike the last book I read by this author, here a character travels back in time rather than forward.
    — Sight Unseen by Hunter Raines. I had a few quibbles with the characters and storyline in this male/male romance, but overall I enjoyed it.
    — High Lonesome by Tanya Chris was an enjoyable story (currently FREE for Kindle readers) that featured three men – Joe, Pyotr, and Tanner. Most of the story takes place in a high altitude hut on a mountain during a snowstorm. There’s Joe (the hut attendant), Tanner (an addict who is on the verge of committing treason), and Pyotr (who is a Russian agent or maybe CIA or ….) This has a suspense element as well as a three way romance.
    — quite enjoyed The Music of the Spheres by Chase Potter which showed the relationship of Ryan and Adam who first connected due to a high school assignment. They become friends and then move to a deeper attachment over the course of years. The reader also gets to know Ryan’s father and sister. Expect to cry if you read this.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance ~ The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang. I’ll likely re-read this at some point.
    — enjoyed the London set male/male mystery ~ Pressure Head (The Plumber’s Mate Book 1) by JL Merrow. I hope to read more in this series.

    Reply
  70. I’ve read and enjoyed a number of the books that you mentioned in your monthly round-up and have added a couple to my library hold list.
    Lots of reading here in the past month ~
    — Colson Whitehead’s The Underground Railroad for my book group. I found it a dismal story which likely means that the author did a good job. My group had a lively discussion.
    — Leta Blake’s Any Given Lifetime which I quite enjoyed despite the story aspects that strained credulity. It’s a male/male romance with a reincarnation theme. I’ll likely re-read it.
    — Jackie North’s Heroes for Ghosts: A Love Across Time Story. This was (surprise!) a time travel romance set in WWI era and present day France featuring a student of history working on his thesis and a doughboy (an American soldier). I have a fondness for time travel stories, and I enjoyed this one despite having a few quibbles. It’s the first in a time travel series by the author and I look forward to reading the next book which features different characters.
    — Would it Be Okay to Love You? by Amy Tasukada which was a pleasant m/m story set in Japan featuring two very different characters: a voice actor and an accountant (a salaryman). I thought the story did well at giving a sense of place through food, celebrations, even bathing. That said, I don’t have an interest in continuing the series.
    — two books that the authors describe as “…essentially Regency Romances set on alien world — Space Regencies, if you will, and our bow to Georgette Heyer ….” They are set in what is known as the Liaden Universe; I enjoyed them both. They are Local Custom and Scout’s Progress.
    — One of my favorite series last year was a science fiction trilogy by author (a pair of Australian sisters) S. K. Dunstall, so I’d been eagerly anticipating their new book which I read with pleasure. Now I get to look forward to the next book. This book is set in a totally different universe from that of the first trilogy, but it is equally intriguing. It’s Stars Uncharted by S. K. Dunstall.
    — I was then inspired to go back and re-read Dunstall’s earlier trilogy. I enjoyed re-reading Linesman, Alliance, and Confluence. Fans of Patricia Briggs might be interested to know that these books have her recommendation.
    — read Idyll Threats: A Thomas Lynch Novel by Stephanie Gayle which was a mystery which I enjoyed. It’s the first in a series, and I plan to continue on.
    — also read Fields of Gold (Tarnished Souls Book 2) by Dev Bentham which was a pleasant m/m contemporary romance.
    — read an enjoyable children’s book with lovely illustrations, The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus by Jen Bryant and Melissa Sweet.
    — I read Anna Butler’s book Gyrfalcon (Taking Shield Book 1) (which is currently free for Kindle readers). I’d classify it as futuristic military science fiction. I enjoyed this book and will happily read on.
    — I also read Seasonal Sentiments: NineStar Press 2016 Holiday Stories which introduced me to many new authors. As with all anthologies, some stories appealed more than others. I particularly liked Stone and Shell by Lloyd A. Meeker, Hearts Alight by Elliot Cooper, Ibiza on Ice by Gillian St. Kevern, and A Christmas for Oscar by Alex Whitehall
    — I read the novella Different Names for the Same Thing by Francis Gideon. This featured a writer pre- and post-transition and his connection with a fan both in the current day and five years earlier.
    — I read E.M. Lindsey’s Time and Tide. The story begins in 1890s Baltimore and features William, an American with an exceedingly domineering mother, and Theodore, an author and Frenchman who has almost no vision. I didn’t care for the book initially as William, a new lawyer, is bullied by his mother into marriage and into defending a wealthy criminal. Ultimately, I grew to enjoy the book though certain events strained credulity.
    — I also re-read Dev Bentham’s Learning from Isaac (Tarnished Souls Book 1) which I enjoyed once again.
    — Anne Cleeland’s Murder in Spite (The Doyle & Acton murder series Book 8). This mystery, unlike the first seven, primarily takes place in Dublin. This series should definitely be read in order; if interested, start with Murder in Thrall.
    — (hmm, another book eight though it’s actually the third in this 20 plus book series that I’ve read) Conflict of Honors (Liaden Universe Book 8) by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller. The author note I read says this book is their tribute to “Peter Wimsey, who did what duty demanded, and was never afraid to cry.” [That might mean more to me had I ever read books with Peter Wimsey!] Nonetheless, I enjoyed the book and may read more Liaden Universe books at some point.
    — enjoyed Jackie North’s time travel romance Honey From the Lion: A Love Across Time Story. Admittedly, it did leave me with some questions for example, I can’t figure out the significance of the title (though I believe it’s biblical). Unlike the last book I read by this author, here a character travels back in time rather than forward.
    — Sight Unseen by Hunter Raines. I had a few quibbles with the characters and storyline in this male/male romance, but overall I enjoyed it.
    — High Lonesome by Tanya Chris was an enjoyable story (currently FREE for Kindle readers) that featured three men – Joe, Pyotr, and Tanner. Most of the story takes place in a high altitude hut on a mountain during a snowstorm. There’s Joe (the hut attendant), Tanner (an addict who is on the verge of committing treason), and Pyotr (who is a Russian agent or maybe CIA or ….) This has a suspense element as well as a three way romance.
    — quite enjoyed The Music of the Spheres by Chase Potter which showed the relationship of Ryan and Adam who first connected due to a high school assignment. They become friends and then move to a deeper attachment over the course of years. The reader also gets to know Ryan’s father and sister. Expect to cry if you read this.
    — enjoyed the contemporary romance ~ The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang. I’ll likely re-read this at some point.
    — enjoyed the London set male/male mystery ~ Pressure Head (The Plumber’s Mate Book 1) by JL Merrow. I hope to read more in this series.

    Reply
  71. Wow, I’ll have to copy this out and start perusing the shelves! The wenches are great fans of Lee and Miller and devour the Liaden Universe books. You should check out Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey books if you enjoy the Liaden Universe. They’re quite wry and amusing in the same way.
    Thank you for giving us so much to look at!

    Reply
  72. Wow, I’ll have to copy this out and start perusing the shelves! The wenches are great fans of Lee and Miller and devour the Liaden Universe books. You should check out Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey books if you enjoy the Liaden Universe. They’re quite wry and amusing in the same way.
    Thank you for giving us so much to look at!

    Reply
  73. Wow, I’ll have to copy this out and start perusing the shelves! The wenches are great fans of Lee and Miller and devour the Liaden Universe books. You should check out Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey books if you enjoy the Liaden Universe. They’re quite wry and amusing in the same way.
    Thank you for giving us so much to look at!

    Reply
  74. Wow, I’ll have to copy this out and start perusing the shelves! The wenches are great fans of Lee and Miller and devour the Liaden Universe books. You should check out Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey books if you enjoy the Liaden Universe. They’re quite wry and amusing in the same way.
    Thank you for giving us so much to look at!

    Reply
  75. Wow, I’ll have to copy this out and start perusing the shelves! The wenches are great fans of Lee and Miller and devour the Liaden Universe books. You should check out Dorothy Sayers’ Lord Peter Wimsey books if you enjoy the Liaden Universe. They’re quite wry and amusing in the same way.
    Thank you for giving us so much to look at!

    Reply

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