What We’re Reading in February

White horse booksNicola here, introducing the Wenchly reading recommendations in the month of February. As ever we have a big mix of books for you and look forward to hearing what you've been reading too! the picture on the left is the rather gorgeous old bookshop in Marlborough, a town just down the road from me, where I love to browse. Sometimes you might even meet the resident bookshop ghost, which seems appropriate for Pat's first recommendation today!

Pat writes:

SEANCES ARE FOR SUCKERS by Tamara Berry

Ellie Wilde is a cynic, for good reason. As the youngest of triplets, she’s paying to keep her comatose sister in the best nursing home available by using her limited skill set—tricking people. To be fair, she also gives them comfort—by ridding their homes of ghosts she doesn’t believe in. People might call her a psychic medium, but in reality, she’s a great problem-solver and people reader. She has to be, or her sister will be out on the street. Her brother is a gym teacher and can’t possibly afford the cost of nursing care, so it’s up to Ellie. When she’s offered a small fortune and the opportunity to fly to England and live in a mansion while she rids the house of its resident ghost, she happily takes the job.

Only this job turns out to be more than rooting out rats in the attic. As bodies, quite literally, stack up, she has a real murder Seancesmystery on her hands and no convenient ghost to help her out. And then there’s sexy Nicholas, who doesn’t really believe in ghosts either but hires her anyway. Why?

This is first in a series, and I’m already eagerly awaiting the next one. Ellie is almost as clever as Sherlock Holmes, but not quite experienced enough to stay out of trouble.

Andrea says: Though I’m not usually drawn to paranormal stories involving vampires and witches, I really enjoyed Deborah Harkness’s All Souls Trilogy for its rich history and terrific writing. (Harkness is a university history professor who teaches courses on the history of science) So I was very happy to snatch up her latest release, Time’s Convert, which tells the story of one of the secondary characters from the original trilogy. The story starts in today’s world, where Matthew’s ”son” Marcus and his girlfriend Phoebe have decided that Phoebe is going to become a vampire. It’s a fascinating description of changing from one being to another, and as the process is happening you switch back and forth to colonial America to learn Matthew’s story of becoming a vampire. We see the American Revolution through the eyes of a teenage boy who runs away from home after killing his abusive father to protect his mother and little sister, and finds himself drawn to learning medicine. The history is really wonderfully drawn, and Harkness  does a fabulous job with the modern times as she slyly describes a vampire clan trying to figure out how to blend all the new pieces of their family together (Matthew’s wife is a witch, and their young twins are exhibiting odd skills that have their parents fretting that the kids are not normal!) and she has them deal with all the same issues we warmbloods do! 

Deborah HarknessI also was lucky enough to get an ARC of Anne Perry’s upcoming Triple Jeopardy, the second book in her Daniel Pitt series, which features, Thomas and Charlotte Pitt’s son, now all grown up to be a barrister in Edwardian England. Perry always writes great, twisty mystery plots, and this series is particularly interesting as Daniel is attracted to an older “spinster"—the brilliant daughter of the head of his law office, who has a degree in medicine and is a forensic expert, but can’t get a job because she’s a woman. She, of course, teams up with him informally to help prove his clients innocent, and it's fun to watch the growing attraction. 

Nicola: I've been reading a real mixture of books this month. Prisoners of Geography by Tim Marshall looks at how the decisions that our political leaders make are dictated by the geography of their countries. It gives the historical context to explain how the different parts of the world are in the situation they are in – how mountains, rivers and seas can create borders and can fundamentally affect the policies that drive politicians. It's rather like viewing the passing world from the air than the ground – a completely different perspective on why the countries of the world have developed as they have.

On the fiction side, I'm in the middle of The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton. it's been a runaway bestseller in the UK. It's described as a metaphysical murder mystery, Agatha Christie with supernatural elements and it's one of the most weird and twisty books I've read in a long time. If this doesn't sound like a totally ringing endorsement that's because I didn't quite know what to make of it to start with. It felt a bit too mannered in style and so clever it was in danger of tripping itself up. However I stuck with it and now that I'm in the middle of it I'm gripped. I only hope he pulls of an ending that answers all the questions he's raised!

I also read Mr One-Night Stand by Rachael Stewart from Mills & Boon Dare. I really enjoyed this; the sexy scenes were perfectly MrOnebalanced by the emotional character development. Marcus was one hot hero and Jennifer was a great heroine. Together they were explosive and their dialogue was as sparky as their attraction. Their relationship felt very real and I was rooting for them to sort themselves out and get together.  What I particularly loved was that the relationship development felt totally realistic and convincing. I I read the book in one sitting when I was supposed to be working but I just didn't want to put it down!

Susan writes:

Currently I'm deep in a stretch of writing, editing, and research (history of whisky, anyone?), while the fiction stack gently teeters until I find time to get back to the books I've set aside for next reads. I've started many good books and finished few, and hope to change that soon.  I did set everything aside for one book–the new Flavia de Luce mystery. This one couldn't wait–it's one of my favorite series. Alan Bradley's Golden Tresses of the Dead is the tenth outing for young Miss Flavia, now twelve, and as canny, quirky, brilliant, and touching as ever. Even more so, now that she's teamed up with the De Luce family retainer, the enigmatic and reliable Mr. Dogger, to open their own detective agency. 

Golden tressesDogger's vast body of knowledge, particularly scientific and medical (what was he in his past? he never quite lets on) provides Flavia not only a solid co-detective, but a wise mentor in for her growth as chemist, Sherlockian sleuth, and as a person. When Flavia's older sister gets married, someone's withered severed finger pops up in the wedding cake, belonging to none of the guests …tracing what they can discover about the odd finger, Flavia and Dogger uncover a web of snake oil medicine that leads to a surprising death, and the possible involvement of some rather upstanding locals. Bradley's brilliant mystery series is among the smartest, most enjoyable I have ever read — never a dull moment, always full of surprises, smiles, erudite facts, and poignant wisdom too. After ten books, I hope the author intends to keep going with the very delightful Flavia!  

 

Anne: I've just finished reading Elly Griffiths' STONE CIRCLE, a crime novel starring the forensic anthropologist Dr Ruth Galloway and Stone circle police detective, DCI Nelson. The discovery of the bodies of two young girls in a stone circle, one ancient and one relatively recent, stirs up an old unsolved murder case. 

I enjoy these books so much. The murder mysteries are intriguing, the characterizations excellent and I do enjoy the ongoing relationship between Ruth Galloway and the dour DCI Nelson. If you haven't read them before, I recommend starting with the first in the series, THE CROSSING PLACES, as the characters and their relationships develop and change over time, and for me this is a big part of the enjoyment.

I'm just back from the Australian Romance Readers Awards, and the book that won the "Favourite 2018 romance with laugh-out-loud moment" and "Favourite Contemporary Romance" is Kylie Scott's CHASER. I'm a fan of Kylie Scott's books and had read this one back in April 2018 and so, on the plane home, pulled out my kindle for a refresher, and ending up reading and enjoying it all over again.

ChaserIt's a contemporary romance about a young man who at the start, plays the field and is pretty irresponsible. We watch as, all unknowing and in the most charming fashion, he grows into a responsible adult as he cares for his young pregnant neighbor as she gives birth and raises her baby. He falls in love with the baby, as well as the girl, and watching him fall is both funny and delightful. It's part of a series, but can be read alone.

Jo writes: There’s a whole raft of Fantasy authors — George MacDonald, Lord Dunsany, Thomas Burnett Swann, Alan Garner, Poul Anderson, JRR Tolkien, TH White,  Peter S Beagle, William Hope Hodgson, Manly Wade Wellman — who are foundational in the genre and beautifully lyrical.

I read these guys when I was growing up and the language stays with me.

Seems I missed one of the classics in the field: The Forgotten Beasts of Eld by Patricia McKillip. A Forgotten2 friend recommended it recently and I downloaded an e-copy. It's a good read and useful from a writing standpoint. I find Fantasy sometimes gives a different slant on "voice". There’s enough storytelling distance to make the unselfconsciously rich and beautiful language sound natural.

Forgotten Beasts is a love story set among powerful magics and conflicting loyalties. Warms the heart on a cold grey day.

So there you have our Word Wench reading for the month, full of variety and surprise as ever! What are you reading at the moment? Share your recommendations with us and add to the TBR pile!

 

130 thoughts on “What We’re Reading in February”

  1. I have read the Cursed Kingdom trilogy by Emily Gee twice and am now reading her regencies done as Emily Larkin. I am enjoying them tremendously and recommend her books. I really like the fantasy books, although I do not usually read fantasy. I happened upon “The Sentinel Mage” by accident and kept going.

    Reply
  2. I have read the Cursed Kingdom trilogy by Emily Gee twice and am now reading her regencies done as Emily Larkin. I am enjoying them tremendously and recommend her books. I really like the fantasy books, although I do not usually read fantasy. I happened upon “The Sentinel Mage” by accident and kept going.

    Reply
  3. I have read the Cursed Kingdom trilogy by Emily Gee twice and am now reading her regencies done as Emily Larkin. I am enjoying them tremendously and recommend her books. I really like the fantasy books, although I do not usually read fantasy. I happened upon “The Sentinel Mage” by accident and kept going.

    Reply
  4. I have read the Cursed Kingdom trilogy by Emily Gee twice and am now reading her regencies done as Emily Larkin. I am enjoying them tremendously and recommend her books. I really like the fantasy books, although I do not usually read fantasy. I happened upon “The Sentinel Mage” by accident and kept going.

    Reply
  5. I have read the Cursed Kingdom trilogy by Emily Gee twice and am now reading her regencies done as Emily Larkin. I am enjoying them tremendously and recommend her books. I really like the fantasy books, although I do not usually read fantasy. I happened upon “The Sentinel Mage” by accident and kept going.

    Reply
  6. I’ve been coping with the mid-west cold and magnified by aging, so it’s all been re-reads.
    But 1 series is worthy of note. The “Tall Stones” quartet by Moyra Caldecott. I had read it years ago, and decided to re-read when I found an e-book version. I have mixed feelings about these books—somewhat “too simplistic, too mystic, too …” but I keep reading through the 4 books. She gives a very interesting look at England when the stone circles were the center of worship. I somewhat doubt her accuracy, even when fantasy is not in play. I think they might be worth a look for some of you.
    I have bought Nicola’s Woman in the Water, but haven’t started it yet.

    Reply
  7. I’ve been coping with the mid-west cold and magnified by aging, so it’s all been re-reads.
    But 1 series is worthy of note. The “Tall Stones” quartet by Moyra Caldecott. I had read it years ago, and decided to re-read when I found an e-book version. I have mixed feelings about these books—somewhat “too simplistic, too mystic, too …” but I keep reading through the 4 books. She gives a very interesting look at England when the stone circles were the center of worship. I somewhat doubt her accuracy, even when fantasy is not in play. I think they might be worth a look for some of you.
    I have bought Nicola’s Woman in the Water, but haven’t started it yet.

    Reply
  8. I’ve been coping with the mid-west cold and magnified by aging, so it’s all been re-reads.
    But 1 series is worthy of note. The “Tall Stones” quartet by Moyra Caldecott. I had read it years ago, and decided to re-read when I found an e-book version. I have mixed feelings about these books—somewhat “too simplistic, too mystic, too …” but I keep reading through the 4 books. She gives a very interesting look at England when the stone circles were the center of worship. I somewhat doubt her accuracy, even when fantasy is not in play. I think they might be worth a look for some of you.
    I have bought Nicola’s Woman in the Water, but haven’t started it yet.

    Reply
  9. I’ve been coping with the mid-west cold and magnified by aging, so it’s all been re-reads.
    But 1 series is worthy of note. The “Tall Stones” quartet by Moyra Caldecott. I had read it years ago, and decided to re-read when I found an e-book version. I have mixed feelings about these books—somewhat “too simplistic, too mystic, too …” but I keep reading through the 4 books. She gives a very interesting look at England when the stone circles were the center of worship. I somewhat doubt her accuracy, even when fantasy is not in play. I think they might be worth a look for some of you.
    I have bought Nicola’s Woman in the Water, but haven’t started it yet.

    Reply
  10. I’ve been coping with the mid-west cold and magnified by aging, so it’s all been re-reads.
    But 1 series is worthy of note. The “Tall Stones” quartet by Moyra Caldecott. I had read it years ago, and decided to re-read when I found an e-book version. I have mixed feelings about these books—somewhat “too simplistic, too mystic, too …” but I keep reading through the 4 books. She gives a very interesting look at England when the stone circles were the center of worship. I somewhat doubt her accuracy, even when fantasy is not in play. I think they might be worth a look for some of you.
    I have bought Nicola’s Woman in the Water, but haven’t started it yet.

    Reply
  11. WOW more recommendations, there are so many books never enough time to read them all 🙂
    Nicola, I too have read Rachael Stewarts, Mr One-Night Stand and loved it 🙂
    I have just read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane a fabulous WW2 story a must read and also a rural romance by Lily Malone Café by the Bridge also fabulous
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  12. WOW more recommendations, there are so many books never enough time to read them all 🙂
    Nicola, I too have read Rachael Stewarts, Mr One-Night Stand and loved it 🙂
    I have just read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane a fabulous WW2 story a must read and also a rural romance by Lily Malone Café by the Bridge also fabulous
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  13. WOW more recommendations, there are so many books never enough time to read them all 🙂
    Nicola, I too have read Rachael Stewarts, Mr One-Night Stand and loved it 🙂
    I have just read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane a fabulous WW2 story a must read and also a rural romance by Lily Malone Café by the Bridge also fabulous
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  14. WOW more recommendations, there are so many books never enough time to read them all 🙂
    Nicola, I too have read Rachael Stewarts, Mr One-Night Stand and loved it 🙂
    I have just read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane a fabulous WW2 story a must read and also a rural romance by Lily Malone Café by the Bridge also fabulous
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  15. WOW more recommendations, there are so many books never enough time to read them all 🙂
    Nicola, I too have read Rachael Stewarts, Mr One-Night Stand and loved it 🙂
    I have just read The Spitfire Girls by Soraya Lane a fabulous WW2 story a must read and also a rural romance by Lily Malone Café by the Bridge also fabulous
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  16. Read over the past four weeks ~
    — Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin. This proved educational while also being a good albeit sad read. I knew the term gender fluid but I better understand it after reading this book.
    — enjoyed Sarina Bowen’s Overnight Sensation though it does not replace my favorite of her books.
    — also reread with pleasure Anne Bishop’s Murder of Crows and Vision In Silver.
    — continued my Anne Bishop reread and finished Marked In Flesh, Etched in Bone, and Lake Silence … ahhh. Now I am more than ready for her forthcoming book.
    — read Rebecca Roanhorse’s Trail of Lightning. While it was an intriguing story (and I learned a good bit of native American mythology), I don’t believe I’ll reread it and I likely won’t read on in the series.
    — I discovered Alex Bledsoe’s Tufa series and read The Hum and the Shiver, Wisp of a Thing, Long Black Curl, and Chapel of Ease. I enjoyed them all and plan to read on.
    – Tessa Bailey’s Getaway Girl, a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — read a local 100 Things to Do guide. I’ve lived here over fifteen years, so many items in the book were known to me, however some were not. I read this for my library’s new winter reading program.
    — Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko for my book group. It was an interesting read and eye opening about being Korean in Japan. The book takes place from the 1930s to the 1980s, but I imagine much is still the same.
    — Peripheral People by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore: a science fiction novel that also had a mystery/suspense component. It had a bit more gore than I’d prefer but I enjoyed the story nonetheless.
    — Gather Her Round: Alex Bledsoe’s fifth book in the Tufa series; it was another enjoyable, albeit somewhat gory, read.
    — Roni Loren’s contemporary romance The One You Fight For (The Ones Who Got Away Book 3). This could be a challenging read for some as it deals with the aftereffects of a school shooting. It was eye opening in that it made me think how difficult it might be for family members of someone who has committed a violent crime.
    — Cooper West’s Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella which did not quite meet my expectations after enjoying the author’s other works in this series.

    Reply
  17. Read over the past four weeks ~
    — Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin. This proved educational while also being a good albeit sad read. I knew the term gender fluid but I better understand it after reading this book.
    — enjoyed Sarina Bowen’s Overnight Sensation though it does not replace my favorite of her books.
    — also reread with pleasure Anne Bishop’s Murder of Crows and Vision In Silver.
    — continued my Anne Bishop reread and finished Marked In Flesh, Etched in Bone, and Lake Silence … ahhh. Now I am more than ready for her forthcoming book.
    — read Rebecca Roanhorse’s Trail of Lightning. While it was an intriguing story (and I learned a good bit of native American mythology), I don’t believe I’ll reread it and I likely won’t read on in the series.
    — I discovered Alex Bledsoe’s Tufa series and read The Hum and the Shiver, Wisp of a Thing, Long Black Curl, and Chapel of Ease. I enjoyed them all and plan to read on.
    – Tessa Bailey’s Getaway Girl, a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — read a local 100 Things to Do guide. I’ve lived here over fifteen years, so many items in the book were known to me, however some were not. I read this for my library’s new winter reading program.
    — Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko for my book group. It was an interesting read and eye opening about being Korean in Japan. The book takes place from the 1930s to the 1980s, but I imagine much is still the same.
    — Peripheral People by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore: a science fiction novel that also had a mystery/suspense component. It had a bit more gore than I’d prefer but I enjoyed the story nonetheless.
    — Gather Her Round: Alex Bledsoe’s fifth book in the Tufa series; it was another enjoyable, albeit somewhat gory, read.
    — Roni Loren’s contemporary romance The One You Fight For (The Ones Who Got Away Book 3). This could be a challenging read for some as it deals with the aftereffects of a school shooting. It was eye opening in that it made me think how difficult it might be for family members of someone who has committed a violent crime.
    — Cooper West’s Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella which did not quite meet my expectations after enjoying the author’s other works in this series.

    Reply
  18. Read over the past four weeks ~
    — Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin. This proved educational while also being a good albeit sad read. I knew the term gender fluid but I better understand it after reading this book.
    — enjoyed Sarina Bowen’s Overnight Sensation though it does not replace my favorite of her books.
    — also reread with pleasure Anne Bishop’s Murder of Crows and Vision In Silver.
    — continued my Anne Bishop reread and finished Marked In Flesh, Etched in Bone, and Lake Silence … ahhh. Now I am more than ready for her forthcoming book.
    — read Rebecca Roanhorse’s Trail of Lightning. While it was an intriguing story (and I learned a good bit of native American mythology), I don’t believe I’ll reread it and I likely won’t read on in the series.
    — I discovered Alex Bledsoe’s Tufa series and read The Hum and the Shiver, Wisp of a Thing, Long Black Curl, and Chapel of Ease. I enjoyed them all and plan to read on.
    – Tessa Bailey’s Getaway Girl, a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — read a local 100 Things to Do guide. I’ve lived here over fifteen years, so many items in the book were known to me, however some were not. I read this for my library’s new winter reading program.
    — Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko for my book group. It was an interesting read and eye opening about being Korean in Japan. The book takes place from the 1930s to the 1980s, but I imagine much is still the same.
    — Peripheral People by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore: a science fiction novel that also had a mystery/suspense component. It had a bit more gore than I’d prefer but I enjoyed the story nonetheless.
    — Gather Her Round: Alex Bledsoe’s fifth book in the Tufa series; it was another enjoyable, albeit somewhat gory, read.
    — Roni Loren’s contemporary romance The One You Fight For (The Ones Who Got Away Book 3). This could be a challenging read for some as it deals with the aftereffects of a school shooting. It was eye opening in that it made me think how difficult it might be for family members of someone who has committed a violent crime.
    — Cooper West’s Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella which did not quite meet my expectations after enjoying the author’s other works in this series.

    Reply
  19. Read over the past four weeks ~
    — Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin. This proved educational while also being a good albeit sad read. I knew the term gender fluid but I better understand it after reading this book.
    — enjoyed Sarina Bowen’s Overnight Sensation though it does not replace my favorite of her books.
    — also reread with pleasure Anne Bishop’s Murder of Crows and Vision In Silver.
    — continued my Anne Bishop reread and finished Marked In Flesh, Etched in Bone, and Lake Silence … ahhh. Now I am more than ready for her forthcoming book.
    — read Rebecca Roanhorse’s Trail of Lightning. While it was an intriguing story (and I learned a good bit of native American mythology), I don’t believe I’ll reread it and I likely won’t read on in the series.
    — I discovered Alex Bledsoe’s Tufa series and read The Hum and the Shiver, Wisp of a Thing, Long Black Curl, and Chapel of Ease. I enjoyed them all and plan to read on.
    – Tessa Bailey’s Getaway Girl, a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — read a local 100 Things to Do guide. I’ve lived here over fifteen years, so many items in the book were known to me, however some were not. I read this for my library’s new winter reading program.
    — Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko for my book group. It was an interesting read and eye opening about being Korean in Japan. The book takes place from the 1930s to the 1980s, but I imagine much is still the same.
    — Peripheral People by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore: a science fiction novel that also had a mystery/suspense component. It had a bit more gore than I’d prefer but I enjoyed the story nonetheless.
    — Gather Her Round: Alex Bledsoe’s fifth book in the Tufa series; it was another enjoyable, albeit somewhat gory, read.
    — Roni Loren’s contemporary romance The One You Fight For (The Ones Who Got Away Book 3). This could be a challenging read for some as it deals with the aftereffects of a school shooting. It was eye opening in that it made me think how difficult it might be for family members of someone who has committed a violent crime.
    — Cooper West’s Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella which did not quite meet my expectations after enjoying the author’s other works in this series.

    Reply
  20. Read over the past four weeks ~
    — Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin. This proved educational while also being a good albeit sad read. I knew the term gender fluid but I better understand it after reading this book.
    — enjoyed Sarina Bowen’s Overnight Sensation though it does not replace my favorite of her books.
    — also reread with pleasure Anne Bishop’s Murder of Crows and Vision In Silver.
    — continued my Anne Bishop reread and finished Marked In Flesh, Etched in Bone, and Lake Silence … ahhh. Now I am more than ready for her forthcoming book.
    — read Rebecca Roanhorse’s Trail of Lightning. While it was an intriguing story (and I learned a good bit of native American mythology), I don’t believe I’ll reread it and I likely won’t read on in the series.
    — I discovered Alex Bledsoe’s Tufa series and read The Hum and the Shiver, Wisp of a Thing, Long Black Curl, and Chapel of Ease. I enjoyed them all and plan to read on.
    – Tessa Bailey’s Getaway Girl, a contemporary romance which I quite enjoyed.
    — read a local 100 Things to Do guide. I’ve lived here over fifteen years, so many items in the book were known to me, however some were not. I read this for my library’s new winter reading program.
    — Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko for my book group. It was an interesting read and eye opening about being Korean in Japan. The book takes place from the 1930s to the 1980s, but I imagine much is still the same.
    — Peripheral People by Reesa Herberth and Michelle Moore: a science fiction novel that also had a mystery/suspense component. It had a bit more gore than I’d prefer but I enjoyed the story nonetheless.
    — Gather Her Round: Alex Bledsoe’s fifth book in the Tufa series; it was another enjoyable, albeit somewhat gory, read.
    — Roni Loren’s contemporary romance The One You Fight For (The Ones Who Got Away Book 3). This could be a challenging read for some as it deals with the aftereffects of a school shooting. It was eye opening in that it made me think how difficult it might be for family members of someone who has committed a violent crime.
    — Cooper West’s Mismatched: A Guardsmen Romance Novella which did not quite meet my expectations after enjoying the author’s other works in this series.

    Reply
  21. Four standouts this month (or at least they stood out enough for me to remember them!)
    The Cajun Cowboy by Sandra Hill. Kind of a contemporary cowboy romance with a lot of Louisiana thrown into it. Oddly enough I didn’t totally like the characters, didn’t totally like the writing style but I kept reading because it was so ridiculously funny. You definitely had to suspend belief in any reality for that one.
    The Gentleman Rogue by Margaret McPhee. It was a tightly written book. Opposites, mystery, love, betrayal yet not betrayal. Very gripping romance about 2 people who won through. Really enjoyed it.
    Laura Trentham – Cottonbloom Series set in Louisiana/Mississippi (Cottonbloom is half in Louisiana and half in Mississippi). Really enjoyed it because there were class issues besides the look down on the other state issues. Opposites attracting each other, mysteries. Good writing and good characters. Kiss Me that Way, Then He Kissed me, If I kissed you, Leave the light on, When the Stars come out, Set the Night on fire. (Contemporary)
    Stephanie Laurens – Lady Osbaldstones Christmas Goose. Very much enjoyed it because it was a light, fun book. Will definitely reread it again.
    That Geography book sounds like one I’ll have to get my father for Father’s Day. Plus it sounds intriguing to read for me as well. And yes…my wishlist of books grew. Not enough time for all these new discoveries.

    Reply
  22. Four standouts this month (or at least they stood out enough for me to remember them!)
    The Cajun Cowboy by Sandra Hill. Kind of a contemporary cowboy romance with a lot of Louisiana thrown into it. Oddly enough I didn’t totally like the characters, didn’t totally like the writing style but I kept reading because it was so ridiculously funny. You definitely had to suspend belief in any reality for that one.
    The Gentleman Rogue by Margaret McPhee. It was a tightly written book. Opposites, mystery, love, betrayal yet not betrayal. Very gripping romance about 2 people who won through. Really enjoyed it.
    Laura Trentham – Cottonbloom Series set in Louisiana/Mississippi (Cottonbloom is half in Louisiana and half in Mississippi). Really enjoyed it because there were class issues besides the look down on the other state issues. Opposites attracting each other, mysteries. Good writing and good characters. Kiss Me that Way, Then He Kissed me, If I kissed you, Leave the light on, When the Stars come out, Set the Night on fire. (Contemporary)
    Stephanie Laurens – Lady Osbaldstones Christmas Goose. Very much enjoyed it because it was a light, fun book. Will definitely reread it again.
    That Geography book sounds like one I’ll have to get my father for Father’s Day. Plus it sounds intriguing to read for me as well. And yes…my wishlist of books grew. Not enough time for all these new discoveries.

    Reply
  23. Four standouts this month (or at least they stood out enough for me to remember them!)
    The Cajun Cowboy by Sandra Hill. Kind of a contemporary cowboy romance with a lot of Louisiana thrown into it. Oddly enough I didn’t totally like the characters, didn’t totally like the writing style but I kept reading because it was so ridiculously funny. You definitely had to suspend belief in any reality for that one.
    The Gentleman Rogue by Margaret McPhee. It was a tightly written book. Opposites, mystery, love, betrayal yet not betrayal. Very gripping romance about 2 people who won through. Really enjoyed it.
    Laura Trentham – Cottonbloom Series set in Louisiana/Mississippi (Cottonbloom is half in Louisiana and half in Mississippi). Really enjoyed it because there were class issues besides the look down on the other state issues. Opposites attracting each other, mysteries. Good writing and good characters. Kiss Me that Way, Then He Kissed me, If I kissed you, Leave the light on, When the Stars come out, Set the Night on fire. (Contemporary)
    Stephanie Laurens – Lady Osbaldstones Christmas Goose. Very much enjoyed it because it was a light, fun book. Will definitely reread it again.
    That Geography book sounds like one I’ll have to get my father for Father’s Day. Plus it sounds intriguing to read for me as well. And yes…my wishlist of books grew. Not enough time for all these new discoveries.

    Reply
  24. Four standouts this month (or at least they stood out enough for me to remember them!)
    The Cajun Cowboy by Sandra Hill. Kind of a contemporary cowboy romance with a lot of Louisiana thrown into it. Oddly enough I didn’t totally like the characters, didn’t totally like the writing style but I kept reading because it was so ridiculously funny. You definitely had to suspend belief in any reality for that one.
    The Gentleman Rogue by Margaret McPhee. It was a tightly written book. Opposites, mystery, love, betrayal yet not betrayal. Very gripping romance about 2 people who won through. Really enjoyed it.
    Laura Trentham – Cottonbloom Series set in Louisiana/Mississippi (Cottonbloom is half in Louisiana and half in Mississippi). Really enjoyed it because there were class issues besides the look down on the other state issues. Opposites attracting each other, mysteries. Good writing and good characters. Kiss Me that Way, Then He Kissed me, If I kissed you, Leave the light on, When the Stars come out, Set the Night on fire. (Contemporary)
    Stephanie Laurens – Lady Osbaldstones Christmas Goose. Very much enjoyed it because it was a light, fun book. Will definitely reread it again.
    That Geography book sounds like one I’ll have to get my father for Father’s Day. Plus it sounds intriguing to read for me as well. And yes…my wishlist of books grew. Not enough time for all these new discoveries.

    Reply
  25. Four standouts this month (or at least they stood out enough for me to remember them!)
    The Cajun Cowboy by Sandra Hill. Kind of a contemporary cowboy romance with a lot of Louisiana thrown into it. Oddly enough I didn’t totally like the characters, didn’t totally like the writing style but I kept reading because it was so ridiculously funny. You definitely had to suspend belief in any reality for that one.
    The Gentleman Rogue by Margaret McPhee. It was a tightly written book. Opposites, mystery, love, betrayal yet not betrayal. Very gripping romance about 2 people who won through. Really enjoyed it.
    Laura Trentham – Cottonbloom Series set in Louisiana/Mississippi (Cottonbloom is half in Louisiana and half in Mississippi). Really enjoyed it because there were class issues besides the look down on the other state issues. Opposites attracting each other, mysteries. Good writing and good characters. Kiss Me that Way, Then He Kissed me, If I kissed you, Leave the light on, When the Stars come out, Set the Night on fire. (Contemporary)
    Stephanie Laurens – Lady Osbaldstones Christmas Goose. Very much enjoyed it because it was a light, fun book. Will definitely reread it again.
    That Geography book sounds like one I’ll have to get my father for Father’s Day. Plus it sounds intriguing to read for me as well. And yes…my wishlist of books grew. Not enough time for all these new discoveries.

    Reply
  26. I finished Sharon Cullen’s Elizabethan spy trilogy, which had great strong women characters, and lots of intrigue at the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots. The books are “Wed To a Spy” “Bound To a Spy” and “Lost To a Spy” and they’re all very good, but I think the second one was my favorite. The heroine was really amazing once she came into her own.
    But now to my real find of the month! Based on a recommendation, I found a used copy of an old Dinah Dean paperback, “Flight From the Eagle” online. It was originally released as “The Road to Kaluga” back in the 1970’s. It was a happy surprise when it arrived and I realized I had purchased a 2-in-1 volume, with the 2nd book in the series “The Eagle’s Fate” also included. What amazing storytelling! It’s set in Russia during Napoleon’s invasion. The hero is an officer in the Russian Army, who was wounded in battle and is leading a motley troop of wounded, but mostly ambulatory soldiers to safely, as the French Army advances towards Moscow. They come upon the heroine, who was also fleeing the fighting, but abandoned after her aunt dies on the road. So our hero and 2 other officers take her under their wings as they embark on an arduous journey, nursing the wounded, foraging for food, and avoiding the French Army as they travel through the Russian countryside. There is a great slow burn closed-door romance(not that there are any doors, because they are sleeping on the ground in a tent for the most part). I also learned a lot about the military campaign, like the fighting retreat and scorched earth tactics used by the Russians.
    I haven’t finished the second book yet, but it picks up where the first book left off, in the late summer of 1812, and continues into the winter that Napoleon’s army was defeated, in large part by the Russian winter weather. Dinah Dean has a wonderful grasp of the history. Her books have somewhat of the same flavor as Carla Kelly’s best wartime romances, especially the first one, which is largely from the hero’s POV. Doing it from the male POV reveals his fears, insecurities and human weaknesses, which is something I’ve always loved about Kelly, and now Dean’s books.
    But now to the sad news; there are a total of 6 connected books set in Russian, but they are all out of print. I was lucky to find a cheap copy of “Flight From the Eagle” but some of the others are only available at ridiculous prices. Maybe one day the author, if she’s still around, will rerelease them as e-books!

    Reply
  27. I finished Sharon Cullen’s Elizabethan spy trilogy, which had great strong women characters, and lots of intrigue at the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots. The books are “Wed To a Spy” “Bound To a Spy” and “Lost To a Spy” and they’re all very good, but I think the second one was my favorite. The heroine was really amazing once she came into her own.
    But now to my real find of the month! Based on a recommendation, I found a used copy of an old Dinah Dean paperback, “Flight From the Eagle” online. It was originally released as “The Road to Kaluga” back in the 1970’s. It was a happy surprise when it arrived and I realized I had purchased a 2-in-1 volume, with the 2nd book in the series “The Eagle’s Fate” also included. What amazing storytelling! It’s set in Russia during Napoleon’s invasion. The hero is an officer in the Russian Army, who was wounded in battle and is leading a motley troop of wounded, but mostly ambulatory soldiers to safely, as the French Army advances towards Moscow. They come upon the heroine, who was also fleeing the fighting, but abandoned after her aunt dies on the road. So our hero and 2 other officers take her under their wings as they embark on an arduous journey, nursing the wounded, foraging for food, and avoiding the French Army as they travel through the Russian countryside. There is a great slow burn closed-door romance(not that there are any doors, because they are sleeping on the ground in a tent for the most part). I also learned a lot about the military campaign, like the fighting retreat and scorched earth tactics used by the Russians.
    I haven’t finished the second book yet, but it picks up where the first book left off, in the late summer of 1812, and continues into the winter that Napoleon’s army was defeated, in large part by the Russian winter weather. Dinah Dean has a wonderful grasp of the history. Her books have somewhat of the same flavor as Carla Kelly’s best wartime romances, especially the first one, which is largely from the hero’s POV. Doing it from the male POV reveals his fears, insecurities and human weaknesses, which is something I’ve always loved about Kelly, and now Dean’s books.
    But now to the sad news; there are a total of 6 connected books set in Russian, but they are all out of print. I was lucky to find a cheap copy of “Flight From the Eagle” but some of the others are only available at ridiculous prices. Maybe one day the author, if she’s still around, will rerelease them as e-books!

    Reply
  28. I finished Sharon Cullen’s Elizabethan spy trilogy, which had great strong women characters, and lots of intrigue at the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots. The books are “Wed To a Spy” “Bound To a Spy” and “Lost To a Spy” and they’re all very good, but I think the second one was my favorite. The heroine was really amazing once she came into her own.
    But now to my real find of the month! Based on a recommendation, I found a used copy of an old Dinah Dean paperback, “Flight From the Eagle” online. It was originally released as “The Road to Kaluga” back in the 1970’s. It was a happy surprise when it arrived and I realized I had purchased a 2-in-1 volume, with the 2nd book in the series “The Eagle’s Fate” also included. What amazing storytelling! It’s set in Russia during Napoleon’s invasion. The hero is an officer in the Russian Army, who was wounded in battle and is leading a motley troop of wounded, but mostly ambulatory soldiers to safely, as the French Army advances towards Moscow. They come upon the heroine, who was also fleeing the fighting, but abandoned after her aunt dies on the road. So our hero and 2 other officers take her under their wings as they embark on an arduous journey, nursing the wounded, foraging for food, and avoiding the French Army as they travel through the Russian countryside. There is a great slow burn closed-door romance(not that there are any doors, because they are sleeping on the ground in a tent for the most part). I also learned a lot about the military campaign, like the fighting retreat and scorched earth tactics used by the Russians.
    I haven’t finished the second book yet, but it picks up where the first book left off, in the late summer of 1812, and continues into the winter that Napoleon’s army was defeated, in large part by the Russian winter weather. Dinah Dean has a wonderful grasp of the history. Her books have somewhat of the same flavor as Carla Kelly’s best wartime romances, especially the first one, which is largely from the hero’s POV. Doing it from the male POV reveals his fears, insecurities and human weaknesses, which is something I’ve always loved about Kelly, and now Dean’s books.
    But now to the sad news; there are a total of 6 connected books set in Russian, but they are all out of print. I was lucky to find a cheap copy of “Flight From the Eagle” but some of the others are only available at ridiculous prices. Maybe one day the author, if she’s still around, will rerelease them as e-books!

    Reply
  29. I finished Sharon Cullen’s Elizabethan spy trilogy, which had great strong women characters, and lots of intrigue at the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots. The books are “Wed To a Spy” “Bound To a Spy” and “Lost To a Spy” and they’re all very good, but I think the second one was my favorite. The heroine was really amazing once she came into her own.
    But now to my real find of the month! Based on a recommendation, I found a used copy of an old Dinah Dean paperback, “Flight From the Eagle” online. It was originally released as “The Road to Kaluga” back in the 1970’s. It was a happy surprise when it arrived and I realized I had purchased a 2-in-1 volume, with the 2nd book in the series “The Eagle’s Fate” also included. What amazing storytelling! It’s set in Russia during Napoleon’s invasion. The hero is an officer in the Russian Army, who was wounded in battle and is leading a motley troop of wounded, but mostly ambulatory soldiers to safely, as the French Army advances towards Moscow. They come upon the heroine, who was also fleeing the fighting, but abandoned after her aunt dies on the road. So our hero and 2 other officers take her under their wings as they embark on an arduous journey, nursing the wounded, foraging for food, and avoiding the French Army as they travel through the Russian countryside. There is a great slow burn closed-door romance(not that there are any doors, because they are sleeping on the ground in a tent for the most part). I also learned a lot about the military campaign, like the fighting retreat and scorched earth tactics used by the Russians.
    I haven’t finished the second book yet, but it picks up where the first book left off, in the late summer of 1812, and continues into the winter that Napoleon’s army was defeated, in large part by the Russian winter weather. Dinah Dean has a wonderful grasp of the history. Her books have somewhat of the same flavor as Carla Kelly’s best wartime romances, especially the first one, which is largely from the hero’s POV. Doing it from the male POV reveals his fears, insecurities and human weaknesses, which is something I’ve always loved about Kelly, and now Dean’s books.
    But now to the sad news; there are a total of 6 connected books set in Russian, but they are all out of print. I was lucky to find a cheap copy of “Flight From the Eagle” but some of the others are only available at ridiculous prices. Maybe one day the author, if she’s still around, will rerelease them as e-books!

    Reply
  30. I finished Sharon Cullen’s Elizabethan spy trilogy, which had great strong women characters, and lots of intrigue at the Court of Mary, Queen of Scots. The books are “Wed To a Spy” “Bound To a Spy” and “Lost To a Spy” and they’re all very good, but I think the second one was my favorite. The heroine was really amazing once she came into her own.
    But now to my real find of the month! Based on a recommendation, I found a used copy of an old Dinah Dean paperback, “Flight From the Eagle” online. It was originally released as “The Road to Kaluga” back in the 1970’s. It was a happy surprise when it arrived and I realized I had purchased a 2-in-1 volume, with the 2nd book in the series “The Eagle’s Fate” also included. What amazing storytelling! It’s set in Russia during Napoleon’s invasion. The hero is an officer in the Russian Army, who was wounded in battle and is leading a motley troop of wounded, but mostly ambulatory soldiers to safely, as the French Army advances towards Moscow. They come upon the heroine, who was also fleeing the fighting, but abandoned after her aunt dies on the road. So our hero and 2 other officers take her under their wings as they embark on an arduous journey, nursing the wounded, foraging for food, and avoiding the French Army as they travel through the Russian countryside. There is a great slow burn closed-door romance(not that there are any doors, because they are sleeping on the ground in a tent for the most part). I also learned a lot about the military campaign, like the fighting retreat and scorched earth tactics used by the Russians.
    I haven’t finished the second book yet, but it picks up where the first book left off, in the late summer of 1812, and continues into the winter that Napoleon’s army was defeated, in large part by the Russian winter weather. Dinah Dean has a wonderful grasp of the history. Her books have somewhat of the same flavor as Carla Kelly’s best wartime romances, especially the first one, which is largely from the hero’s POV. Doing it from the male POV reveals his fears, insecurities and human weaknesses, which is something I’ve always loved about Kelly, and now Dean’s books.
    But now to the sad news; there are a total of 6 connected books set in Russian, but they are all out of print. I was lucky to find a cheap copy of “Flight From the Eagle” but some of the others are only available at ridiculous prices. Maybe one day the author, if she’s still around, will rerelease them as e-books!

    Reply
  31. Karin, I adore Dinah Dean. And it took me years to collect all her books. I paid a ridiculous price for Tatya’s Story, but I had waited 20 years to read it! Sadly, she died a few years ago. I keep hoping someone with the rights to her books will e-publish them. It’s another view of the Napoleonic wars and her characters are memorable- Lev Orlov, and the title character of the Ice King!

    Reply
  32. Karin, I adore Dinah Dean. And it took me years to collect all her books. I paid a ridiculous price for Tatya’s Story, but I had waited 20 years to read it! Sadly, she died a few years ago. I keep hoping someone with the rights to her books will e-publish them. It’s another view of the Napoleonic wars and her characters are memorable- Lev Orlov, and the title character of the Ice King!

    Reply
  33. Karin, I adore Dinah Dean. And it took me years to collect all her books. I paid a ridiculous price for Tatya’s Story, but I had waited 20 years to read it! Sadly, she died a few years ago. I keep hoping someone with the rights to her books will e-publish them. It’s another view of the Napoleonic wars and her characters are memorable- Lev Orlov, and the title character of the Ice King!

    Reply
  34. Karin, I adore Dinah Dean. And it took me years to collect all her books. I paid a ridiculous price for Tatya’s Story, but I had waited 20 years to read it! Sadly, she died a few years ago. I keep hoping someone with the rights to her books will e-publish them. It’s another view of the Napoleonic wars and her characters are memorable- Lev Orlov, and the title character of the Ice King!

    Reply
  35. Karin, I adore Dinah Dean. And it took me years to collect all her books. I paid a ridiculous price for Tatya’s Story, but I had waited 20 years to read it! Sadly, she died a few years ago. I keep hoping someone with the rights to her books will e-publish them. It’s another view of the Napoleonic wars and her characters are memorable- Lev Orlov, and the title character of the Ice King!

    Reply
  36. Wow, Kareni, what a great and eclectic list. Thank you for the recommendations – I love that there was a local 100 things to do guide in your list as well; it’s often the way that even when you’ve lived somewhere for a while there’s more to discover.

    Reply
  37. Wow, Kareni, what a great and eclectic list. Thank you for the recommendations – I love that there was a local 100 things to do guide in your list as well; it’s often the way that even when you’ve lived somewhere for a while there’s more to discover.

    Reply
  38. Wow, Kareni, what a great and eclectic list. Thank you for the recommendations – I love that there was a local 100 things to do guide in your list as well; it’s often the way that even when you’ve lived somewhere for a while there’s more to discover.

    Reply
  39. Wow, Kareni, what a great and eclectic list. Thank you for the recommendations – I love that there was a local 100 things to do guide in your list as well; it’s often the way that even when you’ve lived somewhere for a while there’s more to discover.

    Reply
  40. Wow, Kareni, what a great and eclectic list. Thank you for the recommendations – I love that there was a local 100 things to do guide in your list as well; it’s often the way that even when you’ve lived somewhere for a while there’s more to discover.

    Reply
  41. Oh, I love Margaret McPhee’s books, Vicki! She is a great Regency writer. The Prisoners of Geography book is fascinating and I liked it because I learned a lot of interesting facts about geography in an accessible way. It didn’t feel like a lecture but was totally engaging.

    Reply
  42. Oh, I love Margaret McPhee’s books, Vicki! She is a great Regency writer. The Prisoners of Geography book is fascinating and I liked it because I learned a lot of interesting facts about geography in an accessible way. It didn’t feel like a lecture but was totally engaging.

    Reply
  43. Oh, I love Margaret McPhee’s books, Vicki! She is a great Regency writer. The Prisoners of Geography book is fascinating and I liked it because I learned a lot of interesting facts about geography in an accessible way. It didn’t feel like a lecture but was totally engaging.

    Reply
  44. Oh, I love Margaret McPhee’s books, Vicki! She is a great Regency writer. The Prisoners of Geography book is fascinating and I liked it because I learned a lot of interesting facts about geography in an accessible way. It didn’t feel like a lecture but was totally engaging.

    Reply
  45. Oh, I love Margaret McPhee’s books, Vicki! She is a great Regency writer. The Prisoners of Geography book is fascinating and I liked it because I learned a lot of interesting facts about geography in an accessible way. It didn’t feel like a lecture but was totally engaging.

    Reply
  46. Love, love, love Dinah Dean’s Russian series (and all her other books too.)! I used to have the whole series in paperback but lost Tatya’s Story and have never found another copy. I do hope you can find them!

    Reply
  47. Love, love, love Dinah Dean’s Russian series (and all her other books too.)! I used to have the whole series in paperback but lost Tatya’s Story and have never found another copy. I do hope you can find them!

    Reply
  48. Love, love, love Dinah Dean’s Russian series (and all her other books too.)! I used to have the whole series in paperback but lost Tatya’s Story and have never found another copy. I do hope you can find them!

    Reply
  49. Love, love, love Dinah Dean’s Russian series (and all her other books too.)! I used to have the whole series in paperback but lost Tatya’s Story and have never found another copy. I do hope you can find them!

    Reply
  50. Love, love, love Dinah Dean’s Russian series (and all her other books too.)! I used to have the whole series in paperback but lost Tatya’s Story and have never found another copy. I do hope you can find them!

    Reply
  51. Thanks for the ideas for future books to read which you have listed above.
    This month due to the cold I have read quite a few books among them –
    Jasmine Guillory “The Proposal” I loved her first one “The Wedding Guest” and looking forward to the next one.
    Josie Silver “One Day In December” which was wonderful
    Eloisa James “Enchanting Pleasures” as I had read the other two ‘Pleasure’ books and had to read the missing one.
    Grace Burrowes last two of the Windham Brides which I enjoyed very much and have many more of hers waiting in line.
    Alexander McCall Smith tried his for the first time by reading “The Good Pilot Peter Woodhouse” I liked the stories of the characters and how the war affected them. Just finished his “Trains and Lovers” This was an interesting way of telling so many stories. I borrowed it from the library because of the title – I wanted a nice story about trains as tomorrow is my late husbands birthday and we travelled the route from Edinburgh to London several times and he loved trains so this was perfect.
    Now I am into the Devil Riders series by Anne Gracie. I had read two of them but now that I own all of them I will read them in order and number 2 is up next. Thanks Anne – I love them.

    Reply
  52. Thanks for the ideas for future books to read which you have listed above.
    This month due to the cold I have read quite a few books among them –
    Jasmine Guillory “The Proposal” I loved her first one “The Wedding Guest” and looking forward to the next one.
    Josie Silver “One Day In December” which was wonderful
    Eloisa James “Enchanting Pleasures” as I had read the other two ‘Pleasure’ books and had to read the missing one.
    Grace Burrowes last two of the Windham Brides which I enjoyed very much and have many more of hers waiting in line.
    Alexander McCall Smith tried his for the first time by reading “The Good Pilot Peter Woodhouse” I liked the stories of the characters and how the war affected them. Just finished his “Trains and Lovers” This was an interesting way of telling so many stories. I borrowed it from the library because of the title – I wanted a nice story about trains as tomorrow is my late husbands birthday and we travelled the route from Edinburgh to London several times and he loved trains so this was perfect.
    Now I am into the Devil Riders series by Anne Gracie. I had read two of them but now that I own all of them I will read them in order and number 2 is up next. Thanks Anne – I love them.

    Reply
  53. Thanks for the ideas for future books to read which you have listed above.
    This month due to the cold I have read quite a few books among them –
    Jasmine Guillory “The Proposal” I loved her first one “The Wedding Guest” and looking forward to the next one.
    Josie Silver “One Day In December” which was wonderful
    Eloisa James “Enchanting Pleasures” as I had read the other two ‘Pleasure’ books and had to read the missing one.
    Grace Burrowes last two of the Windham Brides which I enjoyed very much and have many more of hers waiting in line.
    Alexander McCall Smith tried his for the first time by reading “The Good Pilot Peter Woodhouse” I liked the stories of the characters and how the war affected them. Just finished his “Trains and Lovers” This was an interesting way of telling so many stories. I borrowed it from the library because of the title – I wanted a nice story about trains as tomorrow is my late husbands birthday and we travelled the route from Edinburgh to London several times and he loved trains so this was perfect.
    Now I am into the Devil Riders series by Anne Gracie. I had read two of them but now that I own all of them I will read them in order and number 2 is up next. Thanks Anne – I love them.

    Reply
  54. Thanks for the ideas for future books to read which you have listed above.
    This month due to the cold I have read quite a few books among them –
    Jasmine Guillory “The Proposal” I loved her first one “The Wedding Guest” and looking forward to the next one.
    Josie Silver “One Day In December” which was wonderful
    Eloisa James “Enchanting Pleasures” as I had read the other two ‘Pleasure’ books and had to read the missing one.
    Grace Burrowes last two of the Windham Brides which I enjoyed very much and have many more of hers waiting in line.
    Alexander McCall Smith tried his for the first time by reading “The Good Pilot Peter Woodhouse” I liked the stories of the characters and how the war affected them. Just finished his “Trains and Lovers” This was an interesting way of telling so many stories. I borrowed it from the library because of the title – I wanted a nice story about trains as tomorrow is my late husbands birthday and we travelled the route from Edinburgh to London several times and he loved trains so this was perfect.
    Now I am into the Devil Riders series by Anne Gracie. I had read two of them but now that I own all of them I will read them in order and number 2 is up next. Thanks Anne – I love them.

    Reply
  55. Thanks for the ideas for future books to read which you have listed above.
    This month due to the cold I have read quite a few books among them –
    Jasmine Guillory “The Proposal” I loved her first one “The Wedding Guest” and looking forward to the next one.
    Josie Silver “One Day In December” which was wonderful
    Eloisa James “Enchanting Pleasures” as I had read the other two ‘Pleasure’ books and had to read the missing one.
    Grace Burrowes last two of the Windham Brides which I enjoyed very much and have many more of hers waiting in line.
    Alexander McCall Smith tried his for the first time by reading “The Good Pilot Peter Woodhouse” I liked the stories of the characters and how the war affected them. Just finished his “Trains and Lovers” This was an interesting way of telling so many stories. I borrowed it from the library because of the title – I wanted a nice story about trains as tomorrow is my late husbands birthday and we travelled the route from Edinburgh to London several times and he loved trains so this was perfect.
    Now I am into the Devil Riders series by Anne Gracie. I had read two of them but now that I own all of them I will read them in order and number 2 is up next. Thanks Anne – I love them.

    Reply
  56. I’m reading Time’s Convert right now. I’m really enjoying it – seems a little more playful than the trilogy. The family scenes are a delight. I immediately searched out The Forgotten Beasts of Eld. I thought I had read all of Patricia McKillips books! Not so. Can’t wait to begin it.

    Reply
  57. I’m reading Time’s Convert right now. I’m really enjoying it – seems a little more playful than the trilogy. The family scenes are a delight. I immediately searched out The Forgotten Beasts of Eld. I thought I had read all of Patricia McKillips books! Not so. Can’t wait to begin it.

    Reply
  58. I’m reading Time’s Convert right now. I’m really enjoying it – seems a little more playful than the trilogy. The family scenes are a delight. I immediately searched out The Forgotten Beasts of Eld. I thought I had read all of Patricia McKillips books! Not so. Can’t wait to begin it.

    Reply
  59. I’m reading Time’s Convert right now. I’m really enjoying it – seems a little more playful than the trilogy. The family scenes are a delight. I immediately searched out The Forgotten Beasts of Eld. I thought I had read all of Patricia McKillips books! Not so. Can’t wait to begin it.

    Reply
  60. I’m reading Time’s Convert right now. I’m really enjoying it – seems a little more playful than the trilogy. The family scenes are a delight. I immediately searched out The Forgotten Beasts of Eld. I thought I had read all of Patricia McKillips books! Not so. Can’t wait to begin it.

    Reply
  61. Hi Jeanne! I’m glad you’re enjoying Time’s Convert – that’s a great recommendation. Enjoy The Forgotten Beasts of Eld; it’s always so lovely to discover something new by a favourite author isn’t it!

    Reply
  62. Hi Jeanne! I’m glad you’re enjoying Time’s Convert – that’s a great recommendation. Enjoy The Forgotten Beasts of Eld; it’s always so lovely to discover something new by a favourite author isn’t it!

    Reply
  63. Hi Jeanne! I’m glad you’re enjoying Time’s Convert – that’s a great recommendation. Enjoy The Forgotten Beasts of Eld; it’s always so lovely to discover something new by a favourite author isn’t it!

    Reply
  64. Hi Jeanne! I’m glad you’re enjoying Time’s Convert – that’s a great recommendation. Enjoy The Forgotten Beasts of Eld; it’s always so lovely to discover something new by a favourite author isn’t it!

    Reply
  65. Hi Jeanne! I’m glad you’re enjoying Time’s Convert – that’s a great recommendation. Enjoy The Forgotten Beasts of Eld; it’s always so lovely to discover something new by a favourite author isn’t it!

    Reply
  66. Right now I’m re-reading The Bastion Club series By Stephanie Laurens. I’m nearly done. Next on my list is Dukes Are Forever By Bec McMaster, which is the latest addition to London Steampunk: The Blue Blood Conspiracy Series. I absolutely love that series! Then I might read Capturing the Cavedweller’s Heart by Shanna Hatfield. It seems… interesting. On my list is also The World According to Bob By James Bowen. I also recommend the book A Street Cat Named Bob and the movie based on that book (don’t forget Kleenex).
    And now I have to brag: every once in a while I take a look at the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold and I have done some of the exercises suggested in the book and a few days ago I finally did it and sort of woke up inside my dream and I was able to have some control over it. As far as I know I’ve never had any flying dreams, but now I was totally flying. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  67. Right now I’m re-reading The Bastion Club series By Stephanie Laurens. I’m nearly done. Next on my list is Dukes Are Forever By Bec McMaster, which is the latest addition to London Steampunk: The Blue Blood Conspiracy Series. I absolutely love that series! Then I might read Capturing the Cavedweller’s Heart by Shanna Hatfield. It seems… interesting. On my list is also The World According to Bob By James Bowen. I also recommend the book A Street Cat Named Bob and the movie based on that book (don’t forget Kleenex).
    And now I have to brag: every once in a while I take a look at the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold and I have done some of the exercises suggested in the book and a few days ago I finally did it and sort of woke up inside my dream and I was able to have some control over it. As far as I know I’ve never had any flying dreams, but now I was totally flying. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  68. Right now I’m re-reading The Bastion Club series By Stephanie Laurens. I’m nearly done. Next on my list is Dukes Are Forever By Bec McMaster, which is the latest addition to London Steampunk: The Blue Blood Conspiracy Series. I absolutely love that series! Then I might read Capturing the Cavedweller’s Heart by Shanna Hatfield. It seems… interesting. On my list is also The World According to Bob By James Bowen. I also recommend the book A Street Cat Named Bob and the movie based on that book (don’t forget Kleenex).
    And now I have to brag: every once in a while I take a look at the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold and I have done some of the exercises suggested in the book and a few days ago I finally did it and sort of woke up inside my dream and I was able to have some control over it. As far as I know I’ve never had any flying dreams, but now I was totally flying. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  69. Right now I’m re-reading The Bastion Club series By Stephanie Laurens. I’m nearly done. Next on my list is Dukes Are Forever By Bec McMaster, which is the latest addition to London Steampunk: The Blue Blood Conspiracy Series. I absolutely love that series! Then I might read Capturing the Cavedweller’s Heart by Shanna Hatfield. It seems… interesting. On my list is also The World According to Bob By James Bowen. I also recommend the book A Street Cat Named Bob and the movie based on that book (don’t forget Kleenex).
    And now I have to brag: every once in a while I take a look at the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold and I have done some of the exercises suggested in the book and a few days ago I finally did it and sort of woke up inside my dream and I was able to have some control over it. As far as I know I’ve never had any flying dreams, but now I was totally flying. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  70. Right now I’m re-reading The Bastion Club series By Stephanie Laurens. I’m nearly done. Next on my list is Dukes Are Forever By Bec McMaster, which is the latest addition to London Steampunk: The Blue Blood Conspiracy Series. I absolutely love that series! Then I might read Capturing the Cavedweller’s Heart by Shanna Hatfield. It seems… interesting. On my list is also The World According to Bob By James Bowen. I also recommend the book A Street Cat Named Bob and the movie based on that book (don’t forget Kleenex).
    And now I have to brag: every once in a while I take a look at the book Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming by Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold and I have done some of the exercises suggested in the book and a few days ago I finally did it and sort of woke up inside my dream and I was able to have some control over it. As far as I know I’ve never had any flying dreams, but now I was totally flying. It was so much fun.

    Reply
  71. I definitely recommend the book. You can also write “lucid dreaming Stephen Laberge” on Youtube’s search field. Among other things, you can find animated book summary (it also gives summary of the techniques mentioned in the book) and Stephen Laberge’s IN DREAMS AWAKE lecture.

    Reply
  72. I definitely recommend the book. You can also write “lucid dreaming Stephen Laberge” on Youtube’s search field. Among other things, you can find animated book summary (it also gives summary of the techniques mentioned in the book) and Stephen Laberge’s IN DREAMS AWAKE lecture.

    Reply
  73. I definitely recommend the book. You can also write “lucid dreaming Stephen Laberge” on Youtube’s search field. Among other things, you can find animated book summary (it also gives summary of the techniques mentioned in the book) and Stephen Laberge’s IN DREAMS AWAKE lecture.

    Reply
  74. I definitely recommend the book. You can also write “lucid dreaming Stephen Laberge” on Youtube’s search field. Among other things, you can find animated book summary (it also gives summary of the techniques mentioned in the book) and Stephen Laberge’s IN DREAMS AWAKE lecture.

    Reply
  75. I definitely recommend the book. You can also write “lucid dreaming Stephen Laberge” on Youtube’s search field. Among other things, you can find animated book summary (it also gives summary of the techniques mentioned in the book) and Stephen Laberge’s IN DREAMS AWAKE lecture.

    Reply
  76. Mind you, it might take quite a while until this lucid dreaming thing works (or maybe not, but for me it took months), but there’s one thing you’ll notice right away: you are more likely to remember your dreams in the morning.

    Reply
  77. Mind you, it might take quite a while until this lucid dreaming thing works (or maybe not, but for me it took months), but there’s one thing you’ll notice right away: you are more likely to remember your dreams in the morning.

    Reply
  78. Mind you, it might take quite a while until this lucid dreaming thing works (or maybe not, but for me it took months), but there’s one thing you’ll notice right away: you are more likely to remember your dreams in the morning.

    Reply
  79. Mind you, it might take quite a while until this lucid dreaming thing works (or maybe not, but for me it took months), but there’s one thing you’ll notice right away: you are more likely to remember your dreams in the morning.

    Reply
  80. Mind you, it might take quite a while until this lucid dreaming thing works (or maybe not, but for me it took months), but there’s one thing you’ll notice right away: you are more likely to remember your dreams in the morning.

    Reply

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