What We’re Looking At In July

Image003Nicola here! It's time for our monthly What We're Reading column, but this month the Wenches have been out and about, travelling, attending conferences, moving house or in some cases disappearing under a huge mound of work and/or laundry! So instead of our monthly round up of books, we thought we would share What We Are Looking At instead. What better way to start than with Sparky, the Wench Godkitten, who provides us with the perfect image for this post.

On the subject of Sparky, Sherrie writes:

As far as “what I’m looking at,” it’s hard to see anything but the kitten. Until today, his crate rested on my desk. He’s moved to the next size crate—large dog size—and I’ve set it up beside my desk, so he’s still in my sightline where he keeps me entertained with his antics. Several times a day he’s let out of the crate and has free run of my desk and kitchen.

Mary Jo is also looking at her gorgeous animal companions:

I'm looking at CATS!  Go away for almost a week, and when you return, they're everywhere.  I have Grady and awards four cats, all adoptees, and I'll wake up in the morning with all three of the toms on the bed, assuring I don't slip away without feeding them breakfast.  (The tabby girl will be in the powder room, yowling to be fed first, away from all those big bossy toms.)  Here's the senior tom, Grady, looking like a space alien on top of a bookcase in my office.

From fur to feathers! Joanna writes:

When Nicola suggested we give everybody a glimpse of what we're doing … of what we're looking at … I said to myself something like —

  Hummingbird 9'What I'm doing is staring out the window and not writing and sorta, y'know, panicking because of the aforementioned.  Oh.  And watching hummingbirds.'

So Andrea said — 'That's your message right there, Joanna. Just snap a pic and you're done!''

Have you ever tried to photograph hummingbirds?  It makes capturing that word that's just on the tip of your tongue, (and it sounds like serendipity but it's not,) Hummingbird 12 seem easy.

Here are my poor attempts.  Did you know that hummingbirds fight?  They're fierce.  They dive bomb each other and chase each other away from the feeder.  Like jewels quarrelling.  Beautiful.

Joanna, we’re glad you were able to capture such beautiful pictures!

Brothers, 10, 6, 2Susan is doing that thing I love – poring over family photos. It always brings with it some lovely feelings of nostalgia:

Today I'm looking at some family photos and rearranging some of them in a new location. It's back to work tomorrow! Here are my three guys when they were young Jeremy_meets_Sean — and a photo of the middle brother meeting the youngest for the first time. 

Cara/Andrea is looking at the great outdoors:

I’m looking at the wild raspberries in my backyard and smiling. It’s been a tough summer for them. Andrea's berries They usually ripen around Fourth of July, but heavy rains, then searing heat delayed the process until this week. For a number of years, I’ve had an annual ritual of picking them at the height of flavor and making a homemade “Framboise” with sugar and vodka to serve throughout the winter as an after dinner cordial at parties—it’s always a huge hit with friends. (Trust me, it’s delicious, and the rich color looks very festive in tiny crystal glasses!) I admit that I also eat handfuls right off the prickly vines, their sun-warmed sweetness the very epitome of summer for me.

This year, the sight is more special than usual because Hurricane Sandy really hammered my property last November. I lost lots of towering 100 ft. pines, which crushed much of the smaller plantings when they came crashing down. Cleaning up the debris—lumberjacks with chainsaws and tractors dragging logs and branches out to be carted away—pretty much destroyed the rest. I had a huge thicket of wild blackberry bushes that right now is a patch of bare dirt since the stump grinder and excavator finished their work earlier this summer. It makes me a little sad to look at it  . . . but raspberry canes grow quickly, and it did my heart good to see them suddenly sprout up this spring in their old location. Rebirth, regeneration—the handful of berries I had this morning tasted extra sweet. 

BeansJo is also looking at the view outside and in particular the results of her hard work in the garden:

I'm looking with satisfaction at our runner beans. They're already producing delicious beans and I'll be stocking my freezer for the winter!

A crop of the runner beans. No, they didn't fight back and leave me bloody. The red Beans2 is from picking raspberries!

Nicola here, and I have been out and about too. July has been unusually warm and sunny in the UK, which has made it perfect for butterflies. I’ve been looking out for them on my walks with the dog. Last weekend we visited the ancient hunting ground of Savernake Forest. I love walking in Savernake. It has such an air of timeless history about it. I stand in awe, looking at oak trees that were saplings when King Henry VIII came hunting here.

At Savernake we were looking for the Purple Emperor butterfly. One thing I love about butterflies apart Purple Emperor 1 from their delicacy and jewel bright colours is that so many of them have unusual names and a rich and fascinating history. James Petiver named the Purple Emperor "Mr Dale's Purple Eye" in 1704 in honour of a fellow collector. By the middle of the 18th century it was known as the purple high flyer because of its penchant for living in treetops. It became the Purple Emperor in 1766, but in Germany it is" the large shimmer butterfly" and to the French "the greater flashing Mars" after the Roman God of War. Such impressive names for such a fragile creature! We found this one feeding on the ground.

Patpic1Pat has been moving in and getting sorted out in her new home.  This is what she is up against:

What I'm looking at–unpacked boxes and an empty living room! Can't decide Patpic2 what will fit into my cottage living area or where to hang all those photos!

 Finally Anne has been beachcombing and finding the most delicious things:

I went down to the beach the other day. I was having lunch with two other historical romance authors in Brighton — the Melbourne version, not any of the many other namesakes of the original Brighton Beach. I took my camera, thinking that I'd pop down to the beach afterward and take a photo of the Victorian-era beach huts there. http://bit.ly/13NuYOd They're historically protected, though their exterior colors aren't  exactly historic, and these days they're highly desirable properties.  Recently one sold for half a million dollars.

SaeGlass1However, it was easing into peak hour by the time I got there, and I overshot the car park turn off and ended up much further along from the beach huts. Thinking I'd walk off some of my very nice lunch, I took my camera and hit the beach to walk back. I walked on the sand, along the tide mark. Mistake. I'm a beachcomber to the core — I don't think I've ever come away from the beach without having picked something up. The moment I spotted the first little piece of sea-glass, my pace slowed to a crawl. I love sea-glass, and I use it to make jewellery. I didn't end up making it to the beach huts — I had to get to the city for a book launch — but I did end up with a lovely  collection of sea-glass.

We hope you have enjoyed this glimpse into what the Wenches have been looking at this month. SeaGlass Now it’s over to youwhat have you been looking at during July? Whether you have been travelling, visiting places, reading or just looking at the view from your window, we’d love to hear about it!

 

115 thoughts on “What We’re Looking At In July”

  1. Love the cat pictures and the raspberries brought back childhood memories. Delightful!
    It’s so easy to look and not see. I make it a point to see things as I walk each morning. Right now the bush roses are in their second bloom; the crepe myrtle is at full flower, and someone planted zinnas that are flourishing. I wish I knew the name of the wild blooms that thrive on big bushes by my favorite pond. The mainly pink and blush blooms are five petals, that appear to open at sunrise and close at sunset.
    My other favorite sight is the condo’s pool all blue and turquoise. I have to say that poolside is a more sense-orient (sensual implies something different) experience–the press of the humidity and the warm breeze through the trees–than a visual one. When I get in the water I savor the cool bite as I place that first ankle in the water and then the silky flow of water as I breast stroke back and forth after getting in all the way.

    Reply
  2. Love the cat pictures and the raspberries brought back childhood memories. Delightful!
    It’s so easy to look and not see. I make it a point to see things as I walk each morning. Right now the bush roses are in their second bloom; the crepe myrtle is at full flower, and someone planted zinnas that are flourishing. I wish I knew the name of the wild blooms that thrive on big bushes by my favorite pond. The mainly pink and blush blooms are five petals, that appear to open at sunrise and close at sunset.
    My other favorite sight is the condo’s pool all blue and turquoise. I have to say that poolside is a more sense-orient (sensual implies something different) experience–the press of the humidity and the warm breeze through the trees–than a visual one. When I get in the water I savor the cool bite as I place that first ankle in the water and then the silky flow of water as I breast stroke back and forth after getting in all the way.

    Reply
  3. Love the cat pictures and the raspberries brought back childhood memories. Delightful!
    It’s so easy to look and not see. I make it a point to see things as I walk each morning. Right now the bush roses are in their second bloom; the crepe myrtle is at full flower, and someone planted zinnas that are flourishing. I wish I knew the name of the wild blooms that thrive on big bushes by my favorite pond. The mainly pink and blush blooms are five petals, that appear to open at sunrise and close at sunset.
    My other favorite sight is the condo’s pool all blue and turquoise. I have to say that poolside is a more sense-orient (sensual implies something different) experience–the press of the humidity and the warm breeze through the trees–than a visual one. When I get in the water I savor the cool bite as I place that first ankle in the water and then the silky flow of water as I breast stroke back and forth after getting in all the way.

    Reply
  4. Love the cat pictures and the raspberries brought back childhood memories. Delightful!
    It’s so easy to look and not see. I make it a point to see things as I walk each morning. Right now the bush roses are in their second bloom; the crepe myrtle is at full flower, and someone planted zinnas that are flourishing. I wish I knew the name of the wild blooms that thrive on big bushes by my favorite pond. The mainly pink and blush blooms are five petals, that appear to open at sunrise and close at sunset.
    My other favorite sight is the condo’s pool all blue and turquoise. I have to say that poolside is a more sense-orient (sensual implies something different) experience–the press of the humidity and the warm breeze through the trees–than a visual one. When I get in the water I savor the cool bite as I place that first ankle in the water and then the silky flow of water as I breast stroke back and forth after getting in all the way.

    Reply
  5. Love the cat pictures and the raspberries brought back childhood memories. Delightful!
    It’s so easy to look and not see. I make it a point to see things as I walk each morning. Right now the bush roses are in their second bloom; the crepe myrtle is at full flower, and someone planted zinnas that are flourishing. I wish I knew the name of the wild blooms that thrive on big bushes by my favorite pond. The mainly pink and blush blooms are five petals, that appear to open at sunrise and close at sunset.
    My other favorite sight is the condo’s pool all blue and turquoise. I have to say that poolside is a more sense-orient (sensual implies something different) experience–the press of the humidity and the warm breeze through the trees–than a visual one. When I get in the water I savor the cool bite as I place that first ankle in the water and then the silky flow of water as I breast stroke back and forth after getting in all the way.

    Reply
  6. Hi Shannon. Isn’t Sparky the cutest? And such an appropriate picture. I loved the raspberries too. We found a load of them growing wild in Savernake last weekend. They were tiny, though, unlike those lovely luscious fruits in Cara/Andrea’s back yard!
    I absolutely loved your description of the condo’s pool. It really made me “feel” it as well as want to jump straight in. Thank you!

    Reply
  7. Hi Shannon. Isn’t Sparky the cutest? And such an appropriate picture. I loved the raspberries too. We found a load of them growing wild in Savernake last weekend. They were tiny, though, unlike those lovely luscious fruits in Cara/Andrea’s back yard!
    I absolutely loved your description of the condo’s pool. It really made me “feel” it as well as want to jump straight in. Thank you!

    Reply
  8. Hi Shannon. Isn’t Sparky the cutest? And such an appropriate picture. I loved the raspberries too. We found a load of them growing wild in Savernake last weekend. They were tiny, though, unlike those lovely luscious fruits in Cara/Andrea’s back yard!
    I absolutely loved your description of the condo’s pool. It really made me “feel” it as well as want to jump straight in. Thank you!

    Reply
  9. Hi Shannon. Isn’t Sparky the cutest? And such an appropriate picture. I loved the raspberries too. We found a load of them growing wild in Savernake last weekend. They were tiny, though, unlike those lovely luscious fruits in Cara/Andrea’s back yard!
    I absolutely loved your description of the condo’s pool. It really made me “feel” it as well as want to jump straight in. Thank you!

    Reply
  10. Hi Shannon. Isn’t Sparky the cutest? And such an appropriate picture. I loved the raspberries too. We found a load of them growing wild in Savernake last weekend. They were tiny, though, unlike those lovely luscious fruits in Cara/Andrea’s back yard!
    I absolutely loved your description of the condo’s pool. It really made me “feel” it as well as want to jump straight in. Thank you!

    Reply
  11. Brilliant sunsets, veggies and fruit. Dirty paint brushes, my version of the sunsets. This was the first time I ever did a commissioned picture, and the client says he LOVES it! (His caps, not mine!)

    Reply
  12. Brilliant sunsets, veggies and fruit. Dirty paint brushes, my version of the sunsets. This was the first time I ever did a commissioned picture, and the client says he LOVES it! (His caps, not mine!)

    Reply
  13. Brilliant sunsets, veggies and fruit. Dirty paint brushes, my version of the sunsets. This was the first time I ever did a commissioned picture, and the client says he LOVES it! (His caps, not mine!)

    Reply
  14. Brilliant sunsets, veggies and fruit. Dirty paint brushes, my version of the sunsets. This was the first time I ever did a commissioned picture, and the client says he LOVES it! (His caps, not mine!)

    Reply
  15. Brilliant sunsets, veggies and fruit. Dirty paint brushes, my version of the sunsets. This was the first time I ever did a commissioned picture, and the client says he LOVES it! (His caps, not mine!)

    Reply
  16. Last week I was looking at the sapphire blue seas of Byron Bay in northern NSW. Now home in Melbourne walking in the toe tingling frosty mornings on my exercise route to a local cafe. The thought of the coffee is the ONLY thing that gets me out pumping the pavement!

    Reply
  17. Last week I was looking at the sapphire blue seas of Byron Bay in northern NSW. Now home in Melbourne walking in the toe tingling frosty mornings on my exercise route to a local cafe. The thought of the coffee is the ONLY thing that gets me out pumping the pavement!

    Reply
  18. Last week I was looking at the sapphire blue seas of Byron Bay in northern NSW. Now home in Melbourne walking in the toe tingling frosty mornings on my exercise route to a local cafe. The thought of the coffee is the ONLY thing that gets me out pumping the pavement!

    Reply
  19. Last week I was looking at the sapphire blue seas of Byron Bay in northern NSW. Now home in Melbourne walking in the toe tingling frosty mornings on my exercise route to a local cafe. The thought of the coffee is the ONLY thing that gets me out pumping the pavement!

    Reply
  20. Last week I was looking at the sapphire blue seas of Byron Bay in northern NSW. Now home in Melbourne walking in the toe tingling frosty mornings on my exercise route to a local cafe. The thought of the coffee is the ONLY thing that gets me out pumping the pavement!

    Reply
  21. How diverse and lovely …. in July I’ve looked at the flocks of crows in the park where I daily walk my dog. I distinctly remember that in previous times, there were more pigeons and sparrows, and even some gulls, but not so many crows. Now sparrows and other small birds are quite rare, and the gulls are all gone. There also seem to be a lot less insects than in my youth.
    The crows are either all black or grey-breasted and black. I observed one of them bring a ripe cherry as a gift to another – he put the fruit right into his friend or lover’s beak. There are no cherry trees in the park, so I wondered how far he had carried the treat. This scene made me realise that there is more to birds than I gave them credit for. The crows also bath in the pond, right next to the ducks, though I haven’t seen them swim so far.
    Sometimes crows will provoke dogs on purpose, despite the danger, like young dare-devil teenagers.

    Reply
  22. How diverse and lovely …. in July I’ve looked at the flocks of crows in the park where I daily walk my dog. I distinctly remember that in previous times, there were more pigeons and sparrows, and even some gulls, but not so many crows. Now sparrows and other small birds are quite rare, and the gulls are all gone. There also seem to be a lot less insects than in my youth.
    The crows are either all black or grey-breasted and black. I observed one of them bring a ripe cherry as a gift to another – he put the fruit right into his friend or lover’s beak. There are no cherry trees in the park, so I wondered how far he had carried the treat. This scene made me realise that there is more to birds than I gave them credit for. The crows also bath in the pond, right next to the ducks, though I haven’t seen them swim so far.
    Sometimes crows will provoke dogs on purpose, despite the danger, like young dare-devil teenagers.

    Reply
  23. How diverse and lovely …. in July I’ve looked at the flocks of crows in the park where I daily walk my dog. I distinctly remember that in previous times, there were more pigeons and sparrows, and even some gulls, but not so many crows. Now sparrows and other small birds are quite rare, and the gulls are all gone. There also seem to be a lot less insects than in my youth.
    The crows are either all black or grey-breasted and black. I observed one of them bring a ripe cherry as a gift to another – he put the fruit right into his friend or lover’s beak. There are no cherry trees in the park, so I wondered how far he had carried the treat. This scene made me realise that there is more to birds than I gave them credit for. The crows also bath in the pond, right next to the ducks, though I haven’t seen them swim so far.
    Sometimes crows will provoke dogs on purpose, despite the danger, like young dare-devil teenagers.

    Reply
  24. How diverse and lovely …. in July I’ve looked at the flocks of crows in the park where I daily walk my dog. I distinctly remember that in previous times, there were more pigeons and sparrows, and even some gulls, but not so many crows. Now sparrows and other small birds are quite rare, and the gulls are all gone. There also seem to be a lot less insects than in my youth.
    The crows are either all black or grey-breasted and black. I observed one of them bring a ripe cherry as a gift to another – he put the fruit right into his friend or lover’s beak. There are no cherry trees in the park, so I wondered how far he had carried the treat. This scene made me realise that there is more to birds than I gave them credit for. The crows also bath in the pond, right next to the ducks, though I haven’t seen them swim so far.
    Sometimes crows will provoke dogs on purpose, despite the danger, like young dare-devil teenagers.

    Reply
  25. How diverse and lovely …. in July I’ve looked at the flocks of crows in the park where I daily walk my dog. I distinctly remember that in previous times, there were more pigeons and sparrows, and even some gulls, but not so many crows. Now sparrows and other small birds are quite rare, and the gulls are all gone. There also seem to be a lot less insects than in my youth.
    The crows are either all black or grey-breasted and black. I observed one of them bring a ripe cherry as a gift to another – he put the fruit right into his friend or lover’s beak. There are no cherry trees in the park, so I wondered how far he had carried the treat. This scene made me realise that there is more to birds than I gave them credit for. The crows also bath in the pond, right next to the ducks, though I haven’t seen them swim so far.
    Sometimes crows will provoke dogs on purpose, despite the danger, like young dare-devil teenagers.

    Reply
  26. Most of the month I’ve been working on a rush project, trying to meet a deadline, and so I’ve been seeing a computer screen with white pages filling up with black letters, sometimes for sustained periods when my fingers can scarcely keep pace with my thoughts and sometimes in fits and starts. Occasionally the thoughts dry up, and I stare at the white screen or at a blue water bottle or at an orange bunny named Flannery who lives on a corner of my desk. One day I went back-to-school shopping with the grands and came home from the office supply store, which I find almost as irresistible as a bookstore, with post-its in purple and aqua in the shape of high heels and purses with color coordinated paper clips and binder clips and a rainbow of markers and two dozen notebooks, including one with bright purple flowers and another with stripes of pink and burgundy and teal and lemon. This last day of July I’ve been out running errands, looking at angry gray skies and rain falling in silver sheets and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors shielding people moving at double speed and sometimes sliding on slick pavement.

    Reply
  27. Most of the month I’ve been working on a rush project, trying to meet a deadline, and so I’ve been seeing a computer screen with white pages filling up with black letters, sometimes for sustained periods when my fingers can scarcely keep pace with my thoughts and sometimes in fits and starts. Occasionally the thoughts dry up, and I stare at the white screen or at a blue water bottle or at an orange bunny named Flannery who lives on a corner of my desk. One day I went back-to-school shopping with the grands and came home from the office supply store, which I find almost as irresistible as a bookstore, with post-its in purple and aqua in the shape of high heels and purses with color coordinated paper clips and binder clips and a rainbow of markers and two dozen notebooks, including one with bright purple flowers and another with stripes of pink and burgundy and teal and lemon. This last day of July I’ve been out running errands, looking at angry gray skies and rain falling in silver sheets and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors shielding people moving at double speed and sometimes sliding on slick pavement.

    Reply
  28. Most of the month I’ve been working on a rush project, trying to meet a deadline, and so I’ve been seeing a computer screen with white pages filling up with black letters, sometimes for sustained periods when my fingers can scarcely keep pace with my thoughts and sometimes in fits and starts. Occasionally the thoughts dry up, and I stare at the white screen or at a blue water bottle or at an orange bunny named Flannery who lives on a corner of my desk. One day I went back-to-school shopping with the grands and came home from the office supply store, which I find almost as irresistible as a bookstore, with post-its in purple and aqua in the shape of high heels and purses with color coordinated paper clips and binder clips and a rainbow of markers and two dozen notebooks, including one with bright purple flowers and another with stripes of pink and burgundy and teal and lemon. This last day of July I’ve been out running errands, looking at angry gray skies and rain falling in silver sheets and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors shielding people moving at double speed and sometimes sliding on slick pavement.

    Reply
  29. Most of the month I’ve been working on a rush project, trying to meet a deadline, and so I’ve been seeing a computer screen with white pages filling up with black letters, sometimes for sustained periods when my fingers can scarcely keep pace with my thoughts and sometimes in fits and starts. Occasionally the thoughts dry up, and I stare at the white screen or at a blue water bottle or at an orange bunny named Flannery who lives on a corner of my desk. One day I went back-to-school shopping with the grands and came home from the office supply store, which I find almost as irresistible as a bookstore, with post-its in purple and aqua in the shape of high heels and purses with color coordinated paper clips and binder clips and a rainbow of markers and two dozen notebooks, including one with bright purple flowers and another with stripes of pink and burgundy and teal and lemon. This last day of July I’ve been out running errands, looking at angry gray skies and rain falling in silver sheets and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors shielding people moving at double speed and sometimes sliding on slick pavement.

    Reply
  30. Most of the month I’ve been working on a rush project, trying to meet a deadline, and so I’ve been seeing a computer screen with white pages filling up with black letters, sometimes for sustained periods when my fingers can scarcely keep pace with my thoughts and sometimes in fits and starts. Occasionally the thoughts dry up, and I stare at the white screen or at a blue water bottle or at an orange bunny named Flannery who lives on a corner of my desk. One day I went back-to-school shopping with the grands and came home from the office supply store, which I find almost as irresistible as a bookstore, with post-its in purple and aqua in the shape of high heels and purses with color coordinated paper clips and binder clips and a rainbow of markers and two dozen notebooks, including one with bright purple flowers and another with stripes of pink and burgundy and teal and lemon. This last day of July I’ve been out running errands, looking at angry gray skies and rain falling in silver sheets and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors shielding people moving at double speed and sometimes sliding on slick pavement.

    Reply
  31. Ms Johanna…
    I’ve been trying for several years to get a “good” photo of a humming bird. Mostly I tend to move the camera when I click the picture. They are little “buzz bombs”.

    Reply
  32. Ms Johanna…
    I’ve been trying for several years to get a “good” photo of a humming bird. Mostly I tend to move the camera when I click the picture. They are little “buzz bombs”.

    Reply
  33. Ms Johanna…
    I’ve been trying for several years to get a “good” photo of a humming bird. Mostly I tend to move the camera when I click the picture. They are little “buzz bombs”.

    Reply
  34. Ms Johanna…
    I’ve been trying for several years to get a “good” photo of a humming bird. Mostly I tend to move the camera when I click the picture. They are little “buzz bombs”.

    Reply
  35. Ms Johanna…
    I’ve been trying for several years to get a “good” photo of a humming bird. Mostly I tend to move the camera when I click the picture. They are little “buzz bombs”.

    Reply
  36. I had a young, distant relative, and friend, visiting me from Sweden this past month and showed them around all the wonderful monuments here in Washington,DC.
    Though I have seen them many times over the years, I am still impressed by the beauty of these various structures and awed by the history they tell. Every time I cross the Mall and look up at the Capital it takes my breathe away.

    Reply
  37. I had a young, distant relative, and friend, visiting me from Sweden this past month and showed them around all the wonderful monuments here in Washington,DC.
    Though I have seen them many times over the years, I am still impressed by the beauty of these various structures and awed by the history they tell. Every time I cross the Mall and look up at the Capital it takes my breathe away.

    Reply
  38. I had a young, distant relative, and friend, visiting me from Sweden this past month and showed them around all the wonderful monuments here in Washington,DC.
    Though I have seen them many times over the years, I am still impressed by the beauty of these various structures and awed by the history they tell. Every time I cross the Mall and look up at the Capital it takes my breathe away.

    Reply
  39. I had a young, distant relative, and friend, visiting me from Sweden this past month and showed them around all the wonderful monuments here in Washington,DC.
    Though I have seen them many times over the years, I am still impressed by the beauty of these various structures and awed by the history they tell. Every time I cross the Mall and look up at the Capital it takes my breathe away.

    Reply
  40. I had a young, distant relative, and friend, visiting me from Sweden this past month and showed them around all the wonderful monuments here in Washington,DC.
    Though I have seen them many times over the years, I am still impressed by the beauty of these various structures and awed by the history they tell. Every time I cross the Mall and look up at the Capital it takes my breathe away.

    Reply
  41. Sherrie here. Wow! Just . . . wow!!! I am blown away by the reader comments. Each of your descriptions were just so lovely, so evocative, so rich. What I especially love is how you described what would normally be considered mundane things. Janga, your angry skies and silver sheets of rain and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors painted an immediate picture. Your wording and observations were p;erfect!
    Shannon, you’re right when you say it’s so easy to look and not see. I’m glad you’re enjoying the pictures of Sparky. (Yes, the kitten finally has a name!)
    I have lots of wall space in my home, and hearly every inch is covered with artwork. I’m a very visual person and pretty things make me happy, so I surround myself with pretty things. I’ve just finished 2 large picture groupings–one of horses and one of flowers–and though I’ve seen most of the pictures hundreds of times, they still give me great joy.

    Reply
  42. Sherrie here. Wow! Just . . . wow!!! I am blown away by the reader comments. Each of your descriptions were just so lovely, so evocative, so rich. What I especially love is how you described what would normally be considered mundane things. Janga, your angry skies and silver sheets of rain and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors painted an immediate picture. Your wording and observations were p;erfect!
    Shannon, you’re right when you say it’s so easy to look and not see. I’m glad you’re enjoying the pictures of Sparky. (Yes, the kitten finally has a name!)
    I have lots of wall space in my home, and hearly every inch is covered with artwork. I’m a very visual person and pretty things make me happy, so I surround myself with pretty things. I’ve just finished 2 large picture groupings–one of horses and one of flowers–and though I’ve seen most of the pictures hundreds of times, they still give me great joy.

    Reply
  43. Sherrie here. Wow! Just . . . wow!!! I am blown away by the reader comments. Each of your descriptions were just so lovely, so evocative, so rich. What I especially love is how you described what would normally be considered mundane things. Janga, your angry skies and silver sheets of rain and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors painted an immediate picture. Your wording and observations were p;erfect!
    Shannon, you’re right when you say it’s so easy to look and not see. I’m glad you’re enjoying the pictures of Sparky. (Yes, the kitten finally has a name!)
    I have lots of wall space in my home, and hearly every inch is covered with artwork. I’m a very visual person and pretty things make me happy, so I surround myself with pretty things. I’ve just finished 2 large picture groupings–one of horses and one of flowers–and though I’ve seen most of the pictures hundreds of times, they still give me great joy.

    Reply
  44. Sherrie here. Wow! Just . . . wow!!! I am blown away by the reader comments. Each of your descriptions were just so lovely, so evocative, so rich. What I especially love is how you described what would normally be considered mundane things. Janga, your angry skies and silver sheets of rain and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors painted an immediate picture. Your wording and observations were p;erfect!
    Shannon, you’re right when you say it’s so easy to look and not see. I’m glad you’re enjoying the pictures of Sparky. (Yes, the kitten finally has a name!)
    I have lots of wall space in my home, and hearly every inch is covered with artwork. I’m a very visual person and pretty things make me happy, so I surround myself with pretty things. I’ve just finished 2 large picture groupings–one of horses and one of flowers–and though I’ve seen most of the pictures hundreds of times, they still give me great joy.

    Reply
  45. Sherrie here. Wow! Just . . . wow!!! I am blown away by the reader comments. Each of your descriptions were just so lovely, so evocative, so rich. What I especially love is how you described what would normally be considered mundane things. Janga, your angry skies and silver sheets of rain and umbrellas in bright, defiant colors painted an immediate picture. Your wording and observations were p;erfect!
    Shannon, you’re right when you say it’s so easy to look and not see. I’m glad you’re enjoying the pictures of Sparky. (Yes, the kitten finally has a name!)
    I have lots of wall space in my home, and hearly every inch is covered with artwork. I’m a very visual person and pretty things make me happy, so I surround myself with pretty things. I’ve just finished 2 large picture groupings–one of horses and one of flowers–and though I’ve seen most of the pictures hundreds of times, they still give me great joy.

    Reply
  46. Hi Louis —
    Hummingbirds are never, in pictures, what they are i real life. Pictures just five no idea of them.
    Our Anne Gracie first saw hummingbirds when she visited the US. They impressed her, says she.
    Another thing they don’t seem to have elsewhere is lightning bugs.

    Reply
  47. Hi Louis —
    Hummingbirds are never, in pictures, what they are i real life. Pictures just five no idea of them.
    Our Anne Gracie first saw hummingbirds when she visited the US. They impressed her, says she.
    Another thing they don’t seem to have elsewhere is lightning bugs.

    Reply
  48. Hi Louis —
    Hummingbirds are never, in pictures, what they are i real life. Pictures just five no idea of them.
    Our Anne Gracie first saw hummingbirds when she visited the US. They impressed her, says she.
    Another thing they don’t seem to have elsewhere is lightning bugs.

    Reply
  49. Hi Louis —
    Hummingbirds are never, in pictures, what they are i real life. Pictures just five no idea of them.
    Our Anne Gracie first saw hummingbirds when she visited the US. They impressed her, says she.
    Another thing they don’t seem to have elsewhere is lightning bugs.

    Reply
  50. Hi Louis —
    Hummingbirds are never, in pictures, what they are i real life. Pictures just five no idea of them.
    Our Anne Gracie first saw hummingbirds when she visited the US. They impressed her, says she.
    Another thing they don’t seem to have elsewhere is lightning bugs.

    Reply
  51. Hi Alison —
    I grew up in the northern suburbs of Washington DC, but I never went up to the top of the Washington Monument, never visited the Lincoln Memorial, never saw fireworks on the Mall, never saw the cherry blossoms until … yep, you guessed it —
    Showing European friends around the city when I was all growed up.

    Reply
  52. Hi Alison —
    I grew up in the northern suburbs of Washington DC, but I never went up to the top of the Washington Monument, never visited the Lincoln Memorial, never saw fireworks on the Mall, never saw the cherry blossoms until … yep, you guessed it —
    Showing European friends around the city when I was all growed up.

    Reply
  53. Hi Alison —
    I grew up in the northern suburbs of Washington DC, but I never went up to the top of the Washington Monument, never visited the Lincoln Memorial, never saw fireworks on the Mall, never saw the cherry blossoms until … yep, you guessed it —
    Showing European friends around the city when I was all growed up.

    Reply
  54. Hi Alison —
    I grew up in the northern suburbs of Washington DC, but I never went up to the top of the Washington Monument, never visited the Lincoln Memorial, never saw fireworks on the Mall, never saw the cherry blossoms until … yep, you guessed it —
    Showing European friends around the city when I was all growed up.

    Reply
  55. Hi Alison —
    I grew up in the northern suburbs of Washington DC, but I never went up to the top of the Washington Monument, never visited the Lincoln Memorial, never saw fireworks on the Mall, never saw the cherry blossoms until … yep, you guessed it —
    Showing European friends around the city when I was all growed up.

    Reply
  56. Cara, I could be very wrong–I often am–but I have this sneaking suspicion that within five years, you will again have a large wild blackberry thicket.
    They’re not usually quite that easy to get rid of.
    Watch for sucker canes next spring. 😉

    Reply
  57. Cara, I could be very wrong–I often am–but I have this sneaking suspicion that within five years, you will again have a large wild blackberry thicket.
    They’re not usually quite that easy to get rid of.
    Watch for sucker canes next spring. 😉

    Reply
  58. Cara, I could be very wrong–I often am–but I have this sneaking suspicion that within five years, you will again have a large wild blackberry thicket.
    They’re not usually quite that easy to get rid of.
    Watch for sucker canes next spring. 😉

    Reply
  59. Cara, I could be very wrong–I often am–but I have this sneaking suspicion that within five years, you will again have a large wild blackberry thicket.
    They’re not usually quite that easy to get rid of.
    Watch for sucker canes next spring. 😉

    Reply
  60. Cara, I could be very wrong–I often am–but I have this sneaking suspicion that within five years, you will again have a large wild blackberry thicket.
    They’re not usually quite that easy to get rid of.
    Watch for sucker canes next spring. 😉

    Reply
  61. I am loving all the word pictures that are coming in — Janga, that was wonderfully evocative writing! The world is beautiful place, no matter where you are.
    I did indeed see my first hummingbirds in the US, darting and hovering around Mary Jo’s hanging baskets and a feeder. Beautiful. I’ve just looked through my photos from then and they’re mostly of snoozing cats and labyrinths — things that keep still and are easy to photograph.

    Reply
  62. I am loving all the word pictures that are coming in — Janga, that was wonderfully evocative writing! The world is beautiful place, no matter where you are.
    I did indeed see my first hummingbirds in the US, darting and hovering around Mary Jo’s hanging baskets and a feeder. Beautiful. I’ve just looked through my photos from then and they’re mostly of snoozing cats and labyrinths — things that keep still and are easy to photograph.

    Reply
  63. I am loving all the word pictures that are coming in — Janga, that was wonderfully evocative writing! The world is beautiful place, no matter where you are.
    I did indeed see my first hummingbirds in the US, darting and hovering around Mary Jo’s hanging baskets and a feeder. Beautiful. I’ve just looked through my photos from then and they’re mostly of snoozing cats and labyrinths — things that keep still and are easy to photograph.

    Reply
  64. I am loving all the word pictures that are coming in — Janga, that was wonderfully evocative writing! The world is beautiful place, no matter where you are.
    I did indeed see my first hummingbirds in the US, darting and hovering around Mary Jo’s hanging baskets and a feeder. Beautiful. I’ve just looked through my photos from then and they’re mostly of snoozing cats and labyrinths — things that keep still and are easy to photograph.

    Reply
  65. I am loving all the word pictures that are coming in — Janga, that was wonderfully evocative writing! The world is beautiful place, no matter where you are.
    I did indeed see my first hummingbirds in the US, darting and hovering around Mary Jo’s hanging baskets and a feeder. Beautiful. I’ve just looked through my photos from then and they’re mostly of snoozing cats and labyrinths — things that keep still and are easy to photograph.

    Reply
  66. Late to the party, and after reading these beautiful and evocative posts, I’m a bit intimidated here!
    Be that as it may, pretty much all I saw in July was rain and more rain, and yet more rain! Record breaking month here for rainfall. But there is a part of me that enjoyed it, appreciated it. It is awe inspiring to watch a two-inch-per-hour torrential rainfall. It put me in mind of e. e. cummings beautiful line describing the subtle power of rain, “no one, not even the rain has such small hands.”
    Joanna – what about bluebirds? Do you see them where you are. One of my favorite memories of living in N. Va. (Clarke Co.) was walking through an old orchard and coming upon scores of bluebirds with the late afternoon sun glistening off of their sapphire feathers.

    Reply
  67. Late to the party, and after reading these beautiful and evocative posts, I’m a bit intimidated here!
    Be that as it may, pretty much all I saw in July was rain and more rain, and yet more rain! Record breaking month here for rainfall. But there is a part of me that enjoyed it, appreciated it. It is awe inspiring to watch a two-inch-per-hour torrential rainfall. It put me in mind of e. e. cummings beautiful line describing the subtle power of rain, “no one, not even the rain has such small hands.”
    Joanna – what about bluebirds? Do you see them where you are. One of my favorite memories of living in N. Va. (Clarke Co.) was walking through an old orchard and coming upon scores of bluebirds with the late afternoon sun glistening off of their sapphire feathers.

    Reply
  68. Late to the party, and after reading these beautiful and evocative posts, I’m a bit intimidated here!
    Be that as it may, pretty much all I saw in July was rain and more rain, and yet more rain! Record breaking month here for rainfall. But there is a part of me that enjoyed it, appreciated it. It is awe inspiring to watch a two-inch-per-hour torrential rainfall. It put me in mind of e. e. cummings beautiful line describing the subtle power of rain, “no one, not even the rain has such small hands.”
    Joanna – what about bluebirds? Do you see them where you are. One of my favorite memories of living in N. Va. (Clarke Co.) was walking through an old orchard and coming upon scores of bluebirds with the late afternoon sun glistening off of their sapphire feathers.

    Reply
  69. Late to the party, and after reading these beautiful and evocative posts, I’m a bit intimidated here!
    Be that as it may, pretty much all I saw in July was rain and more rain, and yet more rain! Record breaking month here for rainfall. But there is a part of me that enjoyed it, appreciated it. It is awe inspiring to watch a two-inch-per-hour torrential rainfall. It put me in mind of e. e. cummings beautiful line describing the subtle power of rain, “no one, not even the rain has such small hands.”
    Joanna – what about bluebirds? Do you see them where you are. One of my favorite memories of living in N. Va. (Clarke Co.) was walking through an old orchard and coming upon scores of bluebirds with the late afternoon sun glistening off of their sapphire feathers.

    Reply
  70. Late to the party, and after reading these beautiful and evocative posts, I’m a bit intimidated here!
    Be that as it may, pretty much all I saw in July was rain and more rain, and yet more rain! Record breaking month here for rainfall. But there is a part of me that enjoyed it, appreciated it. It is awe inspiring to watch a two-inch-per-hour torrential rainfall. It put me in mind of e. e. cummings beautiful line describing the subtle power of rain, “no one, not even the rain has such small hands.”
    Joanna – what about bluebirds? Do you see them where you are. One of my favorite memories of living in N. Va. (Clarke Co.) was walking through an old orchard and coming upon scores of bluebirds with the late afternoon sun glistening off of their sapphire feathers.

    Reply
  71. Thank you everyone, your descriptions and the beautiful pictures are lovely.
    For part of the summer, I watched a family of Carolina wrens raise their young who happened to live in my garage. When they were all able to actually fly, (they needed tails for that), they then took turns rolling in the water I put in the plant saucer for them.
    I watched one of my emerald colored lizards stand on top of a trash can, turning brown and waiting to catch a passing fly. He must be successful because he is there every day.
    I watched the giant brown and beige toad sit in different potted plants and make a nest in the cool dirt. (he is not crazy about being watered)
    And finally I watched the cloudless summer sky – we had some rain but not enough.

    Reply
  72. Thank you everyone, your descriptions and the beautiful pictures are lovely.
    For part of the summer, I watched a family of Carolina wrens raise their young who happened to live in my garage. When they were all able to actually fly, (they needed tails for that), they then took turns rolling in the water I put in the plant saucer for them.
    I watched one of my emerald colored lizards stand on top of a trash can, turning brown and waiting to catch a passing fly. He must be successful because he is there every day.
    I watched the giant brown and beige toad sit in different potted plants and make a nest in the cool dirt. (he is not crazy about being watered)
    And finally I watched the cloudless summer sky – we had some rain but not enough.

    Reply
  73. Thank you everyone, your descriptions and the beautiful pictures are lovely.
    For part of the summer, I watched a family of Carolina wrens raise their young who happened to live in my garage. When they were all able to actually fly, (they needed tails for that), they then took turns rolling in the water I put in the plant saucer for them.
    I watched one of my emerald colored lizards stand on top of a trash can, turning brown and waiting to catch a passing fly. He must be successful because he is there every day.
    I watched the giant brown and beige toad sit in different potted plants and make a nest in the cool dirt. (he is not crazy about being watered)
    And finally I watched the cloudless summer sky – we had some rain but not enough.

    Reply
  74. Thank you everyone, your descriptions and the beautiful pictures are lovely.
    For part of the summer, I watched a family of Carolina wrens raise their young who happened to live in my garage. When they were all able to actually fly, (they needed tails for that), they then took turns rolling in the water I put in the plant saucer for them.
    I watched one of my emerald colored lizards stand on top of a trash can, turning brown and waiting to catch a passing fly. He must be successful because he is there every day.
    I watched the giant brown and beige toad sit in different potted plants and make a nest in the cool dirt. (he is not crazy about being watered)
    And finally I watched the cloudless summer sky – we had some rain but not enough.

    Reply
  75. Thank you everyone, your descriptions and the beautiful pictures are lovely.
    For part of the summer, I watched a family of Carolina wrens raise their young who happened to live in my garage. When they were all able to actually fly, (they needed tails for that), they then took turns rolling in the water I put in the plant saucer for them.
    I watched one of my emerald colored lizards stand on top of a trash can, turning brown and waiting to catch a passing fly. He must be successful because he is there every day.
    I watched the giant brown and beige toad sit in different potted plants and make a nest in the cool dirt. (he is not crazy about being watered)
    And finally I watched the cloudless summer sky – we had some rain but not enough.

    Reply
  76. I can’t be evocative or descriptive anything else. Most of July has been taken up with water in the elevator pit and the only description I can give you is “Yech!” (plus “It’ll cost how much?!”

    Reply
  77. I can’t be evocative or descriptive anything else. Most of July has been taken up with water in the elevator pit and the only description I can give you is “Yech!” (plus “It’ll cost how much?!”

    Reply
  78. I can’t be evocative or descriptive anything else. Most of July has been taken up with water in the elevator pit and the only description I can give you is “Yech!” (plus “It’ll cost how much?!”

    Reply
  79. I can’t be evocative or descriptive anything else. Most of July has been taken up with water in the elevator pit and the only description I can give you is “Yech!” (plus “It’ll cost how much?!”

    Reply
  80. I can’t be evocative or descriptive anything else. Most of July has been taken up with water in the elevator pit and the only description I can give you is “Yech!” (plus “It’ll cost how much?!”

    Reply
  81. Everyones’ descriptions are so lovely and now my mouth is watering for wild raspberries.
    I’ve been keeping odd hours and seeing the moon at night; there was a very big full moon in July. It’s beautiful coming up over the ocean(on the East Coast of the U.S. where I am)
    I’ve also been seeing tomatoes-they ripened earlier this year, maybe because of the heat wave, so I’ve been eating my Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes, which are a beautiful deep ruby red, solid flesh, all the way through. Well worth growing if you’re a gardener.

    Reply
  82. Everyones’ descriptions are so lovely and now my mouth is watering for wild raspberries.
    I’ve been keeping odd hours and seeing the moon at night; there was a very big full moon in July. It’s beautiful coming up over the ocean(on the East Coast of the U.S. where I am)
    I’ve also been seeing tomatoes-they ripened earlier this year, maybe because of the heat wave, so I’ve been eating my Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes, which are a beautiful deep ruby red, solid flesh, all the way through. Well worth growing if you’re a gardener.

    Reply
  83. Everyones’ descriptions are so lovely and now my mouth is watering for wild raspberries.
    I’ve been keeping odd hours and seeing the moon at night; there was a very big full moon in July. It’s beautiful coming up over the ocean(on the East Coast of the U.S. where I am)
    I’ve also been seeing tomatoes-they ripened earlier this year, maybe because of the heat wave, so I’ve been eating my Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes, which are a beautiful deep ruby red, solid flesh, all the way through. Well worth growing if you’re a gardener.

    Reply
  84. Everyones’ descriptions are so lovely and now my mouth is watering for wild raspberries.
    I’ve been keeping odd hours and seeing the moon at night; there was a very big full moon in July. It’s beautiful coming up over the ocean(on the East Coast of the U.S. where I am)
    I’ve also been seeing tomatoes-they ripened earlier this year, maybe because of the heat wave, so I’ve been eating my Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes, which are a beautiful deep ruby red, solid flesh, all the way through. Well worth growing if you’re a gardener.

    Reply
  85. Everyones’ descriptions are so lovely and now my mouth is watering for wild raspberries.
    I’ve been keeping odd hours and seeing the moon at night; there was a very big full moon in July. It’s beautiful coming up over the ocean(on the East Coast of the U.S. where I am)
    I’ve also been seeing tomatoes-they ripened earlier this year, maybe because of the heat wave, so I’ve been eating my Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes, which are a beautiful deep ruby red, solid flesh, all the way through. Well worth growing if you’re a gardener.

    Reply
  86. Yikes, Artemisia. I hope it’s fixed now – and not too expensively!
    I love all the different views on the natural world, from Donna’s rain to Annette’s birds and amphibians.
    Karin, I’ve been watching the moon too, albeit over Oxfordshire not the East Coast. It’s one of the joys of taking my dog for his evening walk. We go around the fields and look at the moon and stars.

    Reply
  87. Yikes, Artemisia. I hope it’s fixed now – and not too expensively!
    I love all the different views on the natural world, from Donna’s rain to Annette’s birds and amphibians.
    Karin, I’ve been watching the moon too, albeit over Oxfordshire not the East Coast. It’s one of the joys of taking my dog for his evening walk. We go around the fields and look at the moon and stars.

    Reply
  88. Yikes, Artemisia. I hope it’s fixed now – and not too expensively!
    I love all the different views on the natural world, from Donna’s rain to Annette’s birds and amphibians.
    Karin, I’ve been watching the moon too, albeit over Oxfordshire not the East Coast. It’s one of the joys of taking my dog for his evening walk. We go around the fields and look at the moon and stars.

    Reply
  89. Yikes, Artemisia. I hope it’s fixed now – and not too expensively!
    I love all the different views on the natural world, from Donna’s rain to Annette’s birds and amphibians.
    Karin, I’ve been watching the moon too, albeit over Oxfordshire not the East Coast. It’s one of the joys of taking my dog for his evening walk. We go around the fields and look at the moon and stars.

    Reply
  90. Yikes, Artemisia. I hope it’s fixed now – and not too expensively!
    I love all the different views on the natural world, from Donna’s rain to Annette’s birds and amphibians.
    Karin, I’ve been watching the moon too, albeit over Oxfordshire not the East Coast. It’s one of the joys of taking my dog for his evening walk. We go around the fields and look at the moon and stars.

    Reply

Leave a Comment