What We Are Reading-August

Sweep This month's What We Are Reading feature takes us on our usual delightful peregrinations through different worlds and different eras. So get pencil and paper ready to start making notes for your TBR pile!

Anne here:
The latest in Ilona Andrews' "Innkeeper Chronicles" series, Sweep of the Blade, came out this month, and the minute I started it, I realized I wanted to go back to the beginning and read all four books in order. Which I did. I really enjoy these books and the world of the Innkeeper — they're fantasy/paranormal, with magic, werewolves, vampires and aliens — and a few years back that would have been enough to put me off. Not any more. 

WorkOfArtInnkeepers are people who have a special magical bond with their inn — they can configure it any way they want, even to breaking rules of physics — and their purpose is to provide a safe haven for their guests, who come from all over the galaxy. The guests must be sworn to keep the knowledge of aliens etc from  ordinary humans. So we're dealing with small town Texas and a galaxy of other-wordly visitors. The books are action-packed and entertaining, and the slowly developing romance very satisfying. If you haven't tried urban fantasy before, give this one a try and start with book 1, Clean Sweep

The second recommendation I have is for a Regency—The Work of Art, by Mimi Matthews—which was recommended by wenchly reader Karin last month. With a starred review from Publisher's Weekly and a host of other excellent reviews, it's a classic regency, with an appealing heroine, a wounded hero and a villainous "other man", as well as a small pack of dogs — which the heroine has rescued. A delightful read.

OgreNicola here: This month I’ve read something old and something borrowed! The “old” was Maya Banks’ McCabe Trilogy, which I first fell in love with years ago.  When I’m in the mood for some hot Scottish historical action these three books are so much fun and I love the way that she gives the characters really powerful emotional conflicts and makes them feel very real. I have a soft spot for romances set in a time of conflict because it adds another layer of tension with divided loyalties as well as personal struggles to contend with. These romances are very satisfying!
 
I also caught up with the only Emily Larkin book I haven’t read, Lady Isabella’s Ogre, a lovely re-telling of the Beauty and the Beast theme.  Emily Larkin is one of my go-to Regency authors and this story was as fun as all her others – Lady Isabella Knox is one of London’s most eligible heiresses although she prefers her independence to any ideas of marriage. When she accidentally ruins the marriage prospects of Major Nicholas Reynolds, a war hero, she sets out to undo the harm she has done by persuading him into a make-believe flirtation. It’s lovely!

I also borrowed a copy of Closed Casket by Sophie Hannah whilst I was on holiday. I read it on a 4 day train journey across Canada from Vancouver to Toronto and this felt totally appropriate as it is a Hercule Poirot mystery and I felt as though I was living in Agatha Christie World! Sophie really does capture the essence of the old Poirot books and the character perfectly. I loved all the old stories and I am enjoying her new take on these! Closed Casket is classic crime fare with a family gathered together in a Gothic mansion, a controversial will and a dastardly murder.

When We Believed in MermaidsMary Jo here: The most memorable book I've read lately is Barbara O'Neal's When We Believed in Mermaids.  It's women's fiction, more specifically sister fiction, told alternately in first person by Kit Bianci, an ER doctor, and her two year older sister, Josie. The story begins when Kit sees her sister in a news video from New Zealand–except that her sister died fifteen years earlier in Europe.  Driven by a need to know, Kit flies off to Auckland–and changes not only her own life, but the lives around her.

Josie, now known as Mari, had compelling reasons for walking away from the disaster her life had become, and in the years since, she's found peace and happiness with a new family.  But she misses Kit desperately, and when they meet again, the past erupts into the present.

Barbara is a wonderful writer, and she builds her story as a mosaic as she moves back and forth between the sisters.  In some ways, their childhood was idyllic as they grew up on the California coast in their father's famous restaurant, learning food and surfing and loving the broken runaway boy who becomes part of the family and looked after the two little girls.  But in other ways, their childhood was laced with neglect and abuse, and only as the past is fully revealed can Kit and Mari become wholly healed.

As always with Barbara O'Neal books, the characterizations are wonderful, as are the descriptions of food <G>, and there's a lovely romance as well.  It made me want to visit New Zealand again!

51lnnhRTrKLPat here: This is what caught my fancy this month—Some Die Eloquent (the Calleshire Chronicles) by Catherine Aird. This British cop mystery was copyrighted in 1979 but reads to me almost as if it were written much earlier. Still, we have recognizable modernisms like plastics and conservation and a husband with his wife as she gives birth—in the few minutes he gets away from the case. There is lots of dialogue and not as much setting as I’d like. Mostly, this is a character study and social commentary, which was different enough to appeal to me.

The case involves a science teacher who dies of diabetes with an unexpected quarter million pounds deposited in her bank account. It’s real small town stuff when word of the bank account gets out and is enough to bring in the coroner’s office after the death certificate is already issued. One of the suspects works at the hospital where the Inspector’s wife is about to give birth, which makes for a nice cozy. It’s an entertaining insight into a time before cell phones, when everyone knows the drunk who wrecks the bollards every night. Read if you’re in the mood for something different.

Guest BookAndrea here: I’ve had a strange reading month, jumping around to various genres. Because it was getting such raves from the Wenches and Wenchly readers, I read The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMasters Bujold, which I very much enjoyed, even though I’m not a huge fantasy reader. Then I picked up a new British mystery set in the 1930s, which was fun and well-written, but the plot was SO predictable, I was disappointed that it didn’t offer any fun twist, so I can’t recommend it here.

The real “meaty” read of the month is The Guest Book by Sarah Blake. It’s a sweeping family saga of three generations of a wealthy WASP family, spanning the 1930s to present day. The modern protagonist is a historian who teaches at a university—there is a marvelous classroom scene where she challenges her students on what IS history. The touchstone of the family is an idyllic island off the coast of Maine they have owned since the late 30s where the generations have gathered every summer. The fact that family money is running out, and the professor and her cousins are facing the prospect of having to sell the island, challenges her to explore her own history—with the requisite buried secrets coming to life.

It’s beautifully written, though in places it drags a bit. I also felt the author perhaps tackled one too many elemental themes in family relationships . . . and there are some structural problems—she head-hops sometimes, and also never gives the date of a section, so sometimes I got a little lost for a page or two. But I overlooked the flaws because the story is very well done, with interesting, vulnerable characters. It's a poignant look at a traditional, orderly world—where all the rules are comfortable and known by heart—giving way to the frightening chaos of modern life.

So, what have you been reading lately?  Please share!

295 thoughts on “What We Are Reading-August”

  1. I finished Anne’s Chance Sister quartet with Daisy’s story. The audio is beautifully read by Alison Larkin and is packed with Anne’s characteristic humor. I think this would be my favorite of the series … highly recommended!
    I also loved ‘Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. It is based on the life of Mary Anning the renowned nineteenth century fossil collector. Description of the discovery of dinosaur fossils on the English Jurassic coast and the struggles of Anning to make a living and achieve recognition when science was so dominated by male investigators was fascinating. My familiarity with Lyme Regis and the fossil museum there may have colored my response, but I think that listening to this audio may well inspire you to visit this world heritage coastline and pick up a few fossils.
    Finally I would mention Lynda La Plante’s ‘The Dirty Dozen’, book 8 of the Jane Tennison series. Here Jane joins the flying squad and battles with the usual male prejudice against female officers. The audio is well read and I enjoyed it but think that this tale has about run its course now.
    Thanks for all the new suggestions. Some interesting authors here for me to try .. but will view them through an audio filter. 😊

    Reply
  2. I finished Anne’s Chance Sister quartet with Daisy’s story. The audio is beautifully read by Alison Larkin and is packed with Anne’s characteristic humor. I think this would be my favorite of the series … highly recommended!
    I also loved ‘Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. It is based on the life of Mary Anning the renowned nineteenth century fossil collector. Description of the discovery of dinosaur fossils on the English Jurassic coast and the struggles of Anning to make a living and achieve recognition when science was so dominated by male investigators was fascinating. My familiarity with Lyme Regis and the fossil museum there may have colored my response, but I think that listening to this audio may well inspire you to visit this world heritage coastline and pick up a few fossils.
    Finally I would mention Lynda La Plante’s ‘The Dirty Dozen’, book 8 of the Jane Tennison series. Here Jane joins the flying squad and battles with the usual male prejudice against female officers. The audio is well read and I enjoyed it but think that this tale has about run its course now.
    Thanks for all the new suggestions. Some interesting authors here for me to try .. but will view them through an audio filter. 😊

    Reply
  3. I finished Anne’s Chance Sister quartet with Daisy’s story. The audio is beautifully read by Alison Larkin and is packed with Anne’s characteristic humor. I think this would be my favorite of the series … highly recommended!
    I also loved ‘Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. It is based on the life of Mary Anning the renowned nineteenth century fossil collector. Description of the discovery of dinosaur fossils on the English Jurassic coast and the struggles of Anning to make a living and achieve recognition when science was so dominated by male investigators was fascinating. My familiarity with Lyme Regis and the fossil museum there may have colored my response, but I think that listening to this audio may well inspire you to visit this world heritage coastline and pick up a few fossils.
    Finally I would mention Lynda La Plante’s ‘The Dirty Dozen’, book 8 of the Jane Tennison series. Here Jane joins the flying squad and battles with the usual male prejudice against female officers. The audio is well read and I enjoyed it but think that this tale has about run its course now.
    Thanks for all the new suggestions. Some interesting authors here for me to try .. but will view them through an audio filter. 😊

    Reply
  4. I finished Anne’s Chance Sister quartet with Daisy’s story. The audio is beautifully read by Alison Larkin and is packed with Anne’s characteristic humor. I think this would be my favorite of the series … highly recommended!
    I also loved ‘Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. It is based on the life of Mary Anning the renowned nineteenth century fossil collector. Description of the discovery of dinosaur fossils on the English Jurassic coast and the struggles of Anning to make a living and achieve recognition when science was so dominated by male investigators was fascinating. My familiarity with Lyme Regis and the fossil museum there may have colored my response, but I think that listening to this audio may well inspire you to visit this world heritage coastline and pick up a few fossils.
    Finally I would mention Lynda La Plante’s ‘The Dirty Dozen’, book 8 of the Jane Tennison series. Here Jane joins the flying squad and battles with the usual male prejudice against female officers. The audio is well read and I enjoyed it but think that this tale has about run its course now.
    Thanks for all the new suggestions. Some interesting authors here for me to try .. but will view them through an audio filter. 😊

    Reply
  5. I finished Anne’s Chance Sister quartet with Daisy’s story. The audio is beautifully read by Alison Larkin and is packed with Anne’s characteristic humor. I think this would be my favorite of the series … highly recommended!
    I also loved ‘Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier. It is based on the life of Mary Anning the renowned nineteenth century fossil collector. Description of the discovery of dinosaur fossils on the English Jurassic coast and the struggles of Anning to make a living and achieve recognition when science was so dominated by male investigators was fascinating. My familiarity with Lyme Regis and the fossil museum there may have colored my response, but I think that listening to this audio may well inspire you to visit this world heritage coastline and pick up a few fossils.
    Finally I would mention Lynda La Plante’s ‘The Dirty Dozen’, book 8 of the Jane Tennison series. Here Jane joins the flying squad and battles with the usual male prejudice against female officers. The audio is well read and I enjoyed it but think that this tale has about run its course now.
    Thanks for all the new suggestions. Some interesting authors here for me to try .. but will view them through an audio filter. 😊

    Reply
  6. I’m reading Peter May’s Entry Island.
    “IF YOU FLEE FATE…
    When Detective Sime Mackenzie is sent from Montreal to investigate a murder on the remote Entry Island, 850 miles from the Canadian mainland, he leaves behind him a life of sleeplessness and regret.
    FATE WILL FIND YOU…
    But what had initially seemed an open-and-shut case takes on a disturbing dimension when he meets the prime suspect, the victim’s wife, and is convinced that he knows her – even though they have never met.
    And when his insomnia becomes punctuated by dreams of a distant Scottish past in another century, this murder in the Gulf of St. Lawrence leads him down a path he could never have foreseen, forcing him to face a conflict between his professional duty and his personal destiny.”
    It’s been very good so far though I absolutely LOVE his Lewis Trilogy. He has a way of drawing you into the setting so you feel as if you’re walking along with the characters.
    I finished the Shetland series by Ann Cleeves last week. Fabulous. Different from, and frankly, much richer than the TV series though I’m hooked on that as well.

    Reply
  7. I’m reading Peter May’s Entry Island.
    “IF YOU FLEE FATE…
    When Detective Sime Mackenzie is sent from Montreal to investigate a murder on the remote Entry Island, 850 miles from the Canadian mainland, he leaves behind him a life of sleeplessness and regret.
    FATE WILL FIND YOU…
    But what had initially seemed an open-and-shut case takes on a disturbing dimension when he meets the prime suspect, the victim’s wife, and is convinced that he knows her – even though they have never met.
    And when his insomnia becomes punctuated by dreams of a distant Scottish past in another century, this murder in the Gulf of St. Lawrence leads him down a path he could never have foreseen, forcing him to face a conflict between his professional duty and his personal destiny.”
    It’s been very good so far though I absolutely LOVE his Lewis Trilogy. He has a way of drawing you into the setting so you feel as if you’re walking along with the characters.
    I finished the Shetland series by Ann Cleeves last week. Fabulous. Different from, and frankly, much richer than the TV series though I’m hooked on that as well.

    Reply
  8. I’m reading Peter May’s Entry Island.
    “IF YOU FLEE FATE…
    When Detective Sime Mackenzie is sent from Montreal to investigate a murder on the remote Entry Island, 850 miles from the Canadian mainland, he leaves behind him a life of sleeplessness and regret.
    FATE WILL FIND YOU…
    But what had initially seemed an open-and-shut case takes on a disturbing dimension when he meets the prime suspect, the victim’s wife, and is convinced that he knows her – even though they have never met.
    And when his insomnia becomes punctuated by dreams of a distant Scottish past in another century, this murder in the Gulf of St. Lawrence leads him down a path he could never have foreseen, forcing him to face a conflict between his professional duty and his personal destiny.”
    It’s been very good so far though I absolutely LOVE his Lewis Trilogy. He has a way of drawing you into the setting so you feel as if you’re walking along with the characters.
    I finished the Shetland series by Ann Cleeves last week. Fabulous. Different from, and frankly, much richer than the TV series though I’m hooked on that as well.

    Reply
  9. I’m reading Peter May’s Entry Island.
    “IF YOU FLEE FATE…
    When Detective Sime Mackenzie is sent from Montreal to investigate a murder on the remote Entry Island, 850 miles from the Canadian mainland, he leaves behind him a life of sleeplessness and regret.
    FATE WILL FIND YOU…
    But what had initially seemed an open-and-shut case takes on a disturbing dimension when he meets the prime suspect, the victim’s wife, and is convinced that he knows her – even though they have never met.
    And when his insomnia becomes punctuated by dreams of a distant Scottish past in another century, this murder in the Gulf of St. Lawrence leads him down a path he could never have foreseen, forcing him to face a conflict between his professional duty and his personal destiny.”
    It’s been very good so far though I absolutely LOVE his Lewis Trilogy. He has a way of drawing you into the setting so you feel as if you’re walking along with the characters.
    I finished the Shetland series by Ann Cleeves last week. Fabulous. Different from, and frankly, much richer than the TV series though I’m hooked on that as well.

    Reply
  10. I’m reading Peter May’s Entry Island.
    “IF YOU FLEE FATE…
    When Detective Sime Mackenzie is sent from Montreal to investigate a murder on the remote Entry Island, 850 miles from the Canadian mainland, he leaves behind him a life of sleeplessness and regret.
    FATE WILL FIND YOU…
    But what had initially seemed an open-and-shut case takes on a disturbing dimension when he meets the prime suspect, the victim’s wife, and is convinced that he knows her – even though they have never met.
    And when his insomnia becomes punctuated by dreams of a distant Scottish past in another century, this murder in the Gulf of St. Lawrence leads him down a path he could never have foreseen, forcing him to face a conflict between his professional duty and his personal destiny.”
    It’s been very good so far though I absolutely LOVE his Lewis Trilogy. He has a way of drawing you into the setting so you feel as if you’re walking along with the characters.
    I finished the Shetland series by Ann Cleeves last week. Fabulous. Different from, and frankly, much richer than the TV series though I’m hooked on that as well.

    Reply
  11. The only new book that I have read this month is Anne Gracie’s MARRY IN SECRET which I loved.
    I see that Mimi Matthews is mentioned above. She is a fairly new author to me also. I have read a couple of her books and loved them. I’ll be putting THE WORK OF ART on my kindle as soon as my budget allows. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  12. The only new book that I have read this month is Anne Gracie’s MARRY IN SECRET which I loved.
    I see that Mimi Matthews is mentioned above. She is a fairly new author to me also. I have read a couple of her books and loved them. I’ll be putting THE WORK OF ART on my kindle as soon as my budget allows. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  13. The only new book that I have read this month is Anne Gracie’s MARRY IN SECRET which I loved.
    I see that Mimi Matthews is mentioned above. She is a fairly new author to me also. I have read a couple of her books and loved them. I’ll be putting THE WORK OF ART on my kindle as soon as my budget allows. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  14. The only new book that I have read this month is Anne Gracie’s MARRY IN SECRET which I loved.
    I see that Mimi Matthews is mentioned above. She is a fairly new author to me also. I have read a couple of her books and loved them. I’ll be putting THE WORK OF ART on my kindle as soon as my budget allows. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  15. The only new book that I have read this month is Anne Gracie’s MARRY IN SECRET which I loved.
    I see that Mimi Matthews is mentioned above. She is a fairly new author to me also. I have read a couple of her books and loved them. I’ll be putting THE WORK OF ART on my kindle as soon as my budget allows. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Reply
  16. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret. It was delicious and good as always. Very fun.
    I was in the mood for something tried and true and known fun so I re-read Mary Jo’s The Rogue and the Runaway and The Controversial Countess (now known as Petals in the Storm) The old Signet versions since that is what I have on my keeper shelf.
    American Duchess – Karen Harper. Interesting mix of fact and fiction about Consuelo Vanderbilt and her life. It was somewhat slow moving at times but interesting.
    Project Duchess and The Secret of Flirting by Sabrina Jefferies. Both good solid regencies. (As in they didn’t yank you the wrong direction – smile)
    A Good Heart is Hard to Find by Trisha Ashley – Quite a few laugh out loud moments with very quirky characters.
    Wish Upon a Star by Trisha Ashley. I think this one is the best I’ve read by her so far. Very well rounded characters. Will definitely re-read this one in the future.
    The Cooking Gene by Michael Twitty. Back in June Karin had mentioned this book so I got it from my library. I’m not sure if it was me and my mood or his writing style but I could just never get into it. The parts I read were interesting but I didn’t finish it before I had to return it to the library.
    Lost Towns of North Georgia – Lisa M. Russell. Read this one for a reading Challenge. It was smallish but fun and covered towns from 3 different era’s of Georgia history.
    There were many other books but those are the highlights.

    Reply
  17. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret. It was delicious and good as always. Very fun.
    I was in the mood for something tried and true and known fun so I re-read Mary Jo’s The Rogue and the Runaway and The Controversial Countess (now known as Petals in the Storm) The old Signet versions since that is what I have on my keeper shelf.
    American Duchess – Karen Harper. Interesting mix of fact and fiction about Consuelo Vanderbilt and her life. It was somewhat slow moving at times but interesting.
    Project Duchess and The Secret of Flirting by Sabrina Jefferies. Both good solid regencies. (As in they didn’t yank you the wrong direction – smile)
    A Good Heart is Hard to Find by Trisha Ashley – Quite a few laugh out loud moments with very quirky characters.
    Wish Upon a Star by Trisha Ashley. I think this one is the best I’ve read by her so far. Very well rounded characters. Will definitely re-read this one in the future.
    The Cooking Gene by Michael Twitty. Back in June Karin had mentioned this book so I got it from my library. I’m not sure if it was me and my mood or his writing style but I could just never get into it. The parts I read were interesting but I didn’t finish it before I had to return it to the library.
    Lost Towns of North Georgia – Lisa M. Russell. Read this one for a reading Challenge. It was smallish but fun and covered towns from 3 different era’s of Georgia history.
    There were many other books but those are the highlights.

    Reply
  18. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret. It was delicious and good as always. Very fun.
    I was in the mood for something tried and true and known fun so I re-read Mary Jo’s The Rogue and the Runaway and The Controversial Countess (now known as Petals in the Storm) The old Signet versions since that is what I have on my keeper shelf.
    American Duchess – Karen Harper. Interesting mix of fact and fiction about Consuelo Vanderbilt and her life. It was somewhat slow moving at times but interesting.
    Project Duchess and The Secret of Flirting by Sabrina Jefferies. Both good solid regencies. (As in they didn’t yank you the wrong direction – smile)
    A Good Heart is Hard to Find by Trisha Ashley – Quite a few laugh out loud moments with very quirky characters.
    Wish Upon a Star by Trisha Ashley. I think this one is the best I’ve read by her so far. Very well rounded characters. Will definitely re-read this one in the future.
    The Cooking Gene by Michael Twitty. Back in June Karin had mentioned this book so I got it from my library. I’m not sure if it was me and my mood or his writing style but I could just never get into it. The parts I read were interesting but I didn’t finish it before I had to return it to the library.
    Lost Towns of North Georgia – Lisa M. Russell. Read this one for a reading Challenge. It was smallish but fun and covered towns from 3 different era’s of Georgia history.
    There were many other books but those are the highlights.

    Reply
  19. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret. It was delicious and good as always. Very fun.
    I was in the mood for something tried and true and known fun so I re-read Mary Jo’s The Rogue and the Runaway and The Controversial Countess (now known as Petals in the Storm) The old Signet versions since that is what I have on my keeper shelf.
    American Duchess – Karen Harper. Interesting mix of fact and fiction about Consuelo Vanderbilt and her life. It was somewhat slow moving at times but interesting.
    Project Duchess and The Secret of Flirting by Sabrina Jefferies. Both good solid regencies. (As in they didn’t yank you the wrong direction – smile)
    A Good Heart is Hard to Find by Trisha Ashley – Quite a few laugh out loud moments with very quirky characters.
    Wish Upon a Star by Trisha Ashley. I think this one is the best I’ve read by her so far. Very well rounded characters. Will definitely re-read this one in the future.
    The Cooking Gene by Michael Twitty. Back in June Karin had mentioned this book so I got it from my library. I’m not sure if it was me and my mood or his writing style but I could just never get into it. The parts I read were interesting but I didn’t finish it before I had to return it to the library.
    Lost Towns of North Georgia – Lisa M. Russell. Read this one for a reading Challenge. It was smallish but fun and covered towns from 3 different era’s of Georgia history.
    There were many other books but those are the highlights.

    Reply
  20. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret. It was delicious and good as always. Very fun.
    I was in the mood for something tried and true and known fun so I re-read Mary Jo’s The Rogue and the Runaway and The Controversial Countess (now known as Petals in the Storm) The old Signet versions since that is what I have on my keeper shelf.
    American Duchess – Karen Harper. Interesting mix of fact and fiction about Consuelo Vanderbilt and her life. It was somewhat slow moving at times but interesting.
    Project Duchess and The Secret of Flirting by Sabrina Jefferies. Both good solid regencies. (As in they didn’t yank you the wrong direction – smile)
    A Good Heart is Hard to Find by Trisha Ashley – Quite a few laugh out loud moments with very quirky characters.
    Wish Upon a Star by Trisha Ashley. I think this one is the best I’ve read by her so far. Very well rounded characters. Will definitely re-read this one in the future.
    The Cooking Gene by Michael Twitty. Back in June Karin had mentioned this book so I got it from my library. I’m not sure if it was me and my mood or his writing style but I could just never get into it. The parts I read were interesting but I didn’t finish it before I had to return it to the library.
    Lost Towns of North Georgia – Lisa M. Russell. Read this one for a reading Challenge. It was smallish but fun and covered towns from 3 different era’s of Georgia history.
    There were many other books but those are the highlights.

    Reply
  21. This has not been a good month for reading. But I have read “The Diary of Martha Ballard” she was a midwife in the early 1700’s in Maine. It’s something that should be on a reader’s list if you wish to understand the state of medicine and women’s roles in society during the American Revolution and into the Federal period.

    Reply
  22. This has not been a good month for reading. But I have read “The Diary of Martha Ballard” she was a midwife in the early 1700’s in Maine. It’s something that should be on a reader’s list if you wish to understand the state of medicine and women’s roles in society during the American Revolution and into the Federal period.

    Reply
  23. This has not been a good month for reading. But I have read “The Diary of Martha Ballard” she was a midwife in the early 1700’s in Maine. It’s something that should be on a reader’s list if you wish to understand the state of medicine and women’s roles in society during the American Revolution and into the Federal period.

    Reply
  24. This has not been a good month for reading. But I have read “The Diary of Martha Ballard” she was a midwife in the early 1700’s in Maine. It’s something that should be on a reader’s list if you wish to understand the state of medicine and women’s roles in society during the American Revolution and into the Federal period.

    Reply
  25. This has not been a good month for reading. But I have read “The Diary of Martha Ballard” she was a midwife in the early 1700’s in Maine. It’s something that should be on a reader’s list if you wish to understand the state of medicine and women’s roles in society during the American Revolution and into the Federal period.

    Reply
  26. I keep meaning to keep track of what I read; this past August wasn’t good month for doing so. New books: Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret and the two most recent books in Mary Balogh’s “Someone to …” series. New to me: Joanna Maitlland’s novels. I have been following Liberta books posts, but this is the first time I have read her books. Rereads: Almost everything by Anne McCaffrey that isn’t Pern.
    I thought I owned everything Catheirine Aird had written. “Some Die Eloquent” is new to me. I off to find it and add it to my reads.

    Reply
  27. I keep meaning to keep track of what I read; this past August wasn’t good month for doing so. New books: Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret and the two most recent books in Mary Balogh’s “Someone to …” series. New to me: Joanna Maitlland’s novels. I have been following Liberta books posts, but this is the first time I have read her books. Rereads: Almost everything by Anne McCaffrey that isn’t Pern.
    I thought I owned everything Catheirine Aird had written. “Some Die Eloquent” is new to me. I off to find it and add it to my reads.

    Reply
  28. I keep meaning to keep track of what I read; this past August wasn’t good month for doing so. New books: Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret and the two most recent books in Mary Balogh’s “Someone to …” series. New to me: Joanna Maitlland’s novels. I have been following Liberta books posts, but this is the first time I have read her books. Rereads: Almost everything by Anne McCaffrey that isn’t Pern.
    I thought I owned everything Catheirine Aird had written. “Some Die Eloquent” is new to me. I off to find it and add it to my reads.

    Reply
  29. I keep meaning to keep track of what I read; this past August wasn’t good month for doing so. New books: Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret and the two most recent books in Mary Balogh’s “Someone to …” series. New to me: Joanna Maitlland’s novels. I have been following Liberta books posts, but this is the first time I have read her books. Rereads: Almost everything by Anne McCaffrey that isn’t Pern.
    I thought I owned everything Catheirine Aird had written. “Some Die Eloquent” is new to me. I off to find it and add it to my reads.

    Reply
  30. I keep meaning to keep track of what I read; this past August wasn’t good month for doing so. New books: Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret and the two most recent books in Mary Balogh’s “Someone to …” series. New to me: Joanna Maitlland’s novels. I have been following Liberta books posts, but this is the first time I have read her books. Rereads: Almost everything by Anne McCaffrey that isn’t Pern.
    I thought I owned everything Catheirine Aird had written. “Some Die Eloquent” is new to me. I off to find it and add it to my reads.

    Reply
  31. I always enjoy this post and the comments!
    Read in August ~
    — The 5th Gender: A Tinkered Stars Mystery by G. L. Carriger. The author is Gail Carriger, but she uses this pen name for her books with adult content. It’s a male/alien romance. I quite liked this and expect to read it again.
    — Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport which I enjoyed. I’m not sure though if I will continue on with the next book in the series. (Significant violence) This is science fiction.
    — Many samples that have accumulated on my Kindle.
    — Teach Me (There’s Something About Marysburg Book 1) by Olivia Dade was a very enjoyable read. The two leads are the teachers we would all like to have.
    — My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Ribon; it was definitely a unique graphic novel/comic but certainly not for children.
    — The Book Charmer by Karen Hawkins was an enjoyable story with a touch of magic. I will happily read more by the author.
    — The Bones Beneath My Skin by TJ Klune was an enjoyable male/male romance that I’ll likely reread. It had a very intriguing character and an interesting premise.
    — in trying to get some ideas for my monthly art gathering, I read the enjoyable How to Make Hand-Drawn Maps: A Creative Guide with Tips, Tricks, and Projects by Helen Cann.
    — read/used a very short book which showed a fairly straight forward process which I used to make a couple of cards. How to Draw NeoPopRealism Color Abstract Images: Ink Background by Nadia Russ
    — read two more short books for art group inspiration. The author is from Russia, and the books are in dire need of editing; as proof, the first title is complete as given. Also, in the first book which is clearly written for children, the author spends several pages lambasting two people who she believes did her wrong. (And how often does one get to use the word lambasting?!) How to Draw Without Eraser and How to Draw Advanced NeoPopRealism Ink Images by Nadia Russ
    — read this book in its entirety in one day; I recommend it. When All Is Said: A Novel by Anne Griffin.
    — enjoyed The Mage on the Hill (The Web of Arcana Book 1) by Angel Martinez. This is a romance featuring two men and is, I believe, the start of a series; I’d happily read more.
    — Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul was an enjoyable fantasy novella.
    — Roomies by Christina Lauren which I enjoyed. It was a fun contemporary romance that had me laughing from time to time.
    — Fortune’s Fool (Eterean Empire Book 1) by Angela Boord; this debut fantasy impressed me. If you decide to read the book, be prepared to invest some time as it’s over 700 pages.
    — Honor Among Thieves (Honors Book 1) by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre is a young adult science fiction novel which I also enjoyed; I’ve read each of these authors separately but this is the first co-authored book I’ve read by them. I will happily read more in this series.

    Reply
  32. I always enjoy this post and the comments!
    Read in August ~
    — The 5th Gender: A Tinkered Stars Mystery by G. L. Carriger. The author is Gail Carriger, but she uses this pen name for her books with adult content. It’s a male/alien romance. I quite liked this and expect to read it again.
    — Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport which I enjoyed. I’m not sure though if I will continue on with the next book in the series. (Significant violence) This is science fiction.
    — Many samples that have accumulated on my Kindle.
    — Teach Me (There’s Something About Marysburg Book 1) by Olivia Dade was a very enjoyable read. The two leads are the teachers we would all like to have.
    — My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Ribon; it was definitely a unique graphic novel/comic but certainly not for children.
    — The Book Charmer by Karen Hawkins was an enjoyable story with a touch of magic. I will happily read more by the author.
    — The Bones Beneath My Skin by TJ Klune was an enjoyable male/male romance that I’ll likely reread. It had a very intriguing character and an interesting premise.
    — in trying to get some ideas for my monthly art gathering, I read the enjoyable How to Make Hand-Drawn Maps: A Creative Guide with Tips, Tricks, and Projects by Helen Cann.
    — read/used a very short book which showed a fairly straight forward process which I used to make a couple of cards. How to Draw NeoPopRealism Color Abstract Images: Ink Background by Nadia Russ
    — read two more short books for art group inspiration. The author is from Russia, and the books are in dire need of editing; as proof, the first title is complete as given. Also, in the first book which is clearly written for children, the author spends several pages lambasting two people who she believes did her wrong. (And how often does one get to use the word lambasting?!) How to Draw Without Eraser and How to Draw Advanced NeoPopRealism Ink Images by Nadia Russ
    — read this book in its entirety in one day; I recommend it. When All Is Said: A Novel by Anne Griffin.
    — enjoyed The Mage on the Hill (The Web of Arcana Book 1) by Angel Martinez. This is a romance featuring two men and is, I believe, the start of a series; I’d happily read more.
    — Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul was an enjoyable fantasy novella.
    — Roomies by Christina Lauren which I enjoyed. It was a fun contemporary romance that had me laughing from time to time.
    — Fortune’s Fool (Eterean Empire Book 1) by Angela Boord; this debut fantasy impressed me. If you decide to read the book, be prepared to invest some time as it’s over 700 pages.
    — Honor Among Thieves (Honors Book 1) by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre is a young adult science fiction novel which I also enjoyed; I’ve read each of these authors separately but this is the first co-authored book I’ve read by them. I will happily read more in this series.

    Reply
  33. I always enjoy this post and the comments!
    Read in August ~
    — The 5th Gender: A Tinkered Stars Mystery by G. L. Carriger. The author is Gail Carriger, but she uses this pen name for her books with adult content. It’s a male/alien romance. I quite liked this and expect to read it again.
    — Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport which I enjoyed. I’m not sure though if I will continue on with the next book in the series. (Significant violence) This is science fiction.
    — Many samples that have accumulated on my Kindle.
    — Teach Me (There’s Something About Marysburg Book 1) by Olivia Dade was a very enjoyable read. The two leads are the teachers we would all like to have.
    — My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Ribon; it was definitely a unique graphic novel/comic but certainly not for children.
    — The Book Charmer by Karen Hawkins was an enjoyable story with a touch of magic. I will happily read more by the author.
    — The Bones Beneath My Skin by TJ Klune was an enjoyable male/male romance that I’ll likely reread. It had a very intriguing character and an interesting premise.
    — in trying to get some ideas for my monthly art gathering, I read the enjoyable How to Make Hand-Drawn Maps: A Creative Guide with Tips, Tricks, and Projects by Helen Cann.
    — read/used a very short book which showed a fairly straight forward process which I used to make a couple of cards. How to Draw NeoPopRealism Color Abstract Images: Ink Background by Nadia Russ
    — read two more short books for art group inspiration. The author is from Russia, and the books are in dire need of editing; as proof, the first title is complete as given. Also, in the first book which is clearly written for children, the author spends several pages lambasting two people who she believes did her wrong. (And how often does one get to use the word lambasting?!) How to Draw Without Eraser and How to Draw Advanced NeoPopRealism Ink Images by Nadia Russ
    — read this book in its entirety in one day; I recommend it. When All Is Said: A Novel by Anne Griffin.
    — enjoyed The Mage on the Hill (The Web of Arcana Book 1) by Angel Martinez. This is a romance featuring two men and is, I believe, the start of a series; I’d happily read more.
    — Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul was an enjoyable fantasy novella.
    — Roomies by Christina Lauren which I enjoyed. It was a fun contemporary romance that had me laughing from time to time.
    — Fortune’s Fool (Eterean Empire Book 1) by Angela Boord; this debut fantasy impressed me. If you decide to read the book, be prepared to invest some time as it’s over 700 pages.
    — Honor Among Thieves (Honors Book 1) by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre is a young adult science fiction novel which I also enjoyed; I’ve read each of these authors separately but this is the first co-authored book I’ve read by them. I will happily read more in this series.

    Reply
  34. I always enjoy this post and the comments!
    Read in August ~
    — The 5th Gender: A Tinkered Stars Mystery by G. L. Carriger. The author is Gail Carriger, but she uses this pen name for her books with adult content. It’s a male/alien romance. I quite liked this and expect to read it again.
    — Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport which I enjoyed. I’m not sure though if I will continue on with the next book in the series. (Significant violence) This is science fiction.
    — Many samples that have accumulated on my Kindle.
    — Teach Me (There’s Something About Marysburg Book 1) by Olivia Dade was a very enjoyable read. The two leads are the teachers we would all like to have.
    — My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Ribon; it was definitely a unique graphic novel/comic but certainly not for children.
    — The Book Charmer by Karen Hawkins was an enjoyable story with a touch of magic. I will happily read more by the author.
    — The Bones Beneath My Skin by TJ Klune was an enjoyable male/male romance that I’ll likely reread. It had a very intriguing character and an interesting premise.
    — in trying to get some ideas for my monthly art gathering, I read the enjoyable How to Make Hand-Drawn Maps: A Creative Guide with Tips, Tricks, and Projects by Helen Cann.
    — read/used a very short book which showed a fairly straight forward process which I used to make a couple of cards. How to Draw NeoPopRealism Color Abstract Images: Ink Background by Nadia Russ
    — read two more short books for art group inspiration. The author is from Russia, and the books are in dire need of editing; as proof, the first title is complete as given. Also, in the first book which is clearly written for children, the author spends several pages lambasting two people who she believes did her wrong. (And how often does one get to use the word lambasting?!) How to Draw Without Eraser and How to Draw Advanced NeoPopRealism Ink Images by Nadia Russ
    — read this book in its entirety in one day; I recommend it. When All Is Said: A Novel by Anne Griffin.
    — enjoyed The Mage on the Hill (The Web of Arcana Book 1) by Angel Martinez. This is a romance featuring two men and is, I believe, the start of a series; I’d happily read more.
    — Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul was an enjoyable fantasy novella.
    — Roomies by Christina Lauren which I enjoyed. It was a fun contemporary romance that had me laughing from time to time.
    — Fortune’s Fool (Eterean Empire Book 1) by Angela Boord; this debut fantasy impressed me. If you decide to read the book, be prepared to invest some time as it’s over 700 pages.
    — Honor Among Thieves (Honors Book 1) by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre is a young adult science fiction novel which I also enjoyed; I’ve read each of these authors separately but this is the first co-authored book I’ve read by them. I will happily read more in this series.

    Reply
  35. I always enjoy this post and the comments!
    Read in August ~
    — The 5th Gender: A Tinkered Stars Mystery by G. L. Carriger. The author is Gail Carriger, but she uses this pen name for her books with adult content. It’s a male/alien romance. I quite liked this and expect to read it again.
    — Medusa Uploaded by Emily Devenport which I enjoyed. I’m not sure though if I will continue on with the next book in the series. (Significant violence) This is science fiction.
    — Many samples that have accumulated on my Kindle.
    — Teach Me (There’s Something About Marysburg Book 1) by Olivia Dade was a very enjoyable read. The two leads are the teachers we would all like to have.
    — My Boyfriend is a Bear by Pamela Ribon; it was definitely a unique graphic novel/comic but certainly not for children.
    — The Book Charmer by Karen Hawkins was an enjoyable story with a touch of magic. I will happily read more by the author.
    — The Bones Beneath My Skin by TJ Klune was an enjoyable male/male romance that I’ll likely reread. It had a very intriguing character and an interesting premise.
    — in trying to get some ideas for my monthly art gathering, I read the enjoyable How to Make Hand-Drawn Maps: A Creative Guide with Tips, Tricks, and Projects by Helen Cann.
    — read/used a very short book which showed a fairly straight forward process which I used to make a couple of cards. How to Draw NeoPopRealism Color Abstract Images: Ink Background by Nadia Russ
    — read two more short books for art group inspiration. The author is from Russia, and the books are in dire need of editing; as proof, the first title is complete as given. Also, in the first book which is clearly written for children, the author spends several pages lambasting two people who she believes did her wrong. (And how often does one get to use the word lambasting?!) How to Draw Without Eraser and How to Draw Advanced NeoPopRealism Ink Images by Nadia Russ
    — read this book in its entirety in one day; I recommend it. When All Is Said: A Novel by Anne Griffin.
    — enjoyed The Mage on the Hill (The Web of Arcana Book 1) by Angel Martinez. This is a romance featuring two men and is, I believe, the start of a series; I’d happily read more.
    — Brandon Sanderson’s The Emperor’s Soul was an enjoyable fantasy novella.
    — Roomies by Christina Lauren which I enjoyed. It was a fun contemporary romance that had me laughing from time to time.
    — Fortune’s Fool (Eterean Empire Book 1) by Angela Boord; this debut fantasy impressed me. If you decide to read the book, be prepared to invest some time as it’s over 700 pages.
    — Honor Among Thieves (Honors Book 1) by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguirre is a young adult science fiction novel which I also enjoyed; I’ve read each of these authors separately but this is the first co-authored book I’ve read by them. I will happily read more in this series.

    Reply
  36. Like Andrea, I read The Curse of Challion because so many people had recommended it, and I loved it. Then I read the sequel, Paladin of Souls, and didn’t like it nearly as much. Too many demons for me. I think I am not really much of a fantasy fan.
    I also read They Were Counted, the first book of the Transylvanian Trilogy by Miklos Banffy. No vampires in this one. It reminds me of Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks. It traces the fortunes of a pair of young aristocrats in Transylvania in the pre-World War I Austro-Hungarian Empire. The later volumes carry them on to World War II. It’s absolutely fascinating, and a bit of history I know nothing about. I feel as if I ought to be grabbing people by the lapels and saying “Read this!”

    Reply
  37. Like Andrea, I read The Curse of Challion because so many people had recommended it, and I loved it. Then I read the sequel, Paladin of Souls, and didn’t like it nearly as much. Too many demons for me. I think I am not really much of a fantasy fan.
    I also read They Were Counted, the first book of the Transylvanian Trilogy by Miklos Banffy. No vampires in this one. It reminds me of Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks. It traces the fortunes of a pair of young aristocrats in Transylvania in the pre-World War I Austro-Hungarian Empire. The later volumes carry them on to World War II. It’s absolutely fascinating, and a bit of history I know nothing about. I feel as if I ought to be grabbing people by the lapels and saying “Read this!”

    Reply
  38. Like Andrea, I read The Curse of Challion because so many people had recommended it, and I loved it. Then I read the sequel, Paladin of Souls, and didn’t like it nearly as much. Too many demons for me. I think I am not really much of a fantasy fan.
    I also read They Were Counted, the first book of the Transylvanian Trilogy by Miklos Banffy. No vampires in this one. It reminds me of Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks. It traces the fortunes of a pair of young aristocrats in Transylvania in the pre-World War I Austro-Hungarian Empire. The later volumes carry them on to World War II. It’s absolutely fascinating, and a bit of history I know nothing about. I feel as if I ought to be grabbing people by the lapels and saying “Read this!”

    Reply
  39. Like Andrea, I read The Curse of Challion because so many people had recommended it, and I loved it. Then I read the sequel, Paladin of Souls, and didn’t like it nearly as much. Too many demons for me. I think I am not really much of a fantasy fan.
    I also read They Were Counted, the first book of the Transylvanian Trilogy by Miklos Banffy. No vampires in this one. It reminds me of Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks. It traces the fortunes of a pair of young aristocrats in Transylvania in the pre-World War I Austro-Hungarian Empire. The later volumes carry them on to World War II. It’s absolutely fascinating, and a bit of history I know nothing about. I feel as if I ought to be grabbing people by the lapels and saying “Read this!”

    Reply
  40. Like Andrea, I read The Curse of Challion because so many people had recommended it, and I loved it. Then I read the sequel, Paladin of Souls, and didn’t like it nearly as much. Too many demons for me. I think I am not really much of a fantasy fan.
    I also read They Were Counted, the first book of the Transylvanian Trilogy by Miklos Banffy. No vampires in this one. It reminds me of Thomas Mann’s Buddenbrooks. It traces the fortunes of a pair of young aristocrats in Transylvania in the pre-World War I Austro-Hungarian Empire. The later volumes carry them on to World War II. It’s absolutely fascinating, and a bit of history I know nothing about. I feel as if I ought to be grabbing people by the lapels and saying “Read this!”

    Reply
  41. I just read “Turning Darkness Into Light” by Marie Brennan. This is a continuation into the next generation through Lady Trent’s granddaughter, Audrey.
    It’s meticulously written in detailing ancient tablets and the story they tell and don’t tell and the deception within it.
    I’ve enjoyed this series about the adventures of Lady Trent and now stretching into the next phase of what her granddaughter is up to.

    Reply
  42. I just read “Turning Darkness Into Light” by Marie Brennan. This is a continuation into the next generation through Lady Trent’s granddaughter, Audrey.
    It’s meticulously written in detailing ancient tablets and the story they tell and don’t tell and the deception within it.
    I’ve enjoyed this series about the adventures of Lady Trent and now stretching into the next phase of what her granddaughter is up to.

    Reply
  43. I just read “Turning Darkness Into Light” by Marie Brennan. This is a continuation into the next generation through Lady Trent’s granddaughter, Audrey.
    It’s meticulously written in detailing ancient tablets and the story they tell and don’t tell and the deception within it.
    I’ve enjoyed this series about the adventures of Lady Trent and now stretching into the next phase of what her granddaughter is up to.

    Reply
  44. I just read “Turning Darkness Into Light” by Marie Brennan. This is a continuation into the next generation through Lady Trent’s granddaughter, Audrey.
    It’s meticulously written in detailing ancient tablets and the story they tell and don’t tell and the deception within it.
    I’ve enjoyed this series about the adventures of Lady Trent and now stretching into the next phase of what her granddaughter is up to.

    Reply
  45. I just read “Turning Darkness Into Light” by Marie Brennan. This is a continuation into the next generation through Lady Trent’s granddaughter, Audrey.
    It’s meticulously written in detailing ancient tablets and the story they tell and don’t tell and the deception within it.
    I’ve enjoyed this series about the adventures of Lady Trent and now stretching into the next phase of what her granddaughter is up to.

    Reply
  46. Just finished the delightful romance Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore and fixing to start A Single Thread by Traci Chevalier.

    Reply
  47. Just finished the delightful romance Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore and fixing to start A Single Thread by Traci Chevalier.

    Reply
  48. Just finished the delightful romance Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore and fixing to start A Single Thread by Traci Chevalier.

    Reply
  49. Just finished the delightful romance Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore and fixing to start A Single Thread by Traci Chevalier.

    Reply
  50. Just finished the delightful romance Bringing Down the Duke by Evie Dunmore and fixing to start A Single Thread by Traci Chevalier.

    Reply
  51. I have a lot of time to read, so I won’t list everything I’ve read, just a few highlights. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (and loved it). I’ve been reading books by a “local” author (in Ohio USA everybody’s local) Lori Foster who writes action adventure romances. I’ve also been revisiting Hannah Howell including her second book in the 7 Brides for 7 Scotsmen series set in the mid to late 1860’s. For a more contemporary setting, I read Diana Palmer’s newest Long,Tall,Texan novel Unleashed. Currently, I am reading Dianne Duvall’s latest addition to her paranormal Immortal Guardians Series, Death of Darkness. This is just skimming the surface, but as you can tell, my literary tastes are eclectic to say the least. Read on, my friends!

    Reply
  52. I have a lot of time to read, so I won’t list everything I’ve read, just a few highlights. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (and loved it). I’ve been reading books by a “local” author (in Ohio USA everybody’s local) Lori Foster who writes action adventure romances. I’ve also been revisiting Hannah Howell including her second book in the 7 Brides for 7 Scotsmen series set in the mid to late 1860’s. For a more contemporary setting, I read Diana Palmer’s newest Long,Tall,Texan novel Unleashed. Currently, I am reading Dianne Duvall’s latest addition to her paranormal Immortal Guardians Series, Death of Darkness. This is just skimming the surface, but as you can tell, my literary tastes are eclectic to say the least. Read on, my friends!

    Reply
  53. I have a lot of time to read, so I won’t list everything I’ve read, just a few highlights. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (and loved it). I’ve been reading books by a “local” author (in Ohio USA everybody’s local) Lori Foster who writes action adventure romances. I’ve also been revisiting Hannah Howell including her second book in the 7 Brides for 7 Scotsmen series set in the mid to late 1860’s. For a more contemporary setting, I read Diana Palmer’s newest Long,Tall,Texan novel Unleashed. Currently, I am reading Dianne Duvall’s latest addition to her paranormal Immortal Guardians Series, Death of Darkness. This is just skimming the surface, but as you can tell, my literary tastes are eclectic to say the least. Read on, my friends!

    Reply
  54. I have a lot of time to read, so I won’t list everything I’ve read, just a few highlights. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (and loved it). I’ve been reading books by a “local” author (in Ohio USA everybody’s local) Lori Foster who writes action adventure romances. I’ve also been revisiting Hannah Howell including her second book in the 7 Brides for 7 Scotsmen series set in the mid to late 1860’s. For a more contemporary setting, I read Diana Palmer’s newest Long,Tall,Texan novel Unleashed. Currently, I am reading Dianne Duvall’s latest addition to her paranormal Immortal Guardians Series, Death of Darkness. This is just skimming the surface, but as you can tell, my literary tastes are eclectic to say the least. Read on, my friends!

    Reply
  55. I have a lot of time to read, so I won’t list everything I’ve read, just a few highlights. I too read Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (and loved it). I’ve been reading books by a “local” author (in Ohio USA everybody’s local) Lori Foster who writes action adventure romances. I’ve also been revisiting Hannah Howell including her second book in the 7 Brides for 7 Scotsmen series set in the mid to late 1860’s. For a more contemporary setting, I read Diana Palmer’s newest Long,Tall,Texan novel Unleashed. Currently, I am reading Dianne Duvall’s latest addition to her paranormal Immortal Guardians Series, Death of Darkness. This is just skimming the surface, but as you can tell, my literary tastes are eclectic to say the least. Read on, my friends!

    Reply
  56. Quantum, that’s lovely of you — thank you. I did enjoy writing Daisy’s story, and Alison Larkin does a lovely job, doesn’t she? She’s also read all but the first one of my new series.
    Thanks also for the Tracy Chevalier recommendation. I’ve never been to Lyme Regis, but have always been fascinated by it.

    Reply
  57. Quantum, that’s lovely of you — thank you. I did enjoy writing Daisy’s story, and Alison Larkin does a lovely job, doesn’t she? She’s also read all but the first one of my new series.
    Thanks also for the Tracy Chevalier recommendation. I’ve never been to Lyme Regis, but have always been fascinated by it.

    Reply
  58. Quantum, that’s lovely of you — thank you. I did enjoy writing Daisy’s story, and Alison Larkin does a lovely job, doesn’t she? She’s also read all but the first one of my new series.
    Thanks also for the Tracy Chevalier recommendation. I’ve never been to Lyme Regis, but have always been fascinated by it.

    Reply
  59. Quantum, that’s lovely of you — thank you. I did enjoy writing Daisy’s story, and Alison Larkin does a lovely job, doesn’t she? She’s also read all but the first one of my new series.
    Thanks also for the Tracy Chevalier recommendation. I’ve never been to Lyme Regis, but have always been fascinated by it.

    Reply
  60. Quantum, that’s lovely of you — thank you. I did enjoy writing Daisy’s story, and Alison Larkin does a lovely job, doesn’t she? She’s also read all but the first one of my new series.
    Thanks also for the Tracy Chevalier recommendation. I’ve never been to Lyme Regis, but have always been fascinated by it.

    Reply
  61. Theo, you hooked me on the Ann Cleeves Shetland series, and I’ve been working my way through that. I find it a bit grim in places, but thoroughly engrossing. And I have the first of the Lewis books on my kindle.

    Reply
  62. Theo, you hooked me on the Ann Cleeves Shetland series, and I’ve been working my way through that. I find it a bit grim in places, but thoroughly engrossing. And I have the first of the Lewis books on my kindle.

    Reply
  63. Theo, you hooked me on the Ann Cleeves Shetland series, and I’ve been working my way through that. I find it a bit grim in places, but thoroughly engrossing. And I have the first of the Lewis books on my kindle.

    Reply
  64. Theo, you hooked me on the Ann Cleeves Shetland series, and I’ve been working my way through that. I find it a bit grim in places, but thoroughly engrossing. And I have the first of the Lewis books on my kindle.

    Reply
  65. Theo, you hooked me on the Ann Cleeves Shetland series, and I’ve been working my way through that. I find it a bit grim in places, but thoroughly engrossing. And I have the first of the Lewis books on my kindle.

    Reply
  66. Thank you, Vicki, I’m so pleased you enjoyed my book. I’m a big rereader of favorite books and I often pull out older books of Mary Jo’s — and often download e-versions of the books of hers that I already have.
    As for Trisha Ashley, I also enjoy her books. I reread her ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’ pretty much every year. And your comment might prompt me to reread Wish Upon a Star. Thanks.

    Reply
  67. Thank you, Vicki, I’m so pleased you enjoyed my book. I’m a big rereader of favorite books and I often pull out older books of Mary Jo’s — and often download e-versions of the books of hers that I already have.
    As for Trisha Ashley, I also enjoy her books. I reread her ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’ pretty much every year. And your comment might prompt me to reread Wish Upon a Star. Thanks.

    Reply
  68. Thank you, Vicki, I’m so pleased you enjoyed my book. I’m a big rereader of favorite books and I often pull out older books of Mary Jo’s — and often download e-versions of the books of hers that I already have.
    As for Trisha Ashley, I also enjoy her books. I reread her ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’ pretty much every year. And your comment might prompt me to reread Wish Upon a Star. Thanks.

    Reply
  69. Thank you, Vicki, I’m so pleased you enjoyed my book. I’m a big rereader of favorite books and I often pull out older books of Mary Jo’s — and often download e-versions of the books of hers that I already have.
    As for Trisha Ashley, I also enjoy her books. I reread her ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’ pretty much every year. And your comment might prompt me to reread Wish Upon a Star. Thanks.

    Reply
  70. Thank you, Vicki, I’m so pleased you enjoyed my book. I’m a big rereader of favorite books and I often pull out older books of Mary Jo’s — and often download e-versions of the books of hers that I already have.
    As for Trisha Ashley, I also enjoy her books. I reread her ‘Twelve Days of Christmas’ pretty much every year. And your comment might prompt me to reread Wish Upon a Star. Thanks.

    Reply
  71. Lilian, ‘They Were Counted’ sounds fascinating. I don’t know a lot about that period — Eva Ibbotson edges along it, but she’s mostly in the between the wars period. I might investigate the Banffy, thanks.

    Reply
  72. Lilian, ‘They Were Counted’ sounds fascinating. I don’t know a lot about that period — Eva Ibbotson edges along it, but she’s mostly in the between the wars period. I might investigate the Banffy, thanks.

    Reply
  73. Lilian, ‘They Were Counted’ sounds fascinating. I don’t know a lot about that period — Eva Ibbotson edges along it, but she’s mostly in the between the wars period. I might investigate the Banffy, thanks.

    Reply
  74. Lilian, ‘They Were Counted’ sounds fascinating. I don’t know a lot about that period — Eva Ibbotson edges along it, but she’s mostly in the between the wars period. I might investigate the Banffy, thanks.

    Reply
  75. Lilian, ‘They Were Counted’ sounds fascinating. I don’t know a lot about that period — Eva Ibbotson edges along it, but she’s mostly in the between the wars period. I might investigate the Banffy, thanks.

    Reply
  76. Sharlene, I have Evie Dunmore’s book on my TBR pile. She was at the Berkley signing at the RWAmerica conference last month, and when I asked my editor who I should be grabbing books by, she indicated Evie and said, “really interesting debut” and since then I’ve only heard good things about it.

    Reply
  77. Sharlene, I have Evie Dunmore’s book on my TBR pile. She was at the Berkley signing at the RWAmerica conference last month, and when I asked my editor who I should be grabbing books by, she indicated Evie and said, “really interesting debut” and since then I’ve only heard good things about it.

    Reply
  78. Sharlene, I have Evie Dunmore’s book on my TBR pile. She was at the Berkley signing at the RWAmerica conference last month, and when I asked my editor who I should be grabbing books by, she indicated Evie and said, “really interesting debut” and since then I’ve only heard good things about it.

    Reply
  79. Sharlene, I have Evie Dunmore’s book on my TBR pile. She was at the Berkley signing at the RWAmerica conference last month, and when I asked my editor who I should be grabbing books by, she indicated Evie and said, “really interesting debut” and since then I’ve only heard good things about it.

    Reply
  80. Sharlene, I have Evie Dunmore’s book on my TBR pile. She was at the Berkley signing at the RWAmerica conference last month, and when I asked my editor who I should be grabbing books by, she indicated Evie and said, “really interesting debut” and since then I’ve only heard good things about it.

    Reply
  81. Claire, thanks — I’m very glad you enjoyed Marry In Seceret.
    One of the things I enjoy about this regular column and the recommendations that come in is that they are so varied in their range. I think we all like to explore — I know I need a variety of reading matter to keep me happy. I’ve read Lori Foster and also Diana Palmer, but I haven’t read Dianne Duval. I do enjoy some paranormals, so I’ll investigate further. And as the wenches will attest, I’ve been feeling my Scottish roots lately — I had to dig out a pipes and drums video to show Pat and Mary Jo what The Black Bear was and where one “oy!s” in it. *g* So the Seven Brides for Seven Scotsmen appeals, too.

    Reply
  82. Claire, thanks — I’m very glad you enjoyed Marry In Seceret.
    One of the things I enjoy about this regular column and the recommendations that come in is that they are so varied in their range. I think we all like to explore — I know I need a variety of reading matter to keep me happy. I’ve read Lori Foster and also Diana Palmer, but I haven’t read Dianne Duval. I do enjoy some paranormals, so I’ll investigate further. And as the wenches will attest, I’ve been feeling my Scottish roots lately — I had to dig out a pipes and drums video to show Pat and Mary Jo what The Black Bear was and where one “oy!s” in it. *g* So the Seven Brides for Seven Scotsmen appeals, too.

    Reply
  83. Claire, thanks — I’m very glad you enjoyed Marry In Seceret.
    One of the things I enjoy about this regular column and the recommendations that come in is that they are so varied in their range. I think we all like to explore — I know I need a variety of reading matter to keep me happy. I’ve read Lori Foster and also Diana Palmer, but I haven’t read Dianne Duval. I do enjoy some paranormals, so I’ll investigate further. And as the wenches will attest, I’ve been feeling my Scottish roots lately — I had to dig out a pipes and drums video to show Pat and Mary Jo what The Black Bear was and where one “oy!s” in it. *g* So the Seven Brides for Seven Scotsmen appeals, too.

    Reply
  84. Claire, thanks — I’m very glad you enjoyed Marry In Seceret.
    One of the things I enjoy about this regular column and the recommendations that come in is that they are so varied in their range. I think we all like to explore — I know I need a variety of reading matter to keep me happy. I’ve read Lori Foster and also Diana Palmer, but I haven’t read Dianne Duval. I do enjoy some paranormals, so I’ll investigate further. And as the wenches will attest, I’ve been feeling my Scottish roots lately — I had to dig out a pipes and drums video to show Pat and Mary Jo what The Black Bear was and where one “oy!s” in it. *g* So the Seven Brides for Seven Scotsmen appeals, too.

    Reply
  85. Claire, thanks — I’m very glad you enjoyed Marry In Seceret.
    One of the things I enjoy about this regular column and the recommendations that come in is that they are so varied in their range. I think we all like to explore — I know I need a variety of reading matter to keep me happy. I’ve read Lori Foster and also Diana Palmer, but I haven’t read Dianne Duval. I do enjoy some paranormals, so I’ll investigate further. And as the wenches will attest, I’ve been feeling my Scottish roots lately — I had to dig out a pipes and drums video to show Pat and Mary Jo what The Black Bear was and where one “oy!s” in it. *g* So the Seven Brides for Seven Scotsmen appeals, too.

    Reply
  86. I hope you love them as much as I do. There are some grim and dark places in the Shetland series, but Cleeves is such a good writer that she yanks you back out before you know it. And I went so far as to contact Peter May to say, if Fin ever starts nattering in his ear again, I’d love to read more.

    Reply
  87. I hope you love them as much as I do. There are some grim and dark places in the Shetland series, but Cleeves is such a good writer that she yanks you back out before you know it. And I went so far as to contact Peter May to say, if Fin ever starts nattering in his ear again, I’d love to read more.

    Reply
  88. I hope you love them as much as I do. There are some grim and dark places in the Shetland series, but Cleeves is such a good writer that she yanks you back out before you know it. And I went so far as to contact Peter May to say, if Fin ever starts nattering in his ear again, I’d love to read more.

    Reply
  89. I hope you love them as much as I do. There are some grim and dark places in the Shetland series, but Cleeves is such a good writer that she yanks you back out before you know it. And I went so far as to contact Peter May to say, if Fin ever starts nattering in his ear again, I’d love to read more.

    Reply
  90. I hope you love them as much as I do. There are some grim and dark places in the Shetland series, but Cleeves is such a good writer that she yanks you back out before you know it. And I went so far as to contact Peter May to say, if Fin ever starts nattering in his ear again, I’d love to read more.

    Reply
  91. Hi All
    Sounds like some fabulous reading there, I have read some great books as well
    Barbara Hannay’s Meet Me In Venice, took me to Venice with a fabulous family filled with emotions
    The Aussie Next Door Stefanie London has a hero on the autism spectrum two dogs and a American heroine all who will steal your heart
    Undara by Annie Seaton an action packed romantic suspense set around lave tubes in Northern Queensland had me turning the pages
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  92. Hi All
    Sounds like some fabulous reading there, I have read some great books as well
    Barbara Hannay’s Meet Me In Venice, took me to Venice with a fabulous family filled with emotions
    The Aussie Next Door Stefanie London has a hero on the autism spectrum two dogs and a American heroine all who will steal your heart
    Undara by Annie Seaton an action packed romantic suspense set around lave tubes in Northern Queensland had me turning the pages
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  93. Hi All
    Sounds like some fabulous reading there, I have read some great books as well
    Barbara Hannay’s Meet Me In Venice, took me to Venice with a fabulous family filled with emotions
    The Aussie Next Door Stefanie London has a hero on the autism spectrum two dogs and a American heroine all who will steal your heart
    Undara by Annie Seaton an action packed romantic suspense set around lave tubes in Northern Queensland had me turning the pages
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  94. Hi All
    Sounds like some fabulous reading there, I have read some great books as well
    Barbara Hannay’s Meet Me In Venice, took me to Venice with a fabulous family filled with emotions
    The Aussie Next Door Stefanie London has a hero on the autism spectrum two dogs and a American heroine all who will steal your heart
    Undara by Annie Seaton an action packed romantic suspense set around lave tubes in Northern Queensland had me turning the pages
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  95. Hi All
    Sounds like some fabulous reading there, I have read some great books as well
    Barbara Hannay’s Meet Me In Venice, took me to Venice with a fabulous family filled with emotions
    The Aussie Next Door Stefanie London has a hero on the autism spectrum two dogs and a American heroine all who will steal your heart
    Undara by Annie Seaton an action packed romantic suspense set around lave tubes in Northern Queensland had me turning the pages
    Have Fun
    Helen

    Reply
  96. Thanks for this, Helen. And sorry for the frustration of not being able to comment at first. I hope it’s fixed now.
    I agree with you on Barbara Hannay’s MEET ME IN VENICE — she’s a lovely writer, isn’t she? And Annie Seaton and Stefanie London are on my TBR pile.

    Reply
  97. Thanks for this, Helen. And sorry for the frustration of not being able to comment at first. I hope it’s fixed now.
    I agree with you on Barbara Hannay’s MEET ME IN VENICE — she’s a lovely writer, isn’t she? And Annie Seaton and Stefanie London are on my TBR pile.

    Reply
  98. Thanks for this, Helen. And sorry for the frustration of not being able to comment at first. I hope it’s fixed now.
    I agree with you on Barbara Hannay’s MEET ME IN VENICE — she’s a lovely writer, isn’t she? And Annie Seaton and Stefanie London are on my TBR pile.

    Reply
  99. Thanks for this, Helen. And sorry for the frustration of not being able to comment at first. I hope it’s fixed now.
    I agree with you on Barbara Hannay’s MEET ME IN VENICE — she’s a lovely writer, isn’t she? And Annie Seaton and Stefanie London are on my TBR pile.

    Reply
  100. Thanks for this, Helen. And sorry for the frustration of not being able to comment at first. I hope it’s fixed now.
    I agree with you on Barbara Hannay’s MEET ME IN VENICE — she’s a lovely writer, isn’t she? And Annie Seaton and Stefanie London are on my TBR pile.

    Reply
  101. Me too! So many people have recommended it that I’m very curious to read it. I’e also just picked up the Mimi Matthews book because of the recommendations.

    Reply
  102. Me too! So many people have recommended it that I’m very curious to read it. I’e also just picked up the Mimi Matthews book because of the recommendations.

    Reply
  103. Me too! So many people have recommended it that I’m very curious to read it. I’e also just picked up the Mimi Matthews book because of the recommendations.

    Reply
  104. Me too! So many people have recommended it that I’m very curious to read it. I’e also just picked up the Mimi Matthews book because of the recommendations.

    Reply
  105. Me too! So many people have recommended it that I’m very curious to read it. I’e also just picked up the Mimi Matthews book because of the recommendations.

    Reply
  106. I’m just wondering where in the world August went. Whoosh, and it was gone. What stood out the most were The Friend Zone, by Abby Jimenz, a brand new book that merits all the hype it came with, the utterly wonderful The Way of All Flesh by husband and wife team Ambrose Perry, a reassuring and comforting reread of Joanna’s The Spymaster’s Lady and My Lord and Spymaster, as well as a quick and delighted reread of Anne’s Marry in Haste. I also very much enjoyed the new Ask Again, Yes, by Mary Beth Keane, which perfectly chronicled life in NYC from the early 70s through present day and told a a touching story that has stayed with me.

    Reply
  107. I’m just wondering where in the world August went. Whoosh, and it was gone. What stood out the most were The Friend Zone, by Abby Jimenz, a brand new book that merits all the hype it came with, the utterly wonderful The Way of All Flesh by husband and wife team Ambrose Perry, a reassuring and comforting reread of Joanna’s The Spymaster’s Lady and My Lord and Spymaster, as well as a quick and delighted reread of Anne’s Marry in Haste. I also very much enjoyed the new Ask Again, Yes, by Mary Beth Keane, which perfectly chronicled life in NYC from the early 70s through present day and told a a touching story that has stayed with me.

    Reply
  108. I’m just wondering where in the world August went. Whoosh, and it was gone. What stood out the most were The Friend Zone, by Abby Jimenz, a brand new book that merits all the hype it came with, the utterly wonderful The Way of All Flesh by husband and wife team Ambrose Perry, a reassuring and comforting reread of Joanna’s The Spymaster’s Lady and My Lord and Spymaster, as well as a quick and delighted reread of Anne’s Marry in Haste. I also very much enjoyed the new Ask Again, Yes, by Mary Beth Keane, which perfectly chronicled life in NYC from the early 70s through present day and told a a touching story that has stayed with me.

    Reply
  109. I’m just wondering where in the world August went. Whoosh, and it was gone. What stood out the most were The Friend Zone, by Abby Jimenz, a brand new book that merits all the hype it came with, the utterly wonderful The Way of All Flesh by husband and wife team Ambrose Perry, a reassuring and comforting reread of Joanna’s The Spymaster’s Lady and My Lord and Spymaster, as well as a quick and delighted reread of Anne’s Marry in Haste. I also very much enjoyed the new Ask Again, Yes, by Mary Beth Keane, which perfectly chronicled life in NYC from the early 70s through present day and told a a touching story that has stayed with me.

    Reply
  110. I’m just wondering where in the world August went. Whoosh, and it was gone. What stood out the most were The Friend Zone, by Abby Jimenz, a brand new book that merits all the hype it came with, the utterly wonderful The Way of All Flesh by husband and wife team Ambrose Perry, a reassuring and comforting reread of Joanna’s The Spymaster’s Lady and My Lord and Spymaster, as well as a quick and delighted reread of Anne’s Marry in Haste. I also very much enjoyed the new Ask Again, Yes, by Mary Beth Keane, which perfectly chronicled life in NYC from the early 70s through present day and told a a touching story that has stayed with me.

    Reply
  111. I just finished the new David Baldacci and was disappointed…it took four days to finish! I also read Becky Chambers Record of a Spaceborn Few and really liked it.
    I also recommend any of Sy Montgomery’s books for those who like animals. She is a wonderful writer and has done nonfiction for both adults and juniors. I highly recommend A Good, Good Pig or, if you want to “dip” into her material try her newest How to be a Good Creature.
    Finally, after finishing a total re-read of the Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series, I decided to next reread the Patricia Veryan books!

    Reply
  112. I just finished the new David Baldacci and was disappointed…it took four days to finish! I also read Becky Chambers Record of a Spaceborn Few and really liked it.
    I also recommend any of Sy Montgomery’s books for those who like animals. She is a wonderful writer and has done nonfiction for both adults and juniors. I highly recommend A Good, Good Pig or, if you want to “dip” into her material try her newest How to be a Good Creature.
    Finally, after finishing a total re-read of the Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series, I decided to next reread the Patricia Veryan books!

    Reply
  113. I just finished the new David Baldacci and was disappointed…it took four days to finish! I also read Becky Chambers Record of a Spaceborn Few and really liked it.
    I also recommend any of Sy Montgomery’s books for those who like animals. She is a wonderful writer and has done nonfiction for both adults and juniors. I highly recommend A Good, Good Pig or, if you want to “dip” into her material try her newest How to be a Good Creature.
    Finally, after finishing a total re-read of the Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series, I decided to next reread the Patricia Veryan books!

    Reply
  114. I just finished the new David Baldacci and was disappointed…it took four days to finish! I also read Becky Chambers Record of a Spaceborn Few and really liked it.
    I also recommend any of Sy Montgomery’s books for those who like animals. She is a wonderful writer and has done nonfiction for both adults and juniors. I highly recommend A Good, Good Pig or, if you want to “dip” into her material try her newest How to be a Good Creature.
    Finally, after finishing a total re-read of the Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series, I decided to next reread the Patricia Veryan books!

    Reply
  115. I just finished the new David Baldacci and was disappointed…it took four days to finish! I also read Becky Chambers Record of a Spaceborn Few and really liked it.
    I also recommend any of Sy Montgomery’s books for those who like animals. She is a wonderful writer and has done nonfiction for both adults and juniors. I highly recommend A Good, Good Pig or, if you want to “dip” into her material try her newest How to be a Good Creature.
    Finally, after finishing a total re-read of the Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series, I decided to next reread the Patricia Veryan books!

    Reply
  116. I’m so glad the wenches are enjoying “The Work of Art”. The first Mimi Matthews book I picked up was “The Matrimonial Advertisement” and then I snapped up everything else that was available. TMA also has a heroine in need of rescue, and if anything it’s darker and more Gothic. It’s amazing how a different author can breathe new life into an old trope.
    I won a copy of “Marry in Secret”(thank you Anne!) so that was supposed to be my next read, but then “A Scandalous Deal”by Joanna Shupe came up on my library wait list, so I had to read it right away. Very enjoyable, with a architect heroine. In my opinion her writing, depth of characters and historic world building has really improved since her earlier books.
    Vicki L, I think when I mentioned “The Cooking Gene” I had just started reading it. Twitty’s premise was good, but partway through it became repetitive, so I confess that I just skimmed the 2nd half, mainly looking for recipes!

    Reply
  117. I’m so glad the wenches are enjoying “The Work of Art”. The first Mimi Matthews book I picked up was “The Matrimonial Advertisement” and then I snapped up everything else that was available. TMA also has a heroine in need of rescue, and if anything it’s darker and more Gothic. It’s amazing how a different author can breathe new life into an old trope.
    I won a copy of “Marry in Secret”(thank you Anne!) so that was supposed to be my next read, but then “A Scandalous Deal”by Joanna Shupe came up on my library wait list, so I had to read it right away. Very enjoyable, with a architect heroine. In my opinion her writing, depth of characters and historic world building has really improved since her earlier books.
    Vicki L, I think when I mentioned “The Cooking Gene” I had just started reading it. Twitty’s premise was good, but partway through it became repetitive, so I confess that I just skimmed the 2nd half, mainly looking for recipes!

    Reply
  118. I’m so glad the wenches are enjoying “The Work of Art”. The first Mimi Matthews book I picked up was “The Matrimonial Advertisement” and then I snapped up everything else that was available. TMA also has a heroine in need of rescue, and if anything it’s darker and more Gothic. It’s amazing how a different author can breathe new life into an old trope.
    I won a copy of “Marry in Secret”(thank you Anne!) so that was supposed to be my next read, but then “A Scandalous Deal”by Joanna Shupe came up on my library wait list, so I had to read it right away. Very enjoyable, with a architect heroine. In my opinion her writing, depth of characters and historic world building has really improved since her earlier books.
    Vicki L, I think when I mentioned “The Cooking Gene” I had just started reading it. Twitty’s premise was good, but partway through it became repetitive, so I confess that I just skimmed the 2nd half, mainly looking for recipes!

    Reply
  119. I’m so glad the wenches are enjoying “The Work of Art”. The first Mimi Matthews book I picked up was “The Matrimonial Advertisement” and then I snapped up everything else that was available. TMA also has a heroine in need of rescue, and if anything it’s darker and more Gothic. It’s amazing how a different author can breathe new life into an old trope.
    I won a copy of “Marry in Secret”(thank you Anne!) so that was supposed to be my next read, but then “A Scandalous Deal”by Joanna Shupe came up on my library wait list, so I had to read it right away. Very enjoyable, with a architect heroine. In my opinion her writing, depth of characters and historic world building has really improved since her earlier books.
    Vicki L, I think when I mentioned “The Cooking Gene” I had just started reading it. Twitty’s premise was good, but partway through it became repetitive, so I confess that I just skimmed the 2nd half, mainly looking for recipes!

    Reply
  120. I’m so glad the wenches are enjoying “The Work of Art”. The first Mimi Matthews book I picked up was “The Matrimonial Advertisement” and then I snapped up everything else that was available. TMA also has a heroine in need of rescue, and if anything it’s darker and more Gothic. It’s amazing how a different author can breathe new life into an old trope.
    I won a copy of “Marry in Secret”(thank you Anne!) so that was supposed to be my next read, but then “A Scandalous Deal”by Joanna Shupe came up on my library wait list, so I had to read it right away. Very enjoyable, with a architect heroine. In my opinion her writing, depth of characters and historic world building has really improved since her earlier books.
    Vicki L, I think when I mentioned “The Cooking Gene” I had just started reading it. Twitty’s premise was good, but partway through it became repetitive, so I confess that I just skimmed the 2nd half, mainly looking for recipes!

    Reply
  121. I love this monthly list of books – the only trouble is that it makes my to be read pile so heavy. Some good new authors and titles listed this month.
    I read Marry in Secret but since I had read the first two some time back I had to read them again before starting on it. I was never one to re-read books as I always seemed to recall too much but I have enjoyed re=reading these.
    Then Mary Jo Putney has been ruining my partially planned days. I am loving her Fallen Angels series. Started with Petals in the Storm as the first two had not yet arrived and I wanted to read about Margot – I never read a book in which a character shares my name. Then I read Angel Rogue as it follows Robin, and today I finished Thunder and Roses. Now on to the next 4. I love these stories and wonder how you come up with these varied ideas to put your characters into. Keep it up – please.

    Reply
  122. I love this monthly list of books – the only trouble is that it makes my to be read pile so heavy. Some good new authors and titles listed this month.
    I read Marry in Secret but since I had read the first two some time back I had to read them again before starting on it. I was never one to re-read books as I always seemed to recall too much but I have enjoyed re=reading these.
    Then Mary Jo Putney has been ruining my partially planned days. I am loving her Fallen Angels series. Started with Petals in the Storm as the first two had not yet arrived and I wanted to read about Margot – I never read a book in which a character shares my name. Then I read Angel Rogue as it follows Robin, and today I finished Thunder and Roses. Now on to the next 4. I love these stories and wonder how you come up with these varied ideas to put your characters into. Keep it up – please.

    Reply
  123. I love this monthly list of books – the only trouble is that it makes my to be read pile so heavy. Some good new authors and titles listed this month.
    I read Marry in Secret but since I had read the first two some time back I had to read them again before starting on it. I was never one to re-read books as I always seemed to recall too much but I have enjoyed re=reading these.
    Then Mary Jo Putney has been ruining my partially planned days. I am loving her Fallen Angels series. Started with Petals in the Storm as the first two had not yet arrived and I wanted to read about Margot – I never read a book in which a character shares my name. Then I read Angel Rogue as it follows Robin, and today I finished Thunder and Roses. Now on to the next 4. I love these stories and wonder how you come up with these varied ideas to put your characters into. Keep it up – please.

    Reply
  124. I love this monthly list of books – the only trouble is that it makes my to be read pile so heavy. Some good new authors and titles listed this month.
    I read Marry in Secret but since I had read the first two some time back I had to read them again before starting on it. I was never one to re-read books as I always seemed to recall too much but I have enjoyed re=reading these.
    Then Mary Jo Putney has been ruining my partially planned days. I am loving her Fallen Angels series. Started with Petals in the Storm as the first two had not yet arrived and I wanted to read about Margot – I never read a book in which a character shares my name. Then I read Angel Rogue as it follows Robin, and today I finished Thunder and Roses. Now on to the next 4. I love these stories and wonder how you come up with these varied ideas to put your characters into. Keep it up – please.

    Reply
  125. I love this monthly list of books – the only trouble is that it makes my to be read pile so heavy. Some good new authors and titles listed this month.
    I read Marry in Secret but since I had read the first two some time back I had to read them again before starting on it. I was never one to re-read books as I always seemed to recall too much but I have enjoyed re=reading these.
    Then Mary Jo Putney has been ruining my partially planned days. I am loving her Fallen Angels series. Started with Petals in the Storm as the first two had not yet arrived and I wanted to read about Margot – I never read a book in which a character shares my name. Then I read Angel Rogue as it follows Robin, and today I finished Thunder and Roses. Now on to the next 4. I love these stories and wonder how you come up with these varied ideas to put your characters into. Keep it up – please.

    Reply
  126. What did I read last month? I can’t even remember, I seem to go from one to another so quickly when it’s summer with long days. I did read some eminently forgettable regencies from the 1970s/1980s Dell Candlelight line; some old classic Signets by Dorothy Mack and Sheila Walsh; got halfway through a book about the Templars before I was Templar’d out; a zillion samples (none bought) on Kindle.
    The books I did read, do remember and would recommend were Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (what fun); Mary Balogh’s Someone to Honor (always carefully crafted prose); Jane Ashford’s How to Cross a Marquess (the central theme of people dealing with grief and loss, and getting by with a little help from their friends resonates for me).
    On Kindle I read Acting on Impulse, a recent collection of Georgette Heyer short stories which she either ignored or suppressed. They are, to be honest, pretty awful examples of the mannered light reading magazine stories of the 1920s/1930s that were meant as an escape from reality and succeeded in having little relation with it. But I am a completist so I finished them, and I did enjoy the commentaries by Jennifer Kloester, even if I can’t be as enthusiastic about them as she is, although I will agree that the one with the bulldog was pretty good in the bulldog parts.
    Now reading The Chrysalids by John Wyndham and Bonfire by Krysten Ritter (because she was so great as Jessica Jones).

    Reply
  127. What did I read last month? I can’t even remember, I seem to go from one to another so quickly when it’s summer with long days. I did read some eminently forgettable regencies from the 1970s/1980s Dell Candlelight line; some old classic Signets by Dorothy Mack and Sheila Walsh; got halfway through a book about the Templars before I was Templar’d out; a zillion samples (none bought) on Kindle.
    The books I did read, do remember and would recommend were Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (what fun); Mary Balogh’s Someone to Honor (always carefully crafted prose); Jane Ashford’s How to Cross a Marquess (the central theme of people dealing with grief and loss, and getting by with a little help from their friends resonates for me).
    On Kindle I read Acting on Impulse, a recent collection of Georgette Heyer short stories which she either ignored or suppressed. They are, to be honest, pretty awful examples of the mannered light reading magazine stories of the 1920s/1930s that were meant as an escape from reality and succeeded in having little relation with it. But I am a completist so I finished them, and I did enjoy the commentaries by Jennifer Kloester, even if I can’t be as enthusiastic about them as she is, although I will agree that the one with the bulldog was pretty good in the bulldog parts.
    Now reading The Chrysalids by John Wyndham and Bonfire by Krysten Ritter (because she was so great as Jessica Jones).

    Reply
  128. What did I read last month? I can’t even remember, I seem to go from one to another so quickly when it’s summer with long days. I did read some eminently forgettable regencies from the 1970s/1980s Dell Candlelight line; some old classic Signets by Dorothy Mack and Sheila Walsh; got halfway through a book about the Templars before I was Templar’d out; a zillion samples (none bought) on Kindle.
    The books I did read, do remember and would recommend were Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (what fun); Mary Balogh’s Someone to Honor (always carefully crafted prose); Jane Ashford’s How to Cross a Marquess (the central theme of people dealing with grief and loss, and getting by with a little help from their friends resonates for me).
    On Kindle I read Acting on Impulse, a recent collection of Georgette Heyer short stories which she either ignored or suppressed. They are, to be honest, pretty awful examples of the mannered light reading magazine stories of the 1920s/1930s that were meant as an escape from reality and succeeded in having little relation with it. But I am a completist so I finished them, and I did enjoy the commentaries by Jennifer Kloester, even if I can’t be as enthusiastic about them as she is, although I will agree that the one with the bulldog was pretty good in the bulldog parts.
    Now reading The Chrysalids by John Wyndham and Bonfire by Krysten Ritter (because she was so great as Jessica Jones).

    Reply
  129. What did I read last month? I can’t even remember, I seem to go from one to another so quickly when it’s summer with long days. I did read some eminently forgettable regencies from the 1970s/1980s Dell Candlelight line; some old classic Signets by Dorothy Mack and Sheila Walsh; got halfway through a book about the Templars before I was Templar’d out; a zillion samples (none bought) on Kindle.
    The books I did read, do remember and would recommend were Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (what fun); Mary Balogh’s Someone to Honor (always carefully crafted prose); Jane Ashford’s How to Cross a Marquess (the central theme of people dealing with grief and loss, and getting by with a little help from their friends resonates for me).
    On Kindle I read Acting on Impulse, a recent collection of Georgette Heyer short stories which she either ignored or suppressed. They are, to be honest, pretty awful examples of the mannered light reading magazine stories of the 1920s/1930s that were meant as an escape from reality and succeeded in having little relation with it. But I am a completist so I finished them, and I did enjoy the commentaries by Jennifer Kloester, even if I can’t be as enthusiastic about them as she is, although I will agree that the one with the bulldog was pretty good in the bulldog parts.
    Now reading The Chrysalids by John Wyndham and Bonfire by Krysten Ritter (because she was so great as Jessica Jones).

    Reply
  130. What did I read last month? I can’t even remember, I seem to go from one to another so quickly when it’s summer with long days. I did read some eminently forgettable regencies from the 1970s/1980s Dell Candlelight line; some old classic Signets by Dorothy Mack and Sheila Walsh; got halfway through a book about the Templars before I was Templar’d out; a zillion samples (none bought) on Kindle.
    The books I did read, do remember and would recommend were Anne Gracie’s Marry in Secret (what fun); Mary Balogh’s Someone to Honor (always carefully crafted prose); Jane Ashford’s How to Cross a Marquess (the central theme of people dealing with grief and loss, and getting by with a little help from their friends resonates for me).
    On Kindle I read Acting on Impulse, a recent collection of Georgette Heyer short stories which she either ignored or suppressed. They are, to be honest, pretty awful examples of the mannered light reading magazine stories of the 1920s/1930s that were meant as an escape from reality and succeeded in having little relation with it. But I am a completist so I finished them, and I did enjoy the commentaries by Jennifer Kloester, even if I can’t be as enthusiastic about them as she is, although I will agree that the one with the bulldog was pretty good in the bulldog parts.
    Now reading The Chrysalids by John Wyndham and Bonfire by Krysten Ritter (because she was so great as Jessica Jones).

    Reply
  131. I have to agree that most of the GH short stories that were suppressed have been pretty awful. Being extremely short means there is not meat to them but what is there wasn’t fun reading either.

    Reply
  132. I have to agree that most of the GH short stories that were suppressed have been pretty awful. Being extremely short means there is not meat to them but what is there wasn’t fun reading either.

    Reply
  133. I have to agree that most of the GH short stories that were suppressed have been pretty awful. Being extremely short means there is not meat to them but what is there wasn’t fun reading either.

    Reply
  134. I have to agree that most of the GH short stories that were suppressed have been pretty awful. Being extremely short means there is not meat to them but what is there wasn’t fun reading either.

    Reply
  135. I have to agree that most of the GH short stories that were suppressed have been pretty awful. Being extremely short means there is not meat to them but what is there wasn’t fun reading either.

    Reply
  136. You wenches named two of my very favorite comfort reads: Ilona Andrews’ Innkeeper series, which I probably read quarterly, and Barbara O’Neal’s women’s fiction (and romances as Barbara Samuel and Ruth Wind).
    O’Neal’s When We Believed in Mermaids isn’t a comfort read…it’s a difficult journey, but well worth it and deeply affecting…but several of her others, most notably The Art of Inheriting Secrets, are also on my re-read list, especially when I’m stressed or “too busy to read.” (which is never).
    Like the so many of the commenters, I count on these monthly Wench book reports to widen my horizons and remind me of old favorites.
    Thanks, gals!!!

    Reply
  137. You wenches named two of my very favorite comfort reads: Ilona Andrews’ Innkeeper series, which I probably read quarterly, and Barbara O’Neal’s women’s fiction (and romances as Barbara Samuel and Ruth Wind).
    O’Neal’s When We Believed in Mermaids isn’t a comfort read…it’s a difficult journey, but well worth it and deeply affecting…but several of her others, most notably The Art of Inheriting Secrets, are also on my re-read list, especially when I’m stressed or “too busy to read.” (which is never).
    Like the so many of the commenters, I count on these monthly Wench book reports to widen my horizons and remind me of old favorites.
    Thanks, gals!!!

    Reply
  138. You wenches named two of my very favorite comfort reads: Ilona Andrews’ Innkeeper series, which I probably read quarterly, and Barbara O’Neal’s women’s fiction (and romances as Barbara Samuel and Ruth Wind).
    O’Neal’s When We Believed in Mermaids isn’t a comfort read…it’s a difficult journey, but well worth it and deeply affecting…but several of her others, most notably The Art of Inheriting Secrets, are also on my re-read list, especially when I’m stressed or “too busy to read.” (which is never).
    Like the so many of the commenters, I count on these monthly Wench book reports to widen my horizons and remind me of old favorites.
    Thanks, gals!!!

    Reply
  139. You wenches named two of my very favorite comfort reads: Ilona Andrews’ Innkeeper series, which I probably read quarterly, and Barbara O’Neal’s women’s fiction (and romances as Barbara Samuel and Ruth Wind).
    O’Neal’s When We Believed in Mermaids isn’t a comfort read…it’s a difficult journey, but well worth it and deeply affecting…but several of her others, most notably The Art of Inheriting Secrets, are also on my re-read list, especially when I’m stressed or “too busy to read.” (which is never).
    Like the so many of the commenters, I count on these monthly Wench book reports to widen my horizons and remind me of old favorites.
    Thanks, gals!!!

    Reply
  140. You wenches named two of my very favorite comfort reads: Ilona Andrews’ Innkeeper series, which I probably read quarterly, and Barbara O’Neal’s women’s fiction (and romances as Barbara Samuel and Ruth Wind).
    O’Neal’s When We Believed in Mermaids isn’t a comfort read…it’s a difficult journey, but well worth it and deeply affecting…but several of her others, most notably The Art of Inheriting Secrets, are also on my re-read list, especially when I’m stressed or “too busy to read.” (which is never).
    Like the so many of the commenters, I count on these monthly Wench book reports to widen my horizons and remind me of old favorites.
    Thanks, gals!!!

    Reply
  141. I left out something: Becoming Superman by J. Michael Straczynski – his autobiography, including his truly horrendous childhood (a father to rival anything in our favorite regencies); the times of the 1970s; how he learned to read – and write stories – from comics, his first love; and a lot of stuff about Babylon 5, Changeling, Sense8 and his other works. Some stuff I knew, other things came as a complete surprise. I’d recommend it, especially to writers.

    Reply
  142. I left out something: Becoming Superman by J. Michael Straczynski – his autobiography, including his truly horrendous childhood (a father to rival anything in our favorite regencies); the times of the 1970s; how he learned to read – and write stories – from comics, his first love; and a lot of stuff about Babylon 5, Changeling, Sense8 and his other works. Some stuff I knew, other things came as a complete surprise. I’d recommend it, especially to writers.

    Reply
  143. I left out something: Becoming Superman by J. Michael Straczynski – his autobiography, including his truly horrendous childhood (a father to rival anything in our favorite regencies); the times of the 1970s; how he learned to read – and write stories – from comics, his first love; and a lot of stuff about Babylon 5, Changeling, Sense8 and his other works. Some stuff I knew, other things came as a complete surprise. I’d recommend it, especially to writers.

    Reply
  144. I left out something: Becoming Superman by J. Michael Straczynski – his autobiography, including his truly horrendous childhood (a father to rival anything in our favorite regencies); the times of the 1970s; how he learned to read – and write stories – from comics, his first love; and a lot of stuff about Babylon 5, Changeling, Sense8 and his other works. Some stuff I knew, other things came as a complete surprise. I’d recommend it, especially to writers.

    Reply
  145. I left out something: Becoming Superman by J. Michael Straczynski – his autobiography, including his truly horrendous childhood (a father to rival anything in our favorite regencies); the times of the 1970s; how he learned to read – and write stories – from comics, his first love; and a lot of stuff about Babylon 5, Changeling, Sense8 and his other works. Some stuff I knew, other things came as a complete surprise. I’d recommend it, especially to writers.

    Reply

Leave a Comment