What We Are Reading!

This month's What We Are Reading features a wonderful array of delights, including a lovely selection of traditional holiday stories, a Viking timeslip and thrilling real-life historical  adventures. Remember that books make marvelous presents—and be sure to treat yourself  . . . because Santa thinks we all deserve some comforts to end a very difficult year. So curl with a good book this holiday season and stay safe and well! Now on to the treats!

Christmas WishesPia: Last year I travelled to Sweden with my friend Sue Moorcroft because she wanted to do some background research for a Christmas story and I was very happy to show her around. We had great fun and I’ve been eagerly awaiting the resulting book – I wasn’t disappointed! Christmas Wishes is a wonderful festive tale, partly set in my native country and partly in a little English village. The heroine, Hannah, has been living and working in Sweden, where she has her own shop in Gamla Stan (the old town) in Stockholm. It’s not doing as well as she would like and things are not going great with her Swedish boyfriend either, but when she runs into her teenage crush, Swedish Nico Pettersson, her life begins to change. Nico has big problems of his own as a single father, with an ex-wife who is battling depression and drug dependency, and a tiny step-daughter who needs him as much as his biological daughter does. As his world unravels, he is forced to take some drastic measures in order to cope, and in addition he has a secret he doesn’t like to share with anyone either. I loved this story, and I was rooting for these two characters all the way. The snow, the Christmas cheer and the many festive customs and touches from both countries add loads of charm, as do the two little girls. Nico is the kind of hero you can’t help but fall in love with and I definitely did! The best Christmas story I’ve read in a long time!

To Catch a King by Charles Spencer is historical non-fiction at its best! Earl Spencer is a master at telling a story at the same time as imparting all the pertinent facts and that makes for a thrilling read. The tale of how the future King Charles II escaped his enemies after losing the battle of Worcester is so fantastic it could actually have made a great fictional story. On the run through ten of England’s counties for six weeks, Charles had to improvise and trust those who were firm royalists. His life was in constant danger and with a price of £1,000 on his head (an enormous sum at the time!), there were many people who wouldn’t have hesitated to turn him over to the authorities. Lord Wilmot, his constant companion, was a flamboyant man who ran many risks during those weeks, but seemed to be born under a lucky star. Charles himself was more circumspect and donned several different disguises, as well as suffering hardships such as walking for miles in shoes that chafed his feet raw. He proved to be resourceful, quick-thinking and incredibly courageous. This, as well as his innate charm to everyone he met, proved part of his salvation. Reading this tale, one can’t but cheer him on and rejoice as he finally set sail for France and safety. And there is huge satisfaction in hearing about the rewards he gave those who helped him, as well as his revenge on those who had sought to end his life. This is highly recommended for anyone who enjoys history and especially from the Stuart era.

ChristmasbridePat: For fans of satirical sf/f, Douglas Adams, and Neil Gaiman, Carpet Diem: Or How to Save The World by Accident by Justin Lee Anderson is a mad trip into an earthly world caught between heaven and hell. Simon Debovar hates people. He’s the ultimate introverted hermit. He doesn’t even have to put up with family because all of them, except his great-aunt and one cousin, were blown up at a family reunion. He inherited everything, including a rug that apparently heaven and hell have made a wager on. In Simon’s world, the devil is a female, represented by a female demon, and our heavenly father is a domineering, uptight male god, represented by a male angel. The carpet could very well be the end of the world, unless Simon and the mostly clueless and wildly irreverent crew he grudgingly collects can find a way to keep heaven and hell from winning it. I am on a violence avoidance kick and even though Simon and his crew are threatened with every conceivable kind of death and nearly killed over and over—no one ever dies, even the villain with his head off. Read it as a rollicking adventure. If there’s a moral to the story, I don’t want to know what it is.

My second report is on a novella meant for savoring, our own Anne Gracie's The Christmas Bride. I know you've heard about it from us before but I just wanted to pitch my praises. I love this novella. It has all the wonderful Gracie trademarks–a heroine in trouble, a hero who can help her but not himself, and lovely, lovely romance with the added fun of children, brides, and a duck. For extra reading pleasure, we also have a glimpse of the Chance sisters from a previous series and a great manor house Christmas holiday! It's just a perfect confection for a cozy evening by the fire (or for those down under, a day at the beach).

The Runes of DestinyLAndrea: I was lucky enough to get an advance copy of our own Christina Courtenay’s new Viking timeslip, The Runes of Destiny, which releases on December 10! (One of the many wonderful things about being a Wench is we often share our books with each other before the official release.) I just loved it—it’s a marvelous combination of a captivating love story and enthralling history. . . and had me staying up way too late as it that swept me along in a magical journey.

Linnea Berger, a specialist in ancient Norse languages, is taking refuge from the emotional trauma of a recent car accident by working at a summer archeological dig. Because she’s spooked by the idea of digging up bones, she’s sent to a deserted field with a metal detector, and discovers a magnificent silver brooch . . only prick her finger and pass out. When she awakes, she surrounded by a band of men in Viking dress—led by the hunky Hrafn, who promptly informs her that she is now his captive. Thinking they are Viking reenactors, she plays along for a bit . . . until it becomes shockingly clear that she’s somehow been transported to the ninth century.

Initial panics gives way to logic. The brooch must have brought her here, so perhaps it can take her back. The only problem is it belongs to Hrafn’s horrible half brother, and the only way to have a chance of getting her hands on it is to go along with their plan to take her with them on a long and perilous trading journey to the city we know as Constantinople—where Hrafn intends to sell her as a thrall.

The journey is absolutely riveting. Christina’s meticulous descriptions—the river journey through Russia, the trading towns, the details of everyday life and the dangers the party faces—really makes history. But even more compelling is how she develops a friendship between Linnea and Hrafn based on mutual respect for each other’s courage and moral principles, sentiments that soon develop into something way more complicated. And as they reach Constantinople, there are some very difficult decisions to face . . . Fix a cup of hot chocolate, snuggle into a comfy chair and escape into a thrilling and heartwarming adventure!

I also got the chance to read Anne's new Christmas novella, The Christmas Bride, and echo Pat's praises. It's absolutely delightful, with wonderfully engaging characters . . .and a little brother of the heroine who will steal your heart!

Jane Austen's best friendNicola: This month I picked up The Rebel Heiress and the Knight by Melissa Oliver, which recently won the Romantic Novelists' Association Joan Hessayon Award for best debut novel. I'm partial to a bit of medieval romance and this story, set in the reign of King John, was a great combination of adventure and romance. Eleanor, the heroine, has been widowed after an abusive marriage and when the King decrees she should marry Hugh de Villiers she's pretty horrified. Hugh isn't thrilled either as he hadn't planned on getting married at all, least of all to Eleanor, whom he finds standoffish and arrogant.
 
The journey these two characters make through respect and admiration to love is at the emotional heart of the story, with Hugh recognising the scars from Eleanor's first marriage and wooing her gently. There's also a fun adventure story mixed in as Hugh tries to track down the outlaws who have been causing mayhem in the local area and who keep giving him the run around… All in all it was a very enjoyable and romantic read!
 
I also read Jane Austen's Best Friend by Zoe Wheddon, which is a biography of Martha Lloyd and examines the long and close friendship between Martha and Jane over many decades. I wasn't sure I was going to enjoy it to start with because it kept talking about BFFs and seemed to be trying too hard to use modern concepts and parlance to describe the friendship, but when the book got down to details it was fascinating. I particularly liked the way that it examined the relationship between the two friends through different aspects of their lives – everything from fashion, to socialising, to Jane's writing. It was an interesting approach and let us get to know Martha as well as to see Jane in a different way. The book is up for pre-order and out next year.

The FlatshareMary Jo: Some months back, there were recommendations here to read Beth O'Leary's The Flatshare. (I think Anne Gracie first called the book to our attention–I'm one of several people who read and loved it.)  It was a clever story of a man and woman sharing a flat but never seeing each other because he works nights and she works days. But they write  each other notes….  It's called a romantic comedy, but with more than the usual number of layers.  

O'Leary's much anticipated second book, The Switch, had big boots to fill, and she succeeds beautifully.  Leena lives a fast paced, high stress in life in London while her much loved  79 year old grandmother, Eileen, lives in a village in Yorkshire, lonely and yearning for more out of life.  When Leena is ordered to take two months off work to rest up, she goes to visit Eileen–and comes up with the idea of the two of them swapping their homes for two months.  Eileen can live with Leena's hip young flatmates, and Leena can relax in her grandmother's charming cottage and garden.  

 Naturally things are not that simple.  The book is funny and romantic, but the beating heart of the story is the earlier loss of Leena's sister to cancer, a tragedy that devastated Leena, her mother, and her grandmother, so the subtext is growth and reconciliation as well as new chances for love.  A great read with a thoroughly satisfying resolution! 
 
ChristmasRevelsAnne: For some reason, this month I've been doing a lot of rereading. I have plenty of new books waiting in the TBR pile, but instead, I've gravitated to old books I know I will enjoy, even for the second (or third or fifth) time around. 

While I was waiting for the US election results (and also waiting for my novella to come out) I started reading old favorite Christmas stories, some of whom were by the Wenches. MJP's lovely collection in Christmas Revels (5 excellent stories—4 historical and 1 contemporary—in one anthology), Pat Rice's Tin Angel, some of Mary Balogh's Christmas stories and others, not forgetting the Wenchly Christmas anthology (The Last Chance Christmas Ball) I usually reread Trisha Ashley's Twelve Days of Christmas but I haven't yet. I have however reread her Invitation to Christmas, which is a favorite too, and that sparked a reread of several other of her books. 

I also read (new) Jenny Colgan's Christmas at the Island Hotel, and enjoyed it very much. It has rather a large case of characters and though I think you could read it as a stand-alone, it would probably be better if you'd read the others in the series. In other rereads, I enjoyed Nancy Warren's Toni Diamond series, where Toni, a larger than-life character is a makeup consultant who gets involved in murder mysteries. Lots of fun, and I'm sad there are only four books in the series. Another series I wish were longer is Ilona Andrews' Innkeeper series, and I reread that whole series, too. Next I think I'll reread either one of Sharon Shinn's series, or maybe one by Patricia Briggs

Now, let keep adding to the TBR pile! What have YOU all been reading lately? Please share!

 

240 thoughts on “What We Are Reading!”

  1. Thank you so much, Andrea – I’m really pleased you enjoyed The Runes of Destiny!
    As always, this post has added lots of books to my TBR pile!

    Reply
  2. Thank you so much, Andrea – I’m really pleased you enjoyed The Runes of Destiny!
    As always, this post has added lots of books to my TBR pile!

    Reply
  3. Thank you so much, Andrea – I’m really pleased you enjoyed The Runes of Destiny!
    As always, this post has added lots of books to my TBR pile!

    Reply
  4. Thank you so much, Andrea – I’m really pleased you enjoyed The Runes of Destiny!
    As always, this post has added lots of books to my TBR pile!

    Reply
  5. Thank you so much, Andrea – I’m really pleased you enjoyed The Runes of Destiny!
    As always, this post has added lots of books to my TBR pile!

    Reply
  6. If you like a bit of fantasy, a bit of SF and a bit of romance, try “A Lot like Christmas” by Connie Willis. I highly recommend it. Also any book by Kate Morton, big fat family sagas with a twist. For non fiction, I am looking forward to reading “Royal Blood” King Richard III
    and the mystery of the Princes by Bertram Fields.

    Reply
  7. If you like a bit of fantasy, a bit of SF and a bit of romance, try “A Lot like Christmas” by Connie Willis. I highly recommend it. Also any book by Kate Morton, big fat family sagas with a twist. For non fiction, I am looking forward to reading “Royal Blood” King Richard III
    and the mystery of the Princes by Bertram Fields.

    Reply
  8. If you like a bit of fantasy, a bit of SF and a bit of romance, try “A Lot like Christmas” by Connie Willis. I highly recommend it. Also any book by Kate Morton, big fat family sagas with a twist. For non fiction, I am looking forward to reading “Royal Blood” King Richard III
    and the mystery of the Princes by Bertram Fields.

    Reply
  9. If you like a bit of fantasy, a bit of SF and a bit of romance, try “A Lot like Christmas” by Connie Willis. I highly recommend it. Also any book by Kate Morton, big fat family sagas with a twist. For non fiction, I am looking forward to reading “Royal Blood” King Richard III
    and the mystery of the Princes by Bertram Fields.

    Reply
  10. If you like a bit of fantasy, a bit of SF and a bit of romance, try “A Lot like Christmas” by Connie Willis. I highly recommend it. Also any book by Kate Morton, big fat family sagas with a twist. For non fiction, I am looking forward to reading “Royal Blood” King Richard III
    and the mystery of the Princes by Bertram Fields.

    Reply
  11. Last month I started catching up on the Christmas stories I bought last year and didn’t get to. So Edith Layton’s holiday collection is in the TBR, Some of Grace Burrowes’ Duke’s Daughters are in the line up, too. I’ll probably reread my collection of MJP’s Christmas novellas. Hers are among some of my favorites, Christmas Cuckoo, Beast of Belleterre, and One Wicked Winter Night are well worth revisiting on a cold winter’s night!

    Reply
  12. Last month I started catching up on the Christmas stories I bought last year and didn’t get to. So Edith Layton’s holiday collection is in the TBR, Some of Grace Burrowes’ Duke’s Daughters are in the line up, too. I’ll probably reread my collection of MJP’s Christmas novellas. Hers are among some of my favorites, Christmas Cuckoo, Beast of Belleterre, and One Wicked Winter Night are well worth revisiting on a cold winter’s night!

    Reply
  13. Last month I started catching up on the Christmas stories I bought last year and didn’t get to. So Edith Layton’s holiday collection is in the TBR, Some of Grace Burrowes’ Duke’s Daughters are in the line up, too. I’ll probably reread my collection of MJP’s Christmas novellas. Hers are among some of my favorites, Christmas Cuckoo, Beast of Belleterre, and One Wicked Winter Night are well worth revisiting on a cold winter’s night!

    Reply
  14. Last month I started catching up on the Christmas stories I bought last year and didn’t get to. So Edith Layton’s holiday collection is in the TBR, Some of Grace Burrowes’ Duke’s Daughters are in the line up, too. I’ll probably reread my collection of MJP’s Christmas novellas. Hers are among some of my favorites, Christmas Cuckoo, Beast of Belleterre, and One Wicked Winter Night are well worth revisiting on a cold winter’s night!

    Reply
  15. Last month I started catching up on the Christmas stories I bought last year and didn’t get to. So Edith Layton’s holiday collection is in the TBR, Some of Grace Burrowes’ Duke’s Daughters are in the line up, too. I’ll probably reread my collection of MJP’s Christmas novellas. Hers are among some of my favorites, Christmas Cuckoo, Beast of Belleterre, and One Wicked Winter Night are well worth revisiting on a cold winter’s night!

    Reply
  16. I am still doing a lot of re-reads. I have so many books on my kindle that I have forgotten how good some of them are. One of these is THE LADY MOST WILLING, a novel in three parts, by Julia Quinn, Eloisa James and Connie Brockway. Neither of Laird Taran Ferguson’s two nephews have married quickly enough to suit him. So, being the eccentric character he is, he decides to kidnap a few prospective brides for them. A snowstorm and a drafty castle add to the fun.
    One new read I have done this month is THE POSTMISTRESS by Alison Stuart. I think I discovered Ms. Stuart on this website not too long ago. I really enjoyed the book. Takes place in Australia circa 1871. Looking forward to reading THE GOLDMINER’S SISTER which looks to be a continuation – at least it takes place in the same setting.
    And this post certainly offers some good suggestions for some new Christmas readings I would like to try. Thank you.

    Reply
  17. I am still doing a lot of re-reads. I have so many books on my kindle that I have forgotten how good some of them are. One of these is THE LADY MOST WILLING, a novel in three parts, by Julia Quinn, Eloisa James and Connie Brockway. Neither of Laird Taran Ferguson’s two nephews have married quickly enough to suit him. So, being the eccentric character he is, he decides to kidnap a few prospective brides for them. A snowstorm and a drafty castle add to the fun.
    One new read I have done this month is THE POSTMISTRESS by Alison Stuart. I think I discovered Ms. Stuart on this website not too long ago. I really enjoyed the book. Takes place in Australia circa 1871. Looking forward to reading THE GOLDMINER’S SISTER which looks to be a continuation – at least it takes place in the same setting.
    And this post certainly offers some good suggestions for some new Christmas readings I would like to try. Thank you.

    Reply
  18. I am still doing a lot of re-reads. I have so many books on my kindle that I have forgotten how good some of them are. One of these is THE LADY MOST WILLING, a novel in three parts, by Julia Quinn, Eloisa James and Connie Brockway. Neither of Laird Taran Ferguson’s two nephews have married quickly enough to suit him. So, being the eccentric character he is, he decides to kidnap a few prospective brides for them. A snowstorm and a drafty castle add to the fun.
    One new read I have done this month is THE POSTMISTRESS by Alison Stuart. I think I discovered Ms. Stuart on this website not too long ago. I really enjoyed the book. Takes place in Australia circa 1871. Looking forward to reading THE GOLDMINER’S SISTER which looks to be a continuation – at least it takes place in the same setting.
    And this post certainly offers some good suggestions for some new Christmas readings I would like to try. Thank you.

    Reply
  19. I am still doing a lot of re-reads. I have so many books on my kindle that I have forgotten how good some of them are. One of these is THE LADY MOST WILLING, a novel in three parts, by Julia Quinn, Eloisa James and Connie Brockway. Neither of Laird Taran Ferguson’s two nephews have married quickly enough to suit him. So, being the eccentric character he is, he decides to kidnap a few prospective brides for them. A snowstorm and a drafty castle add to the fun.
    One new read I have done this month is THE POSTMISTRESS by Alison Stuart. I think I discovered Ms. Stuart on this website not too long ago. I really enjoyed the book. Takes place in Australia circa 1871. Looking forward to reading THE GOLDMINER’S SISTER which looks to be a continuation – at least it takes place in the same setting.
    And this post certainly offers some good suggestions for some new Christmas readings I would like to try. Thank you.

    Reply
  20. I am still doing a lot of re-reads. I have so many books on my kindle that I have forgotten how good some of them are. One of these is THE LADY MOST WILLING, a novel in three parts, by Julia Quinn, Eloisa James and Connie Brockway. Neither of Laird Taran Ferguson’s two nephews have married quickly enough to suit him. So, being the eccentric character he is, he decides to kidnap a few prospective brides for them. A snowstorm and a drafty castle add to the fun.
    One new read I have done this month is THE POSTMISTRESS by Alison Stuart. I think I discovered Ms. Stuart on this website not too long ago. I really enjoyed the book. Takes place in Australia circa 1871. Looking forward to reading THE GOLDMINER’S SISTER which looks to be a continuation – at least it takes place in the same setting.
    And this post certainly offers some good suggestions for some new Christmas readings I would like to try. Thank you.

    Reply
  21. If I need a break from the Christmasy stories, my TBR has wonderful mysteries, too. Your most recent Wrexford and Sloane is topping copies of Winspeare, Perry, and Finch among others!

    Reply
  22. If I need a break from the Christmasy stories, my TBR has wonderful mysteries, too. Your most recent Wrexford and Sloane is topping copies of Winspeare, Perry, and Finch among others!

    Reply
  23. If I need a break from the Christmasy stories, my TBR has wonderful mysteries, too. Your most recent Wrexford and Sloane is topping copies of Winspeare, Perry, and Finch among others!

    Reply
  24. If I need a break from the Christmasy stories, my TBR has wonderful mysteries, too. Your most recent Wrexford and Sloane is topping copies of Winspeare, Perry, and Finch among others!

    Reply
  25. If I need a break from the Christmasy stories, my TBR has wonderful mysteries, too. Your most recent Wrexford and Sloane is topping copies of Winspeare, Perry, and Finch among others!

    Reply
  26. Since last time ~
    — read Boundary Haunted (Boundary Magic) by Melissa F. Olson. You’d need to read the series in order as this volume builds on its predecessors.
    — the novella Bloodsick: An Old World Tale by Melissa F. Olson. It’s in the same world as the book I mentioned above, but it stands alone. You can read it for FREE in The Witching Hour: 10 Enchanting Novels Featuring Witches, Wizards, Vampires, Shifters, Ghosts, Fae, and More!
    — the contemporary romance You Lucky Dog by Julia London; it was entertaining and made me laugh aloud a few times.
    — a reread of Anne Bishop’s Lake Silence (The World of the Others); I enjoyed it once again.
    — The Roommate by Rosie Danan. I was trying to decide whether or not to describe this as a romance since I’m not used to romances that include a Readers guide. In any event, the book is self described as a contemporary romance and I enjoyed it.
    — the contemporary romance Well Met by Jen DeLuca; it was an enjoyable read.
    — Written on His Skin by Simone Stark, a novella which I enjoyed. This was Winner: Best Novella of 2017, Romance Writers of America, Erotic Romance Chapter.
    — quite enjoyed Refuge: An Intergalactic Space Opera Series (Tradepoint Saga Book 1) by JJ Blacklocke and look forward to reading the next book in the series which is due in January. The only downside was that there were a few too many tears (in the book, not from me!).
    — The previous book inspired me to read the free prequel which I obtained by signing up for the author’s newsletter. If interested, go to http://www.jjblacklocke.com ….Venna (Tradepoint Saga, Prequel) by JJ Blacklocke.
    — read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave, which is available in the 1351 page multi author anthology Warlords, Witches and Wolves: A Fantasy Realms Anthology.
    — read and enjoyed Glass Tidings: A MM Holiday Romance by Amy Jo Cousins; this story had more depth than many other stories I’ve recently read.
    — For my local book group, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. This was an interesting mix of nature writing and mystery; it’s the author’s first novel, but she’d already published three books about her work as a wildlife scientist in Africa. It was a gripping read with an ending that surprised me.
    — Companion Pieces: Stories from the Old World and Beyond by Melissa F. Olson; it’s a compilation of stories that I quite enjoyed. I’d recommend this book to those who’ve already read books by the author.
    — Killing Trail (A Timber Creek K-9 Mystery Book 1) by Margaret Mizushima; this is the first book in a mystery series and I enjoyed it.
    — For my old book group that I was invited to rejoin via Zoom, I read Saturday by Ian McEwan. It was an incredibly introspective novel.
    — the contemporary romance Lies and Lullabies (Hush Note Book 1) by Sarina Bowen which I enjoyed.
    — Minor Mage by T. Kingfisher which was an enjoyable novella. The author says that she thinks of it as a children’s book; however, others feel otherwise. I can see that it has appeal over a wide range of ages.
    — Plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  27. Since last time ~
    — read Boundary Haunted (Boundary Magic) by Melissa F. Olson. You’d need to read the series in order as this volume builds on its predecessors.
    — the novella Bloodsick: An Old World Tale by Melissa F. Olson. It’s in the same world as the book I mentioned above, but it stands alone. You can read it for FREE in The Witching Hour: 10 Enchanting Novels Featuring Witches, Wizards, Vampires, Shifters, Ghosts, Fae, and More!
    — the contemporary romance You Lucky Dog by Julia London; it was entertaining and made me laugh aloud a few times.
    — a reread of Anne Bishop’s Lake Silence (The World of the Others); I enjoyed it once again.
    — The Roommate by Rosie Danan. I was trying to decide whether or not to describe this as a romance since I’m not used to romances that include a Readers guide. In any event, the book is self described as a contemporary romance and I enjoyed it.
    — the contemporary romance Well Met by Jen DeLuca; it was an enjoyable read.
    — Written on His Skin by Simone Stark, a novella which I enjoyed. This was Winner: Best Novella of 2017, Romance Writers of America, Erotic Romance Chapter.
    — quite enjoyed Refuge: An Intergalactic Space Opera Series (Tradepoint Saga Book 1) by JJ Blacklocke and look forward to reading the next book in the series which is due in January. The only downside was that there were a few too many tears (in the book, not from me!).
    — The previous book inspired me to read the free prequel which I obtained by signing up for the author’s newsletter. If interested, go to http://www.jjblacklocke.com ….Venna (Tradepoint Saga, Prequel) by JJ Blacklocke.
    — read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave, which is available in the 1351 page multi author anthology Warlords, Witches and Wolves: A Fantasy Realms Anthology.
    — read and enjoyed Glass Tidings: A MM Holiday Romance by Amy Jo Cousins; this story had more depth than many other stories I’ve recently read.
    — For my local book group, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. This was an interesting mix of nature writing and mystery; it’s the author’s first novel, but she’d already published three books about her work as a wildlife scientist in Africa. It was a gripping read with an ending that surprised me.
    — Companion Pieces: Stories from the Old World and Beyond by Melissa F. Olson; it’s a compilation of stories that I quite enjoyed. I’d recommend this book to those who’ve already read books by the author.
    — Killing Trail (A Timber Creek K-9 Mystery Book 1) by Margaret Mizushima; this is the first book in a mystery series and I enjoyed it.
    — For my old book group that I was invited to rejoin via Zoom, I read Saturday by Ian McEwan. It was an incredibly introspective novel.
    — the contemporary romance Lies and Lullabies (Hush Note Book 1) by Sarina Bowen which I enjoyed.
    — Minor Mage by T. Kingfisher which was an enjoyable novella. The author says that she thinks of it as a children’s book; however, others feel otherwise. I can see that it has appeal over a wide range of ages.
    — Plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  28. Since last time ~
    — read Boundary Haunted (Boundary Magic) by Melissa F. Olson. You’d need to read the series in order as this volume builds on its predecessors.
    — the novella Bloodsick: An Old World Tale by Melissa F. Olson. It’s in the same world as the book I mentioned above, but it stands alone. You can read it for FREE in The Witching Hour: 10 Enchanting Novels Featuring Witches, Wizards, Vampires, Shifters, Ghosts, Fae, and More!
    — the contemporary romance You Lucky Dog by Julia London; it was entertaining and made me laugh aloud a few times.
    — a reread of Anne Bishop’s Lake Silence (The World of the Others); I enjoyed it once again.
    — The Roommate by Rosie Danan. I was trying to decide whether or not to describe this as a romance since I’m not used to romances that include a Readers guide. In any event, the book is self described as a contemporary romance and I enjoyed it.
    — the contemporary romance Well Met by Jen DeLuca; it was an enjoyable read.
    — Written on His Skin by Simone Stark, a novella which I enjoyed. This was Winner: Best Novella of 2017, Romance Writers of America, Erotic Romance Chapter.
    — quite enjoyed Refuge: An Intergalactic Space Opera Series (Tradepoint Saga Book 1) by JJ Blacklocke and look forward to reading the next book in the series which is due in January. The only downside was that there were a few too many tears (in the book, not from me!).
    — The previous book inspired me to read the free prequel which I obtained by signing up for the author’s newsletter. If interested, go to http://www.jjblacklocke.com ….Venna (Tradepoint Saga, Prequel) by JJ Blacklocke.
    — read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave, which is available in the 1351 page multi author anthology Warlords, Witches and Wolves: A Fantasy Realms Anthology.
    — read and enjoyed Glass Tidings: A MM Holiday Romance by Amy Jo Cousins; this story had more depth than many other stories I’ve recently read.
    — For my local book group, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. This was an interesting mix of nature writing and mystery; it’s the author’s first novel, but she’d already published three books about her work as a wildlife scientist in Africa. It was a gripping read with an ending that surprised me.
    — Companion Pieces: Stories from the Old World and Beyond by Melissa F. Olson; it’s a compilation of stories that I quite enjoyed. I’d recommend this book to those who’ve already read books by the author.
    — Killing Trail (A Timber Creek K-9 Mystery Book 1) by Margaret Mizushima; this is the first book in a mystery series and I enjoyed it.
    — For my old book group that I was invited to rejoin via Zoom, I read Saturday by Ian McEwan. It was an incredibly introspective novel.
    — the contemporary romance Lies and Lullabies (Hush Note Book 1) by Sarina Bowen which I enjoyed.
    — Minor Mage by T. Kingfisher which was an enjoyable novella. The author says that she thinks of it as a children’s book; however, others feel otherwise. I can see that it has appeal over a wide range of ages.
    — Plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  29. Since last time ~
    — read Boundary Haunted (Boundary Magic) by Melissa F. Olson. You’d need to read the series in order as this volume builds on its predecessors.
    — the novella Bloodsick: An Old World Tale by Melissa F. Olson. It’s in the same world as the book I mentioned above, but it stands alone. You can read it for FREE in The Witching Hour: 10 Enchanting Novels Featuring Witches, Wizards, Vampires, Shifters, Ghosts, Fae, and More!
    — the contemporary romance You Lucky Dog by Julia London; it was entertaining and made me laugh aloud a few times.
    — a reread of Anne Bishop’s Lake Silence (The World of the Others); I enjoyed it once again.
    — The Roommate by Rosie Danan. I was trying to decide whether or not to describe this as a romance since I’m not used to romances that include a Readers guide. In any event, the book is self described as a contemporary romance and I enjoyed it.
    — the contemporary romance Well Met by Jen DeLuca; it was an enjoyable read.
    — Written on His Skin by Simone Stark, a novella which I enjoyed. This was Winner: Best Novella of 2017, Romance Writers of America, Erotic Romance Chapter.
    — quite enjoyed Refuge: An Intergalactic Space Opera Series (Tradepoint Saga Book 1) by JJ Blacklocke and look forward to reading the next book in the series which is due in January. The only downside was that there were a few too many tears (in the book, not from me!).
    — The previous book inspired me to read the free prequel which I obtained by signing up for the author’s newsletter. If interested, go to http://www.jjblacklocke.com ….Venna (Tradepoint Saga, Prequel) by JJ Blacklocke.
    — read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave, which is available in the 1351 page multi author anthology Warlords, Witches and Wolves: A Fantasy Realms Anthology.
    — read and enjoyed Glass Tidings: A MM Holiday Romance by Amy Jo Cousins; this story had more depth than many other stories I’ve recently read.
    — For my local book group, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. This was an interesting mix of nature writing and mystery; it’s the author’s first novel, but she’d already published three books about her work as a wildlife scientist in Africa. It was a gripping read with an ending that surprised me.
    — Companion Pieces: Stories from the Old World and Beyond by Melissa F. Olson; it’s a compilation of stories that I quite enjoyed. I’d recommend this book to those who’ve already read books by the author.
    — Killing Trail (A Timber Creek K-9 Mystery Book 1) by Margaret Mizushima; this is the first book in a mystery series and I enjoyed it.
    — For my old book group that I was invited to rejoin via Zoom, I read Saturday by Ian McEwan. It was an incredibly introspective novel.
    — the contemporary romance Lies and Lullabies (Hush Note Book 1) by Sarina Bowen which I enjoyed.
    — Minor Mage by T. Kingfisher which was an enjoyable novella. The author says that she thinks of it as a children’s book; however, others feel otherwise. I can see that it has appeal over a wide range of ages.
    — Plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  30. Since last time ~
    — read Boundary Haunted (Boundary Magic) by Melissa F. Olson. You’d need to read the series in order as this volume builds on its predecessors.
    — the novella Bloodsick: An Old World Tale by Melissa F. Olson. It’s in the same world as the book I mentioned above, but it stands alone. You can read it for FREE in The Witching Hour: 10 Enchanting Novels Featuring Witches, Wizards, Vampires, Shifters, Ghosts, Fae, and More!
    — the contemporary romance You Lucky Dog by Julia London; it was entertaining and made me laugh aloud a few times.
    — a reread of Anne Bishop’s Lake Silence (The World of the Others); I enjoyed it once again.
    — The Roommate by Rosie Danan. I was trying to decide whether or not to describe this as a romance since I’m not used to romances that include a Readers guide. In any event, the book is self described as a contemporary romance and I enjoyed it.
    — the contemporary romance Well Met by Jen DeLuca; it was an enjoyable read.
    — Written on His Skin by Simone Stark, a novella which I enjoyed. This was Winner: Best Novella of 2017, Romance Writers of America, Erotic Romance Chapter.
    — quite enjoyed Refuge: An Intergalactic Space Opera Series (Tradepoint Saga Book 1) by JJ Blacklocke and look forward to reading the next book in the series which is due in January. The only downside was that there were a few too many tears (in the book, not from me!).
    — The previous book inspired me to read the free prequel which I obtained by signing up for the author’s newsletter. If interested, go to http://www.jjblacklocke.com ….Venna (Tradepoint Saga, Prequel) by JJ Blacklocke.
    — read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave, which is available in the 1351 page multi author anthology Warlords, Witches and Wolves: A Fantasy Realms Anthology.
    — read and enjoyed Glass Tidings: A MM Holiday Romance by Amy Jo Cousins; this story had more depth than many other stories I’ve recently read.
    — For my local book group, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. This was an interesting mix of nature writing and mystery; it’s the author’s first novel, but she’d already published three books about her work as a wildlife scientist in Africa. It was a gripping read with an ending that surprised me.
    — Companion Pieces: Stories from the Old World and Beyond by Melissa F. Olson; it’s a compilation of stories that I quite enjoyed. I’d recommend this book to those who’ve already read books by the author.
    — Killing Trail (A Timber Creek K-9 Mystery Book 1) by Margaret Mizushima; this is the first book in a mystery series and I enjoyed it.
    — For my old book group that I was invited to rejoin via Zoom, I read Saturday by Ian McEwan. It was an incredibly introspective novel.
    — the contemporary romance Lies and Lullabies (Hush Note Book 1) by Sarina Bowen which I enjoyed.
    — Minor Mage by T. Kingfisher which was an enjoyable novella. The author says that she thinks of it as a children’s book; however, others feel otherwise. I can see that it has appeal over a wide range of ages.
    — Plus a host of book samples.

    Reply
  31. I haven’t done much reading (old or new) this month as I went on a serious “purge my world of useless items” binge.
    At the beginning of November the comments by Donna H and Susan Ward to Nicola’s Timeslip Keeper post inspired me to reread The Nonsuch by Mary Luke again. It was, as always, a very satisfying read. Tudor, Georgian, modern (as in 1980’s modern I think).Love story, adventure and reincarnation.
    My Last Duchess by Eloisa James. That was a lovely, tender romance. Usually I find the prequel/sequel’s aren’t as good as the original characters but this one was very well done. It is reaching back to show how Ophelia came to marry Hugo Wilde, the Duke of Lindow. The father of all the Wilde children. I really enjoyed it.
    I also read Seduction on a Snowy Night which had Mary Jo’s story about Lady Diana in it. Another lovely, lovely story.
    The Christmas Bride by Anne Gracie – that was such a fun story. Really love that duck!
    Fast Women by Jennifer Crusie. The H/h are both middle aged. It was a very meaty romance and I enjoyed it very much. Everyone in this book had to grow and adapt. Those who didn’t became very pathetic people. There was also a mystery running through the book.
    There were also several that didn’t live up to my expectations. I muttered thank goodness I got them from the library and didn’t spend my money on. The stories were fine but it was the style of writing that just put me off. I like complete sentences and paragraphs…which the Wenches ALWAYS write. An entire book of herky jerky writing is arrghhh.

    Reply
  32. I haven’t done much reading (old or new) this month as I went on a serious “purge my world of useless items” binge.
    At the beginning of November the comments by Donna H and Susan Ward to Nicola’s Timeslip Keeper post inspired me to reread The Nonsuch by Mary Luke again. It was, as always, a very satisfying read. Tudor, Georgian, modern (as in 1980’s modern I think).Love story, adventure and reincarnation.
    My Last Duchess by Eloisa James. That was a lovely, tender romance. Usually I find the prequel/sequel’s aren’t as good as the original characters but this one was very well done. It is reaching back to show how Ophelia came to marry Hugo Wilde, the Duke of Lindow. The father of all the Wilde children. I really enjoyed it.
    I also read Seduction on a Snowy Night which had Mary Jo’s story about Lady Diana in it. Another lovely, lovely story.
    The Christmas Bride by Anne Gracie – that was such a fun story. Really love that duck!
    Fast Women by Jennifer Crusie. The H/h are both middle aged. It was a very meaty romance and I enjoyed it very much. Everyone in this book had to grow and adapt. Those who didn’t became very pathetic people. There was also a mystery running through the book.
    There were also several that didn’t live up to my expectations. I muttered thank goodness I got them from the library and didn’t spend my money on. The stories were fine but it was the style of writing that just put me off. I like complete sentences and paragraphs…which the Wenches ALWAYS write. An entire book of herky jerky writing is arrghhh.

    Reply
  33. I haven’t done much reading (old or new) this month as I went on a serious “purge my world of useless items” binge.
    At the beginning of November the comments by Donna H and Susan Ward to Nicola’s Timeslip Keeper post inspired me to reread The Nonsuch by Mary Luke again. It was, as always, a very satisfying read. Tudor, Georgian, modern (as in 1980’s modern I think).Love story, adventure and reincarnation.
    My Last Duchess by Eloisa James. That was a lovely, tender romance. Usually I find the prequel/sequel’s aren’t as good as the original characters but this one was very well done. It is reaching back to show how Ophelia came to marry Hugo Wilde, the Duke of Lindow. The father of all the Wilde children. I really enjoyed it.
    I also read Seduction on a Snowy Night which had Mary Jo’s story about Lady Diana in it. Another lovely, lovely story.
    The Christmas Bride by Anne Gracie – that was such a fun story. Really love that duck!
    Fast Women by Jennifer Crusie. The H/h are both middle aged. It was a very meaty romance and I enjoyed it very much. Everyone in this book had to grow and adapt. Those who didn’t became very pathetic people. There was also a mystery running through the book.
    There were also several that didn’t live up to my expectations. I muttered thank goodness I got them from the library and didn’t spend my money on. The stories were fine but it was the style of writing that just put me off. I like complete sentences and paragraphs…which the Wenches ALWAYS write. An entire book of herky jerky writing is arrghhh.

    Reply
  34. I haven’t done much reading (old or new) this month as I went on a serious “purge my world of useless items” binge.
    At the beginning of November the comments by Donna H and Susan Ward to Nicola’s Timeslip Keeper post inspired me to reread The Nonsuch by Mary Luke again. It was, as always, a very satisfying read. Tudor, Georgian, modern (as in 1980’s modern I think).Love story, adventure and reincarnation.
    My Last Duchess by Eloisa James. That was a lovely, tender romance. Usually I find the prequel/sequel’s aren’t as good as the original characters but this one was very well done. It is reaching back to show how Ophelia came to marry Hugo Wilde, the Duke of Lindow. The father of all the Wilde children. I really enjoyed it.
    I also read Seduction on a Snowy Night which had Mary Jo’s story about Lady Diana in it. Another lovely, lovely story.
    The Christmas Bride by Anne Gracie – that was such a fun story. Really love that duck!
    Fast Women by Jennifer Crusie. The H/h are both middle aged. It was a very meaty romance and I enjoyed it very much. Everyone in this book had to grow and adapt. Those who didn’t became very pathetic people. There was also a mystery running through the book.
    There were also several that didn’t live up to my expectations. I muttered thank goodness I got them from the library and didn’t spend my money on. The stories were fine but it was the style of writing that just put me off. I like complete sentences and paragraphs…which the Wenches ALWAYS write. An entire book of herky jerky writing is arrghhh.

    Reply
  35. I haven’t done much reading (old or new) this month as I went on a serious “purge my world of useless items” binge.
    At the beginning of November the comments by Donna H and Susan Ward to Nicola’s Timeslip Keeper post inspired me to reread The Nonsuch by Mary Luke again. It was, as always, a very satisfying read. Tudor, Georgian, modern (as in 1980’s modern I think).Love story, adventure and reincarnation.
    My Last Duchess by Eloisa James. That was a lovely, tender romance. Usually I find the prequel/sequel’s aren’t as good as the original characters but this one was very well done. It is reaching back to show how Ophelia came to marry Hugo Wilde, the Duke of Lindow. The father of all the Wilde children. I really enjoyed it.
    I also read Seduction on a Snowy Night which had Mary Jo’s story about Lady Diana in it. Another lovely, lovely story.
    The Christmas Bride by Anne Gracie – that was such a fun story. Really love that duck!
    Fast Women by Jennifer Crusie. The H/h are both middle aged. It was a very meaty romance and I enjoyed it very much. Everyone in this book had to grow and adapt. Those who didn’t became very pathetic people. There was also a mystery running through the book.
    There were also several that didn’t live up to my expectations. I muttered thank goodness I got them from the library and didn’t spend my money on. The stories were fine but it was the style of writing that just put me off. I like complete sentences and paragraphs…which the Wenches ALWAYS write. An entire book of herky jerky writing is arrghhh.

    Reply
  36. I thought that I might escape all the current doom and gloom with a little time travel and chose ‘The Psychology of Time Travel’ by Kate Mascarenhas….. big mistake! The way that hallowed conservation laws were ignored pained my inner scientist and moreover the author explored the unpleasant mental disorders that could arise, hence the title. To recover I think I will now pick one of the delightful Christmas stories highlighted here or dig out a Balogh 5-star re-read, maybe ‘Snow Angels’ or ‘Christmas Belle’ or ‘A Christmas Promise’ …. something guaranteed to make me smile!

    Reply
  37. I thought that I might escape all the current doom and gloom with a little time travel and chose ‘The Psychology of Time Travel’ by Kate Mascarenhas….. big mistake! The way that hallowed conservation laws were ignored pained my inner scientist and moreover the author explored the unpleasant mental disorders that could arise, hence the title. To recover I think I will now pick one of the delightful Christmas stories highlighted here or dig out a Balogh 5-star re-read, maybe ‘Snow Angels’ or ‘Christmas Belle’ or ‘A Christmas Promise’ …. something guaranteed to make me smile!

    Reply
  38. I thought that I might escape all the current doom and gloom with a little time travel and chose ‘The Psychology of Time Travel’ by Kate Mascarenhas….. big mistake! The way that hallowed conservation laws were ignored pained my inner scientist and moreover the author explored the unpleasant mental disorders that could arise, hence the title. To recover I think I will now pick one of the delightful Christmas stories highlighted here or dig out a Balogh 5-star re-read, maybe ‘Snow Angels’ or ‘Christmas Belle’ or ‘A Christmas Promise’ …. something guaranteed to make me smile!

    Reply
  39. I thought that I might escape all the current doom and gloom with a little time travel and chose ‘The Psychology of Time Travel’ by Kate Mascarenhas….. big mistake! The way that hallowed conservation laws were ignored pained my inner scientist and moreover the author explored the unpleasant mental disorders that could arise, hence the title. To recover I think I will now pick one of the delightful Christmas stories highlighted here or dig out a Balogh 5-star re-read, maybe ‘Snow Angels’ or ‘Christmas Belle’ or ‘A Christmas Promise’ …. something guaranteed to make me smile!

    Reply
  40. I thought that I might escape all the current doom and gloom with a little time travel and chose ‘The Psychology of Time Travel’ by Kate Mascarenhas….. big mistake! The way that hallowed conservation laws were ignored pained my inner scientist and moreover the author explored the unpleasant mental disorders that could arise, hence the title. To recover I think I will now pick one of the delightful Christmas stories highlighted here or dig out a Balogh 5-star re-read, maybe ‘Snow Angels’ or ‘Christmas Belle’ or ‘A Christmas Promise’ …. something guaranteed to make me smile!

    Reply
  41. An amazing list, as always, Kareni! Thanks so much for sharing.I always get such fabulous recommendations for new-to-me authors from you. (Though I have to hide wallet under the couch!)
    I loved Where the Crawdads Sing. It was a different sort of read for me, but I found it really moving, and yes, the end was a suprise. Beautiful writing, especially about nature.

    Reply
  42. An amazing list, as always, Kareni! Thanks so much for sharing.I always get such fabulous recommendations for new-to-me authors from you. (Though I have to hide wallet under the couch!)
    I loved Where the Crawdads Sing. It was a different sort of read for me, but I found it really moving, and yes, the end was a suprise. Beautiful writing, especially about nature.

    Reply
  43. An amazing list, as always, Kareni! Thanks so much for sharing.I always get such fabulous recommendations for new-to-me authors from you. (Though I have to hide wallet under the couch!)
    I loved Where the Crawdads Sing. It was a different sort of read for me, but I found it really moving, and yes, the end was a suprise. Beautiful writing, especially about nature.

    Reply
  44. An amazing list, as always, Kareni! Thanks so much for sharing.I always get such fabulous recommendations for new-to-me authors from you. (Though I have to hide wallet under the couch!)
    I loved Where the Crawdads Sing. It was a different sort of read for me, but I found it really moving, and yes, the end was a suprise. Beautiful writing, especially about nature.

    Reply
  45. An amazing list, as always, Kareni! Thanks so much for sharing.I always get such fabulous recommendations for new-to-me authors from you. (Though I have to hide wallet under the couch!)
    I loved Where the Crawdads Sing. It was a different sort of read for me, but I found it really moving, and yes, the end was a suprise. Beautiful writing, especially about nature.

    Reply
  46. Vicki, you managed to read some lovely books while doing your “purging” (You’re an inspiration to tackle all the stuffed closets!)
    Anne’s Christmas story is delightful, isn’t it? And duck is a sweetheart! And of course, Mary Jo’s is a perfect winter night read!
    Eloisa James is always a favorite of mine, too. I haven’t yet read My Last Duchess, so will move that up on the TRB list. As always, thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  47. Vicki, you managed to read some lovely books while doing your “purging” (You’re an inspiration to tackle all the stuffed closets!)
    Anne’s Christmas story is delightful, isn’t it? And duck is a sweetheart! And of course, Mary Jo’s is a perfect winter night read!
    Eloisa James is always a favorite of mine, too. I haven’t yet read My Last Duchess, so will move that up on the TRB list. As always, thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  48. Vicki, you managed to read some lovely books while doing your “purging” (You’re an inspiration to tackle all the stuffed closets!)
    Anne’s Christmas story is delightful, isn’t it? And duck is a sweetheart! And of course, Mary Jo’s is a perfect winter night read!
    Eloisa James is always a favorite of mine, too. I haven’t yet read My Last Duchess, so will move that up on the TRB list. As always, thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  49. Vicki, you managed to read some lovely books while doing your “purging” (You’re an inspiration to tackle all the stuffed closets!)
    Anne’s Christmas story is delightful, isn’t it? And duck is a sweetheart! And of course, Mary Jo’s is a perfect winter night read!
    Eloisa James is always a favorite of mine, too. I haven’t yet read My Last Duchess, so will move that up on the TRB list. As always, thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  50. Vicki, you managed to read some lovely books while doing your “purging” (You’re an inspiration to tackle all the stuffed closets!)
    Anne’s Christmas story is delightful, isn’t it? And duck is a sweetheart! And of course, Mary Jo’s is a perfect winter night read!
    Eloisa James is always a favorite of mine, too. I haven’t yet read My Last Duchess, so will move that up on the TRB list. As always, thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  51. Oh, dear, Quantum. It’s always very disappointing when you have high hopes for a book, but it just doesn’t resonate. if one is going to write about science, one ought make sure that one gets the basics right.
    F I think you will definitely have a more enjoyable time with all the Christmas stories mentioned here. Don’t miss Anne’s new one!

    Reply
  52. Oh, dear, Quantum. It’s always very disappointing when you have high hopes for a book, but it just doesn’t resonate. if one is going to write about science, one ought make sure that one gets the basics right.
    F I think you will definitely have a more enjoyable time with all the Christmas stories mentioned here. Don’t miss Anne’s new one!

    Reply
  53. Oh, dear, Quantum. It’s always very disappointing when you have high hopes for a book, but it just doesn’t resonate. if one is going to write about science, one ought make sure that one gets the basics right.
    F I think you will definitely have a more enjoyable time with all the Christmas stories mentioned here. Don’t miss Anne’s new one!

    Reply
  54. Oh, dear, Quantum. It’s always very disappointing when you have high hopes for a book, but it just doesn’t resonate. if one is going to write about science, one ought make sure that one gets the basics right.
    F I think you will definitely have a more enjoyable time with all the Christmas stories mentioned here. Don’t miss Anne’s new one!

    Reply
  55. Oh, dear, Quantum. It’s always very disappointing when you have high hopes for a book, but it just doesn’t resonate. if one is going to write about science, one ought make sure that one gets the basics right.
    F I think you will definitely have a more enjoyable time with all the Christmas stories mentioned here. Don’t miss Anne’s new one!

    Reply
  56. I just finished Christmas anthology by Edith Layton. It was lovely.
    Recently, I have had my ups and downs with reading.
    I believe I am going to go to my keeper shelves and get a couple of the Signet Christmas books I have. I believe going back will make me more into the Christmas spirit.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  57. I just finished Christmas anthology by Edith Layton. It was lovely.
    Recently, I have had my ups and downs with reading.
    I believe I am going to go to my keeper shelves and get a couple of the Signet Christmas books I have. I believe going back will make me more into the Christmas spirit.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  58. I just finished Christmas anthology by Edith Layton. It was lovely.
    Recently, I have had my ups and downs with reading.
    I believe I am going to go to my keeper shelves and get a couple of the Signet Christmas books I have. I believe going back will make me more into the Christmas spirit.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  59. I just finished Christmas anthology by Edith Layton. It was lovely.
    Recently, I have had my ups and downs with reading.
    I believe I am going to go to my keeper shelves and get a couple of the Signet Christmas books I have. I believe going back will make me more into the Christmas spirit.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  60. I just finished Christmas anthology by Edith Layton. It was lovely.
    Recently, I have had my ups and downs with reading.
    I believe I am going to go to my keeper shelves and get a couple of the Signet Christmas books I have. I believe going back will make me more into the Christmas spirit.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  61. Some great recommendations as always. I’ve just downloaded The Christmas Bride as I want to start reading some feel good seasonal books. Also looking forward to The Runes of Destiny. LOVED the last one Christine.
    I’ve had a mixed bag of reading of late as I’ve been reading books for NetGalley and book club reads. There have been a few Agatha Christie’s and Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer.
    I read The Midnight Library by Matt Haig and I loved it. Different to what I usually read but very interesting.
    A Telegram from Berlin by A O Connor is a brilliant read. I love his books but felt he missed the mark with the last two, however, he’s well back on form with this one.
    There have been too many more to mention here. I’m also looking forward to Jane Austen’s Best Friend mentioned here. Love anything to do with Austen.

    Reply
  62. Some great recommendations as always. I’ve just downloaded The Christmas Bride as I want to start reading some feel good seasonal books. Also looking forward to The Runes of Destiny. LOVED the last one Christine.
    I’ve had a mixed bag of reading of late as I’ve been reading books for NetGalley and book club reads. There have been a few Agatha Christie’s and Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer.
    I read The Midnight Library by Matt Haig and I loved it. Different to what I usually read but very interesting.
    A Telegram from Berlin by A O Connor is a brilliant read. I love his books but felt he missed the mark with the last two, however, he’s well back on form with this one.
    There have been too many more to mention here. I’m also looking forward to Jane Austen’s Best Friend mentioned here. Love anything to do with Austen.

    Reply
  63. Some great recommendations as always. I’ve just downloaded The Christmas Bride as I want to start reading some feel good seasonal books. Also looking forward to The Runes of Destiny. LOVED the last one Christine.
    I’ve had a mixed bag of reading of late as I’ve been reading books for NetGalley and book club reads. There have been a few Agatha Christie’s and Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer.
    I read The Midnight Library by Matt Haig and I loved it. Different to what I usually read but very interesting.
    A Telegram from Berlin by A O Connor is a brilliant read. I love his books but felt he missed the mark with the last two, however, he’s well back on form with this one.
    There have been too many more to mention here. I’m also looking forward to Jane Austen’s Best Friend mentioned here. Love anything to do with Austen.

    Reply
  64. Some great recommendations as always. I’ve just downloaded The Christmas Bride as I want to start reading some feel good seasonal books. Also looking forward to The Runes of Destiny. LOVED the last one Christine.
    I’ve had a mixed bag of reading of late as I’ve been reading books for NetGalley and book club reads. There have been a few Agatha Christie’s and Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer.
    I read The Midnight Library by Matt Haig and I loved it. Different to what I usually read but very interesting.
    A Telegram from Berlin by A O Connor is a brilliant read. I love his books but felt he missed the mark with the last two, however, he’s well back on form with this one.
    There have been too many more to mention here. I’m also looking forward to Jane Austen’s Best Friend mentioned here. Love anything to do with Austen.

    Reply
  65. Some great recommendations as always. I’ve just downloaded The Christmas Bride as I want to start reading some feel good seasonal books. Also looking forward to The Runes of Destiny. LOVED the last one Christine.
    I’ve had a mixed bag of reading of late as I’ve been reading books for NetGalley and book club reads. There have been a few Agatha Christie’s and Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer.
    I read The Midnight Library by Matt Haig and I loved it. Different to what I usually read but very interesting.
    A Telegram from Berlin by A O Connor is a brilliant read. I love his books but felt he missed the mark with the last two, however, he’s well back on form with this one.
    There have been too many more to mention here. I’m also looking forward to Jane Austen’s Best Friend mentioned here. Love anything to do with Austen.

    Reply
  66. “read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave”
    Yes, I read that too and enjoyed it, Kareni. And since it was the prequel to a new series set in that world, I preordered the book.

    Reply
  67. “read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave”
    Yes, I read that too and enjoyed it, Kareni. And since it was the prequel to a new series set in that world, I preordered the book.

    Reply
  68. “read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave”
    Yes, I read that too and enjoyed it, Kareni. And since it was the prequel to a new series set in that world, I preordered the book.

    Reply
  69. “read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave”
    Yes, I read that too and enjoyed it, Kareni. And since it was the prequel to a new series set in that world, I preordered the book.

    Reply
  70. “read with pleasure Michelle Diener’s new novella, The Rising Wave”
    Yes, I read that too and enjoyed it, Kareni. And since it was the prequel to a new series set in that world, I preordered the book.

    Reply
  71. I always read Christmas novellas at this time of year, and so far Anne’s “The Christmas Bride” has been the best; the other new ones so far have been mediocre. I did reread, “Once Upon a Christmas” by Diane Farr which was a delightful sweet romance. It has a wonderful cat character, Manegold, who adopts the heroine, and he steals every scene he is in from the humans.
    I have been reading the Verity Kent mysteries, a post World War I era series by Anne Lee Huber. It’s addictive, but you definitely need to start with the first book, “This Side of Murder”, because it has quite a plot twist that affects all subsequent books. I’m about to read book 4, “A Pretty Deceit” and then sadly I’ll have to wait for the author to write another one.
    I loved “The Prince” by Katherine Ashe, against my first inclination. The writing is gorgeously descriptive, the characters are wonderful, and the romance is a long, slow burn. But I say against my inclination because I didn’t realize how angsty it was going to be. These days I am looking for fun, lightweight reads, and this was not that book. But it was worth it in the end. It’s unusual after reading hundreds of historicals not to know where the story is going, but this one, I had no idea how the author would get to an HEA, but she did, beautifully. I realized partway through that it is the last of a series, but it made no difference, it works fine as a standalone.

    Reply
  72. I always read Christmas novellas at this time of year, and so far Anne’s “The Christmas Bride” has been the best; the other new ones so far have been mediocre. I did reread, “Once Upon a Christmas” by Diane Farr which was a delightful sweet romance. It has a wonderful cat character, Manegold, who adopts the heroine, and he steals every scene he is in from the humans.
    I have been reading the Verity Kent mysteries, a post World War I era series by Anne Lee Huber. It’s addictive, but you definitely need to start with the first book, “This Side of Murder”, because it has quite a plot twist that affects all subsequent books. I’m about to read book 4, “A Pretty Deceit” and then sadly I’ll have to wait for the author to write another one.
    I loved “The Prince” by Katherine Ashe, against my first inclination. The writing is gorgeously descriptive, the characters are wonderful, and the romance is a long, slow burn. But I say against my inclination because I didn’t realize how angsty it was going to be. These days I am looking for fun, lightweight reads, and this was not that book. But it was worth it in the end. It’s unusual after reading hundreds of historicals not to know where the story is going, but this one, I had no idea how the author would get to an HEA, but she did, beautifully. I realized partway through that it is the last of a series, but it made no difference, it works fine as a standalone.

    Reply
  73. I always read Christmas novellas at this time of year, and so far Anne’s “The Christmas Bride” has been the best; the other new ones so far have been mediocre. I did reread, “Once Upon a Christmas” by Diane Farr which was a delightful sweet romance. It has a wonderful cat character, Manegold, who adopts the heroine, and he steals every scene he is in from the humans.
    I have been reading the Verity Kent mysteries, a post World War I era series by Anne Lee Huber. It’s addictive, but you definitely need to start with the first book, “This Side of Murder”, because it has quite a plot twist that affects all subsequent books. I’m about to read book 4, “A Pretty Deceit” and then sadly I’ll have to wait for the author to write another one.
    I loved “The Prince” by Katherine Ashe, against my first inclination. The writing is gorgeously descriptive, the characters are wonderful, and the romance is a long, slow burn. But I say against my inclination because I didn’t realize how angsty it was going to be. These days I am looking for fun, lightweight reads, and this was not that book. But it was worth it in the end. It’s unusual after reading hundreds of historicals not to know where the story is going, but this one, I had no idea how the author would get to an HEA, but she did, beautifully. I realized partway through that it is the last of a series, but it made no difference, it works fine as a standalone.

    Reply
  74. I always read Christmas novellas at this time of year, and so far Anne’s “The Christmas Bride” has been the best; the other new ones so far have been mediocre. I did reread, “Once Upon a Christmas” by Diane Farr which was a delightful sweet romance. It has a wonderful cat character, Manegold, who adopts the heroine, and he steals every scene he is in from the humans.
    I have been reading the Verity Kent mysteries, a post World War I era series by Anne Lee Huber. It’s addictive, but you definitely need to start with the first book, “This Side of Murder”, because it has quite a plot twist that affects all subsequent books. I’m about to read book 4, “A Pretty Deceit” and then sadly I’ll have to wait for the author to write another one.
    I loved “The Prince” by Katherine Ashe, against my first inclination. The writing is gorgeously descriptive, the characters are wonderful, and the romance is a long, slow burn. But I say against my inclination because I didn’t realize how angsty it was going to be. These days I am looking for fun, lightweight reads, and this was not that book. But it was worth it in the end. It’s unusual after reading hundreds of historicals not to know where the story is going, but this one, I had no idea how the author would get to an HEA, but she did, beautifully. I realized partway through that it is the last of a series, but it made no difference, it works fine as a standalone.

    Reply
  75. I always read Christmas novellas at this time of year, and so far Anne’s “The Christmas Bride” has been the best; the other new ones so far have been mediocre. I did reread, “Once Upon a Christmas” by Diane Farr which was a delightful sweet romance. It has a wonderful cat character, Manegold, who adopts the heroine, and he steals every scene he is in from the humans.
    I have been reading the Verity Kent mysteries, a post World War I era series by Anne Lee Huber. It’s addictive, but you definitely need to start with the first book, “This Side of Murder”, because it has quite a plot twist that affects all subsequent books. I’m about to read book 4, “A Pretty Deceit” and then sadly I’ll have to wait for the author to write another one.
    I loved “The Prince” by Katherine Ashe, against my first inclination. The writing is gorgeously descriptive, the characters are wonderful, and the romance is a long, slow burn. But I say against my inclination because I didn’t realize how angsty it was going to be. These days I am looking for fun, lightweight reads, and this was not that book. But it was worth it in the end. It’s unusual after reading hundreds of historicals not to know where the story is going, but this one, I had no idea how the author would get to an HEA, but she did, beautifully. I realized partway through that it is the last of a series, but it made no difference, it works fine as a standalone.

    Reply
  76. My earlier post did not turn up yet, but rather than post a duplicate I’ll just hope it’s in internet limbo somewhere. I did want to add another book I forgot to mention. At long last, “Red Adam’s Lady” is available as an e-book! It’s also on Scribd, which I subscribe to. Based on a Wenchly recommendation(I don’t remember who), I read a very ancient paperback copy my local library had, years ago. I was very happy to be able to reread and enjoy it again. Such a great book!

    Reply
  77. My earlier post did not turn up yet, but rather than post a duplicate I’ll just hope it’s in internet limbo somewhere. I did want to add another book I forgot to mention. At long last, “Red Adam’s Lady” is available as an e-book! It’s also on Scribd, which I subscribe to. Based on a Wenchly recommendation(I don’t remember who), I read a very ancient paperback copy my local library had, years ago. I was very happy to be able to reread and enjoy it again. Such a great book!

    Reply
  78. My earlier post did not turn up yet, but rather than post a duplicate I’ll just hope it’s in internet limbo somewhere. I did want to add another book I forgot to mention. At long last, “Red Adam’s Lady” is available as an e-book! It’s also on Scribd, which I subscribe to. Based on a Wenchly recommendation(I don’t remember who), I read a very ancient paperback copy my local library had, years ago. I was very happy to be able to reread and enjoy it again. Such a great book!

    Reply
  79. My earlier post did not turn up yet, but rather than post a duplicate I’ll just hope it’s in internet limbo somewhere. I did want to add another book I forgot to mention. At long last, “Red Adam’s Lady” is available as an e-book! It’s also on Scribd, which I subscribe to. Based on a Wenchly recommendation(I don’t remember who), I read a very ancient paperback copy my local library had, years ago. I was very happy to be able to reread and enjoy it again. Such a great book!

    Reply
  80. My earlier post did not turn up yet, but rather than post a duplicate I’ll just hope it’s in internet limbo somewhere. I did want to add another book I forgot to mention. At long last, “Red Adam’s Lady” is available as an e-book! It’s also on Scribd, which I subscribe to. Based on a Wenchly recommendation(I don’t remember who), I read a very ancient paperback copy my local library had, years ago. I was very happy to be able to reread and enjoy it again. Such a great book!

    Reply
  81. Weighing in very late here. I had hip replacement surgery on Nov 16, and once the drugs wore off, I began the pleasure I’d promised myself – recovering while reading and re-reading Christmas romances! And I started with Anne’s of course – The Christmas Bride will definitely be a re-read many times over. In addition to the other aspects noted in these Comments, I loved the chess games and the various chess sets mentioned. I have a small collection of sets, but none carved by a handsome hero from twigs, I regret to say! The only other first-time read for me so far has been Edith Layton’s An Enchanted Regency Christmas – definitely enchanting and, as always with her wonderful Christmas stories, full of surprises, too. Most of my other re-reads have already been mentioned here, so I will add one not yet mentioned, that is a Victorian Romance, A Holiday by Gaslight by Mimi Matthews. It’s a lovely story full of classic misunderstandings, lovely awakenings, and a spendthrift father who almost bankrupts his family to indulge his tastes for modernization.
    May I just say that while I gobble up every Wench blog post, the What We’ve Been Reading posts, and the Comments that always follow, are just the best fun – often expensive, but always worth it! Thank you all for another wonderful year of reading – and didn’t we need it in 2020!

    Reply
  82. Weighing in very late here. I had hip replacement surgery on Nov 16, and once the drugs wore off, I began the pleasure I’d promised myself – recovering while reading and re-reading Christmas romances! And I started with Anne’s of course – The Christmas Bride will definitely be a re-read many times over. In addition to the other aspects noted in these Comments, I loved the chess games and the various chess sets mentioned. I have a small collection of sets, but none carved by a handsome hero from twigs, I regret to say! The only other first-time read for me so far has been Edith Layton’s An Enchanted Regency Christmas – definitely enchanting and, as always with her wonderful Christmas stories, full of surprises, too. Most of my other re-reads have already been mentioned here, so I will add one not yet mentioned, that is a Victorian Romance, A Holiday by Gaslight by Mimi Matthews. It’s a lovely story full of classic misunderstandings, lovely awakenings, and a spendthrift father who almost bankrupts his family to indulge his tastes for modernization.
    May I just say that while I gobble up every Wench blog post, the What We’ve Been Reading posts, and the Comments that always follow, are just the best fun – often expensive, but always worth it! Thank you all for another wonderful year of reading – and didn’t we need it in 2020!

    Reply
  83. Weighing in very late here. I had hip replacement surgery on Nov 16, and once the drugs wore off, I began the pleasure I’d promised myself – recovering while reading and re-reading Christmas romances! And I started with Anne’s of course – The Christmas Bride will definitely be a re-read many times over. In addition to the other aspects noted in these Comments, I loved the chess games and the various chess sets mentioned. I have a small collection of sets, but none carved by a handsome hero from twigs, I regret to say! The only other first-time read for me so far has been Edith Layton’s An Enchanted Regency Christmas – definitely enchanting and, as always with her wonderful Christmas stories, full of surprises, too. Most of my other re-reads have already been mentioned here, so I will add one not yet mentioned, that is a Victorian Romance, A Holiday by Gaslight by Mimi Matthews. It’s a lovely story full of classic misunderstandings, lovely awakenings, and a spendthrift father who almost bankrupts his family to indulge his tastes for modernization.
    May I just say that while I gobble up every Wench blog post, the What We’ve Been Reading posts, and the Comments that always follow, are just the best fun – often expensive, but always worth it! Thank you all for another wonderful year of reading – and didn’t we need it in 2020!

    Reply
  84. Weighing in very late here. I had hip replacement surgery on Nov 16, and once the drugs wore off, I began the pleasure I’d promised myself – recovering while reading and re-reading Christmas romances! And I started with Anne’s of course – The Christmas Bride will definitely be a re-read many times over. In addition to the other aspects noted in these Comments, I loved the chess games and the various chess sets mentioned. I have a small collection of sets, but none carved by a handsome hero from twigs, I regret to say! The only other first-time read for me so far has been Edith Layton’s An Enchanted Regency Christmas – definitely enchanting and, as always with her wonderful Christmas stories, full of surprises, too. Most of my other re-reads have already been mentioned here, so I will add one not yet mentioned, that is a Victorian Romance, A Holiday by Gaslight by Mimi Matthews. It’s a lovely story full of classic misunderstandings, lovely awakenings, and a spendthrift father who almost bankrupts his family to indulge his tastes for modernization.
    May I just say that while I gobble up every Wench blog post, the What We’ve Been Reading posts, and the Comments that always follow, are just the best fun – often expensive, but always worth it! Thank you all for another wonderful year of reading – and didn’t we need it in 2020!

    Reply
  85. Weighing in very late here. I had hip replacement surgery on Nov 16, and once the drugs wore off, I began the pleasure I’d promised myself – recovering while reading and re-reading Christmas romances! And I started with Anne’s of course – The Christmas Bride will definitely be a re-read many times over. In addition to the other aspects noted in these Comments, I loved the chess games and the various chess sets mentioned. I have a small collection of sets, but none carved by a handsome hero from twigs, I regret to say! The only other first-time read for me so far has been Edith Layton’s An Enchanted Regency Christmas – definitely enchanting and, as always with her wonderful Christmas stories, full of surprises, too. Most of my other re-reads have already been mentioned here, so I will add one not yet mentioned, that is a Victorian Romance, A Holiday by Gaslight by Mimi Matthews. It’s a lovely story full of classic misunderstandings, lovely awakenings, and a spendthrift father who almost bankrupts his family to indulge his tastes for modernization.
    May I just say that while I gobble up every Wench blog post, the What We’ve Been Reading posts, and the Comments that always follow, are just the best fun – often expensive, but always worth it! Thank you all for another wonderful year of reading – and didn’t we need it in 2020!

    Reply
  86. I love these What We’re Reading articles as they offer so many good ideas for Christmas presents, apart from anything else. Does anyone know if Carpet Diem is available in printed form, as I don’t know how to give a kindle book as a gift?

    Reply
  87. I love these What We’re Reading articles as they offer so many good ideas for Christmas presents, apart from anything else. Does anyone know if Carpet Diem is available in printed form, as I don’t know how to give a kindle book as a gift?

    Reply
  88. I love these What We’re Reading articles as they offer so many good ideas for Christmas presents, apart from anything else. Does anyone know if Carpet Diem is available in printed form, as I don’t know how to give a kindle book as a gift?

    Reply
  89. I love these What We’re Reading articles as they offer so many good ideas for Christmas presents, apart from anything else. Does anyone know if Carpet Diem is available in printed form, as I don’t know how to give a kindle book as a gift?

    Reply
  90. I love these What We’re Reading articles as they offer so many good ideas for Christmas presents, apart from anything else. Does anyone know if Carpet Diem is available in printed form, as I don’t know how to give a kindle book as a gift?

    Reply

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