What We Are Reading!

A Murder in TimeFrom timeslips, Viking warriors and fantasy worlds to contemporary romance and historical mysteries, the Wenches have been reading up a storm this month. Check it out! (And don't forget to share your reading list with us!)

Pat: Now, for a completely different twist. . . A Murder In Time by Julie McElwain This is essentially an historical timeslip novel, with a murder mystery, a contemporary story arc, and a hint of romance. Who could ask for anything more? 


Kendra Donovan’s parents were part of a DNA experiment that brought brilliant genes together, so yeah, she’s that kind of genius.  Against their wishes, she became an FBI agent who specializes in serial killers. Then one day, in pursuit of an international criminal who killed her squad, she dresses up for a historical production in a castle and mysteriously disappears through what she calls a wormhole before she can kill her target. She ends up in the Regency era in time to help catch a serial killer there. As with all time travels, there are a few nice conveniences like ending up in a scientific duke’s castle—but possibly, the duke caused the wormhole? Really, the details make everything entertaining and now I’m rooting for Kendra to stay in that time period where she has friends and a man who might love her. Because, of course, this is the first in a series. If you can’t stomach the bookstore prices, check your local library and give it a try first. I’ll be  buying the second book shortly.

An Unexpected PerilAndrea: I'm a big fan of all of Deanna Raybourn's books, and her current Veronica Speedwell series is an absolute delight. The latest book, An Unexpected Peril, features her usual cast of quirky and interesting characters, as well a twisty mystery that has Veronica impersonating a missing foreign princess who visiting London in order to sign an important treaty with the British government. Is it foul play? Or is there some hidden connection with the recent death of famous women adventurer in the princess's home country. Leave it to Veronica and Stoker, her alluring but complicated love interest, to unravel the truth. What I love about her writing is that beneath the clever banter and sly humor, she also writes about more complex issues, like vulnerability, loneliness and what it means to be part of a family

51iVUSWClBLNicola: I’ve been on a glom of Tessa Dare’s Spindle Cove series this month. Although I’ve read and enjoyed some of her books before, I’d never read this series and it all came about in a rather odd way. I was doing some family tree research and came across two relatives who were blacksmiths in the late 18th and early 19th century. This set me off on a train of thought about blacksmith heroes in Regencies, I googled it and came up with Beauty And The Blacksmith. Well, I loved it so much I read the entire series including all the novellas. The concept of Spindle Cove itself as a place of sanctuary for ladies who don’t want to or can’t fit in with society is fun, and the disparate group of heroines were a wonderful and varied bunch but all strong and spirited in their own ways of course. Most of the romance stems from what happens when a platoon of soldiers is stationed in the village to build up the Napoleonic War defences. The ensuing skirmishes are highly entertaining.
 
What I particularly liked about the series was the exceptionally skilled dialogue as well as the way in which Tessa Dare really brings out the emotional heart of a story. The happy ever after is always hard won but so satisfying and all the stories are outrageously romantic, which was just what I needed to read. I’ve now moved on to When A Scot Ties The Knot, which I’m also loving. I’m open to recommendations of any other books with blacksmith heroes!

Folly FarmChristina:  A couple of books stood out for me this month—Home on Folly Farm, Jane Lovering’s new novel, was an auto buy for me and I devoured it in one sitting. I was pulled into the story from the very first sentence and she had me chuckling at the heroine’s pithy comments and subtle humour. But there is an underlying darkness that is slowly revealed as the story progresses, and although the witty repartee continues throughout, things start to get more serious. It turns out there are some quite large skeletons in just about everyone’s closet and it takes a bunch of scumbag sheep rustlers to shake things loose. Jane is brilliant at writing real characters, the kind we really empathise with and I was rooting for the heroine from the word go. I didn’t want all her struggles to be for nothing – she deserved happiness. Ultimately this book shows us that making mistakes when you’re young is not the end of the world. We still all deserve a second chance. Loved it!

I’m always on the lookout for new factual books about the Vikings and River Kings by Dr Cat Jarman is a fascinating take on their history. It is told from a very unusual perspective and incorporates all the latest finds and information available. Dr Jarman is a bioarchaeologist who specialises in isotope analysis. She writes engagingly and makes the narrative exciting throughout. We get to follow one tiny bead made of carnelian, which was found in a Viking grave at Repton in Derbyshire, on a reverse journey back to where it was made – in Gujarat in India.  Along the way, we see the Vikings as they really were and realise what an amazing and diverse group of people they were – not all from one country, but sharing a cultural heritage, customs and beliefs. Their utter fearlessness and thirst for adventure (and silver!) shines through, but most of all, they are shown here as an awful lot more than just the feared raiders and marauders history has portrayed them as.

Paladin'sStrengthAnne: My reading this month has been mostly fantasy and a little bit of mystery, both of which also contain a good dose of romance. I've been working my way through the Gillian Roberts mystery series that I mentioned last month in WWR.(link below) So far I've read bundle 2, 3 & 4, with more to come.  

In earlier WWR posts I have talked about T. Kingfisher's books. This month's reading started with the second in her "Paladin" series — Paladin's Strength. I love this series. It's a great combination of fantasy and romance. The paladins are the last surviving paladins (knights) of a dead god. They're deeply honorable, strong, protective and a little bit lost (because their reason for living has died). In Paladin's Strength Istvhan is posing as a mercenary soldier, but really he's on the trail of a supernatural killer. Clara is a lay-nun from an obscure and secretive order, and she's tracking the raiders who burned her convent and kidnapped her sisters. 

Neither of them have taken vows of celibacy, and the sexual tension between these two is delightful — and also funny. Istvhan fancies Clara rotten, but he keeps reminding himself that she's a nun and he's an honorable man. Clara is powerfully attracted to him, too but is reluctant to jump his bones because she knows her secret will put him right off. The humor in these books is wonderful, with some laugh-out-loud moments. But it's not "just" a romance — the fantasy/mystery is also brilliant with action and adventure, a rich cast of minor characters, and a breathtaking climax. I love these books and am already mourning the fact that only seven paladins of the Saint of Steel survived the death of their god. Previous books in the same world are Swordheart and Paladin's Grace.

BriggsWildSignPatricia Briggs is an auto-buy author for me and when her latest book dropped into my kindle I started on it straight away. Wild Sign is book #6 in the "Alpha and Omega" series about Charles an alpha were-wolf and his mate, Anna, an "omega" wolf. An entire community of peace-loving people has disappeared in the mountains, and Charles and Anna are sent to investigate.

This series also connects with the Mercy Thompson series which I love. And in fact reading Wild Sign started me back on the earliest books in the series, starting with the novella that kicked off the "Alpha and Omega" series. I first read it in an anthology called On the Prowl but it's now available on its own as an e-book called simply Alpha & Omega. Then I went on to reread Moon Called, the first in the Mercy Thompson series, which is still my favorite series. I've reread these books so often and enjoy them every time. 

After DarkMary Jo: This last lockdown year has been a good time for rereading books I've enjoyed in the past.  I like Jayne Ann Krentz in all her incarnations. Her stories are sleek and fast-moving and always include romance and suspense, and they frequently have characters with powerful psychic talents.  
 
She's Jayne Ann Krentz for her contemporaries and Amanda Quick for her historicals. (The Castle books have moved from Regency to Victorian and are now set in California in the roaring '20s.)  Her least well known name is Jayne Castle, which she uses for science fiction and fantasy, and these are the ones I've been chomping through. 
 Her Jayne Castle Harmony books are set on the planet Harmony, which was settled by humans who lost contact with Earth when astronomical conditions changed.  A vanished Alien culture had built cities and catacombs of indestructible green amber that is infused with psi energy.  Amber is key to the human civilization, and people with strong psi talents can do all sorts of things. Naturally all of Castle's characters have powerful and dangerous psi abilities. <G>
 
The Lost NightThe first Harmony Ghost Hunter books is After Dark. There are eight Ghost Hunter books, then she moved into four Rainshadow Island books, the first of which is The Lost Night. Rest assured that all her heroes are dark and dangerous men who fall madly in love with the smart and also dangerous heroines.  <G> The stories are fast and fun and I'm enjoying rereading them. 

 Because most of all I love Jayne Castle dust bunnies!  They are small local critters that look like a tangle of gray dryer lint, have six legs, a pair of adorable baby blue eyes, and also second pair of eyes that only show when they are in hunting mode. They are funny, mischievous, always hungry, and at least once in each book, they save the life of one of protagonists.   By the time you've read one or two of the books, you may well want a dust bunny of your own!

The Wenches love sharing what books have been tickling our fancy—and hope you'll share your recent favorite books! So grab up you cyber pen and let  everyone know what you've been reading!

265 thoughts on “What We Are Reading!”

  1. This month I’ve read Väärin haudattu sotamies (incorrectly buried soldier) by Riku Kauhanen. It’s full of ghost stories from the various wars here in Finland. The author noted there aren’t that many ghost stories from Winter and Continuation war (2nd World War), partly because we Finns did our best to bring our fallen soldiers back home and partly because by then people were aware that things like extreme exhaustion can cause hallusinations.
    At the moment I’m reading Every Tool’s A Hammer by Adam Savage (Mythusters, anyone?). Next on my list is Crash Test Girl by Kari Byron.
    And I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. I’ve ordered the book. Pave was one of my favourite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away in January.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  2. This month I’ve read Väärin haudattu sotamies (incorrectly buried soldier) by Riku Kauhanen. It’s full of ghost stories from the various wars here in Finland. The author noted there aren’t that many ghost stories from Winter and Continuation war (2nd World War), partly because we Finns did our best to bring our fallen soldiers back home and partly because by then people were aware that things like extreme exhaustion can cause hallusinations.
    At the moment I’m reading Every Tool’s A Hammer by Adam Savage (Mythusters, anyone?). Next on my list is Crash Test Girl by Kari Byron.
    And I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. I’ve ordered the book. Pave was one of my favourite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away in January.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  3. This month I’ve read Väärin haudattu sotamies (incorrectly buried soldier) by Riku Kauhanen. It’s full of ghost stories from the various wars here in Finland. The author noted there aren’t that many ghost stories from Winter and Continuation war (2nd World War), partly because we Finns did our best to bring our fallen soldiers back home and partly because by then people were aware that things like extreme exhaustion can cause hallusinations.
    At the moment I’m reading Every Tool’s A Hammer by Adam Savage (Mythusters, anyone?). Next on my list is Crash Test Girl by Kari Byron.
    And I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. I’ve ordered the book. Pave was one of my favourite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away in January.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  4. This month I’ve read Väärin haudattu sotamies (incorrectly buried soldier) by Riku Kauhanen. It’s full of ghost stories from the various wars here in Finland. The author noted there aren’t that many ghost stories from Winter and Continuation war (2nd World War), partly because we Finns did our best to bring our fallen soldiers back home and partly because by then people were aware that things like extreme exhaustion can cause hallusinations.
    At the moment I’m reading Every Tool’s A Hammer by Adam Savage (Mythusters, anyone?). Next on my list is Crash Test Girl by Kari Byron.
    And I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. I’ve ordered the book. Pave was one of my favourite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away in January.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  5. This month I’ve read Väärin haudattu sotamies (incorrectly buried soldier) by Riku Kauhanen. It’s full of ghost stories from the various wars here in Finland. The author noted there aren’t that many ghost stories from Winter and Continuation war (2nd World War), partly because we Finns did our best to bring our fallen soldiers back home and partly because by then people were aware that things like extreme exhaustion can cause hallusinations.
    At the moment I’m reading Every Tool’s A Hammer by Adam Savage (Mythusters, anyone?). Next on my list is Crash Test Girl by Kari Byron.
    And I can’t wait to read Elämän nälkä (hunger for life) by Pave Maijanen and Tommi Saarela. I’ve ordered the book. Pave was one of my favourite Singer-songwriters. He also played several instruments until the effects of ALS forced him give up both singing and playing. He managed to write his memoirs (with a little help) before he passed away in January.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pave_Maijanen
    Elämän Nälkä-Hunger for life
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGN3XB9YXDI
    Kohti uutta maailmaa -Towards a new world
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqoD98q1bBs
    Kaikki nämä vuodet-all these years
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il3ktEs3twM
    Pave Maijanen Lähtisitkö / Would you
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G7U73Hrpuw
    Pave Maijanen – Lähtisitkö
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pAKIWMqKBrw
    Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwmL4ARpMYg
    Pidä Huolta (with Mistakes)- Take Care
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ep-gWF0j_4M

    Reply
  6. My top audio pick this month is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series.Alas only book 5 ‘Lord of Darkness’ and book 12 ‘Duke of Desire’ are available at Audible UK but I found both to be a riveting listen. They feature the dark under currents of Georgian London in a mix of adventure and romance that I particularly enjoy … in some ways reminiscent of MJP’s novels with perhaps a trace more passion. I also greatly enjoyed Christina’s ‘Echoes of the Runes’ in which a Viking ring forms the link between a present archaeological dig and a Viking past. The two time streams are cleverly interwoven and it works well in audio format.
    Intriguing recommendations here as always. I checked my local online public library to try some but alas none were available … what is wrong with UK librarians! Thank heavens for Amazon kindle e-books and audio.

    Reply
  7. My top audio pick this month is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series.Alas only book 5 ‘Lord of Darkness’ and book 12 ‘Duke of Desire’ are available at Audible UK but I found both to be a riveting listen. They feature the dark under currents of Georgian London in a mix of adventure and romance that I particularly enjoy … in some ways reminiscent of MJP’s novels with perhaps a trace more passion. I also greatly enjoyed Christina’s ‘Echoes of the Runes’ in which a Viking ring forms the link between a present archaeological dig and a Viking past. The two time streams are cleverly interwoven and it works well in audio format.
    Intriguing recommendations here as always. I checked my local online public library to try some but alas none were available … what is wrong with UK librarians! Thank heavens for Amazon kindle e-books and audio.

    Reply
  8. My top audio pick this month is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series.Alas only book 5 ‘Lord of Darkness’ and book 12 ‘Duke of Desire’ are available at Audible UK but I found both to be a riveting listen. They feature the dark under currents of Georgian London in a mix of adventure and romance that I particularly enjoy … in some ways reminiscent of MJP’s novels with perhaps a trace more passion. I also greatly enjoyed Christina’s ‘Echoes of the Runes’ in which a Viking ring forms the link between a present archaeological dig and a Viking past. The two time streams are cleverly interwoven and it works well in audio format.
    Intriguing recommendations here as always. I checked my local online public library to try some but alas none were available … what is wrong with UK librarians! Thank heavens for Amazon kindle e-books and audio.

    Reply
  9. My top audio pick this month is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series.Alas only book 5 ‘Lord of Darkness’ and book 12 ‘Duke of Desire’ are available at Audible UK but I found both to be a riveting listen. They feature the dark under currents of Georgian London in a mix of adventure and romance that I particularly enjoy … in some ways reminiscent of MJP’s novels with perhaps a trace more passion. I also greatly enjoyed Christina’s ‘Echoes of the Runes’ in which a Viking ring forms the link between a present archaeological dig and a Viking past. The two time streams are cleverly interwoven and it works well in audio format.
    Intriguing recommendations here as always. I checked my local online public library to try some but alas none were available … what is wrong with UK librarians! Thank heavens for Amazon kindle e-books and audio.

    Reply
  10. My top audio pick this month is Elizabeth Hoyt’s Maiden Lane series.Alas only book 5 ‘Lord of Darkness’ and book 12 ‘Duke of Desire’ are available at Audible UK but I found both to be a riveting listen. They feature the dark under currents of Georgian London in a mix of adventure and romance that I particularly enjoy … in some ways reminiscent of MJP’s novels with perhaps a trace more passion. I also greatly enjoyed Christina’s ‘Echoes of the Runes’ in which a Viking ring forms the link between a present archaeological dig and a Viking past. The two time streams are cleverly interwoven and it works well in audio format.
    Intriguing recommendations here as always. I checked my local online public library to try some but alas none were available … what is wrong with UK librarians! Thank heavens for Amazon kindle e-books and audio.

    Reply
  11. Quantum, Elizabeth Hoyt has always been a great favorite of mine. She writes really interesting and intense characters.
    And I love Christina’s timeslips too!
    So sorry your local libraries aren’t up to snuff. I’m really lucky in that my town has a fabulous library system, and I can find of the wonderful books mentioned in this monthly column there. (Which saves a big hit on my bank account! )

    Reply
  12. Quantum, Elizabeth Hoyt has always been a great favorite of mine. She writes really interesting and intense characters.
    And I love Christina’s timeslips too!
    So sorry your local libraries aren’t up to snuff. I’m really lucky in that my town has a fabulous library system, and I can find of the wonderful books mentioned in this monthly column there. (Which saves a big hit on my bank account! )

    Reply
  13. Quantum, Elizabeth Hoyt has always been a great favorite of mine. She writes really interesting and intense characters.
    And I love Christina’s timeslips too!
    So sorry your local libraries aren’t up to snuff. I’m really lucky in that my town has a fabulous library system, and I can find of the wonderful books mentioned in this monthly column there. (Which saves a big hit on my bank account! )

    Reply
  14. Quantum, Elizabeth Hoyt has always been a great favorite of mine. She writes really interesting and intense characters.
    And I love Christina’s timeslips too!
    So sorry your local libraries aren’t up to snuff. I’m really lucky in that my town has a fabulous library system, and I can find of the wonderful books mentioned in this monthly column there. (Which saves a big hit on my bank account! )

    Reply
  15. Quantum, Elizabeth Hoyt has always been a great favorite of mine. She writes really interesting and intense characters.
    And I love Christina’s timeslips too!
    So sorry your local libraries aren’t up to snuff. I’m really lucky in that my town has a fabulous library system, and I can find of the wonderful books mentioned in this monthly column there. (Which saves a big hit on my bank account! )

    Reply
  16. This month I have been reading World Without End by Ken Follett, it is the follow up to The Pillars of the Earth which I read years ago. Set in the 14th century, the town of Kingsbridge it is a novel of its people and their day to day life. There is love, jealousy, murder, war and then the Black Death.A brilliant novel well worth reading.

    Reply
  17. This month I have been reading World Without End by Ken Follett, it is the follow up to The Pillars of the Earth which I read years ago. Set in the 14th century, the town of Kingsbridge it is a novel of its people and their day to day life. There is love, jealousy, murder, war and then the Black Death.A brilliant novel well worth reading.

    Reply
  18. This month I have been reading World Without End by Ken Follett, it is the follow up to The Pillars of the Earth which I read years ago. Set in the 14th century, the town of Kingsbridge it is a novel of its people and their day to day life. There is love, jealousy, murder, war and then the Black Death.A brilliant novel well worth reading.

    Reply
  19. This month I have been reading World Without End by Ken Follett, it is the follow up to The Pillars of the Earth which I read years ago. Set in the 14th century, the town of Kingsbridge it is a novel of its people and their day to day life. There is love, jealousy, murder, war and then the Black Death.A brilliant novel well worth reading.

    Reply
  20. This month I have been reading World Without End by Ken Follett, it is the follow up to The Pillars of the Earth which I read years ago. Set in the 14th century, the town of Kingsbridge it is a novel of its people and their day to day life. There is love, jealousy, murder, war and then the Black Death.A brilliant novel well worth reading.

    Reply
  21. I really love Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. It’s just fun. She has a new one coming out later this year called Guild Boss and I can’t wait.
    I finished Kelley Armstrong’s A Stranger in Town this month. It’s been kind of a slow month for reading. I have a stack of books on hold at the library though and hopefully, they don’t all come in at the same time.

    Reply
  22. I really love Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. It’s just fun. She has a new one coming out later this year called Guild Boss and I can’t wait.
    I finished Kelley Armstrong’s A Stranger in Town this month. It’s been kind of a slow month for reading. I have a stack of books on hold at the library though and hopefully, they don’t all come in at the same time.

    Reply
  23. I really love Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. It’s just fun. She has a new one coming out later this year called Guild Boss and I can’t wait.
    I finished Kelley Armstrong’s A Stranger in Town this month. It’s been kind of a slow month for reading. I have a stack of books on hold at the library though and hopefully, they don’t all come in at the same time.

    Reply
  24. I really love Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. It’s just fun. She has a new one coming out later this year called Guild Boss and I can’t wait.
    I finished Kelley Armstrong’s A Stranger in Town this month. It’s been kind of a slow month for reading. I have a stack of books on hold at the library though and hopefully, they don’t all come in at the same time.

    Reply
  25. I really love Jayne Castle’s Harmony series. It’s just fun. She has a new one coming out later this year called Guild Boss and I can’t wait.
    I finished Kelley Armstrong’s A Stranger in Town this month. It’s been kind of a slow month for reading. I have a stack of books on hold at the library though and hopefully, they don’t all come in at the same time.

    Reply
  26. I do so enjoy this column and learning what the Word Wenches and the other readers of the site have been reading.
    Mary Jo, I have a copy of Shield’s Lady on my shelf. The author’s name is Amanda Glass which is yet another pseudonym that JAK used to use.
    Anne, I’m eagerly awaiting a library copy of the new Patricia Briggs Alpha and Omega book. I’ll buy my own copy when it’s released in paper. I like the Mercy Thompson series, but it’s the Alpha and Omega series that really grabs me.

    Reply
  27. I do so enjoy this column and learning what the Word Wenches and the other readers of the site have been reading.
    Mary Jo, I have a copy of Shield’s Lady on my shelf. The author’s name is Amanda Glass which is yet another pseudonym that JAK used to use.
    Anne, I’m eagerly awaiting a library copy of the new Patricia Briggs Alpha and Omega book. I’ll buy my own copy when it’s released in paper. I like the Mercy Thompson series, but it’s the Alpha and Omega series that really grabs me.

    Reply
  28. I do so enjoy this column and learning what the Word Wenches and the other readers of the site have been reading.
    Mary Jo, I have a copy of Shield’s Lady on my shelf. The author’s name is Amanda Glass which is yet another pseudonym that JAK used to use.
    Anne, I’m eagerly awaiting a library copy of the new Patricia Briggs Alpha and Omega book. I’ll buy my own copy when it’s released in paper. I like the Mercy Thompson series, but it’s the Alpha and Omega series that really grabs me.

    Reply
  29. I do so enjoy this column and learning what the Word Wenches and the other readers of the site have been reading.
    Mary Jo, I have a copy of Shield’s Lady on my shelf. The author’s name is Amanda Glass which is yet another pseudonym that JAK used to use.
    Anne, I’m eagerly awaiting a library copy of the new Patricia Briggs Alpha and Omega book. I’ll buy my own copy when it’s released in paper. I like the Mercy Thompson series, but it’s the Alpha and Omega series that really grabs me.

    Reply
  30. I do so enjoy this column and learning what the Word Wenches and the other readers of the site have been reading.
    Mary Jo, I have a copy of Shield’s Lady on my shelf. The author’s name is Amanda Glass which is yet another pseudonym that JAK used to use.
    Anne, I’m eagerly awaiting a library copy of the new Patricia Briggs Alpha and Omega book. I’ll buy my own copy when it’s released in paper. I like the Mercy Thompson series, but it’s the Alpha and Omega series that really grabs me.

    Reply
  31. Since last time ~
    — The Spaceship Next Door by Gene Doucette which I quite enjoyed. It was recommended by a commenter and subsequently reviewed on the Dear Author site. I never expected that I’d read and enjoy a book with SPOILER ALERTzombiesEND SPOILER.
    — For my distant book group, Miss Jane: A Novel by Brad Watson. This was a pensive book that reminded me a bit of Where the Crawdads Sing when it focused on the natural world. I found it a quick read.
    — enjoyed the contemporary male/male romance, A Full Plate by Kim Fielding.
    — After learning that a new Acton and Doyle mystery had been released. I promptly bought it and began reading; I enjoyed it. Murder in Unsound Mind: Doyle & Acton #13 by Anne Cleeland.
    — The Last Sun (The Tarot Sequence Book 1) by K. D. Edwards; I quite enjoyed the book and was sorry to see that my library does not own the second book of the planned nonology.
    — a book that my daughter has recommended for years, The Thief (The Queen’s Thief Book 1) by Megan Whalen Turner; it was a very good read.
    — the science fiction novella, Binti by Nnedi Okorafor; I’m now waiting for the next book in the trilogy to arrive from the library.
    — read and enjoyed the contemporary m/m romance, Tough Guy: A Gay Sports Romance (Game Changers Book 3) by Rachel Reid.
    — Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell which I enjoyed. I’m curious to see if it is the first in a series. If yes, I’ll happily read on.
    — reread The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison for my local book group. It was my suggestion to the group, and I was pleased that most enjoyed it even though fantasy is not a genre that most of them read.
    — read with pleasure two fan fiction pieces for a favorite series (Lyn Gala’s Claimings series). I obtained them from Archive of Our Own: Deviations and Revelations, both by allonym.
    — Healing Glass: A Gifted Guilds Novel by Jackie Keswick which I enjoyed. This is a male/male fantasy romance.
    — I read Once Upon A Haunted Moor (The Tyack & Frayne Mysteries Book 1) and then the next six books in the series. I enjoyed all of these male/male paranormal mystery romances.
    — quite enjoyed Heart of Malice (Alice Worth Book 1) by Lisa Edmonds and went on to read the novella Blood Money as well as books 2 and 3, Heart of Fire and Heart of Ice. Now I need to get my hands on the remainder of the series!
    — read and enjoyed One’s Aspect to the Sun (Nearspace Book 1) by Sherry D. Ramsey. I’d read on in this series; however, my library does not own the sequels.
    — the anthology Fantastic Hope by Laurel K. Hamilton, Patricia Briggs and more. As with most anthologies, I found that I liked some of the stories, was ambivalent about others, and did not finish several. My favorite story was “Asil and the Not-Date” by Patricia Briggs; it featured Asil from her Alpha and Omega series.
    — and a host of samples.

    Reply
  32. Since last time ~
    — The Spaceship Next Door by Gene Doucette which I quite enjoyed. It was recommended by a commenter and subsequently reviewed on the Dear Author site. I never expected that I’d read and enjoy a book with SPOILER ALERTzombiesEND SPOILER.
    — For my distant book group, Miss Jane: A Novel by Brad Watson. This was a pensive book that reminded me a bit of Where the Crawdads Sing when it focused on the natural world. I found it a quick read.
    — enjoyed the contemporary male/male romance, A Full Plate by Kim Fielding.
    — After learning that a new Acton and Doyle mystery had been released. I promptly bought it and began reading; I enjoyed it. Murder in Unsound Mind: Doyle & Acton #13 by Anne Cleeland.
    — The Last Sun (The Tarot Sequence Book 1) by K. D. Edwards; I quite enjoyed the book and was sorry to see that my library does not own the second book of the planned nonology.
    — a book that my daughter has recommended for years, The Thief (The Queen’s Thief Book 1) by Megan Whalen Turner; it was a very good read.
    — the science fiction novella, Binti by Nnedi Okorafor; I’m now waiting for the next book in the trilogy to arrive from the library.
    — read and enjoyed the contemporary m/m romance, Tough Guy: A Gay Sports Romance (Game Changers Book 3) by Rachel Reid.
    — Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell which I enjoyed. I’m curious to see if it is the first in a series. If yes, I’ll happily read on.
    — reread The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison for my local book group. It was my suggestion to the group, and I was pleased that most enjoyed it even though fantasy is not a genre that most of them read.
    — read with pleasure two fan fiction pieces for a favorite series (Lyn Gala’s Claimings series). I obtained them from Archive of Our Own: Deviations and Revelations, both by allonym.
    — Healing Glass: A Gifted Guilds Novel by Jackie Keswick which I enjoyed. This is a male/male fantasy romance.
    — I read Once Upon A Haunted Moor (The Tyack & Frayne Mysteries Book 1) and then the next six books in the series. I enjoyed all of these male/male paranormal mystery romances.
    — quite enjoyed Heart of Malice (Alice Worth Book 1) by Lisa Edmonds and went on to read the novella Blood Money as well as books 2 and 3, Heart of Fire and Heart of Ice. Now I need to get my hands on the remainder of the series!
    — read and enjoyed One’s Aspect to the Sun (Nearspace Book 1) by Sherry D. Ramsey. I’d read on in this series; however, my library does not own the sequels.
    — the anthology Fantastic Hope by Laurel K. Hamilton, Patricia Briggs and more. As with most anthologies, I found that I liked some of the stories, was ambivalent about others, and did not finish several. My favorite story was “Asil and the Not-Date” by Patricia Briggs; it featured Asil from her Alpha and Omega series.
    — and a host of samples.

    Reply
  33. Since last time ~
    — The Spaceship Next Door by Gene Doucette which I quite enjoyed. It was recommended by a commenter and subsequently reviewed on the Dear Author site. I never expected that I’d read and enjoy a book with SPOILER ALERTzombiesEND SPOILER.
    — For my distant book group, Miss Jane: A Novel by Brad Watson. This was a pensive book that reminded me a bit of Where the Crawdads Sing when it focused on the natural world. I found it a quick read.
    — enjoyed the contemporary male/male romance, A Full Plate by Kim Fielding.
    — After learning that a new Acton and Doyle mystery had been released. I promptly bought it and began reading; I enjoyed it. Murder in Unsound Mind: Doyle & Acton #13 by Anne Cleeland.
    — The Last Sun (The Tarot Sequence Book 1) by K. D. Edwards; I quite enjoyed the book and was sorry to see that my library does not own the second book of the planned nonology.
    — a book that my daughter has recommended for years, The Thief (The Queen’s Thief Book 1) by Megan Whalen Turner; it was a very good read.
    — the science fiction novella, Binti by Nnedi Okorafor; I’m now waiting for the next book in the trilogy to arrive from the library.
    — read and enjoyed the contemporary m/m romance, Tough Guy: A Gay Sports Romance (Game Changers Book 3) by Rachel Reid.
    — Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell which I enjoyed. I’m curious to see if it is the first in a series. If yes, I’ll happily read on.
    — reread The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison for my local book group. It was my suggestion to the group, and I was pleased that most enjoyed it even though fantasy is not a genre that most of them read.
    — read with pleasure two fan fiction pieces for a favorite series (Lyn Gala’s Claimings series). I obtained them from Archive of Our Own: Deviations and Revelations, both by allonym.
    — Healing Glass: A Gifted Guilds Novel by Jackie Keswick which I enjoyed. This is a male/male fantasy romance.
    — I read Once Upon A Haunted Moor (The Tyack & Frayne Mysteries Book 1) and then the next six books in the series. I enjoyed all of these male/male paranormal mystery romances.
    — quite enjoyed Heart of Malice (Alice Worth Book 1) by Lisa Edmonds and went on to read the novella Blood Money as well as books 2 and 3, Heart of Fire and Heart of Ice. Now I need to get my hands on the remainder of the series!
    — read and enjoyed One’s Aspect to the Sun (Nearspace Book 1) by Sherry D. Ramsey. I’d read on in this series; however, my library does not own the sequels.
    — the anthology Fantastic Hope by Laurel K. Hamilton, Patricia Briggs and more. As with most anthologies, I found that I liked some of the stories, was ambivalent about others, and did not finish several. My favorite story was “Asil and the Not-Date” by Patricia Briggs; it featured Asil from her Alpha and Omega series.
    — and a host of samples.

    Reply
  34. Since last time ~
    — The Spaceship Next Door by Gene Doucette which I quite enjoyed. It was recommended by a commenter and subsequently reviewed on the Dear Author site. I never expected that I’d read and enjoy a book with SPOILER ALERTzombiesEND SPOILER.
    — For my distant book group, Miss Jane: A Novel by Brad Watson. This was a pensive book that reminded me a bit of Where the Crawdads Sing when it focused on the natural world. I found it a quick read.
    — enjoyed the contemporary male/male romance, A Full Plate by Kim Fielding.
    — After learning that a new Acton and Doyle mystery had been released. I promptly bought it and began reading; I enjoyed it. Murder in Unsound Mind: Doyle & Acton #13 by Anne Cleeland.
    — The Last Sun (The Tarot Sequence Book 1) by K. D. Edwards; I quite enjoyed the book and was sorry to see that my library does not own the second book of the planned nonology.
    — a book that my daughter has recommended for years, The Thief (The Queen’s Thief Book 1) by Megan Whalen Turner; it was a very good read.
    — the science fiction novella, Binti by Nnedi Okorafor; I’m now waiting for the next book in the trilogy to arrive from the library.
    — read and enjoyed the contemporary m/m romance, Tough Guy: A Gay Sports Romance (Game Changers Book 3) by Rachel Reid.
    — Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell which I enjoyed. I’m curious to see if it is the first in a series. If yes, I’ll happily read on.
    — reread The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison for my local book group. It was my suggestion to the group, and I was pleased that most enjoyed it even though fantasy is not a genre that most of them read.
    — read with pleasure two fan fiction pieces for a favorite series (Lyn Gala’s Claimings series). I obtained them from Archive of Our Own: Deviations and Revelations, both by allonym.
    — Healing Glass: A Gifted Guilds Novel by Jackie Keswick which I enjoyed. This is a male/male fantasy romance.
    — I read Once Upon A Haunted Moor (The Tyack & Frayne Mysteries Book 1) and then the next six books in the series. I enjoyed all of these male/male paranormal mystery romances.
    — quite enjoyed Heart of Malice (Alice Worth Book 1) by Lisa Edmonds and went on to read the novella Blood Money as well as books 2 and 3, Heart of Fire and Heart of Ice. Now I need to get my hands on the remainder of the series!
    — read and enjoyed One’s Aspect to the Sun (Nearspace Book 1) by Sherry D. Ramsey. I’d read on in this series; however, my library does not own the sequels.
    — the anthology Fantastic Hope by Laurel K. Hamilton, Patricia Briggs and more. As with most anthologies, I found that I liked some of the stories, was ambivalent about others, and did not finish several. My favorite story was “Asil and the Not-Date” by Patricia Briggs; it featured Asil from her Alpha and Omega series.
    — and a host of samples.

    Reply
  35. Since last time ~
    — The Spaceship Next Door by Gene Doucette which I quite enjoyed. It was recommended by a commenter and subsequently reviewed on the Dear Author site. I never expected that I’d read and enjoy a book with SPOILER ALERTzombiesEND SPOILER.
    — For my distant book group, Miss Jane: A Novel by Brad Watson. This was a pensive book that reminded me a bit of Where the Crawdads Sing when it focused on the natural world. I found it a quick read.
    — enjoyed the contemporary male/male romance, A Full Plate by Kim Fielding.
    — After learning that a new Acton and Doyle mystery had been released. I promptly bought it and began reading; I enjoyed it. Murder in Unsound Mind: Doyle & Acton #13 by Anne Cleeland.
    — The Last Sun (The Tarot Sequence Book 1) by K. D. Edwards; I quite enjoyed the book and was sorry to see that my library does not own the second book of the planned nonology.
    — a book that my daughter has recommended for years, The Thief (The Queen’s Thief Book 1) by Megan Whalen Turner; it was a very good read.
    — the science fiction novella, Binti by Nnedi Okorafor; I’m now waiting for the next book in the trilogy to arrive from the library.
    — read and enjoyed the contemporary m/m romance, Tough Guy: A Gay Sports Romance (Game Changers Book 3) by Rachel Reid.
    — Winter’s Orbit by Everina Maxwell which I enjoyed. I’m curious to see if it is the first in a series. If yes, I’ll happily read on.
    — reread The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison for my local book group. It was my suggestion to the group, and I was pleased that most enjoyed it even though fantasy is not a genre that most of them read.
    — read with pleasure two fan fiction pieces for a favorite series (Lyn Gala’s Claimings series). I obtained them from Archive of Our Own: Deviations and Revelations, both by allonym.
    — Healing Glass: A Gifted Guilds Novel by Jackie Keswick which I enjoyed. This is a male/male fantasy romance.
    — I read Once Upon A Haunted Moor (The Tyack & Frayne Mysteries Book 1) and then the next six books in the series. I enjoyed all of these male/male paranormal mystery romances.
    — quite enjoyed Heart of Malice (Alice Worth Book 1) by Lisa Edmonds and went on to read the novella Blood Money as well as books 2 and 3, Heart of Fire and Heart of Ice. Now I need to get my hands on the remainder of the series!
    — read and enjoyed One’s Aspect to the Sun (Nearspace Book 1) by Sherry D. Ramsey. I’d read on in this series; however, my library does not own the sequels.
    — the anthology Fantastic Hope by Laurel K. Hamilton, Patricia Briggs and more. As with most anthologies, I found that I liked some of the stories, was ambivalent about others, and did not finish several. My favorite story was “Asil and the Not-Date” by Patricia Briggs; it featured Asil from her Alpha and Omega series.
    — and a host of samples.

    Reply
  36. I do indeed sleep, Andrea! I read quickly when I’m reading for pleasure; I retain little though which is why I’m an avid rereader of favorites. I’m also fortunate to not currently be working.

    Reply
  37. I do indeed sleep, Andrea! I read quickly when I’m reading for pleasure; I retain little though which is why I’m an avid rereader of favorites. I’m also fortunate to not currently be working.

    Reply
  38. I do indeed sleep, Andrea! I read quickly when I’m reading for pleasure; I retain little though which is why I’m an avid rereader of favorites. I’m also fortunate to not currently be working.

    Reply
  39. I do indeed sleep, Andrea! I read quickly when I’m reading for pleasure; I retain little though which is why I’m an avid rereader of favorites. I’m also fortunate to not currently be working.

    Reply
  40. I do indeed sleep, Andrea! I read quickly when I’m reading for pleasure; I retain little though which is why I’m an avid rereader of favorites. I’m also fortunate to not currently be working.

    Reply
  41. Thank you so much, Quantum – I’m so glad you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes!
    It is so frustrating when we can’t get hold of a particular book though, isn’t it – hope you can find the rest of the Elizabeth Hoyt stories soon!

    Reply
  42. Thank you so much, Quantum – I’m so glad you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes!
    It is so frustrating when we can’t get hold of a particular book though, isn’t it – hope you can find the rest of the Elizabeth Hoyt stories soon!

    Reply
  43. Thank you so much, Quantum – I’m so glad you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes!
    It is so frustrating when we can’t get hold of a particular book though, isn’t it – hope you can find the rest of the Elizabeth Hoyt stories soon!

    Reply
  44. Thank you so much, Quantum – I’m so glad you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes!
    It is so frustrating when we can’t get hold of a particular book though, isn’t it – hope you can find the rest of the Elizabeth Hoyt stories soon!

    Reply
  45. Thank you so much, Quantum – I’m so glad you enjoyed Echoes of the Runes!
    It is so frustrating when we can’t get hold of a particular book though, isn’t it – hope you can find the rest of the Elizabeth Hoyt stories soon!

    Reply
  46. It seems I’m in good company since I too reread all of the Jayne Castle Harmony and Rain Shadow books this month. Totally enjoyed them as usual because well..dust bunnies. Besides Dark, Brooding and handsome H’s and strong women.
    I did read some new to me books but mostly they were meh or a few uggh.
    The one new one I really liked was A Bachelor Establishment by Isabella Barclay. A regency romance. Starts with antagonistic H/h to semi-friends to lovers. A really fun book to read. Two mysteries, 2 romances. Clever, witty banter. Laughed a lot reading it. That is the only Regency she wrote under that name.
    I also 2nd the recommendation of Shield’s Lady. Love love that book. You can find it under Jayne Ann Krentz name now on Amazon. Kindle only unless you want to pay a lot for a hardback.
    Two other books by JAK similar to Shield’s Lady are Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame. Love both of those books as well. They are also out of print but available in Kindle or used Paperback. Might be in your library system as well.

    Reply
  47. It seems I’m in good company since I too reread all of the Jayne Castle Harmony and Rain Shadow books this month. Totally enjoyed them as usual because well..dust bunnies. Besides Dark, Brooding and handsome H’s and strong women.
    I did read some new to me books but mostly they were meh or a few uggh.
    The one new one I really liked was A Bachelor Establishment by Isabella Barclay. A regency romance. Starts with antagonistic H/h to semi-friends to lovers. A really fun book to read. Two mysteries, 2 romances. Clever, witty banter. Laughed a lot reading it. That is the only Regency she wrote under that name.
    I also 2nd the recommendation of Shield’s Lady. Love love that book. You can find it under Jayne Ann Krentz name now on Amazon. Kindle only unless you want to pay a lot for a hardback.
    Two other books by JAK similar to Shield’s Lady are Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame. Love both of those books as well. They are also out of print but available in Kindle or used Paperback. Might be in your library system as well.

    Reply
  48. It seems I’m in good company since I too reread all of the Jayne Castle Harmony and Rain Shadow books this month. Totally enjoyed them as usual because well..dust bunnies. Besides Dark, Brooding and handsome H’s and strong women.
    I did read some new to me books but mostly they were meh or a few uggh.
    The one new one I really liked was A Bachelor Establishment by Isabella Barclay. A regency romance. Starts with antagonistic H/h to semi-friends to lovers. A really fun book to read. Two mysteries, 2 romances. Clever, witty banter. Laughed a lot reading it. That is the only Regency she wrote under that name.
    I also 2nd the recommendation of Shield’s Lady. Love love that book. You can find it under Jayne Ann Krentz name now on Amazon. Kindle only unless you want to pay a lot for a hardback.
    Two other books by JAK similar to Shield’s Lady are Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame. Love both of those books as well. They are also out of print but available in Kindle or used Paperback. Might be in your library system as well.

    Reply
  49. It seems I’m in good company since I too reread all of the Jayne Castle Harmony and Rain Shadow books this month. Totally enjoyed them as usual because well..dust bunnies. Besides Dark, Brooding and handsome H’s and strong women.
    I did read some new to me books but mostly they were meh or a few uggh.
    The one new one I really liked was A Bachelor Establishment by Isabella Barclay. A regency romance. Starts with antagonistic H/h to semi-friends to lovers. A really fun book to read. Two mysteries, 2 romances. Clever, witty banter. Laughed a lot reading it. That is the only Regency she wrote under that name.
    I also 2nd the recommendation of Shield’s Lady. Love love that book. You can find it under Jayne Ann Krentz name now on Amazon. Kindle only unless you want to pay a lot for a hardback.
    Two other books by JAK similar to Shield’s Lady are Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame. Love both of those books as well. They are also out of print but available in Kindle or used Paperback. Might be in your library system as well.

    Reply
  50. It seems I’m in good company since I too reread all of the Jayne Castle Harmony and Rain Shadow books this month. Totally enjoyed them as usual because well..dust bunnies. Besides Dark, Brooding and handsome H’s and strong women.
    I did read some new to me books but mostly they were meh or a few uggh.
    The one new one I really liked was A Bachelor Establishment by Isabella Barclay. A regency romance. Starts with antagonistic H/h to semi-friends to lovers. A really fun book to read. Two mysteries, 2 romances. Clever, witty banter. Laughed a lot reading it. That is the only Regency she wrote under that name.
    I also 2nd the recommendation of Shield’s Lady. Love love that book. You can find it under Jayne Ann Krentz name now on Amazon. Kindle only unless you want to pay a lot for a hardback.
    Two other books by JAK similar to Shield’s Lady are Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame. Love both of those books as well. They are also out of print but available in Kindle or used Paperback. Might be in your library system as well.

    Reply
  51. I was going through my closet thinning out the keeper boxes, so I wound up rereading several older titles by Dorothy Mack, Candice Hern, Irene Saunders, Mary Balogh (must be the 20th time I’ve read Secrets of the Heart – which is now out for Kindle), and I dunno who all else.
    In new to me books I did read The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths; several people had told me it was very entertaining and it was, despite the author’s choice to tell it all in present tense, which has always annoyed me (it’s *not* happening right now, it’s printed in a book, for God’s sake. I hope this is a fad that passes.) They agreed that can be an annoying affectation but that I should stick with it because I’d get used to it and it’s a good story, and all of that is true.
    I also read The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear, in which Maisie got tangled up with the SOE and also had to make a decision about her boyfriend Mark the American. It all feels very real as Winspear describes this now long ago era.
    I finally got around to Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which has been sitting on my bookshelf unread for many months. Brilliant book, both as a story and as a literary stunt.
    Other than that, nothing that would interest anybody here.

    Reply
  52. I was going through my closet thinning out the keeper boxes, so I wound up rereading several older titles by Dorothy Mack, Candice Hern, Irene Saunders, Mary Balogh (must be the 20th time I’ve read Secrets of the Heart – which is now out for Kindle), and I dunno who all else.
    In new to me books I did read The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths; several people had told me it was very entertaining and it was, despite the author’s choice to tell it all in present tense, which has always annoyed me (it’s *not* happening right now, it’s printed in a book, for God’s sake. I hope this is a fad that passes.) They agreed that can be an annoying affectation but that I should stick with it because I’d get used to it and it’s a good story, and all of that is true.
    I also read The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear, in which Maisie got tangled up with the SOE and also had to make a decision about her boyfriend Mark the American. It all feels very real as Winspear describes this now long ago era.
    I finally got around to Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which has been sitting on my bookshelf unread for many months. Brilliant book, both as a story and as a literary stunt.
    Other than that, nothing that would interest anybody here.

    Reply
  53. I was going through my closet thinning out the keeper boxes, so I wound up rereading several older titles by Dorothy Mack, Candice Hern, Irene Saunders, Mary Balogh (must be the 20th time I’ve read Secrets of the Heart – which is now out for Kindle), and I dunno who all else.
    In new to me books I did read The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths; several people had told me it was very entertaining and it was, despite the author’s choice to tell it all in present tense, which has always annoyed me (it’s *not* happening right now, it’s printed in a book, for God’s sake. I hope this is a fad that passes.) They agreed that can be an annoying affectation but that I should stick with it because I’d get used to it and it’s a good story, and all of that is true.
    I also read The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear, in which Maisie got tangled up with the SOE and also had to make a decision about her boyfriend Mark the American. It all feels very real as Winspear describes this now long ago era.
    I finally got around to Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which has been sitting on my bookshelf unread for many months. Brilliant book, both as a story and as a literary stunt.
    Other than that, nothing that would interest anybody here.

    Reply
  54. I was going through my closet thinning out the keeper boxes, so I wound up rereading several older titles by Dorothy Mack, Candice Hern, Irene Saunders, Mary Balogh (must be the 20th time I’ve read Secrets of the Heart – which is now out for Kindle), and I dunno who all else.
    In new to me books I did read The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths; several people had told me it was very entertaining and it was, despite the author’s choice to tell it all in present tense, which has always annoyed me (it’s *not* happening right now, it’s printed in a book, for God’s sake. I hope this is a fad that passes.) They agreed that can be an annoying affectation but that I should stick with it because I’d get used to it and it’s a good story, and all of that is true.
    I also read The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear, in which Maisie got tangled up with the SOE and also had to make a decision about her boyfriend Mark the American. It all feels very real as Winspear describes this now long ago era.
    I finally got around to Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which has been sitting on my bookshelf unread for many months. Brilliant book, both as a story and as a literary stunt.
    Other than that, nothing that would interest anybody here.

    Reply
  55. I was going through my closet thinning out the keeper boxes, so I wound up rereading several older titles by Dorothy Mack, Candice Hern, Irene Saunders, Mary Balogh (must be the 20th time I’ve read Secrets of the Heart – which is now out for Kindle), and I dunno who all else.
    In new to me books I did read The Crossing Places by Elly Griffiths; several people had told me it was very entertaining and it was, despite the author’s choice to tell it all in present tense, which has always annoyed me (it’s *not* happening right now, it’s printed in a book, for God’s sake. I hope this is a fad that passes.) They agreed that can be an annoying affectation but that I should stick with it because I’d get used to it and it’s a good story, and all of that is true.
    I also read The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear, in which Maisie got tangled up with the SOE and also had to make a decision about her boyfriend Mark the American. It all feels very real as Winspear describes this now long ago era.
    I finally got around to Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which has been sitting on my bookshelf unread for many months. Brilliant book, both as a story and as a literary stunt.
    Other than that, nothing that would interest anybody here.

    Reply
  56. Kareni, I read SHIELD’ LADY long, long ago. It was when JAK was seeking to expand the boundaries of romance. She wrote two books, one of which was fantasy romance and the other of which was fantasy science fiction. Shield’s Lady was the fantasy one, I think. I don’t remember the name of the sf one. I think both were written as Amanda Glass, but I’m not sure. It’s been several decades!

    Reply
  57. Kareni, I read SHIELD’ LADY long, long ago. It was when JAK was seeking to expand the boundaries of romance. She wrote two books, one of which was fantasy romance and the other of which was fantasy science fiction. Shield’s Lady was the fantasy one, I think. I don’t remember the name of the sf one. I think both were written as Amanda Glass, but I’m not sure. It’s been several decades!

    Reply
  58. Kareni, I read SHIELD’ LADY long, long ago. It was when JAK was seeking to expand the boundaries of romance. She wrote two books, one of which was fantasy romance and the other of which was fantasy science fiction. Shield’s Lady was the fantasy one, I think. I don’t remember the name of the sf one. I think both were written as Amanda Glass, but I’m not sure. It’s been several decades!

    Reply
  59. Kareni, I read SHIELD’ LADY long, long ago. It was when JAK was seeking to expand the boundaries of romance. She wrote two books, one of which was fantasy romance and the other of which was fantasy science fiction. Shield’s Lady was the fantasy one, I think. I don’t remember the name of the sf one. I think both were written as Amanda Glass, but I’m not sure. It’s been several decades!

    Reply
  60. Kareni, I read SHIELD’ LADY long, long ago. It was when JAK was seeking to expand the boundaries of romance. She wrote two books, one of which was fantasy romance and the other of which was fantasy science fiction. Shield’s Lady was the fantasy one, I think. I don’t remember the name of the sf one. I think both were written as Amanda Glass, but I’m not sure. It’s been several decades!

    Reply
  61. Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame are also sitting on my shelf! They date from the time when JAK, Nora Roberts, and Elizabeth Lowell (aka Ann Maxwell) were my favorite authors.

    Reply
  62. Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame are also sitting on my shelf! They date from the time when JAK, Nora Roberts, and Elizabeth Lowell (aka Ann Maxwell) were my favorite authors.

    Reply
  63. Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame are also sitting on my shelf! They date from the time when JAK, Nora Roberts, and Elizabeth Lowell (aka Ann Maxwell) were my favorite authors.

    Reply
  64. Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame are also sitting on my shelf! They date from the time when JAK, Nora Roberts, and Elizabeth Lowell (aka Ann Maxwell) were my favorite authors.

    Reply
  65. Sweet Starfire and Crystal Flame are also sitting on my shelf! They date from the time when JAK, Nora Roberts, and Elizabeth Lowell (aka Ann Maxwell) were my favorite authors.

    Reply
  66. “The Dark Heart of Florence” is one of the books I just finished, by Tasha Alexander. It’s her latest mystery series about the adventures of Lady Emily and her husband, Colin Hargraves, who works for the British government to uncover criminals and spies against the Crown and Parliament. It’s set in Victorian England. It’s a great series.
    Two of the books mentioned here I also read, “An Unexpected Peril” and “A Murder in Time.” I enjoy both series by these authors. Deanna Raybourn, with the Veronica Speedwell stories, and Julie McElwain with her “In Time” series. Published later this year is, I believe, the sixth book in her series, “Ripples in Time.”

    Reply
  67. “The Dark Heart of Florence” is one of the books I just finished, by Tasha Alexander. It’s her latest mystery series about the adventures of Lady Emily and her husband, Colin Hargraves, who works for the British government to uncover criminals and spies against the Crown and Parliament. It’s set in Victorian England. It’s a great series.
    Two of the books mentioned here I also read, “An Unexpected Peril” and “A Murder in Time.” I enjoy both series by these authors. Deanna Raybourn, with the Veronica Speedwell stories, and Julie McElwain with her “In Time” series. Published later this year is, I believe, the sixth book in her series, “Ripples in Time.”

    Reply
  68. “The Dark Heart of Florence” is one of the books I just finished, by Tasha Alexander. It’s her latest mystery series about the adventures of Lady Emily and her husband, Colin Hargraves, who works for the British government to uncover criminals and spies against the Crown and Parliament. It’s set in Victorian England. It’s a great series.
    Two of the books mentioned here I also read, “An Unexpected Peril” and “A Murder in Time.” I enjoy both series by these authors. Deanna Raybourn, with the Veronica Speedwell stories, and Julie McElwain with her “In Time” series. Published later this year is, I believe, the sixth book in her series, “Ripples in Time.”

    Reply
  69. “The Dark Heart of Florence” is one of the books I just finished, by Tasha Alexander. It’s her latest mystery series about the adventures of Lady Emily and her husband, Colin Hargraves, who works for the British government to uncover criminals and spies against the Crown and Parliament. It’s set in Victorian England. It’s a great series.
    Two of the books mentioned here I also read, “An Unexpected Peril” and “A Murder in Time.” I enjoy both series by these authors. Deanna Raybourn, with the Veronica Speedwell stories, and Julie McElwain with her “In Time” series. Published later this year is, I believe, the sixth book in her series, “Ripples in Time.”

    Reply
  70. “The Dark Heart of Florence” is one of the books I just finished, by Tasha Alexander. It’s her latest mystery series about the adventures of Lady Emily and her husband, Colin Hargraves, who works for the British government to uncover criminals and spies against the Crown and Parliament. It’s set in Victorian England. It’s a great series.
    Two of the books mentioned here I also read, “An Unexpected Peril” and “A Murder in Time.” I enjoy both series by these authors. Deanna Raybourn, with the Veronica Speedwell stories, and Julie McElwain with her “In Time” series. Published later this year is, I believe, the sixth book in her series, “Ripples in Time.”

    Reply
  71. Anne-I also love Patricia Briggs, although generally prefer the Mercy Thompson series to Charles and Anna. An exception is “Alpha and Omega”in the anthology On the Prowl, which IMHO is an exceptional beginning to the Alpha and Omega series. As to what I’m reading now…I just finished Somebody to Love, the latest in Sharon Sala’s “Blessings, Georgia” series. Heartwarming, as always. Next up was Amalie Howard’s The Rakehell of Roth. I’m now rereading Howard’s The Beast of Bestwick. When I was recently in the hospital, a friend managed to get me a sack of books. In it was one of Eileen Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series. I’m in the process of devouring the rest of the series. So far, it’s taken 5 books and a novella to try to determine who’s trying to kill the hero of Waterloo. I’ll be starting the 7th book in the series tomorrow. I’ve also been having a lot of fun filling a friend’s request. She asked me to compile 2 reading lists for her. The first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.” Since this my favorite fairy tale, I’m having a grand time compiling, beginning with many such that are on my own bookshelves. The second list deals with romance novels where the wounded hero is restored to health by the (frequently intrepid) heroine. So far, the list includes Anne’s “The Virtuous Widow” as well as The Accidental Marriage, and also Mary Jo’s Shattered Rainbows. Gotta love those intrepid heroines.

    Reply
  72. Anne-I also love Patricia Briggs, although generally prefer the Mercy Thompson series to Charles and Anna. An exception is “Alpha and Omega”in the anthology On the Prowl, which IMHO is an exceptional beginning to the Alpha and Omega series. As to what I’m reading now…I just finished Somebody to Love, the latest in Sharon Sala’s “Blessings, Georgia” series. Heartwarming, as always. Next up was Amalie Howard’s The Rakehell of Roth. I’m now rereading Howard’s The Beast of Bestwick. When I was recently in the hospital, a friend managed to get me a sack of books. In it was one of Eileen Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series. I’m in the process of devouring the rest of the series. So far, it’s taken 5 books and a novella to try to determine who’s trying to kill the hero of Waterloo. I’ll be starting the 7th book in the series tomorrow. I’ve also been having a lot of fun filling a friend’s request. She asked me to compile 2 reading lists for her. The first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.” Since this my favorite fairy tale, I’m having a grand time compiling, beginning with many such that are on my own bookshelves. The second list deals with romance novels where the wounded hero is restored to health by the (frequently intrepid) heroine. So far, the list includes Anne’s “The Virtuous Widow” as well as The Accidental Marriage, and also Mary Jo’s Shattered Rainbows. Gotta love those intrepid heroines.

    Reply
  73. Anne-I also love Patricia Briggs, although generally prefer the Mercy Thompson series to Charles and Anna. An exception is “Alpha and Omega”in the anthology On the Prowl, which IMHO is an exceptional beginning to the Alpha and Omega series. As to what I’m reading now…I just finished Somebody to Love, the latest in Sharon Sala’s “Blessings, Georgia” series. Heartwarming, as always. Next up was Amalie Howard’s The Rakehell of Roth. I’m now rereading Howard’s The Beast of Bestwick. When I was recently in the hospital, a friend managed to get me a sack of books. In it was one of Eileen Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series. I’m in the process of devouring the rest of the series. So far, it’s taken 5 books and a novella to try to determine who’s trying to kill the hero of Waterloo. I’ll be starting the 7th book in the series tomorrow. I’ve also been having a lot of fun filling a friend’s request. She asked me to compile 2 reading lists for her. The first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.” Since this my favorite fairy tale, I’m having a grand time compiling, beginning with many such that are on my own bookshelves. The second list deals with romance novels where the wounded hero is restored to health by the (frequently intrepid) heroine. So far, the list includes Anne’s “The Virtuous Widow” as well as The Accidental Marriage, and also Mary Jo’s Shattered Rainbows. Gotta love those intrepid heroines.

    Reply
  74. Anne-I also love Patricia Briggs, although generally prefer the Mercy Thompson series to Charles and Anna. An exception is “Alpha and Omega”in the anthology On the Prowl, which IMHO is an exceptional beginning to the Alpha and Omega series. As to what I’m reading now…I just finished Somebody to Love, the latest in Sharon Sala’s “Blessings, Georgia” series. Heartwarming, as always. Next up was Amalie Howard’s The Rakehell of Roth. I’m now rereading Howard’s The Beast of Bestwick. When I was recently in the hospital, a friend managed to get me a sack of books. In it was one of Eileen Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series. I’m in the process of devouring the rest of the series. So far, it’s taken 5 books and a novella to try to determine who’s trying to kill the hero of Waterloo. I’ll be starting the 7th book in the series tomorrow. I’ve also been having a lot of fun filling a friend’s request. She asked me to compile 2 reading lists for her. The first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.” Since this my favorite fairy tale, I’m having a grand time compiling, beginning with many such that are on my own bookshelves. The second list deals with romance novels where the wounded hero is restored to health by the (frequently intrepid) heroine. So far, the list includes Anne’s “The Virtuous Widow” as well as The Accidental Marriage, and also Mary Jo’s Shattered Rainbows. Gotta love those intrepid heroines.

    Reply
  75. Anne-I also love Patricia Briggs, although generally prefer the Mercy Thompson series to Charles and Anna. An exception is “Alpha and Omega”in the anthology On the Prowl, which IMHO is an exceptional beginning to the Alpha and Omega series. As to what I’m reading now…I just finished Somebody to Love, the latest in Sharon Sala’s “Blessings, Georgia” series. Heartwarming, as always. Next up was Amalie Howard’s The Rakehell of Roth. I’m now rereading Howard’s The Beast of Bestwick. When I was recently in the hospital, a friend managed to get me a sack of books. In it was one of Eileen Dreyer’s “Drake’s Rakes” series. I’m in the process of devouring the rest of the series. So far, it’s taken 5 books and a novella to try to determine who’s trying to kill the hero of Waterloo. I’ll be starting the 7th book in the series tomorrow. I’ve also been having a lot of fun filling a friend’s request. She asked me to compile 2 reading lists for her. The first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.” Since this my favorite fairy tale, I’m having a grand time compiling, beginning with many such that are on my own bookshelves. The second list deals with romance novels where the wounded hero is restored to health by the (frequently intrepid) heroine. So far, the list includes Anne’s “The Virtuous Widow” as well as The Accidental Marriage, and also Mary Jo’s Shattered Rainbows. Gotta love those intrepid heroines.

    Reply
  76. I read A Bachelor Establishment a few years ago and enjoyed it very much! Thanks for reminding me of it, Vicki. It’s due a re-read I think.

    Reply
  77. I read A Bachelor Establishment a few years ago and enjoyed it very much! Thanks for reminding me of it, Vicki. It’s due a re-read I think.

    Reply
  78. I read A Bachelor Establishment a few years ago and enjoyed it very much! Thanks for reminding me of it, Vicki. It’s due a re-read I think.

    Reply
  79. I read A Bachelor Establishment a few years ago and enjoyed it very much! Thanks for reminding me of it, Vicki. It’s due a re-read I think.

    Reply
  80. I read A Bachelor Establishment a few years ago and enjoyed it very much! Thanks for reminding me of it, Vicki. It’s due a re-read I think.

    Reply
  81. Quantum, does your library participate in InterLibrary Loans? I was able recently to get two books through ILL that I never expected would show up. One was a 1940-ish British novel that’s listed on Amazon from $629 to more than $800! It came quickly from an obscure college, and inside was marked in pencil 2—, obviously $2 at a second-hand bookshop! Needless to say, I am taking great care of it. I wouldn’t like to replace it with one of those Amazon copies.

    Reply
  82. Quantum, does your library participate in InterLibrary Loans? I was able recently to get two books through ILL that I never expected would show up. One was a 1940-ish British novel that’s listed on Amazon from $629 to more than $800! It came quickly from an obscure college, and inside was marked in pencil 2—, obviously $2 at a second-hand bookshop! Needless to say, I am taking great care of it. I wouldn’t like to replace it with one of those Amazon copies.

    Reply
  83. Quantum, does your library participate in InterLibrary Loans? I was able recently to get two books through ILL that I never expected would show up. One was a 1940-ish British novel that’s listed on Amazon from $629 to more than $800! It came quickly from an obscure college, and inside was marked in pencil 2—, obviously $2 at a second-hand bookshop! Needless to say, I am taking great care of it. I wouldn’t like to replace it with one of those Amazon copies.

    Reply
  84. Quantum, does your library participate in InterLibrary Loans? I was able recently to get two books through ILL that I never expected would show up. One was a 1940-ish British novel that’s listed on Amazon from $629 to more than $800! It came quickly from an obscure college, and inside was marked in pencil 2—, obviously $2 at a second-hand bookshop! Needless to say, I am taking great care of it. I wouldn’t like to replace it with one of those Amazon copies.

    Reply
  85. Quantum, does your library participate in InterLibrary Loans? I was able recently to get two books through ILL that I never expected would show up. One was a 1940-ish British novel that’s listed on Amazon from $629 to more than $800! It came quickly from an obscure college, and inside was marked in pencil 2—, obviously $2 at a second-hand bookshop! Needless to say, I am taking great care of it. I wouldn’t like to replace it with one of those Amazon copies.

    Reply
  86. ALong with Shield’s Lady, JAK a sci-fi type romance back in the 1980’s called “Sweet Starfire”, and another which was more fantasy than sci-fi, called “Crystal Flame”. I think they were the first 2 books I every read by her, when they originally came out. I don’t know how they hold up, but I loved them back in the day!

    Reply
  87. ALong with Shield’s Lady, JAK a sci-fi type romance back in the 1980’s called “Sweet Starfire”, and another which was more fantasy than sci-fi, called “Crystal Flame”. I think they were the first 2 books I every read by her, when they originally came out. I don’t know how they hold up, but I loved them back in the day!

    Reply
  88. ALong with Shield’s Lady, JAK a sci-fi type romance back in the 1980’s called “Sweet Starfire”, and another which was more fantasy than sci-fi, called “Crystal Flame”. I think they were the first 2 books I every read by her, when they originally came out. I don’t know how they hold up, but I loved them back in the day!

    Reply
  89. ALong with Shield’s Lady, JAK a sci-fi type romance back in the 1980’s called “Sweet Starfire”, and another which was more fantasy than sci-fi, called “Crystal Flame”. I think they were the first 2 books I every read by her, when they originally came out. I don’t know how they hold up, but I loved them back in the day!

    Reply
  90. ALong with Shield’s Lady, JAK a sci-fi type romance back in the 1980’s called “Sweet Starfire”, and another which was more fantasy than sci-fi, called “Crystal Flame”. I think they were the first 2 books I every read by her, when they originally came out. I don’t know how they hold up, but I loved them back in the day!

    Reply
  91. It is funny that there seem to be several of us who reread the Jayne Castle books. I also am a rereader of her Amanda Quick books.
    And y’all are reading several books by favorite authors of mine.
    Every month you introduce me to new authors and new books.And every month I add books to my tbr list. Y’all are killing me. I am pretty sure that because I am older than dirt, I would have to read 24 hours a day in order to finish all the books I want to read. And even then there is not way I will finish all of those lovely books.
    I thank each of the authors and each of the readers who are adding to my reading future.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  92. It is funny that there seem to be several of us who reread the Jayne Castle books. I also am a rereader of her Amanda Quick books.
    And y’all are reading several books by favorite authors of mine.
    Every month you introduce me to new authors and new books.And every month I add books to my tbr list. Y’all are killing me. I am pretty sure that because I am older than dirt, I would have to read 24 hours a day in order to finish all the books I want to read. And even then there is not way I will finish all of those lovely books.
    I thank each of the authors and each of the readers who are adding to my reading future.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  93. It is funny that there seem to be several of us who reread the Jayne Castle books. I also am a rereader of her Amanda Quick books.
    And y’all are reading several books by favorite authors of mine.
    Every month you introduce me to new authors and new books.And every month I add books to my tbr list. Y’all are killing me. I am pretty sure that because I am older than dirt, I would have to read 24 hours a day in order to finish all the books I want to read. And even then there is not way I will finish all of those lovely books.
    I thank each of the authors and each of the readers who are adding to my reading future.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  94. It is funny that there seem to be several of us who reread the Jayne Castle books. I also am a rereader of her Amanda Quick books.
    And y’all are reading several books by favorite authors of mine.
    Every month you introduce me to new authors and new books.And every month I add books to my tbr list. Y’all are killing me. I am pretty sure that because I am older than dirt, I would have to read 24 hours a day in order to finish all the books I want to read. And even then there is not way I will finish all of those lovely books.
    I thank each of the authors and each of the readers who are adding to my reading future.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  95. It is funny that there seem to be several of us who reread the Jayne Castle books. I also am a rereader of her Amanda Quick books.
    And y’all are reading several books by favorite authors of mine.
    Every month you introduce me to new authors and new books.And every month I add books to my tbr list. Y’all are killing me. I am pretty sure that because I am older than dirt, I would have to read 24 hours a day in order to finish all the books I want to read. And even then there is not way I will finish all of those lovely books.
    I thank each of the authors and each of the readers who are adding to my reading future.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  96. I had a very productive reading month, catching up on series and delving into my box of old paperbacks. I read the 4th Lizzie Martin/Inspector Ben Ross mystery by Ann Granger, “A Particular Eye for Villainy”. The mystery was very clever but the romantic tension has vanished now that Lizzie and Ben have married. There is something to be said for maintaining the slow burn by keeping the uncertainty of the relationship going for a number of books, the way Andrea/Cara does in the Wrexford & Sloane books. I am now reading the 3rd one in that series, “Murder at Kensington Palace”. I am also up to the 7th Lady Darby mystery by Anna Lee Huber, “An Artless Demise”. Part of the reason for this binge is I’m trying to clear the decks before C.S. Harris releases the next St. Cyr mystery!
    I picked up a bargain on Kindle, “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster and it turned out to be really great. It’s mystery romance, and I loved the characters. The hero is a Hungarian revolutionary in exile, and the heroine is a Duke’s daughter and a spinster/bluestocking type. I loved that the book cover showed her wearing her spectacles, I don’t think I’ve ever seen that before. You can tell it definitely looks like them, not a stock photo!
    I also read Mary Jo’s “Once Dishonored” which I enjoyed very much. It was fun to see the previous couples from the series turn up.
    And I read an old Signet paperback by Jane Ashford, which was absolutely sweeet and charming. “The Three Graces”. They are 3 lovely sisters whose fortunes take a turn for the worse, and then for the better. A gem of its kind.
    Lastly, another old paperback; I am probably the only person here who hadn’t read Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting” until now. I know it’s a classic, but it took me a while to get into it. I tend not to be crazy about 1st person POV and books where you don’t know if the hero is a villain. I prefer plots like “Once Dishonored” where there is trust between the H&h and it’s them united against the world. However as the plot thickened, I was hooked, and the last part of the book is thrilling. She really was an excellent writer.

    Reply
  97. I had a very productive reading month, catching up on series and delving into my box of old paperbacks. I read the 4th Lizzie Martin/Inspector Ben Ross mystery by Ann Granger, “A Particular Eye for Villainy”. The mystery was very clever but the romantic tension has vanished now that Lizzie and Ben have married. There is something to be said for maintaining the slow burn by keeping the uncertainty of the relationship going for a number of books, the way Andrea/Cara does in the Wrexford & Sloane books. I am now reading the 3rd one in that series, “Murder at Kensington Palace”. I am also up to the 7th Lady Darby mystery by Anna Lee Huber, “An Artless Demise”. Part of the reason for this binge is I’m trying to clear the decks before C.S. Harris releases the next St. Cyr mystery!
    I picked up a bargain on Kindle, “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster and it turned out to be really great. It’s mystery romance, and I loved the characters. The hero is a Hungarian revolutionary in exile, and the heroine is a Duke’s daughter and a spinster/bluestocking type. I loved that the book cover showed her wearing her spectacles, I don’t think I’ve ever seen that before. You can tell it definitely looks like them, not a stock photo!
    I also read Mary Jo’s “Once Dishonored” which I enjoyed very much. It was fun to see the previous couples from the series turn up.
    And I read an old Signet paperback by Jane Ashford, which was absolutely sweeet and charming. “The Three Graces”. They are 3 lovely sisters whose fortunes take a turn for the worse, and then for the better. A gem of its kind.
    Lastly, another old paperback; I am probably the only person here who hadn’t read Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting” until now. I know it’s a classic, but it took me a while to get into it. I tend not to be crazy about 1st person POV and books where you don’t know if the hero is a villain. I prefer plots like “Once Dishonored” where there is trust between the H&h and it’s them united against the world. However as the plot thickened, I was hooked, and the last part of the book is thrilling. She really was an excellent writer.

    Reply
  98. I had a very productive reading month, catching up on series and delving into my box of old paperbacks. I read the 4th Lizzie Martin/Inspector Ben Ross mystery by Ann Granger, “A Particular Eye for Villainy”. The mystery was very clever but the romantic tension has vanished now that Lizzie and Ben have married. There is something to be said for maintaining the slow burn by keeping the uncertainty of the relationship going for a number of books, the way Andrea/Cara does in the Wrexford & Sloane books. I am now reading the 3rd one in that series, “Murder at Kensington Palace”. I am also up to the 7th Lady Darby mystery by Anna Lee Huber, “An Artless Demise”. Part of the reason for this binge is I’m trying to clear the decks before C.S. Harris releases the next St. Cyr mystery!
    I picked up a bargain on Kindle, “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster and it turned out to be really great. It’s mystery romance, and I loved the characters. The hero is a Hungarian revolutionary in exile, and the heroine is a Duke’s daughter and a spinster/bluestocking type. I loved that the book cover showed her wearing her spectacles, I don’t think I’ve ever seen that before. You can tell it definitely looks like them, not a stock photo!
    I also read Mary Jo’s “Once Dishonored” which I enjoyed very much. It was fun to see the previous couples from the series turn up.
    And I read an old Signet paperback by Jane Ashford, which was absolutely sweeet and charming. “The Three Graces”. They are 3 lovely sisters whose fortunes take a turn for the worse, and then for the better. A gem of its kind.
    Lastly, another old paperback; I am probably the only person here who hadn’t read Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting” until now. I know it’s a classic, but it took me a while to get into it. I tend not to be crazy about 1st person POV and books where you don’t know if the hero is a villain. I prefer plots like “Once Dishonored” where there is trust between the H&h and it’s them united against the world. However as the plot thickened, I was hooked, and the last part of the book is thrilling. She really was an excellent writer.

    Reply
  99. I had a very productive reading month, catching up on series and delving into my box of old paperbacks. I read the 4th Lizzie Martin/Inspector Ben Ross mystery by Ann Granger, “A Particular Eye for Villainy”. The mystery was very clever but the romantic tension has vanished now that Lizzie and Ben have married. There is something to be said for maintaining the slow burn by keeping the uncertainty of the relationship going for a number of books, the way Andrea/Cara does in the Wrexford & Sloane books. I am now reading the 3rd one in that series, “Murder at Kensington Palace”. I am also up to the 7th Lady Darby mystery by Anna Lee Huber, “An Artless Demise”. Part of the reason for this binge is I’m trying to clear the decks before C.S. Harris releases the next St. Cyr mystery!
    I picked up a bargain on Kindle, “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster and it turned out to be really great. It’s mystery romance, and I loved the characters. The hero is a Hungarian revolutionary in exile, and the heroine is a Duke’s daughter and a spinster/bluestocking type. I loved that the book cover showed her wearing her spectacles, I don’t think I’ve ever seen that before. You can tell it definitely looks like them, not a stock photo!
    I also read Mary Jo’s “Once Dishonored” which I enjoyed very much. It was fun to see the previous couples from the series turn up.
    And I read an old Signet paperback by Jane Ashford, which was absolutely sweeet and charming. “The Three Graces”. They are 3 lovely sisters whose fortunes take a turn for the worse, and then for the better. A gem of its kind.
    Lastly, another old paperback; I am probably the only person here who hadn’t read Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting” until now. I know it’s a classic, but it took me a while to get into it. I tend not to be crazy about 1st person POV and books where you don’t know if the hero is a villain. I prefer plots like “Once Dishonored” where there is trust between the H&h and it’s them united against the world. However as the plot thickened, I was hooked, and the last part of the book is thrilling. She really was an excellent writer.

    Reply
  100. I had a very productive reading month, catching up on series and delving into my box of old paperbacks. I read the 4th Lizzie Martin/Inspector Ben Ross mystery by Ann Granger, “A Particular Eye for Villainy”. The mystery was very clever but the romantic tension has vanished now that Lizzie and Ben have married. There is something to be said for maintaining the slow burn by keeping the uncertainty of the relationship going for a number of books, the way Andrea/Cara does in the Wrexford & Sloane books. I am now reading the 3rd one in that series, “Murder at Kensington Palace”. I am also up to the 7th Lady Darby mystery by Anna Lee Huber, “An Artless Demise”. Part of the reason for this binge is I’m trying to clear the decks before C.S. Harris releases the next St. Cyr mystery!
    I picked up a bargain on Kindle, “Mysterious Lover” by Mary Lancaster and it turned out to be really great. It’s mystery romance, and I loved the characters. The hero is a Hungarian revolutionary in exile, and the heroine is a Duke’s daughter and a spinster/bluestocking type. I loved that the book cover showed her wearing her spectacles, I don’t think I’ve ever seen that before. You can tell it definitely looks like them, not a stock photo!
    I also read Mary Jo’s “Once Dishonored” which I enjoyed very much. It was fun to see the previous couples from the series turn up.
    And I read an old Signet paperback by Jane Ashford, which was absolutely sweeet and charming. “The Three Graces”. They are 3 lovely sisters whose fortunes take a turn for the worse, and then for the better. A gem of its kind.
    Lastly, another old paperback; I am probably the only person here who hadn’t read Mary Stewart’s “Nine Coaches Waiting” until now. I know it’s a classic, but it took me a while to get into it. I tend not to be crazy about 1st person POV and books where you don’t know if the hero is a villain. I prefer plots like “Once Dishonored” where there is trust between the H&h and it’s them united against the world. However as the plot thickened, I was hooked, and the last part of the book is thrilling. She really was an excellent writer.

    Reply
  101. Thanks for the suggestion Mary. I have contacted the library to see if ILL is possible for e-book and audio but suspect that lack of funding will be the reason for a negative. That $800 price reminded me of an old Tony Hancock comedy sketch where Tony managed to smash a priceless antique Ming vase. When the irate owner pointed out that it was very old Hancock responded “Thank goodness, I was worried that it might have been new”!

    Reply
  102. Thanks for the suggestion Mary. I have contacted the library to see if ILL is possible for e-book and audio but suspect that lack of funding will be the reason for a negative. That $800 price reminded me of an old Tony Hancock comedy sketch where Tony managed to smash a priceless antique Ming vase. When the irate owner pointed out that it was very old Hancock responded “Thank goodness, I was worried that it might have been new”!

    Reply
  103. Thanks for the suggestion Mary. I have contacted the library to see if ILL is possible for e-book and audio but suspect that lack of funding will be the reason for a negative. That $800 price reminded me of an old Tony Hancock comedy sketch where Tony managed to smash a priceless antique Ming vase. When the irate owner pointed out that it was very old Hancock responded “Thank goodness, I was worried that it might have been new”!

    Reply
  104. Thanks for the suggestion Mary. I have contacted the library to see if ILL is possible for e-book and audio but suspect that lack of funding will be the reason for a negative. That $800 price reminded me of an old Tony Hancock comedy sketch where Tony managed to smash a priceless antique Ming vase. When the irate owner pointed out that it was very old Hancock responded “Thank goodness, I was worried that it might have been new”!

    Reply
  105. Thanks for the suggestion Mary. I have contacted the library to see if ILL is possible for e-book and audio but suspect that lack of funding will be the reason for a negative. That $800 price reminded me of an old Tony Hancock comedy sketch where Tony managed to smash a priceless antique Ming vase. When the irate owner pointed out that it was very old Hancock responded “Thank goodness, I was worried that it might have been new”!

    Reply
  106. I’ll throw in a couple of historical fiction books that haven’t been mentioned. First up is Band of Sisters by Lauren Willig. I’m a fan of all her fiction but this one was well done. A group of Smithies go to the Somme area to provide aid to civilians during the Great War. Amazing story! Second is Absence of Mercy by S. M. Goodwin. This is a debut novel and it knocked my socks off. It is set in the late 1850s and revolves around a British lord who is the spare, hated by his father the duke, is a survivor of the Crimean war, and investigates for the London Metropolitan police. He has big gaps in his memory thanks to a war wound. I absolutely love this character. I am bemoaning the fact that the next book won’t be out until September.

    Reply
  107. I’ll throw in a couple of historical fiction books that haven’t been mentioned. First up is Band of Sisters by Lauren Willig. I’m a fan of all her fiction but this one was well done. A group of Smithies go to the Somme area to provide aid to civilians during the Great War. Amazing story! Second is Absence of Mercy by S. M. Goodwin. This is a debut novel and it knocked my socks off. It is set in the late 1850s and revolves around a British lord who is the spare, hated by his father the duke, is a survivor of the Crimean war, and investigates for the London Metropolitan police. He has big gaps in his memory thanks to a war wound. I absolutely love this character. I am bemoaning the fact that the next book won’t be out until September.

    Reply
  108. I’ll throw in a couple of historical fiction books that haven’t been mentioned. First up is Band of Sisters by Lauren Willig. I’m a fan of all her fiction but this one was well done. A group of Smithies go to the Somme area to provide aid to civilians during the Great War. Amazing story! Second is Absence of Mercy by S. M. Goodwin. This is a debut novel and it knocked my socks off. It is set in the late 1850s and revolves around a British lord who is the spare, hated by his father the duke, is a survivor of the Crimean war, and investigates for the London Metropolitan police. He has big gaps in his memory thanks to a war wound. I absolutely love this character. I am bemoaning the fact that the next book won’t be out until September.

    Reply
  109. I’ll throw in a couple of historical fiction books that haven’t been mentioned. First up is Band of Sisters by Lauren Willig. I’m a fan of all her fiction but this one was well done. A group of Smithies go to the Somme area to provide aid to civilians during the Great War. Amazing story! Second is Absence of Mercy by S. M. Goodwin. This is a debut novel and it knocked my socks off. It is set in the late 1850s and revolves around a British lord who is the spare, hated by his father the duke, is a survivor of the Crimean war, and investigates for the London Metropolitan police. He has big gaps in his memory thanks to a war wound. I absolutely love this character. I am bemoaning the fact that the next book won’t be out until September.

    Reply
  110. I’ll throw in a couple of historical fiction books that haven’t been mentioned. First up is Band of Sisters by Lauren Willig. I’m a fan of all her fiction but this one was well done. A group of Smithies go to the Somme area to provide aid to civilians during the Great War. Amazing story! Second is Absence of Mercy by S. M. Goodwin. This is a debut novel and it knocked my socks off. It is set in the late 1850s and revolves around a British lord who is the spare, hated by his father the duke, is a survivor of the Crimean war, and investigates for the London Metropolitan police. He has big gaps in his memory thanks to a war wound. I absolutely love this character. I am bemoaning the fact that the next book won’t be out until September.

    Reply
  111. @Nicola: not the hero as such, but Drake Carne (brother-in-law of Ross Poldark in the Poldark books) is a blacksmith. He has a poignant romance with the governess, Morwenna.

    Reply
  112. @Nicola: not the hero as such, but Drake Carne (brother-in-law of Ross Poldark in the Poldark books) is a blacksmith. He has a poignant romance with the governess, Morwenna.

    Reply
  113. @Nicola: not the hero as such, but Drake Carne (brother-in-law of Ross Poldark in the Poldark books) is a blacksmith. He has a poignant romance with the governess, Morwenna.

    Reply
  114. @Nicola: not the hero as such, but Drake Carne (brother-in-law of Ross Poldark in the Poldark books) is a blacksmith. He has a poignant romance with the governess, Morwenna.

    Reply
  115. @Nicola: not the hero as such, but Drake Carne (brother-in-law of Ross Poldark in the Poldark books) is a blacksmith. He has a poignant romance with the governess, Morwenna.

    Reply
  116. I think a lot of us were reading that trifecta in the eighties, Karin! And they all broadened my reading from purely romance with historicals, paranormals, mysteries, and futuristic books.

    Reply
  117. I think a lot of us were reading that trifecta in the eighties, Karin! And they all broadened my reading from purely romance with historicals, paranormals, mysteries, and futuristic books.

    Reply
  118. I think a lot of us were reading that trifecta in the eighties, Karin! And they all broadened my reading from purely romance with historicals, paranormals, mysteries, and futuristic books.

    Reply
  119. I think a lot of us were reading that trifecta in the eighties, Karin! And they all broadened my reading from purely romance with historicals, paranormals, mysteries, and futuristic books.

    Reply
  120. I think a lot of us were reading that trifecta in the eighties, Karin! And they all broadened my reading from purely romance with historicals, paranormals, mysteries, and futuristic books.

    Reply
  121. @Nicola, I thought of another blacksmith hero; at least he started out apprenticing as a blacksmith, but during the book he’s joined the army. It’s Red, Red Rose by Marjorie Farrell. It a beautiful love story, one of my favorites. If I recall correctly his blacksmithing skills come in handy at some point in the story.

    Reply
  122. @Nicola, I thought of another blacksmith hero; at least he started out apprenticing as a blacksmith, but during the book he’s joined the army. It’s Red, Red Rose by Marjorie Farrell. It a beautiful love story, one of my favorites. If I recall correctly his blacksmithing skills come in handy at some point in the story.

    Reply
  123. @Nicola, I thought of another blacksmith hero; at least he started out apprenticing as a blacksmith, but during the book he’s joined the army. It’s Red, Red Rose by Marjorie Farrell. It a beautiful love story, one of my favorites. If I recall correctly his blacksmithing skills come in handy at some point in the story.

    Reply
  124. @Nicola, I thought of another blacksmith hero; at least he started out apprenticing as a blacksmith, but during the book he’s joined the army. It’s Red, Red Rose by Marjorie Farrell. It a beautiful love story, one of my favorites. If I recall correctly his blacksmithing skills come in handy at some point in the story.

    Reply
  125. @Nicola, I thought of another blacksmith hero; at least he started out apprenticing as a blacksmith, but during the book he’s joined the army. It’s Red, Red Rose by Marjorie Farrell. It a beautiful love story, one of my favorites. If I recall correctly his blacksmithing skills come in handy at some point in the story.

    Reply
  126. Wow there are some fantastic books here this month!! I’ve been in a severe reading slump. It really gets to me. I haven’t read a whole lot lately. Thought I’d read some light fluff to get me going again but all it did was annoy me because of the ones I picked.
    Today I started Cotillion by Georgette Heyer for the GR group I’m in. I’ve read it a few times but Heyer always delights me. Hoping it might break the slump.

    Reply
  127. Wow there are some fantastic books here this month!! I’ve been in a severe reading slump. It really gets to me. I haven’t read a whole lot lately. Thought I’d read some light fluff to get me going again but all it did was annoy me because of the ones I picked.
    Today I started Cotillion by Georgette Heyer for the GR group I’m in. I’ve read it a few times but Heyer always delights me. Hoping it might break the slump.

    Reply
  128. Wow there are some fantastic books here this month!! I’ve been in a severe reading slump. It really gets to me. I haven’t read a whole lot lately. Thought I’d read some light fluff to get me going again but all it did was annoy me because of the ones I picked.
    Today I started Cotillion by Georgette Heyer for the GR group I’m in. I’ve read it a few times but Heyer always delights me. Hoping it might break the slump.

    Reply
  129. Wow there are some fantastic books here this month!! I’ve been in a severe reading slump. It really gets to me. I haven’t read a whole lot lately. Thought I’d read some light fluff to get me going again but all it did was annoy me because of the ones I picked.
    Today I started Cotillion by Georgette Heyer for the GR group I’m in. I’ve read it a few times but Heyer always delights me. Hoping it might break the slump.

    Reply
  130. Wow there are some fantastic books here this month!! I’ve been in a severe reading slump. It really gets to me. I haven’t read a whole lot lately. Thought I’d read some light fluff to get me going again but all it did was annoy me because of the ones I picked.
    Today I started Cotillion by Georgette Heyer for the GR group I’m in. I’ve read it a few times but Heyer always delights me. Hoping it might break the slump.

    Reply
  131. “the first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.”
    Don’t forget MJP’s novella ‘The black beast of belleterre’.
    A very moving read!

    Reply
  132. “the first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.”
    Don’t forget MJP’s novella ‘The black beast of belleterre’.
    A very moving read!

    Reply
  133. “the first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.”
    Don’t forget MJP’s novella ‘The black beast of belleterre’.
    A very moving read!

    Reply
  134. “the first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.”
    Don’t forget MJP’s novella ‘The black beast of belleterre’.
    A very moving read!

    Reply
  135. “the first features romance novels whose focus is on the theme “Beauty and the Beast.”
    Don’t forget MJP’s novella ‘The black beast of belleterre’.
    A very moving read!

    Reply
  136. Thanks, Janice. Red, Red Rose is right up there among the best romances set during the Peninsular War. Wonderful character development.

    Reply
  137. Thanks, Janice. Red, Red Rose is right up there among the best romances set during the Peninsular War. Wonderful character development.

    Reply
  138. Thanks, Janice. Red, Red Rose is right up there among the best romances set during the Peninsular War. Wonderful character development.

    Reply
  139. Thanks, Janice. Red, Red Rose is right up there among the best romances set during the Peninsular War. Wonderful character development.

    Reply
  140. Thanks, Janice. Red, Red Rose is right up there among the best romances set during the Peninsular War. Wonderful character development.

    Reply

Leave a Comment