What To Wear In the Rain?

Ethel OxfordNicola here, rambling (literally) today on what to wear for a dog walk in the rain and adding in some historical sidenotes. Each day I go out with Angus, our pet Labrador, or April, our guide dog trainee in the inclement winter weather, generally getting soaking wet in the process. This has prompted me refine my outdoor wear to suit the different elements of winter – frost, snow and wind as well as rain – and make sure that I have the right clothes for the right activity, because you know the saying: “There’s no wrong sort of weather, only the wrong sort of clothes.”

On April’s training walks it’s relatively easy as we are walking on paths and pavements and it isn’t too muddy underfoot. Sometimes we’re even under cover! A pair of warm trousers, sturdy shoes and a rainproof jacket is usually sufficient. However, on a walk like that there is the question of whether or not to carry an umbrella.  April is partial to a nice stick and she needs to learn to ignore umbrellas, parasols, and walking sticks when she is working, whether I’m carrying them or we meet someone with one.

Umbrellas aren’t the most convenient of accessories. They aren’t suitable in a high wind, of course, and you need a spare hand for Louvre-pierre-seguier-chancelier-france them, not easy when you’re trying to train a small dog. They evolved from parasols in the 16th century although in England adoption of parasols for men was considered a curiosity and rather unmasculine, perhaps even something that only foreigners would use! (The guy in the picture is French!)

John Evelyn, in a diary entry from 1664, refers to a collection of “rarities” shown to him which included “fans like our ladies use, but much larger, and with long handles, strangely carved and filled with Chinese characters.” In the ninenteenth century in his book Domestic Manners of the English, Thomas Wright includes a drawing of an Englishman attended by a servant who is carrying an umbrella with a handle that slopes backwards in order to shelter the person walking ahead of him.

Paeasols and umbrellasThe parasol evolved into a wet weather item when oil and wax covers were invented. English ladies were using them in the early 18th century but it was still considered unmanly to use one. Jonas Hanway, the first man in London to use an umbrella in about 1750, was attacked by hackney carriage drivers who saw the umbrella as a threat to their business. Nevertheless the umbrella eventually caught on in the 1780s but the French and Italians, sensible as well as stylish, were far ahead of the English in seeing the umbrella as a fashion accessory.

The alternative to an umbrella is a coat with a hood, and this works pretty well for dog-walking. When I was a child my school uniform included something called a “gaberdine” which was a waterproof coat of heavyweight material with hood attached. Lighter coats for summer showers were known as a mackintosh after Charles Mackintosh who invented a waterproof fabric coat in 1824. I’m not sure whether anyone calls them that anymore! The problem with the mackintosh was that it had a strong and not particularly appealing smell, it was very stiff and had a tendency to melt in the heat. I remember a waxed jacket of mine in this style that smelled oily and disintegrated one hot summer day! These days I guess we have a vast choice of raincoat, cagoule, and other waterproof coats and jackets when we go out.

Now to footwear. The modern-day hiking boot is wonderful thing for my dog walks, tough, Boots comfortable and waterproof. There’s no doubt that walking shoes have come a long way since 3,330 BC when Otzi the Iceman traversed the Alps in shoe made from tree fibres covered in deer hide and tied with string! But what about the trusty Wellington boot?

Wellington bootsAnother historical aside – the first Wellington boots, which were made by Hoby’s of London for Arthur Wellesley, then Viscount Wellington, were cut lower than men’s leather boots had previously been to allow for more comfortable riding. However the Prussians weren’t too happy to adopt a British boot and so they invented the “Blücher” after Field-Marshal von Blücher, which was an even lower cut more like an ankle boot. The Brits weren’t impressed. In 1841, satirical magazine Punch called them “shocking imposters.” The name Wellington Book, however, was co-opted by the North British Rubber Company in the 1860s when they started to produce waterproof “gum boots” which evolved into the Wellingtons we know and love today. And when things are really bad and the rain is up to my ankles, there really is nothing better!

I haven't even touched on hats, gloves and scarves – all very necessary if you are up against a wet or cold winter. And I'm wondering what is the appropriate outfit for a dog walk if you live in a hot climate! Anyway, please share your outdoor tips with me. 

What is your rain wear of choice? Do you favor an umbrella or a hood? Do you ever have a need for a parasol? And what would be your favoured footwear? 

 

130 thoughts on “What To Wear In the Rain?”

  1. Ah, a woman who takes the subtle variations of rain wear as seriously as I do! I don’t walk dogs, but I favor coats with hoods for rain, snow, or any threats thereof. I have a range of them in different weights, and ditto the scarves I wear with them. One needs a carefully grade weight to fit the weather!
    Not sure what a cagoule is!

    Reply
  2. Ah, a woman who takes the subtle variations of rain wear as seriously as I do! I don’t walk dogs, but I favor coats with hoods for rain, snow, or any threats thereof. I have a range of them in different weights, and ditto the scarves I wear with them. One needs a carefully grade weight to fit the weather!
    Not sure what a cagoule is!

    Reply
  3. Ah, a woman who takes the subtle variations of rain wear as seriously as I do! I don’t walk dogs, but I favor coats with hoods for rain, snow, or any threats thereof. I have a range of them in different weights, and ditto the scarves I wear with them. One needs a carefully grade weight to fit the weather!
    Not sure what a cagoule is!

    Reply
  4. Ah, a woman who takes the subtle variations of rain wear as seriously as I do! I don’t walk dogs, but I favor coats with hoods for rain, snow, or any threats thereof. I have a range of them in different weights, and ditto the scarves I wear with them. One needs a carefully grade weight to fit the weather!
    Not sure what a cagoule is!

    Reply
  5. Ah, a woman who takes the subtle variations of rain wear as seriously as I do! I don’t walk dogs, but I favor coats with hoods for rain, snow, or any threats thereof. I have a range of them in different weights, and ditto the scarves I wear with them. One needs a carefully grade weight to fit the weather!
    Not sure what a cagoule is!

    Reply
  6. I carry an umbrella, but seldom use it. It is with us as a “magic” wand. If I carru it the weather won’t get bad enough for me to need it!
    Our rains area either drizzles or torrents. If drizzles — well I’m only going between cars and building, so why bother. (This is urban life in a nutshell.) If the rain is a torrent, I’ll progably get wetter tryiing to manage the umbrella. The rain beats back UP from the sidewalk, the wind is blowing the rain in UNDER the umbrella, and trying to crry off the umbrella, and so on. I can run between car and building if I don’t use the umbrella, and I’ll get soaked either way!
    Again, you see how urban my life is. I’d have different clothing if I lived a country life.

    Reply
  7. I carry an umbrella, but seldom use it. It is with us as a “magic” wand. If I carru it the weather won’t get bad enough for me to need it!
    Our rains area either drizzles or torrents. If drizzles — well I’m only going between cars and building, so why bother. (This is urban life in a nutshell.) If the rain is a torrent, I’ll progably get wetter tryiing to manage the umbrella. The rain beats back UP from the sidewalk, the wind is blowing the rain in UNDER the umbrella, and trying to crry off the umbrella, and so on. I can run between car and building if I don’t use the umbrella, and I’ll get soaked either way!
    Again, you see how urban my life is. I’d have different clothing if I lived a country life.

    Reply
  8. I carry an umbrella, but seldom use it. It is with us as a “magic” wand. If I carru it the weather won’t get bad enough for me to need it!
    Our rains area either drizzles or torrents. If drizzles — well I’m only going between cars and building, so why bother. (This is urban life in a nutshell.) If the rain is a torrent, I’ll progably get wetter tryiing to manage the umbrella. The rain beats back UP from the sidewalk, the wind is blowing the rain in UNDER the umbrella, and trying to crry off the umbrella, and so on. I can run between car and building if I don’t use the umbrella, and I’ll get soaked either way!
    Again, you see how urban my life is. I’d have different clothing if I lived a country life.

    Reply
  9. I carry an umbrella, but seldom use it. It is with us as a “magic” wand. If I carru it the weather won’t get bad enough for me to need it!
    Our rains area either drizzles or torrents. If drizzles — well I’m only going between cars and building, so why bother. (This is urban life in a nutshell.) If the rain is a torrent, I’ll progably get wetter tryiing to manage the umbrella. The rain beats back UP from the sidewalk, the wind is blowing the rain in UNDER the umbrella, and trying to crry off the umbrella, and so on. I can run between car and building if I don’t use the umbrella, and I’ll get soaked either way!
    Again, you see how urban my life is. I’d have different clothing if I lived a country life.

    Reply
  10. I carry an umbrella, but seldom use it. It is with us as a “magic” wand. If I carru it the weather won’t get bad enough for me to need it!
    Our rains area either drizzles or torrents. If drizzles — well I’m only going between cars and building, so why bother. (This is urban life in a nutshell.) If the rain is a torrent, I’ll progably get wetter tryiing to manage the umbrella. The rain beats back UP from the sidewalk, the wind is blowing the rain in UNDER the umbrella, and trying to crry off the umbrella, and so on. I can run between car and building if I don’t use the umbrella, and I’ll get soaked either way!
    Again, you see how urban my life is. I’d have different clothing if I lived a country life.

    Reply
  11. Yes, that’s a very good point, Mary Jo. One size definitely does not suit all when dealing with the vagaries of the weather!
    A cagoule is a very lightweight mac. 🙂

    Reply
  12. Yes, that’s a very good point, Mary Jo. One size definitely does not suit all when dealing with the vagaries of the weather!
    A cagoule is a very lightweight mac. 🙂

    Reply
  13. Yes, that’s a very good point, Mary Jo. One size definitely does not suit all when dealing with the vagaries of the weather!
    A cagoule is a very lightweight mac. 🙂

    Reply
  14. Yes, that’s a very good point, Mary Jo. One size definitely does not suit all when dealing with the vagaries of the weather!
    A cagoule is a very lightweight mac. 🙂

    Reply
  15. Yes, that’s a very good point, Mary Jo. One size definitely does not suit all when dealing with the vagaries of the weather!
    A cagoule is a very lightweight mac. 🙂

    Reply
  16. Haha! That’s very funny, Sue, but I do know what you mean. If you didn’t have that umbrella with you, it would pour with rain! I hadn’t reflected on that aspect of the umbrella but you are quite right – it only works when the rain is falling directly on it. If rain is blown sideways on the wind or bounces off the ground, it’s no good at all!

    Reply
  17. Haha! That’s very funny, Sue, but I do know what you mean. If you didn’t have that umbrella with you, it would pour with rain! I hadn’t reflected on that aspect of the umbrella but you are quite right – it only works when the rain is falling directly on it. If rain is blown sideways on the wind or bounces off the ground, it’s no good at all!

    Reply
  18. Haha! That’s very funny, Sue, but I do know what you mean. If you didn’t have that umbrella with you, it would pour with rain! I hadn’t reflected on that aspect of the umbrella but you are quite right – it only works when the rain is falling directly on it. If rain is blown sideways on the wind or bounces off the ground, it’s no good at all!

    Reply
  19. Haha! That’s very funny, Sue, but I do know what you mean. If you didn’t have that umbrella with you, it would pour with rain! I hadn’t reflected on that aspect of the umbrella but you are quite right – it only works when the rain is falling directly on it. If rain is blown sideways on the wind or bounces off the ground, it’s no good at all!

    Reply
  20. Haha! That’s very funny, Sue, but I do know what you mean. If you didn’t have that umbrella with you, it would pour with rain! I hadn’t reflected on that aspect of the umbrella but you are quite right – it only works when the rain is falling directly on it. If rain is blown sideways on the wind or bounces off the ground, it’s no good at all!

    Reply
  21. I prefer a hood. I like to be hands free when I’m out walking or errands or whatever. Even my purse is a cross body one so I don’t have to hold it.
    About 4 years ago my mom and sister and I took a trip to Scotland in the spring. I bought my first raincoat and waterproof shoes. Then it turned out to be unseasonable dry and I didn’t really get to use them. 🙂 I ran into the grocery store early last Saturday morning and it was raining/snowing and the parking lot was a mess. I was wearing my running shoes and my socks and toes got soaked. Too bad I didn’t wear those nice waterproof shoes!

    Reply
  22. I prefer a hood. I like to be hands free when I’m out walking or errands or whatever. Even my purse is a cross body one so I don’t have to hold it.
    About 4 years ago my mom and sister and I took a trip to Scotland in the spring. I bought my first raincoat and waterproof shoes. Then it turned out to be unseasonable dry and I didn’t really get to use them. 🙂 I ran into the grocery store early last Saturday morning and it was raining/snowing and the parking lot was a mess. I was wearing my running shoes and my socks and toes got soaked. Too bad I didn’t wear those nice waterproof shoes!

    Reply
  23. I prefer a hood. I like to be hands free when I’m out walking or errands or whatever. Even my purse is a cross body one so I don’t have to hold it.
    About 4 years ago my mom and sister and I took a trip to Scotland in the spring. I bought my first raincoat and waterproof shoes. Then it turned out to be unseasonable dry and I didn’t really get to use them. 🙂 I ran into the grocery store early last Saturday morning and it was raining/snowing and the parking lot was a mess. I was wearing my running shoes and my socks and toes got soaked. Too bad I didn’t wear those nice waterproof shoes!

    Reply
  24. I prefer a hood. I like to be hands free when I’m out walking or errands or whatever. Even my purse is a cross body one so I don’t have to hold it.
    About 4 years ago my mom and sister and I took a trip to Scotland in the spring. I bought my first raincoat and waterproof shoes. Then it turned out to be unseasonable dry and I didn’t really get to use them. 🙂 I ran into the grocery store early last Saturday morning and it was raining/snowing and the parking lot was a mess. I was wearing my running shoes and my socks and toes got soaked. Too bad I didn’t wear those nice waterproof shoes!

    Reply
  25. I prefer a hood. I like to be hands free when I’m out walking or errands or whatever. Even my purse is a cross body one so I don’t have to hold it.
    About 4 years ago my mom and sister and I took a trip to Scotland in the spring. I bought my first raincoat and waterproof shoes. Then it turned out to be unseasonable dry and I didn’t really get to use them. 🙂 I ran into the grocery store early last Saturday morning and it was raining/snowing and the parking lot was a mess. I was wearing my running shoes and my socks and toes got soaked. Too bad I didn’t wear those nice waterproof shoes!

    Reply
  26. An umbrella story:
    One day I was meeting my daughter for lunch in the city. It was pouring rain, but I had my lovely umbrella— It has a Caillebotte painting of a Paris street on a rainy day. When we were seated in the restaurant, the waitress said, “Excuse me, but were you walking on 72nd Street a little while ago?”
    I was a bit disconcerted, thinking this sounded too much like Big Brother Is Watching You, but I admitted that I had been.
    She said, “It’s your umbrella. I just love it!”
    I love it too. But for suburban living, where you are racing from the car to the store and vice versa, hoods are more practical.

    Reply
  27. An umbrella story:
    One day I was meeting my daughter for lunch in the city. It was pouring rain, but I had my lovely umbrella— It has a Caillebotte painting of a Paris street on a rainy day. When we were seated in the restaurant, the waitress said, “Excuse me, but were you walking on 72nd Street a little while ago?”
    I was a bit disconcerted, thinking this sounded too much like Big Brother Is Watching You, but I admitted that I had been.
    She said, “It’s your umbrella. I just love it!”
    I love it too. But for suburban living, where you are racing from the car to the store and vice versa, hoods are more practical.

    Reply
  28. An umbrella story:
    One day I was meeting my daughter for lunch in the city. It was pouring rain, but I had my lovely umbrella— It has a Caillebotte painting of a Paris street on a rainy day. When we were seated in the restaurant, the waitress said, “Excuse me, but were you walking on 72nd Street a little while ago?”
    I was a bit disconcerted, thinking this sounded too much like Big Brother Is Watching You, but I admitted that I had been.
    She said, “It’s your umbrella. I just love it!”
    I love it too. But for suburban living, where you are racing from the car to the store and vice versa, hoods are more practical.

    Reply
  29. An umbrella story:
    One day I was meeting my daughter for lunch in the city. It was pouring rain, but I had my lovely umbrella— It has a Caillebotte painting of a Paris street on a rainy day. When we were seated in the restaurant, the waitress said, “Excuse me, but were you walking on 72nd Street a little while ago?”
    I was a bit disconcerted, thinking this sounded too much like Big Brother Is Watching You, but I admitted that I had been.
    She said, “It’s your umbrella. I just love it!”
    I love it too. But for suburban living, where you are racing from the car to the store and vice versa, hoods are more practical.

    Reply
  30. An umbrella story:
    One day I was meeting my daughter for lunch in the city. It was pouring rain, but I had my lovely umbrella— It has a Caillebotte painting of a Paris street on a rainy day. When we were seated in the restaurant, the waitress said, “Excuse me, but were you walking on 72nd Street a little while ago?”
    I was a bit disconcerted, thinking this sounded too much like Big Brother Is Watching You, but I admitted that I had been.
    She said, “It’s your umbrella. I just love it!”
    I love it too. But for suburban living, where you are racing from the car to the store and vice versa, hoods are more practical.

    Reply
  31. Oiled silk cloaks were used as an outer layer by the mid-Victorians. My husband got me one to protect me and my garb when we wear re-enacting. Felted wool worked well, too. for me to stay dry. The water rolls off like it does on a ducks back.
    In the modern day and age, I use an “UnbelievaBrella” A reverse umbrella that is wind proof and can easily be carried in one hand with it’s C-shaped handle. I love being able to open it outside the car and step out of the car without getting wet. When closing it, it folds up trapping the water so it doesn’t drip all over you as you put in away. I let it drip into my car’s weather liner, then dump the water in my work sink when I get home.
    I love my all weather waterproof boots I found at Lands End. my feet stay dry and they look good as a everyday footwear.
    I reserve my wellies for the garden.

    Reply
  32. Oiled silk cloaks were used as an outer layer by the mid-Victorians. My husband got me one to protect me and my garb when we wear re-enacting. Felted wool worked well, too. for me to stay dry. The water rolls off like it does on a ducks back.
    In the modern day and age, I use an “UnbelievaBrella” A reverse umbrella that is wind proof and can easily be carried in one hand with it’s C-shaped handle. I love being able to open it outside the car and step out of the car without getting wet. When closing it, it folds up trapping the water so it doesn’t drip all over you as you put in away. I let it drip into my car’s weather liner, then dump the water in my work sink when I get home.
    I love my all weather waterproof boots I found at Lands End. my feet stay dry and they look good as a everyday footwear.
    I reserve my wellies for the garden.

    Reply
  33. Oiled silk cloaks were used as an outer layer by the mid-Victorians. My husband got me one to protect me and my garb when we wear re-enacting. Felted wool worked well, too. for me to stay dry. The water rolls off like it does on a ducks back.
    In the modern day and age, I use an “UnbelievaBrella” A reverse umbrella that is wind proof and can easily be carried in one hand with it’s C-shaped handle. I love being able to open it outside the car and step out of the car without getting wet. When closing it, it folds up trapping the water so it doesn’t drip all over you as you put in away. I let it drip into my car’s weather liner, then dump the water in my work sink when I get home.
    I love my all weather waterproof boots I found at Lands End. my feet stay dry and they look good as a everyday footwear.
    I reserve my wellies for the garden.

    Reply
  34. Oiled silk cloaks were used as an outer layer by the mid-Victorians. My husband got me one to protect me and my garb when we wear re-enacting. Felted wool worked well, too. for me to stay dry. The water rolls off like it does on a ducks back.
    In the modern day and age, I use an “UnbelievaBrella” A reverse umbrella that is wind proof and can easily be carried in one hand with it’s C-shaped handle. I love being able to open it outside the car and step out of the car without getting wet. When closing it, it folds up trapping the water so it doesn’t drip all over you as you put in away. I let it drip into my car’s weather liner, then dump the water in my work sink when I get home.
    I love my all weather waterproof boots I found at Lands End. my feet stay dry and they look good as a everyday footwear.
    I reserve my wellies for the garden.

    Reply
  35. Oiled silk cloaks were used as an outer layer by the mid-Victorians. My husband got me one to protect me and my garb when we wear re-enacting. Felted wool worked well, too. for me to stay dry. The water rolls off like it does on a ducks back.
    In the modern day and age, I use an “UnbelievaBrella” A reverse umbrella that is wind proof and can easily be carried in one hand with it’s C-shaped handle. I love being able to open it outside the car and step out of the car without getting wet. When closing it, it folds up trapping the water so it doesn’t drip all over you as you put in away. I let it drip into my car’s weather liner, then dump the water in my work sink when I get home.
    I love my all weather waterproof boots I found at Lands End. my feet stay dry and they look good as a everyday footwear.
    I reserve my wellies for the garden.

    Reply
  36. Duck shoes have been my go to rain foot gear. I think LLBean was the originator but other manufacturers have them also. Hooded raincoat, lined, for winter and a hooded jacket round out my rain protection, having both hands free for dog wrangling is important. I usually buy the brightest color to brighten up those rainy, snowy days. And whenever I remember to pack an umbrella for vacation, it never gets used.

    Reply
  37. Duck shoes have been my go to rain foot gear. I think LLBean was the originator but other manufacturers have them also. Hooded raincoat, lined, for winter and a hooded jacket round out my rain protection, having both hands free for dog wrangling is important. I usually buy the brightest color to brighten up those rainy, snowy days. And whenever I remember to pack an umbrella for vacation, it never gets used.

    Reply
  38. Duck shoes have been my go to rain foot gear. I think LLBean was the originator but other manufacturers have them also. Hooded raincoat, lined, for winter and a hooded jacket round out my rain protection, having both hands free for dog wrangling is important. I usually buy the brightest color to brighten up those rainy, snowy days. And whenever I remember to pack an umbrella for vacation, it never gets used.

    Reply
  39. Duck shoes have been my go to rain foot gear. I think LLBean was the originator but other manufacturers have them also. Hooded raincoat, lined, for winter and a hooded jacket round out my rain protection, having both hands free for dog wrangling is important. I usually buy the brightest color to brighten up those rainy, snowy days. And whenever I remember to pack an umbrella for vacation, it never gets used.

    Reply
  40. Duck shoes have been my go to rain foot gear. I think LLBean was the originator but other manufacturers have them also. Hooded raincoat, lined, for winter and a hooded jacket round out my rain protection, having both hands free for dog wrangling is important. I usually buy the brightest color to brighten up those rainy, snowy days. And whenever I remember to pack an umbrella for vacation, it never gets used.

    Reply
  41. I too was not familiar with the word cagoule, so I learned something today! @Pamela DG, my husband was gifted with an umbrella akin to the “UnbelievaBrella”; his degree is in Chemistry and the umbrella has a periodic table as the interior design.
    I tend to use an umbrella in inclement weather. I’m generally a pedestrian or riding the bus, and I don’t have the option of running for a car. I agree that umbrellas work best when the rain is vertical and not too driving.

    Reply
  42. I too was not familiar with the word cagoule, so I learned something today! @Pamela DG, my husband was gifted with an umbrella akin to the “UnbelievaBrella”; his degree is in Chemistry and the umbrella has a periodic table as the interior design.
    I tend to use an umbrella in inclement weather. I’m generally a pedestrian or riding the bus, and I don’t have the option of running for a car. I agree that umbrellas work best when the rain is vertical and not too driving.

    Reply
  43. I too was not familiar with the word cagoule, so I learned something today! @Pamela DG, my husband was gifted with an umbrella akin to the “UnbelievaBrella”; his degree is in Chemistry and the umbrella has a periodic table as the interior design.
    I tend to use an umbrella in inclement weather. I’m generally a pedestrian or riding the bus, and I don’t have the option of running for a car. I agree that umbrellas work best when the rain is vertical and not too driving.

    Reply
  44. I too was not familiar with the word cagoule, so I learned something today! @Pamela DG, my husband was gifted with an umbrella akin to the “UnbelievaBrella”; his degree is in Chemistry and the umbrella has a periodic table as the interior design.
    I tend to use an umbrella in inclement weather. I’m generally a pedestrian or riding the bus, and I don’t have the option of running for a car. I agree that umbrellas work best when the rain is vertical and not too driving.

    Reply
  45. I too was not familiar with the word cagoule, so I learned something today! @Pamela DG, my husband was gifted with an umbrella akin to the “UnbelievaBrella”; his degree is in Chemistry and the umbrella has a periodic table as the interior design.
    I tend to use an umbrella in inclement weather. I’m generally a pedestrian or riding the bus, and I don’t have the option of running for a car. I agree that umbrellas work best when the rain is vertical and not too driving.

    Reply
  46. Here in Phoenix, a truly heavy rain/torrential downpour seems to be approximately a once-in-a-decade event, and most of the normal rain falls overnight. I keep a compact umbrella in the car, but can’t remember when I last used it. (But, ironically, if I had to go out this week, I’d need it–first rain in ages.)
    As for hot weather, it’s not the clothing but the time of day that matters: dog walking occurs mainly at dawn and dusk. The pavement’s too hot for doggy feet during the day.
    I do remember one year–1989, I think–when it got cold early (December) and the on-site TV reporters appeared in winter coats, which all seemed to be circa 1965!

    Reply
  47. Here in Phoenix, a truly heavy rain/torrential downpour seems to be approximately a once-in-a-decade event, and most of the normal rain falls overnight. I keep a compact umbrella in the car, but can’t remember when I last used it. (But, ironically, if I had to go out this week, I’d need it–first rain in ages.)
    As for hot weather, it’s not the clothing but the time of day that matters: dog walking occurs mainly at dawn and dusk. The pavement’s too hot for doggy feet during the day.
    I do remember one year–1989, I think–when it got cold early (December) and the on-site TV reporters appeared in winter coats, which all seemed to be circa 1965!

    Reply
  48. Here in Phoenix, a truly heavy rain/torrential downpour seems to be approximately a once-in-a-decade event, and most of the normal rain falls overnight. I keep a compact umbrella in the car, but can’t remember when I last used it. (But, ironically, if I had to go out this week, I’d need it–first rain in ages.)
    As for hot weather, it’s not the clothing but the time of day that matters: dog walking occurs mainly at dawn and dusk. The pavement’s too hot for doggy feet during the day.
    I do remember one year–1989, I think–when it got cold early (December) and the on-site TV reporters appeared in winter coats, which all seemed to be circa 1965!

    Reply
  49. Here in Phoenix, a truly heavy rain/torrential downpour seems to be approximately a once-in-a-decade event, and most of the normal rain falls overnight. I keep a compact umbrella in the car, but can’t remember when I last used it. (But, ironically, if I had to go out this week, I’d need it–first rain in ages.)
    As for hot weather, it’s not the clothing but the time of day that matters: dog walking occurs mainly at dawn and dusk. The pavement’s too hot for doggy feet during the day.
    I do remember one year–1989, I think–when it got cold early (December) and the on-site TV reporters appeared in winter coats, which all seemed to be circa 1965!

    Reply
  50. Here in Phoenix, a truly heavy rain/torrential downpour seems to be approximately a once-in-a-decade event, and most of the normal rain falls overnight. I keep a compact umbrella in the car, but can’t remember when I last used it. (But, ironically, if I had to go out this week, I’d need it–first rain in ages.)
    As for hot weather, it’s not the clothing but the time of day that matters: dog walking occurs mainly at dawn and dusk. The pavement’s too hot for doggy feet during the day.
    I do remember one year–1989, I think–when it got cold early (December) and the on-site TV reporters appeared in winter coats, which all seemed to be circa 1965!

    Reply
  51. I loved your comment, Misti! Naturally you would prepare for a visit to Scotland with some waterproof clothing and footwear – and then not to need it in a rare dry spell! That’s most unusual.

    Reply
  52. I loved your comment, Misti! Naturally you would prepare for a visit to Scotland with some waterproof clothing and footwear – and then not to need it in a rare dry spell! That’s most unusual.

    Reply
  53. I loved your comment, Misti! Naturally you would prepare for a visit to Scotland with some waterproof clothing and footwear – and then not to need it in a rare dry spell! That’s most unusual.

    Reply
  54. I loved your comment, Misti! Naturally you would prepare for a visit to Scotland with some waterproof clothing and footwear – and then not to need it in a rare dry spell! That’s most unusual.

    Reply
  55. I loved your comment, Misti! Naturally you would prepare for a visit to Scotland with some waterproof clothing and footwear – and then not to need it in a rare dry spell! That’s most unusual.

    Reply
  56. Pamela, you sound very well-prepared for the vagaries of the weather! Interesting that water rolls of felted wool. I didn’t know that. I love the sound of the UnbelievaBrella – very well designed!

    Reply
  57. Pamela, you sound very well-prepared for the vagaries of the weather! Interesting that water rolls of felted wool. I didn’t know that. I love the sound of the UnbelievaBrella – very well designed!

    Reply
  58. Pamela, you sound very well-prepared for the vagaries of the weather! Interesting that water rolls of felted wool. I didn’t know that. I love the sound of the UnbelievaBrella – very well designed!

    Reply
  59. Pamela, you sound very well-prepared for the vagaries of the weather! Interesting that water rolls of felted wool. I didn’t know that. I love the sound of the UnbelievaBrella – very well designed!

    Reply
  60. Pamela, you sound very well-prepared for the vagaries of the weather! Interesting that water rolls of felted wool. I didn’t know that. I love the sound of the UnbelievaBrella – very well designed!

    Reply
  61. Just as people are learning what a cagoule is, I’ve just learned what a duck shoe is! I’d seen them but didn’t know the name. I love the idea of bright-coloured weather gear. Just what’s needed for dark days.

    Reply
  62. Just as people are learning what a cagoule is, I’ve just learned what a duck shoe is! I’d seen them but didn’t know the name. I love the idea of bright-coloured weather gear. Just what’s needed for dark days.

    Reply
  63. Just as people are learning what a cagoule is, I’ve just learned what a duck shoe is! I’d seen them but didn’t know the name. I love the idea of bright-coloured weather gear. Just what’s needed for dark days.

    Reply
  64. Just as people are learning what a cagoule is, I’ve just learned what a duck shoe is! I’d seen them but didn’t know the name. I love the idea of bright-coloured weather gear. Just what’s needed for dark days.

    Reply
  65. Just as people are learning what a cagoule is, I’ve just learned what a duck shoe is! I’d seen them but didn’t know the name. I love the idea of bright-coloured weather gear. Just what’s needed for dark days.

    Reply
  66. Kareni, that sounds like the perfect gift for my husband too! He has the periodic table design on a number of items so I will see if I can find him an umbrella. Thank you!

    Reply
  67. Kareni, that sounds like the perfect gift for my husband too! He has the periodic table design on a number of items so I will see if I can find him an umbrella. Thank you!

    Reply
  68. Kareni, that sounds like the perfect gift for my husband too! He has the periodic table design on a number of items so I will see if I can find him an umbrella. Thank you!

    Reply
  69. Kareni, that sounds like the perfect gift for my husband too! He has the periodic table design on a number of items so I will see if I can find him an umbrella. Thank you!

    Reply
  70. Kareni, that sounds like the perfect gift for my husband too! He has the periodic table design on a number of items so I will see if I can find him an umbrella. Thank you!

    Reply
  71. LOL, Mary, that’s very funny about the reporters in their winter coats! I suppose if it doesn’t happen often, people aren’t going to be very well prepared. I’m laughing to think of them all rushing around trying to find something warm enough to wear!

    Reply
  72. LOL, Mary, that’s very funny about the reporters in their winter coats! I suppose if it doesn’t happen often, people aren’t going to be very well prepared. I’m laughing to think of them all rushing around trying to find something warm enough to wear!

    Reply
  73. LOL, Mary, that’s very funny about the reporters in their winter coats! I suppose if it doesn’t happen often, people aren’t going to be very well prepared. I’m laughing to think of them all rushing around trying to find something warm enough to wear!

    Reply
  74. LOL, Mary, that’s very funny about the reporters in their winter coats! I suppose if it doesn’t happen often, people aren’t going to be very well prepared. I’m laughing to think of them all rushing around trying to find something warm enough to wear!

    Reply
  75. LOL, Mary, that’s very funny about the reporters in their winter coats! I suppose if it doesn’t happen often, people aren’t going to be very well prepared. I’m laughing to think of them all rushing around trying to find something warm enough to wear!

    Reply
  76. I live in Austin Texas. We generally are in a drought situation. In a good steady rain, I am always thinking about running outside just to dance.
    We just got nearly a week of our version of rain – not much. Grey skies, drizzle, spitting and misting. I walk a small dog now, and he loves the rain because that always leads to “the towel”. He loves the towel.
    I formerly walked large dogs- Boxers and I am too clumsy to have walked them while holding an umbrella. I have a pink short hooded rain coat. It is not much for keeping me dry below my waist, but I don’t get rain in my face.
    I have some lovely ones umbrella – one is a Monet. Almost too pretty to use.
    The most interesting umbrella story I have. I worked for FEMA – and after disasters there were not always places that were inside to work and help people affected by the disaster. After Hurricane Ike, we were in a small town in East Texas – in a parking lot – in an empty mall. In the afternoon the sun was fierce and in order for me to see my computer and to be actually able to help my applicants, we had to shelter under my umbrella…all cozy there…cuddled up around my computer screen. I got to know many of my applicants very well.
    I thank you so much for this lovely post. I have some French in my background, so I am glad they were wise enough to try parasols for protection. They are known for being fashion forward.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  77. I live in Austin Texas. We generally are in a drought situation. In a good steady rain, I am always thinking about running outside just to dance.
    We just got nearly a week of our version of rain – not much. Grey skies, drizzle, spitting and misting. I walk a small dog now, and he loves the rain because that always leads to “the towel”. He loves the towel.
    I formerly walked large dogs- Boxers and I am too clumsy to have walked them while holding an umbrella. I have a pink short hooded rain coat. It is not much for keeping me dry below my waist, but I don’t get rain in my face.
    I have some lovely ones umbrella – one is a Monet. Almost too pretty to use.
    The most interesting umbrella story I have. I worked for FEMA – and after disasters there were not always places that were inside to work and help people affected by the disaster. After Hurricane Ike, we were in a small town in East Texas – in a parking lot – in an empty mall. In the afternoon the sun was fierce and in order for me to see my computer and to be actually able to help my applicants, we had to shelter under my umbrella…all cozy there…cuddled up around my computer screen. I got to know many of my applicants very well.
    I thank you so much for this lovely post. I have some French in my background, so I am glad they were wise enough to try parasols for protection. They are known for being fashion forward.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  78. I live in Austin Texas. We generally are in a drought situation. In a good steady rain, I am always thinking about running outside just to dance.
    We just got nearly a week of our version of rain – not much. Grey skies, drizzle, spitting and misting. I walk a small dog now, and he loves the rain because that always leads to “the towel”. He loves the towel.
    I formerly walked large dogs- Boxers and I am too clumsy to have walked them while holding an umbrella. I have a pink short hooded rain coat. It is not much for keeping me dry below my waist, but I don’t get rain in my face.
    I have some lovely ones umbrella – one is a Monet. Almost too pretty to use.
    The most interesting umbrella story I have. I worked for FEMA – and after disasters there were not always places that were inside to work and help people affected by the disaster. After Hurricane Ike, we were in a small town in East Texas – in a parking lot – in an empty mall. In the afternoon the sun was fierce and in order for me to see my computer and to be actually able to help my applicants, we had to shelter under my umbrella…all cozy there…cuddled up around my computer screen. I got to know many of my applicants very well.
    I thank you so much for this lovely post. I have some French in my background, so I am glad they were wise enough to try parasols for protection. They are known for being fashion forward.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  79. I live in Austin Texas. We generally are in a drought situation. In a good steady rain, I am always thinking about running outside just to dance.
    We just got nearly a week of our version of rain – not much. Grey skies, drizzle, spitting and misting. I walk a small dog now, and he loves the rain because that always leads to “the towel”. He loves the towel.
    I formerly walked large dogs- Boxers and I am too clumsy to have walked them while holding an umbrella. I have a pink short hooded rain coat. It is not much for keeping me dry below my waist, but I don’t get rain in my face.
    I have some lovely ones umbrella – one is a Monet. Almost too pretty to use.
    The most interesting umbrella story I have. I worked for FEMA – and after disasters there were not always places that were inside to work and help people affected by the disaster. After Hurricane Ike, we were in a small town in East Texas – in a parking lot – in an empty mall. In the afternoon the sun was fierce and in order for me to see my computer and to be actually able to help my applicants, we had to shelter under my umbrella…all cozy there…cuddled up around my computer screen. I got to know many of my applicants very well.
    I thank you so much for this lovely post. I have some French in my background, so I am glad they were wise enough to try parasols for protection. They are known for being fashion forward.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  80. I live in Austin Texas. We generally are in a drought situation. In a good steady rain, I am always thinking about running outside just to dance.
    We just got nearly a week of our version of rain – not much. Grey skies, drizzle, spitting and misting. I walk a small dog now, and he loves the rain because that always leads to “the towel”. He loves the towel.
    I formerly walked large dogs- Boxers and I am too clumsy to have walked them while holding an umbrella. I have a pink short hooded rain coat. It is not much for keeping me dry below my waist, but I don’t get rain in my face.
    I have some lovely ones umbrella – one is a Monet. Almost too pretty to use.
    The most interesting umbrella story I have. I worked for FEMA – and after disasters there were not always places that were inside to work and help people affected by the disaster. After Hurricane Ike, we were in a small town in East Texas – in a parking lot – in an empty mall. In the afternoon the sun was fierce and in order for me to see my computer and to be actually able to help my applicants, we had to shelter under my umbrella…all cozy there…cuddled up around my computer screen. I got to know many of my applicants very well.
    I thank you so much for this lovely post. I have some French in my background, so I am glad they were wise enough to try parasols for protection. They are known for being fashion forward.
    I hope everyone is taking care and staying well.

    Reply
  81. Definitely a hood!! I use an umbrella now and again but I find them a nuisance when folding them to go into a shop because you’re usually dripping all over the place.
    Now if someone could come up with something to keep glasses rain drop free when out I’d be in seventh heaven!!! It’s one thing that gets to me.

    Reply
  82. Definitely a hood!! I use an umbrella now and again but I find them a nuisance when folding them to go into a shop because you’re usually dripping all over the place.
    Now if someone could come up with something to keep glasses rain drop free when out I’d be in seventh heaven!!! It’s one thing that gets to me.

    Reply
  83. Definitely a hood!! I use an umbrella now and again but I find them a nuisance when folding them to go into a shop because you’re usually dripping all over the place.
    Now if someone could come up with something to keep glasses rain drop free when out I’d be in seventh heaven!!! It’s one thing that gets to me.

    Reply
  84. Definitely a hood!! I use an umbrella now and again but I find them a nuisance when folding them to go into a shop because you’re usually dripping all over the place.
    Now if someone could come up with something to keep glasses rain drop free when out I’d be in seventh heaven!!! It’s one thing that gets to me.

    Reply
  85. Definitely a hood!! I use an umbrella now and again but I find them a nuisance when folding them to go into a shop because you’re usually dripping all over the place.
    Now if someone could come up with something to keep glasses rain drop free when out I’d be in seventh heaven!!! It’s one thing that gets to me.

    Reply
  86. Umbrellas can also be used as sun protection when it’s not raining. However, I need both hands to hang on to my poodle when walking her. She’s just over 1 year old and distractible. Thank you for the new vocabulary word.

    Reply
  87. Umbrellas can also be used as sun protection when it’s not raining. However, I need both hands to hang on to my poodle when walking her. She’s just over 1 year old and distractible. Thank you for the new vocabulary word.

    Reply
  88. Umbrellas can also be used as sun protection when it’s not raining. However, I need both hands to hang on to my poodle when walking her. She’s just over 1 year old and distractible. Thank you for the new vocabulary word.

    Reply
  89. Umbrellas can also be used as sun protection when it’s not raining. However, I need both hands to hang on to my poodle when walking her. She’s just over 1 year old and distractible. Thank you for the new vocabulary word.

    Reply
  90. Umbrellas can also be used as sun protection when it’s not raining. However, I need both hands to hang on to my poodle when walking her. She’s just over 1 year old and distractible. Thank you for the new vocabulary word.

    Reply
  91. Well…..I’m a hat person. I have a variety of hats for the weather. Felted wool, think Stetson, are FABULOUS. Mine has a 3 inch brim so no rain on the glasses or leaking down the neck. No sleet or snow either.
    For summer, a straw hat, again a 3 inch brim. The Stetson traps too much heat for normal use in the summer but if I’m going out in a rain, I’ll wear it.
    If I’m going to an event where I’ll be standing (or sitting) around outside in the brutal sun, definitely an umbrella as I melt if I don’t have shade.
    Shoes….rubber boots around the yard for gardening. Hiking boots for walking and around town. Especially if it is wet or cold. They provide much more protection than tennis shoes or regular shoes.
    Coats – yep, graded for weather. Wind, cold, rain, sleet. The heaviest is big enough multiple layers can be worn underneath it.
    Then we get to gloves/mittens. Yep,got a variety of those. Because holding the freezing cold steering wheel requires a certain thickness. Whereas if I’m the passenger a light fleece flipit mitten will be fine. Grin.
    Then we get to scarves…I used to be a scarf person but now I wear a fleece gaiter. Because it can be pulled way up to the top of my head (fits under my Stetson) and no wind or cold goes touches my neck, touches my ears or chin or goes down my back.
    It can definitely take me awhile to assemble the correct garments but generally speaking I’m warm and dry whereas other people are cold and shivering and wet.

    Reply
  92. Well…..I’m a hat person. I have a variety of hats for the weather. Felted wool, think Stetson, are FABULOUS. Mine has a 3 inch brim so no rain on the glasses or leaking down the neck. No sleet or snow either.
    For summer, a straw hat, again a 3 inch brim. The Stetson traps too much heat for normal use in the summer but if I’m going out in a rain, I’ll wear it.
    If I’m going to an event where I’ll be standing (or sitting) around outside in the brutal sun, definitely an umbrella as I melt if I don’t have shade.
    Shoes….rubber boots around the yard for gardening. Hiking boots for walking and around town. Especially if it is wet or cold. They provide much more protection than tennis shoes or regular shoes.
    Coats – yep, graded for weather. Wind, cold, rain, sleet. The heaviest is big enough multiple layers can be worn underneath it.
    Then we get to gloves/mittens. Yep,got a variety of those. Because holding the freezing cold steering wheel requires a certain thickness. Whereas if I’m the passenger a light fleece flipit mitten will be fine. Grin.
    Then we get to scarves…I used to be a scarf person but now I wear a fleece gaiter. Because it can be pulled way up to the top of my head (fits under my Stetson) and no wind or cold goes touches my neck, touches my ears or chin or goes down my back.
    It can definitely take me awhile to assemble the correct garments but generally speaking I’m warm and dry whereas other people are cold and shivering and wet.

    Reply
  93. Well…..I’m a hat person. I have a variety of hats for the weather. Felted wool, think Stetson, are FABULOUS. Mine has a 3 inch brim so no rain on the glasses or leaking down the neck. No sleet or snow either.
    For summer, a straw hat, again a 3 inch brim. The Stetson traps too much heat for normal use in the summer but if I’m going out in a rain, I’ll wear it.
    If I’m going to an event where I’ll be standing (or sitting) around outside in the brutal sun, definitely an umbrella as I melt if I don’t have shade.
    Shoes….rubber boots around the yard for gardening. Hiking boots for walking and around town. Especially if it is wet or cold. They provide much more protection than tennis shoes or regular shoes.
    Coats – yep, graded for weather. Wind, cold, rain, sleet. The heaviest is big enough multiple layers can be worn underneath it.
    Then we get to gloves/mittens. Yep,got a variety of those. Because holding the freezing cold steering wheel requires a certain thickness. Whereas if I’m the passenger a light fleece flipit mitten will be fine. Grin.
    Then we get to scarves…I used to be a scarf person but now I wear a fleece gaiter. Because it can be pulled way up to the top of my head (fits under my Stetson) and no wind or cold goes touches my neck, touches my ears or chin or goes down my back.
    It can definitely take me awhile to assemble the correct garments but generally speaking I’m warm and dry whereas other people are cold and shivering and wet.

    Reply
  94. Well…..I’m a hat person. I have a variety of hats for the weather. Felted wool, think Stetson, are FABULOUS. Mine has a 3 inch brim so no rain on the glasses or leaking down the neck. No sleet or snow either.
    For summer, a straw hat, again a 3 inch brim. The Stetson traps too much heat for normal use in the summer but if I’m going out in a rain, I’ll wear it.
    If I’m going to an event where I’ll be standing (or sitting) around outside in the brutal sun, definitely an umbrella as I melt if I don’t have shade.
    Shoes….rubber boots around the yard for gardening. Hiking boots for walking and around town. Especially if it is wet or cold. They provide much more protection than tennis shoes or regular shoes.
    Coats – yep, graded for weather. Wind, cold, rain, sleet. The heaviest is big enough multiple layers can be worn underneath it.
    Then we get to gloves/mittens. Yep,got a variety of those. Because holding the freezing cold steering wheel requires a certain thickness. Whereas if I’m the passenger a light fleece flipit mitten will be fine. Grin.
    Then we get to scarves…I used to be a scarf person but now I wear a fleece gaiter. Because it can be pulled way up to the top of my head (fits under my Stetson) and no wind or cold goes touches my neck, touches my ears or chin or goes down my back.
    It can definitely take me awhile to assemble the correct garments but generally speaking I’m warm and dry whereas other people are cold and shivering and wet.

    Reply
  95. Well…..I’m a hat person. I have a variety of hats for the weather. Felted wool, think Stetson, are FABULOUS. Mine has a 3 inch brim so no rain on the glasses or leaking down the neck. No sleet or snow either.
    For summer, a straw hat, again a 3 inch brim. The Stetson traps too much heat for normal use in the summer but if I’m going out in a rain, I’ll wear it.
    If I’m going to an event where I’ll be standing (or sitting) around outside in the brutal sun, definitely an umbrella as I melt if I don’t have shade.
    Shoes….rubber boots around the yard for gardening. Hiking boots for walking and around town. Especially if it is wet or cold. They provide much more protection than tennis shoes or regular shoes.
    Coats – yep, graded for weather. Wind, cold, rain, sleet. The heaviest is big enough multiple layers can be worn underneath it.
    Then we get to gloves/mittens. Yep,got a variety of those. Because holding the freezing cold steering wheel requires a certain thickness. Whereas if I’m the passenger a light fleece flipit mitten will be fine. Grin.
    Then we get to scarves…I used to be a scarf person but now I wear a fleece gaiter. Because it can be pulled way up to the top of my head (fits under my Stetson) and no wind or cold goes touches my neck, touches my ears or chin or goes down my back.
    It can definitely take me awhile to assemble the correct garments but generally speaking I’m warm and dry whereas other people are cold and shivering and wet.

    Reply
  96. Great post, Nicola! I prefer a hood too – umbrellas are so annoying! And I love my Hunter wellies as they have a lining like those in a diving suit which keeps my toes warm. Wouldn’t be without them! Really must invest in a pair of walking boots too though.

    Reply
  97. Great post, Nicola! I prefer a hood too – umbrellas are so annoying! And I love my Hunter wellies as they have a lining like those in a diving suit which keeps my toes warm. Wouldn’t be without them! Really must invest in a pair of walking boots too though.

    Reply
  98. Great post, Nicola! I prefer a hood too – umbrellas are so annoying! And I love my Hunter wellies as they have a lining like those in a diving suit which keeps my toes warm. Wouldn’t be without them! Really must invest in a pair of walking boots too though.

    Reply
  99. Great post, Nicola! I prefer a hood too – umbrellas are so annoying! And I love my Hunter wellies as they have a lining like those in a diving suit which keeps my toes warm. Wouldn’t be without them! Really must invest in a pair of walking boots too though.

    Reply
  100. Great post, Nicola! I prefer a hood too – umbrellas are so annoying! And I love my Hunter wellies as they have a lining like those in a diving suit which keeps my toes warm. Wouldn’t be without them! Really must invest in a pair of walking boots too though.

    Reply
  101. Hi Kathryn, I’m with you on needing both hands for dog walking sometimes. That sounds like me with April! I can imagine an umbrella going flying when the dog suddenly veers off to investigate something exciting…

    Reply
  102. Hi Kathryn, I’m with you on needing both hands for dog walking sometimes. That sounds like me with April! I can imagine an umbrella going flying when the dog suddenly veers off to investigate something exciting…

    Reply
  103. Hi Kathryn, I’m with you on needing both hands for dog walking sometimes. That sounds like me with April! I can imagine an umbrella going flying when the dog suddenly veers off to investigate something exciting…

    Reply
  104. Hi Kathryn, I’m with you on needing both hands for dog walking sometimes. That sounds like me with April! I can imagine an umbrella going flying when the dog suddenly veers off to investigate something exciting…

    Reply
  105. Hi Kathryn, I’m with you on needing both hands for dog walking sometimes. That sounds like me with April! I can imagine an umbrella going flying when the dog suddenly veers off to investigate something exciting…

    Reply
  106. Annette, I do love the idea of running outside to dance in the rain when you’ve been in a drought. We don’t feel like that often around here!
    I also love your FEMA umbrella story. That is very touching.
    Interesting that your dog loves the towel. So does Angus, but April hates it and has to be bribed not to fight with it!

    Reply
  107. Annette, I do love the idea of running outside to dance in the rain when you’ve been in a drought. We don’t feel like that often around here!
    I also love your FEMA umbrella story. That is very touching.
    Interesting that your dog loves the towel. So does Angus, but April hates it and has to be bribed not to fight with it!

    Reply
  108. Annette, I do love the idea of running outside to dance in the rain when you’ve been in a drought. We don’t feel like that often around here!
    I also love your FEMA umbrella story. That is very touching.
    Interesting that your dog loves the towel. So does Angus, but April hates it and has to be bribed not to fight with it!

    Reply
  109. Annette, I do love the idea of running outside to dance in the rain when you’ve been in a drought. We don’t feel like that often around here!
    I also love your FEMA umbrella story. That is very touching.
    Interesting that your dog loves the towel. So does Angus, but April hates it and has to be bribed not to fight with it!

    Reply
  110. Annette, I do love the idea of running outside to dance in the rain when you’ve been in a drought. We don’t feel like that often around here!
    I also love your FEMA umbrella story. That is very touching.
    Interesting that your dog loves the towel. So does Angus, but April hates it and has to be bribed not to fight with it!

    Reply
  111. Vicki, you are so well prepared! Your hats sounds absolutely fabulous. I hadn’t heard of a fleece gaiter and looked it up. Turns out I have one although I’m not sure what it’s called here! Anyway, they are superb.

    Reply
  112. Vicki, you are so well prepared! Your hats sounds absolutely fabulous. I hadn’t heard of a fleece gaiter and looked it up. Turns out I have one although I’m not sure what it’s called here! Anyway, they are superb.

    Reply
  113. Vicki, you are so well prepared! Your hats sounds absolutely fabulous. I hadn’t heard of a fleece gaiter and looked it up. Turns out I have one although I’m not sure what it’s called here! Anyway, they are superb.

    Reply
  114. Vicki, you are so well prepared! Your hats sounds absolutely fabulous. I hadn’t heard of a fleece gaiter and looked it up. Turns out I have one although I’m not sure what it’s called here! Anyway, they are superb.

    Reply
  115. Vicki, you are so well prepared! Your hats sounds absolutely fabulous. I hadn’t heard of a fleece gaiter and looked it up. Turns out I have one although I’m not sure what it’s called here! Anyway, they are superb.

    Reply
  116. We are of one mind, Christina! I too have lined wellington boots although mine are Dunlop not Hunter. My last Hunter wellies I wore until they literally fell apart,I loved them so much. The cosiness of having a fur lining!

    Reply
  117. We are of one mind, Christina! I too have lined wellington boots although mine are Dunlop not Hunter. My last Hunter wellies I wore until they literally fell apart,I loved them so much. The cosiness of having a fur lining!

    Reply
  118. We are of one mind, Christina! I too have lined wellington boots although mine are Dunlop not Hunter. My last Hunter wellies I wore until they literally fell apart,I loved them so much. The cosiness of having a fur lining!

    Reply
  119. We are of one mind, Christina! I too have lined wellington boots although mine are Dunlop not Hunter. My last Hunter wellies I wore until they literally fell apart,I loved them so much. The cosiness of having a fur lining!

    Reply
  120. We are of one mind, Christina! I too have lined wellington boots although mine are Dunlop not Hunter. My last Hunter wellies I wore until they literally fell apart,I loved them so much. The cosiness of having a fur lining!

    Reply

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