What the Wenches are Reading in April!

Christina here to tell you what the Wenches have been reading this month – an eclectic mix as always! With all of us being in isolation, we’ve had plenty of time to dive into our TBR piles and we hope you have too. Have a look and see if anything appeals to you!

The Forgotten SisterI’ll start off with my own April favourites: First and foremost I had the pleasure of reading an advance copy of Wench Nicola’s upcoming release, The Forgotten Sister – published tomorrow! – a Tudor mystery and time slip (dual time) novel. I can safely say that this is one of the best books I have read in a long time! It has everything you want from a time slip story and it was utterly, utterly brilliant!!! Nicola has managed to intertwine the story of Amy Robsart (wife of Robert Dudley in Tudor times) so cleverly with the characters in the present. Robert is part of Queen Elizabeth I’s court and Amy doesn’t seem to figure much in his plans. She needs a way out of their loveless marriage and thinks she’s hit on the perfect solution – but has she? The present day heroine Lizzie has her own problems to contend with and when her life begins to echo the happenings of the past, she has to uncover a centuries old secret in order to move forward. I couldn’t put this down and the characters will stay in my mind for a long time.

Hidden LaneI don’t often read crime novels, but when I discovered that Clare Chase had a new cozy crime/mystery series out, I immediately read the first two, Mystery on Hidden Lane and Mystery at Apple Tree Cottage. These are set in a fictional village right by the UK’s Suffolk coast and from the lush descriptions I long to go there. The heroine, Eve, has a razor-sharp brain, but a soft manner and an innate kindness, making her the sort of woman you’d love to spend time with. She’s an American living in the UK and for a dog-lover like myself, it didn’t hurt that she has an adorable dachshund too.  She’s actually an obituary writer but she keeps stumbling over murders in this quiet backwater. And because she’s doing research for the obituaries she’s working on, she can’t help but put two and two together, which proves rather dangerous for her. Can’t wait for the next book in the series! And if you haven’t discovered Clare’s books already, her Tara Thorpe series, starting with Murder on the Marshes, is also wonderful (and has a little bit of romance too).

The Warsaw ProtocolFor a complete change, I read the latest Steve Berry book, The Warsaw Protocol, which featured his usual hero Cotton Malone, a former secret agent who’s supposed to be retired, but still ends up fighting the bad guys. These stories usually involve ancient treasure of some sort, which really appeals to me, and It’s always fun to see how he’s going to extricate himself from his latest assignment – this book was no exception.  Seven precious relics are stolen from museums and sanctuaries around the world and Cotton finds out they are connected with a private auction where incriminating information about the president of Poland will be offered for sale. Great for blackmailing a country situated between east and west, and seven nations all want to get their hands on these documents. I knew very little about Poland and it was great to find out a lot more about its history. Good plot, great pace and well-drawn characters. I really enjoyed it!

The spotted dogPat here: The Spotted Dog, Kerry Greenwood – I know we’ve recommended Kerry Greenwood (author of the Phryne Fischer mysteries) and her Corinna Chapman series half a dozen times or more, but how can one resist an Aussie baker with a hunky Israeli boyfriend and cats frolicking all over the landscape? This is cozy mystery at its best, with a kidnapped doggie, a ninja burglar, an accidental murder off screen, and lots of lovely food, plus recipes in the back. And even if cozy mysteries aren’t your thing, you can sit back and admire the wordsmithery of an author who can pull off lines like “interpersonal skills of activated mildew.” This is escapism at its finest. Sit back, relax, and just enjoy!

SwitchAnne here This month I've found myself reading more "women's fiction" — though there is a romance in each book. In February I talked about Beth O'Leary's The Flat Share, and this month I read her second book, The Switch, which I thoroughly enjoyed.

It's about Leena, a hot-shot London executive, struggling on the verge of a breakdown and ordered to take a two month holiday. Instead of heading off to Corfu or Bali, she ends up swapping places with her 79 year old, village-dwelling widowed grandmother. It's a delightful read about healing, connection, second chances and finding love, funny, touching and insightful. 

Next up is Jenny Colgan's — The Loveliest Chocolate Shop in Paris. I've been reading several of her books recently — they're enjoyable, pleasant, escape reads.

In this one, Anna Trent suffers an accident in the chocolate factory in which she works. In hospital she meets up with her old French teacher, Claire who arranges for Anna to work in Paris with her former sweetheart, Thierry, a master chocolatier. It's a story about healing, renewal, second chances, courage, love (old and new) and, of course, chocolate. Well worth reading.

DolciDiLoveBack in February, Pat inspired me to read Sarah-Kate Lynch's The Wedding Bees, and I went on to read several more books by her — Blessed Are and Dolci Di Love.

Blessed Are is set mostly in Ireland, on a farm where they make the most amazing cheese. It's a lighthearted, quirky, charming story with a little touch of Irish cheese-making magic, and a romance.

Dolci Di Love is set mostly in Tuscany. Unhappily childless wife turned Manhattan workaholic, Lily Turner, is gutted when she realizes that her husband of many years not only has been unfaithful, but has a child by another woman in Italy, where he visits regularly as part of his wine importing business. She sets out to track him down in Italy and confront him. 

Quoting from the book blurb — "But beneath the cobbled lanes of this charming hilltop village, an underground network of ancient widows is working tirelessly on finding her a happy ending – whether she wants it or not." It's part gorgeous travel story and part emotional journey about reconciliation, connection, forgiveness and the joy of baking.  But what lifts it from the ordinary is the ancient widows. Their interactions are delightful, and as a group, and as individuals, they have their own journey to make. Recommended.

Finally, I read Lisa Kleypas — Chasing Cassandra. Lisa Kleypas is an auto-buy for me, and as expected, I enjoyed it very much.

On PaperAndrea here: This has been an odd month of reading for me. I’ve had the final page proofs of my upcoming September Wrexford & Sloane mystery to read through one last time to doublecheck that the corrections made on the digital file went through without a hitch – and I’m a terrible proofreader, so it takes me ages! So to uncross my eyes, I spent much of my leisure time watching the delightful third season of Miss Fisher’s mysteries on video. (Highly recommended!)

That said, I did read a wonderfully erudite and entertaining non-fiction book on paper. In fact, the title is On Paper—the Everything of Its Two-Thousand-Year History by Nicholas Basbanes. In it, the author takes readers on a journey through hand papermaking in China and Japan, where modern day artisans still follow age-old methods, and then into a fascinating history of how paper made its way from the East around the world and how it influenced so many aspects of life. From hygiene and au courant fashion to economics, politics and pop culture, he also muses with both humor and insight on how it’s become elemental to human culture. I very much enjoyed it!

Star&ShamrockFrom Mary Jo:  I've read both new and old this past month!  A new book was The Star and the Shamrock by the Irish writer Jean Grainger. Set in Liverpool and Northern Ireland just before and during WWII, the story is about Elizabeth Klein, a nurse whose young husband died on the last day of WWI. The years since have been quiet and rather lonely, until she receives a letter from her late Jewish husband's cousin in Berlin. Ariella Bannon's husband had been taken by the Nazis and is probably dead, and she's terrified for her two young children because being Jewish in Germany is becoming increasingly dangerous.

The Kindertransport is beginning to send Jewish children from Germany to the UK, but Ariella can't bear to send her children to strangers, so she begs Elizabeth, a cousin by marriage whom she has never met, to take them in.

After her initial shock, Elizabeth agrees, and Liesl and Erich become part of her life. The bombing of Liverpool sends them to Elizabeth's childhood village in Northern Ireland. Her late mother had disowned Elizabeth for marrying a Jew, but the house is the only refuge for her and her foster children. She's glad to learn that a Jewish refugee camp has been established near the village so her children don't feel so isolated, but there is tension between the communities, and Elizabeth gradually becomes a bridge between them. 

This is a moving story of change, danger, and many kinds of love. I found it compelling as well as giving new insights into survival and hope in a world turned upside down.  

OnePerfectSummerNovakOne Perfect Summer is a recent release by veteran romance author Brenda Novak, who has expanded into women's fiction. True crime writer Serenity Alston had her DNA tested as a useful tool for her writing, and is startled to discover that she has two half-sisters. They'd been raised very differently, in different parts of the country, and they have no idea how they are related. 

Serenity suggests the sisters, plus a small niece, spend a week getting acquainted at her family's Lake Tahoe cabin. All three are dealing with challenging changes in their lives and there is some tension at first, but as they decide to stay all summer, they discover the power of sisterhood. I really enjoyed it, and wonder if there might be a sequel in the works. I'd like to spend more time with these characters!

StepBallChangeStep-Ball-Change by Jeanne Ray is one of my all-time favorites and I just finished a reread. It's narrated by Carolina McSwain, who has a dance studio in Raleigh, North Carolina, and for 42 years has been happily married to Tom, a public defender. All four of their kids have also become lawyers, even the youngest, George, who inherited the dance gene from his mother. 

The story starts when Carolina's only daughter, Kay, phones, sobbing uncontrollably. Carolina and her husband manage to extract the information that Kay has just become engaged to Trey, a scion of one of the richest and most powerful families in Raleigh. Then the other phone rings and it's Carolina's fashionable and rather snobbish younger sister, Taffy, also sobbing uncontrollably, although with better reason since her husband has just left her in favor of a junior executive younger than Taffy's daughter.

The sisters have never been close, but a devastated Taffy shows up on the doorstep the next day with far too much luggage and a hysterically crazed terrier named Stamp. The story is very funny and full of lively characters and evolving relationships, and it also ends with proof that sisterhood is powerful. Great fun. <G>

Christina again:

Hope you are all safe and well – and please add your own recommendations in the comments below as we need lots of wonderful stories to keep us going at the moment!

210 thoughts on “What the Wenches are Reading in April!”

  1. At the moment I’m reading The Elenium and the Tamuli series by David and Leigh Eddings. And I can’t wait to finally read Call It Magic by Janet Chapman! Only few more days until I can buy that ebook!

    Reply
  2. At the moment I’m reading The Elenium and the Tamuli series by David and Leigh Eddings. And I can’t wait to finally read Call It Magic by Janet Chapman! Only few more days until I can buy that ebook!

    Reply
  3. At the moment I’m reading The Elenium and the Tamuli series by David and Leigh Eddings. And I can’t wait to finally read Call It Magic by Janet Chapman! Only few more days until I can buy that ebook!

    Reply
  4. At the moment I’m reading The Elenium and the Tamuli series by David and Leigh Eddings. And I can’t wait to finally read Call It Magic by Janet Chapman! Only few more days until I can buy that ebook!

    Reply
  5. At the moment I’m reading The Elenium and the Tamuli series by David and Leigh Eddings. And I can’t wait to finally read Call It Magic by Janet Chapman! Only few more days until I can buy that ebook!

    Reply
  6. It’s very tempting, isn’t it? I’m trying to resist (but I’ll probably go and buy something later anyway ).

    Reply
  7. It’s very tempting, isn’t it? I’m trying to resist (but I’ll probably go and buy something later anyway ).

    Reply
  8. It’s very tempting, isn’t it? I’m trying to resist (but I’ll probably go and buy something later anyway ).

    Reply
  9. It’s very tempting, isn’t it? I’m trying to resist (but I’ll probably go and buy something later anyway ).

    Reply
  10. It’s very tempting, isn’t it? I’m trying to resist (but I’ll probably go and buy something later anyway ).

    Reply
  11. Among the books I read was a cozy mystery called Murder Once Removed. I’m a genealogist and that leaped into my hands last month when I bought books anticipating the sheltering in place order. (I only had 132 books in my TBR pile!) The protagonist, Lucy Lancaster, loves digging into the past to solve mysteries almost more than she loves tacos. When one of her cases connects to the murder of her best friend and mentor she must investigate. Even when she is cautioned by the handsome FBI Agent/History professor not to interfere with his case. I also read a historical mystery set in the 1920s. “A Subtle Murder” after being the only survivor of a bombing in India, Rose Breckenridge, leaves the country aboard the Star of India to return to England and receive her inheritance. One of her dinner companions is murdered and she is stalked by a mysterious Frenchman. The only WenchWerk I read this month is MJP’s novellas in “Wdding of the Century.

    Reply
  12. Among the books I read was a cozy mystery called Murder Once Removed. I’m a genealogist and that leaped into my hands last month when I bought books anticipating the sheltering in place order. (I only had 132 books in my TBR pile!) The protagonist, Lucy Lancaster, loves digging into the past to solve mysteries almost more than she loves tacos. When one of her cases connects to the murder of her best friend and mentor she must investigate. Even when she is cautioned by the handsome FBI Agent/History professor not to interfere with his case. I also read a historical mystery set in the 1920s. “A Subtle Murder” after being the only survivor of a bombing in India, Rose Breckenridge, leaves the country aboard the Star of India to return to England and receive her inheritance. One of her dinner companions is murdered and she is stalked by a mysterious Frenchman. The only WenchWerk I read this month is MJP’s novellas in “Wdding of the Century.

    Reply
  13. Among the books I read was a cozy mystery called Murder Once Removed. I’m a genealogist and that leaped into my hands last month when I bought books anticipating the sheltering in place order. (I only had 132 books in my TBR pile!) The protagonist, Lucy Lancaster, loves digging into the past to solve mysteries almost more than she loves tacos. When one of her cases connects to the murder of her best friend and mentor she must investigate. Even when she is cautioned by the handsome FBI Agent/History professor not to interfere with his case. I also read a historical mystery set in the 1920s. “A Subtle Murder” after being the only survivor of a bombing in India, Rose Breckenridge, leaves the country aboard the Star of India to return to England and receive her inheritance. One of her dinner companions is murdered and she is stalked by a mysterious Frenchman. The only WenchWerk I read this month is MJP’s novellas in “Wdding of the Century.

    Reply
  14. Among the books I read was a cozy mystery called Murder Once Removed. I’m a genealogist and that leaped into my hands last month when I bought books anticipating the sheltering in place order. (I only had 132 books in my TBR pile!) The protagonist, Lucy Lancaster, loves digging into the past to solve mysteries almost more than she loves tacos. When one of her cases connects to the murder of her best friend and mentor she must investigate. Even when she is cautioned by the handsome FBI Agent/History professor not to interfere with his case. I also read a historical mystery set in the 1920s. “A Subtle Murder” after being the only survivor of a bombing in India, Rose Breckenridge, leaves the country aboard the Star of India to return to England and receive her inheritance. One of her dinner companions is murdered and she is stalked by a mysterious Frenchman. The only WenchWerk I read this month is MJP’s novellas in “Wdding of the Century.

    Reply
  15. Among the books I read was a cozy mystery called Murder Once Removed. I’m a genealogist and that leaped into my hands last month when I bought books anticipating the sheltering in place order. (I only had 132 books in my TBR pile!) The protagonist, Lucy Lancaster, loves digging into the past to solve mysteries almost more than she loves tacos. When one of her cases connects to the murder of her best friend and mentor she must investigate. Even when she is cautioned by the handsome FBI Agent/History professor not to interfere with his case. I also read a historical mystery set in the 1920s. “A Subtle Murder” after being the only survivor of a bombing in India, Rose Breckenridge, leaves the country aboard the Star of India to return to England and receive her inheritance. One of her dinner companions is murdered and she is stalked by a mysterious Frenchman. The only WenchWerk I read this month is MJP’s novellas in “Wdding of the Century.

    Reply
  16. Thanks so much for the lovely mention! I absolutely loved your book, Echoes of the Runes, too Christina – the perfect escape at any time, and especially now. I’ve also been reading cosy/traditional mysteries lately, including A Very English Murder by Verity Bright, and (currently), Bad Day at the Vulture Club by Vaseem Khan, both of which I’d heartily recommend. x

    Reply
  17. Thanks so much for the lovely mention! I absolutely loved your book, Echoes of the Runes, too Christina – the perfect escape at any time, and especially now. I’ve also been reading cosy/traditional mysteries lately, including A Very English Murder by Verity Bright, and (currently), Bad Day at the Vulture Club by Vaseem Khan, both of which I’d heartily recommend. x

    Reply
  18. Thanks so much for the lovely mention! I absolutely loved your book, Echoes of the Runes, too Christina – the perfect escape at any time, and especially now. I’ve also been reading cosy/traditional mysteries lately, including A Very English Murder by Verity Bright, and (currently), Bad Day at the Vulture Club by Vaseem Khan, both of which I’d heartily recommend. x

    Reply
  19. Thanks so much for the lovely mention! I absolutely loved your book, Echoes of the Runes, too Christina – the perfect escape at any time, and especially now. I’ve also been reading cosy/traditional mysteries lately, including A Very English Murder by Verity Bright, and (currently), Bad Day at the Vulture Club by Vaseem Khan, both of which I’d heartily recommend. x

    Reply
  20. Thanks so much for the lovely mention! I absolutely loved your book, Echoes of the Runes, too Christina – the perfect escape at any time, and especially now. I’ve also been reading cosy/traditional mysteries lately, including A Very English Murder by Verity Bright, and (currently), Bad Day at the Vulture Club by Vaseem Khan, both of which I’d heartily recommend. x

    Reply
  21. I like the sound of those, especially the one involving genealogy! I only do it as a hobby but it’s extremely addictive. Thank you for telling us about these Pamela!

    Reply
  22. I like the sound of those, especially the one involving genealogy! I only do it as a hobby but it’s extremely addictive. Thank you for telling us about these Pamela!

    Reply
  23. I like the sound of those, especially the one involving genealogy! I only do it as a hobby but it’s extremely addictive. Thank you for telling us about these Pamela!

    Reply
  24. I like the sound of those, especially the one involving genealogy! I only do it as a hobby but it’s extremely addictive. Thank you for telling us about these Pamela!

    Reply
  25. I like the sound of those, especially the one involving genealogy! I only do it as a hobby but it’s extremely addictive. Thank you for telling us about these Pamela!

    Reply
  26. I really look forward to your monthly reads blog. Unfortunately, some of the authors aren’t readily available in the States. Since the public library system is presently on shutdown, I can’t depend on interlibrary loan. Even though I have access to three eLibraries, they also don’t carry many of these authors. And at this time, I don’t want to purchase more titles,..I still have 100s on the TBR pile!
    That being said, I am reading my way through CJ Box’s Joe Pickett mystery series…on #15 at the moment. Next on the tarmac is the Patricia Veryan books.

    Reply
  27. I really look forward to your monthly reads blog. Unfortunately, some of the authors aren’t readily available in the States. Since the public library system is presently on shutdown, I can’t depend on interlibrary loan. Even though I have access to three eLibraries, they also don’t carry many of these authors. And at this time, I don’t want to purchase more titles,..I still have 100s on the TBR pile!
    That being said, I am reading my way through CJ Box’s Joe Pickett mystery series…on #15 at the moment. Next on the tarmac is the Patricia Veryan books.

    Reply
  28. I really look forward to your monthly reads blog. Unfortunately, some of the authors aren’t readily available in the States. Since the public library system is presently on shutdown, I can’t depend on interlibrary loan. Even though I have access to three eLibraries, they also don’t carry many of these authors. And at this time, I don’t want to purchase more titles,..I still have 100s on the TBR pile!
    That being said, I am reading my way through CJ Box’s Joe Pickett mystery series…on #15 at the moment. Next on the tarmac is the Patricia Veryan books.

    Reply
  29. I really look forward to your monthly reads blog. Unfortunately, some of the authors aren’t readily available in the States. Since the public library system is presently on shutdown, I can’t depend on interlibrary loan. Even though I have access to three eLibraries, they also don’t carry many of these authors. And at this time, I don’t want to purchase more titles,..I still have 100s on the TBR pile!
    That being said, I am reading my way through CJ Box’s Joe Pickett mystery series…on #15 at the moment. Next on the tarmac is the Patricia Veryan books.

    Reply
  30. I really look forward to your monthly reads blog. Unfortunately, some of the authors aren’t readily available in the States. Since the public library system is presently on shutdown, I can’t depend on interlibrary loan. Even though I have access to three eLibraries, they also don’t carry many of these authors. And at this time, I don’t want to purchase more titles,..I still have 100s on the TBR pile!
    That being said, I am reading my way through CJ Box’s Joe Pickett mystery series…on #15 at the moment. Next on the tarmac is the Patricia Veryan books.

    Reply
  31. Goodness, guys! I have written down more authors and titles than usual from your what I’m reading list. I always enjoy the ones that sound appealing and read them, but today there are more than usual. I will look them all up, and check my 2 library systems (for when they open up again) that both seem to still be adding titles. For ones I don’t find, I quite often buy. Lots of good suggestions here.

    Reply
  32. Goodness, guys! I have written down more authors and titles than usual from your what I’m reading list. I always enjoy the ones that sound appealing and read them, but today there are more than usual. I will look them all up, and check my 2 library systems (for when they open up again) that both seem to still be adding titles. For ones I don’t find, I quite often buy. Lots of good suggestions here.

    Reply
  33. Goodness, guys! I have written down more authors and titles than usual from your what I’m reading list. I always enjoy the ones that sound appealing and read them, but today there are more than usual. I will look them all up, and check my 2 library systems (for when they open up again) that both seem to still be adding titles. For ones I don’t find, I quite often buy. Lots of good suggestions here.

    Reply
  34. Goodness, guys! I have written down more authors and titles than usual from your what I’m reading list. I always enjoy the ones that sound appealing and read them, but today there are more than usual. I will look them all up, and check my 2 library systems (for when they open up again) that both seem to still be adding titles. For ones I don’t find, I quite often buy. Lots of good suggestions here.

    Reply
  35. Goodness, guys! I have written down more authors and titles than usual from your what I’m reading list. I always enjoy the ones that sound appealing and read them, but today there are more than usual. I will look them all up, and check my 2 library systems (for when they open up again) that both seem to still be adding titles. For ones I don’t find, I quite often buy. Lots of good suggestions here.

    Reply
  36. Great debut blog Christina!
    I like time slips and am fascinated by the Tudors so Nicola’s latest will be destined for my audio library when I clear some of the backlog …. especially after the glowing recommendation.
    Apart from wading through the debris of my stock market investments, this month I have been reading more technical stuff. Paul Davis’s ‘The Demon in the Machine’ describes ideas for explaining how living matter differs from inanimate matter through ‘information flow’ and is written for the general reader …. highly recommended but needs concentration.
    For fiction I have really enjoyed two audio books by Laura Kinsale. ‘Midsummer Moon’ involves a lady inventor obsessed with developing a flying machine and ‘Flowers from the storm’ involves a male mathematician, condemned to an asylum who is rescued (eventually!) by the heroine. Nicholas Boulton narrates all of Kinsale’s audio books and is excellent. I read that he was chosen particularly by the author.Curiously I believe that most authors have no say in who their publisher selects for narration so Kinsale must have special qualities …. certainly excellent audio books!

    Reply
  37. Great debut blog Christina!
    I like time slips and am fascinated by the Tudors so Nicola’s latest will be destined for my audio library when I clear some of the backlog …. especially after the glowing recommendation.
    Apart from wading through the debris of my stock market investments, this month I have been reading more technical stuff. Paul Davis’s ‘The Demon in the Machine’ describes ideas for explaining how living matter differs from inanimate matter through ‘information flow’ and is written for the general reader …. highly recommended but needs concentration.
    For fiction I have really enjoyed two audio books by Laura Kinsale. ‘Midsummer Moon’ involves a lady inventor obsessed with developing a flying machine and ‘Flowers from the storm’ involves a male mathematician, condemned to an asylum who is rescued (eventually!) by the heroine. Nicholas Boulton narrates all of Kinsale’s audio books and is excellent. I read that he was chosen particularly by the author.Curiously I believe that most authors have no say in who their publisher selects for narration so Kinsale must have special qualities …. certainly excellent audio books!

    Reply
  38. Great debut blog Christina!
    I like time slips and am fascinated by the Tudors so Nicola’s latest will be destined for my audio library when I clear some of the backlog …. especially after the glowing recommendation.
    Apart from wading through the debris of my stock market investments, this month I have been reading more technical stuff. Paul Davis’s ‘The Demon in the Machine’ describes ideas for explaining how living matter differs from inanimate matter through ‘information flow’ and is written for the general reader …. highly recommended but needs concentration.
    For fiction I have really enjoyed two audio books by Laura Kinsale. ‘Midsummer Moon’ involves a lady inventor obsessed with developing a flying machine and ‘Flowers from the storm’ involves a male mathematician, condemned to an asylum who is rescued (eventually!) by the heroine. Nicholas Boulton narrates all of Kinsale’s audio books and is excellent. I read that he was chosen particularly by the author.Curiously I believe that most authors have no say in who their publisher selects for narration so Kinsale must have special qualities …. certainly excellent audio books!

    Reply
  39. Great debut blog Christina!
    I like time slips and am fascinated by the Tudors so Nicola’s latest will be destined for my audio library when I clear some of the backlog …. especially after the glowing recommendation.
    Apart from wading through the debris of my stock market investments, this month I have been reading more technical stuff. Paul Davis’s ‘The Demon in the Machine’ describes ideas for explaining how living matter differs from inanimate matter through ‘information flow’ and is written for the general reader …. highly recommended but needs concentration.
    For fiction I have really enjoyed two audio books by Laura Kinsale. ‘Midsummer Moon’ involves a lady inventor obsessed with developing a flying machine and ‘Flowers from the storm’ involves a male mathematician, condemned to an asylum who is rescued (eventually!) by the heroine. Nicholas Boulton narrates all of Kinsale’s audio books and is excellent. I read that he was chosen particularly by the author.Curiously I believe that most authors have no say in who their publisher selects for narration so Kinsale must have special qualities …. certainly excellent audio books!

    Reply
  40. Great debut blog Christina!
    I like time slips and am fascinated by the Tudors so Nicola’s latest will be destined for my audio library when I clear some of the backlog …. especially after the glowing recommendation.
    Apart from wading through the debris of my stock market investments, this month I have been reading more technical stuff. Paul Davis’s ‘The Demon in the Machine’ describes ideas for explaining how living matter differs from inanimate matter through ‘information flow’ and is written for the general reader …. highly recommended but needs concentration.
    For fiction I have really enjoyed two audio books by Laura Kinsale. ‘Midsummer Moon’ involves a lady inventor obsessed with developing a flying machine and ‘Flowers from the storm’ involves a male mathematician, condemned to an asylum who is rescued (eventually!) by the heroine. Nicholas Boulton narrates all of Kinsale’s audio books and is excellent. I read that he was chosen particularly by the author.Curiously I believe that most authors have no say in who their publisher selects for narration so Kinsale must have special qualities …. certainly excellent audio books!

    Reply
  41. Many thanks,Clare – so glad you enjoyed it! And thank you for those recommendations, cosy mysteries are always great!

    Reply
  42. Many thanks,Clare – so glad you enjoyed it! And thank you for those recommendations, cosy mysteries are always great!

    Reply
  43. Many thanks,Clare – so glad you enjoyed it! And thank you for those recommendations, cosy mysteries are always great!

    Reply
  44. Many thanks,Clare – so glad you enjoyed it! And thank you for those recommendations, cosy mysteries are always great!

    Reply
  45. Many thanks,Clare – so glad you enjoyed it! And thank you for those recommendations, cosy mysteries are always great!

    Reply
  46. You’re right, Linda, it is a bit tricky with the wenches being on three different continents! But hopefully all the titles should become available in the not too distant future and we look forward to being able to use the libraries again too. Thank you for the recommendation!

    Reply
  47. You’re right, Linda, it is a bit tricky with the wenches being on three different continents! But hopefully all the titles should become available in the not too distant future and we look forward to being able to use the libraries again too. Thank you for the recommendation!

    Reply
  48. You’re right, Linda, it is a bit tricky with the wenches being on three different continents! But hopefully all the titles should become available in the not too distant future and we look forward to being able to use the libraries again too. Thank you for the recommendation!

    Reply
  49. You’re right, Linda, it is a bit tricky with the wenches being on three different continents! But hopefully all the titles should become available in the not too distant future and we look forward to being able to use the libraries again too. Thank you for the recommendation!

    Reply
  50. You’re right, Linda, it is a bit tricky with the wenches being on three different continents! But hopefully all the titles should become available in the not too distant future and we look forward to being able to use the libraries again too. Thank you for the recommendation!

    Reply
  51. Thank you very much, I’m really pleased you enjoyed the blog post! That non-fiction book sounds interesting but I’m not sure I have the right concentration levels at the moment. For Laura Kinsale though – definitely! Great recommendations!
    As regards audio books, I believe some authors get to choose between a couple of narrators – depends on the publisher. I was lucky enough to be allocated a wonderful narrator who I got on with really well. (We had long discussions about the pronunciation of Old Norse words :-D)

    Reply
  52. Thank you very much, I’m really pleased you enjoyed the blog post! That non-fiction book sounds interesting but I’m not sure I have the right concentration levels at the moment. For Laura Kinsale though – definitely! Great recommendations!
    As regards audio books, I believe some authors get to choose between a couple of narrators – depends on the publisher. I was lucky enough to be allocated a wonderful narrator who I got on with really well. (We had long discussions about the pronunciation of Old Norse words :-D)

    Reply
  53. Thank you very much, I’m really pleased you enjoyed the blog post! That non-fiction book sounds interesting but I’m not sure I have the right concentration levels at the moment. For Laura Kinsale though – definitely! Great recommendations!
    As regards audio books, I believe some authors get to choose between a couple of narrators – depends on the publisher. I was lucky enough to be allocated a wonderful narrator who I got on with really well. (We had long discussions about the pronunciation of Old Norse words :-D)

    Reply
  54. Thank you very much, I’m really pleased you enjoyed the blog post! That non-fiction book sounds interesting but I’m not sure I have the right concentration levels at the moment. For Laura Kinsale though – definitely! Great recommendations!
    As regards audio books, I believe some authors get to choose between a couple of narrators – depends on the publisher. I was lucky enough to be allocated a wonderful narrator who I got on with really well. (We had long discussions about the pronunciation of Old Norse words :-D)

    Reply
  55. Thank you very much, I’m really pleased you enjoyed the blog post! That non-fiction book sounds interesting but I’m not sure I have the right concentration levels at the moment. For Laura Kinsale though – definitely! Great recommendations!
    As regards audio books, I believe some authors get to choose between a couple of narrators – depends on the publisher. I was lucky enough to be allocated a wonderful narrator who I got on with really well. (We had long discussions about the pronunciation of Old Norse words :-D)

    Reply
  56. This month has mainly been a rereading month. I’ve reread lots of Jo Goodman (Bitter Springs Series), Jayne Ann Krentz, a couple of Mary Jo’s. One of Joanna’s. My most favorite Carolyn Brown. So on and so forth. Books I can pick up and put down which I know my “I can’t decide what to read mood” won’t destroy.
    I’d never read any of Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Phryne Fisher books but ended up with a book containing the 1st 3 in the series – Cocaine Blues, Flying Too High & Murder on the Ballarat Train. Really enjoyed them, especially being able to read them back to back. Now I just have to wait for the library to reopen so I can continue the series! They do have all the books which is exciting.

    Reply
  57. This month has mainly been a rereading month. I’ve reread lots of Jo Goodman (Bitter Springs Series), Jayne Ann Krentz, a couple of Mary Jo’s. One of Joanna’s. My most favorite Carolyn Brown. So on and so forth. Books I can pick up and put down which I know my “I can’t decide what to read mood” won’t destroy.
    I’d never read any of Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Phryne Fisher books but ended up with a book containing the 1st 3 in the series – Cocaine Blues, Flying Too High & Murder on the Ballarat Train. Really enjoyed them, especially being able to read them back to back. Now I just have to wait for the library to reopen so I can continue the series! They do have all the books which is exciting.

    Reply
  58. This month has mainly been a rereading month. I’ve reread lots of Jo Goodman (Bitter Springs Series), Jayne Ann Krentz, a couple of Mary Jo’s. One of Joanna’s. My most favorite Carolyn Brown. So on and so forth. Books I can pick up and put down which I know my “I can’t decide what to read mood” won’t destroy.
    I’d never read any of Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Phryne Fisher books but ended up with a book containing the 1st 3 in the series – Cocaine Blues, Flying Too High & Murder on the Ballarat Train. Really enjoyed them, especially being able to read them back to back. Now I just have to wait for the library to reopen so I can continue the series! They do have all the books which is exciting.

    Reply
  59. This month has mainly been a rereading month. I’ve reread lots of Jo Goodman (Bitter Springs Series), Jayne Ann Krentz, a couple of Mary Jo’s. One of Joanna’s. My most favorite Carolyn Brown. So on and so forth. Books I can pick up and put down which I know my “I can’t decide what to read mood” won’t destroy.
    I’d never read any of Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Phryne Fisher books but ended up with a book containing the 1st 3 in the series – Cocaine Blues, Flying Too High & Murder on the Ballarat Train. Really enjoyed them, especially being able to read them back to back. Now I just have to wait for the library to reopen so I can continue the series! They do have all the books which is exciting.

    Reply
  60. This month has mainly been a rereading month. I’ve reread lots of Jo Goodman (Bitter Springs Series), Jayne Ann Krentz, a couple of Mary Jo’s. One of Joanna’s. My most favorite Carolyn Brown. So on and so forth. Books I can pick up and put down which I know my “I can’t decide what to read mood” won’t destroy.
    I’d never read any of Kerry Greenwood’s Miss Phryne Fisher books but ended up with a book containing the 1st 3 in the series – Cocaine Blues, Flying Too High & Murder on the Ballarat Train. Really enjoyed them, especially being able to read them back to back. Now I just have to wait for the library to reopen so I can continue the series! They do have all the books which is exciting.

    Reply
  61. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk, book five in the DCI Logan Crime Thrillers series. It dropped to my Paperwhite on Monday but today is the first day I can really read it with few distractions.

    Reply
  62. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk, book five in the DCI Logan Crime Thrillers series. It dropped to my Paperwhite on Monday but today is the first day I can really read it with few distractions.

    Reply
  63. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk, book five in the DCI Logan Crime Thrillers series. It dropped to my Paperwhite on Monday but today is the first day I can really read it with few distractions.

    Reply
  64. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk, book five in the DCI Logan Crime Thrillers series. It dropped to my Paperwhite on Monday but today is the first day I can really read it with few distractions.

    Reply
  65. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk, book five in the DCI Logan Crime Thrillers series. It dropped to my Paperwhite on Monday but today is the first day I can really read it with few distractions.

    Reply
  66. Laura Kinsale is an auto-buy for me, Quantum. If you haven’t yet read it, you might enjoy her Flowers from the Storm, which is about a mathematician. And a madhouse. A stunner of a book, IMO.
    As for authors getting to choose audio book narrators, I think it depends on the author, their editor and publisher — some are more open to author input than others. Could also be that after the first one narrated by Nicholas Boulton, she asked that he read all her books.

    Reply
  67. Laura Kinsale is an auto-buy for me, Quantum. If you haven’t yet read it, you might enjoy her Flowers from the Storm, which is about a mathematician. And a madhouse. A stunner of a book, IMO.
    As for authors getting to choose audio book narrators, I think it depends on the author, their editor and publisher — some are more open to author input than others. Could also be that after the first one narrated by Nicholas Boulton, she asked that he read all her books.

    Reply
  68. Laura Kinsale is an auto-buy for me, Quantum. If you haven’t yet read it, you might enjoy her Flowers from the Storm, which is about a mathematician. And a madhouse. A stunner of a book, IMO.
    As for authors getting to choose audio book narrators, I think it depends on the author, their editor and publisher — some are more open to author input than others. Could also be that after the first one narrated by Nicholas Boulton, she asked that he read all her books.

    Reply
  69. Laura Kinsale is an auto-buy for me, Quantum. If you haven’t yet read it, you might enjoy her Flowers from the Storm, which is about a mathematician. And a madhouse. A stunner of a book, IMO.
    As for authors getting to choose audio book narrators, I think it depends on the author, their editor and publisher — some are more open to author input than others. Could also be that after the first one narrated by Nicholas Boulton, she asked that he read all her books.

    Reply
  70. Laura Kinsale is an auto-buy for me, Quantum. If you haven’t yet read it, you might enjoy her Flowers from the Storm, which is about a mathematician. And a madhouse. A stunner of a book, IMO.
    As for authors getting to choose audio book narrators, I think it depends on the author, their editor and publisher — some are more open to author input than others. Could also be that after the first one narrated by Nicholas Boulton, she asked that he read all her books.

    Reply
  71. Vicki, yes, I’m rereading a lot of old faves, too. I’m glad your library has all the Phrynne Fisher books. When you get a chance, try her “Corinna” series — it’s a different kind of series to Miss Fisher — contemporary, rather than historical and more “real.” They’re my favorites of Kerry Greenwood’s books.

    Reply
  72. Vicki, yes, I’m rereading a lot of old faves, too. I’m glad your library has all the Phrynne Fisher books. When you get a chance, try her “Corinna” series — it’s a different kind of series to Miss Fisher — contemporary, rather than historical and more “real.” They’re my favorites of Kerry Greenwood’s books.

    Reply
  73. Vicki, yes, I’m rereading a lot of old faves, too. I’m glad your library has all the Phrynne Fisher books. When you get a chance, try her “Corinna” series — it’s a different kind of series to Miss Fisher — contemporary, rather than historical and more “real.” They’re my favorites of Kerry Greenwood’s books.

    Reply
  74. Vicki, yes, I’m rereading a lot of old faves, too. I’m glad your library has all the Phrynne Fisher books. When you get a chance, try her “Corinna” series — it’s a different kind of series to Miss Fisher — contemporary, rather than historical and more “real.” They’re my favorites of Kerry Greenwood’s books.

    Reply
  75. Vicki, yes, I’m rereading a lot of old faves, too. I’m glad your library has all the Phrynne Fisher books. When you get a chance, try her “Corinna” series — it’s a different kind of series to Miss Fisher — contemporary, rather than historical and more “real.” They’re my favorites of Kerry Greenwood’s books.

    Reply
  76. Linda, it’s infuriating, isn’t it, this false geographical restriction of e-books. It’s the same for us downunder — so many books from the US are not available to us. Makes no sense to me, when the internet is world wide and there’s no shipping cost involved with e-books!
    And it’s not just readers who suffer — authors whose books are kept from readers for no reason other than geography and publishers’ private agreements lose so much potential income.

    Reply
  77. Linda, it’s infuriating, isn’t it, this false geographical restriction of e-books. It’s the same for us downunder — so many books from the US are not available to us. Makes no sense to me, when the internet is world wide and there’s no shipping cost involved with e-books!
    And it’s not just readers who suffer — authors whose books are kept from readers for no reason other than geography and publishers’ private agreements lose so much potential income.

    Reply
  78. Linda, it’s infuriating, isn’t it, this false geographical restriction of e-books. It’s the same for us downunder — so many books from the US are not available to us. Makes no sense to me, when the internet is world wide and there’s no shipping cost involved with e-books!
    And it’s not just readers who suffer — authors whose books are kept from readers for no reason other than geography and publishers’ private agreements lose so much potential income.

    Reply
  79. Linda, it’s infuriating, isn’t it, this false geographical restriction of e-books. It’s the same for us downunder — so many books from the US are not available to us. Makes no sense to me, when the internet is world wide and there’s no shipping cost involved with e-books!
    And it’s not just readers who suffer — authors whose books are kept from readers for no reason other than geography and publishers’ private agreements lose so much potential income.

    Reply
  80. Linda, it’s infuriating, isn’t it, this false geographical restriction of e-books. It’s the same for us downunder — so many books from the US are not available to us. Makes no sense to me, when the internet is world wide and there’s no shipping cost involved with e-books!
    And it’s not just readers who suffer — authors whose books are kept from readers for no reason other than geography and publishers’ private agreements lose so much potential income.

    Reply
  81. You did brilliantly on your first blog, Christina — congratulations!
    I’ve also bought the first in the Clare Chase series. Thank you. That’s the danger of these WWR posts — so many of us are addicted to reading.

    Reply
  82. You did brilliantly on your first blog, Christina — congratulations!
    I’ve also bought the first in the Clare Chase series. Thank you. That’s the danger of these WWR posts — so many of us are addicted to reading.

    Reply
  83. You did brilliantly on your first blog, Christina — congratulations!
    I’ve also bought the first in the Clare Chase series. Thank you. That’s the danger of these WWR posts — so many of us are addicted to reading.

    Reply
  84. You did brilliantly on your first blog, Christina — congratulations!
    I’ve also bought the first in the Clare Chase series. Thank you. That’s the danger of these WWR posts — so many of us are addicted to reading.

    Reply
  85. You did brilliantly on your first blog, Christina — congratulations!
    I’ve also bought the first in the Clare Chase series. Thank you. That’s the danger of these WWR posts — so many of us are addicted to reading.

    Reply
  86. Thank you Anne – all thanks to your great advice! And I’m very tempted by Dolci di Love and quite a few of the other recommendations too – this is definitely dangerous

    Reply
  87. Thank you Anne – all thanks to your great advice! And I’m very tempted by Dolci di Love and quite a few of the other recommendations too – this is definitely dangerous

    Reply
  88. Thank you Anne – all thanks to your great advice! And I’m very tempted by Dolci di Love and quite a few of the other recommendations too – this is definitely dangerous

    Reply
  89. Thank you Anne – all thanks to your great advice! And I’m very tempted by Dolci di Love and quite a few of the other recommendations too – this is definitely dangerous

    Reply
  90. Thank you Anne – all thanks to your great advice! And I’m very tempted by Dolci di Love and quite a few of the other recommendations too – this is definitely dangerous

    Reply
  91. I enjoy the monthly reading list as it gives me new authors to look for and try. Being home alone now has given me so much time to catch up on my bookshelves of books waiting for my eyes to page thru. I jump from mysteries, to Historic and contemporary romance – depending on my mood. I have been reading some of the series that I had stocked up waiting for the last books – Kleypas, Maclean, Balogh, Bowen as well as Once a Spy and Weddings of the Century by Mary Jo Putney. Right now I am on a contemporary kick for the books by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward. Just started reading The Flatshare by O’Leary.
    It has been chilly here and raining so what better to do than sit at home and read. Spring is slow here.

    Reply
  92. I enjoy the monthly reading list as it gives me new authors to look for and try. Being home alone now has given me so much time to catch up on my bookshelves of books waiting for my eyes to page thru. I jump from mysteries, to Historic and contemporary romance – depending on my mood. I have been reading some of the series that I had stocked up waiting for the last books – Kleypas, Maclean, Balogh, Bowen as well as Once a Spy and Weddings of the Century by Mary Jo Putney. Right now I am on a contemporary kick for the books by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward. Just started reading The Flatshare by O’Leary.
    It has been chilly here and raining so what better to do than sit at home and read. Spring is slow here.

    Reply
  93. I enjoy the monthly reading list as it gives me new authors to look for and try. Being home alone now has given me so much time to catch up on my bookshelves of books waiting for my eyes to page thru. I jump from mysteries, to Historic and contemporary romance – depending on my mood. I have been reading some of the series that I had stocked up waiting for the last books – Kleypas, Maclean, Balogh, Bowen as well as Once a Spy and Weddings of the Century by Mary Jo Putney. Right now I am on a contemporary kick for the books by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward. Just started reading The Flatshare by O’Leary.
    It has been chilly here and raining so what better to do than sit at home and read. Spring is slow here.

    Reply
  94. I enjoy the monthly reading list as it gives me new authors to look for and try. Being home alone now has given me so much time to catch up on my bookshelves of books waiting for my eyes to page thru. I jump from mysteries, to Historic and contemporary romance – depending on my mood. I have been reading some of the series that I had stocked up waiting for the last books – Kleypas, Maclean, Balogh, Bowen as well as Once a Spy and Weddings of the Century by Mary Jo Putney. Right now I am on a contemporary kick for the books by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward. Just started reading The Flatshare by O’Leary.
    It has been chilly here and raining so what better to do than sit at home and read. Spring is slow here.

    Reply
  95. I enjoy the monthly reading list as it gives me new authors to look for and try. Being home alone now has given me so much time to catch up on my bookshelves of books waiting for my eyes to page thru. I jump from mysteries, to Historic and contemporary romance – depending on my mood. I have been reading some of the series that I had stocked up waiting for the last books – Kleypas, Maclean, Balogh, Bowen as well as Once a Spy and Weddings of the Century by Mary Jo Putney. Right now I am on a contemporary kick for the books by Vi Keeland and Penelope Ward. Just started reading The Flatshare by O’Leary.
    It has been chilly here and raining so what better to do than sit at home and read. Spring is slow here.

    Reply
  96. Quantum–many audiobooks are done by subright contracting from the publisher so the author generally has no input. Laura Kinsale produced and paid for all those audiobooks herself, and she spent a long time searching for the right narrator. (Isn’t Nicholas Boulton AMAZING?) There are many audio editions of my books that were commissioned by my publishers, but recently I’ve started producing audio editions of my older backlist titles. Finding a great narrator is NOT easy! I did three audiosbooks with other narrators before I found Siobhan Waring, and having found her, I’m not letting her go!

    Reply
  97. Quantum–many audiobooks are done by subright contracting from the publisher so the author generally has no input. Laura Kinsale produced and paid for all those audiobooks herself, and she spent a long time searching for the right narrator. (Isn’t Nicholas Boulton AMAZING?) There are many audio editions of my books that were commissioned by my publishers, but recently I’ve started producing audio editions of my older backlist titles. Finding a great narrator is NOT easy! I did three audiosbooks with other narrators before I found Siobhan Waring, and having found her, I’m not letting her go!

    Reply
  98. Quantum–many audiobooks are done by subright contracting from the publisher so the author generally has no input. Laura Kinsale produced and paid for all those audiobooks herself, and she spent a long time searching for the right narrator. (Isn’t Nicholas Boulton AMAZING?) There are many audio editions of my books that were commissioned by my publishers, but recently I’ve started producing audio editions of my older backlist titles. Finding a great narrator is NOT easy! I did three audiosbooks with other narrators before I found Siobhan Waring, and having found her, I’m not letting her go!

    Reply
  99. Quantum–many audiobooks are done by subright contracting from the publisher so the author generally has no input. Laura Kinsale produced and paid for all those audiobooks herself, and she spent a long time searching for the right narrator. (Isn’t Nicholas Boulton AMAZING?) There are many audio editions of my books that were commissioned by my publishers, but recently I’ve started producing audio editions of my older backlist titles. Finding a great narrator is NOT easy! I did three audiosbooks with other narrators before I found Siobhan Waring, and having found her, I’m not letting her go!

    Reply
  100. Quantum–many audiobooks are done by subright contracting from the publisher so the author generally has no input. Laura Kinsale produced and paid for all those audiobooks herself, and she spent a long time searching for the right narrator. (Isn’t Nicholas Boulton AMAZING?) There are many audio editions of my books that were commissioned by my publishers, but recently I’ve started producing audio editions of my older backlist titles. Finding a great narrator is NOT easy! I did three audiosbooks with other narrators before I found Siobhan Waring, and having found her, I’m not letting her go!

    Reply
  101. It is definitely a good time for reading, Margot! I like jumping between genres too and there is so much choice out there!

    Reply
  102. It is definitely a good time for reading, Margot! I like jumping between genres too and there is so much choice out there!

    Reply
  103. It is definitely a good time for reading, Margot! I like jumping between genres too and there is so much choice out there!

    Reply
  104. It is definitely a good time for reading, Margot! I like jumping between genres too and there is so much choice out there!

    Reply
  105. It is definitely a good time for reading, Margot! I like jumping between genres too and there is so much choice out there!

    Reply
  106. I’ve been going through my bookcase and doing a lot of re-reading. I’ve gone through most of C.S. Harris’ backlist of Sebastian St. Cyr books and am now reading her new one. I’ve been reading my old Dick Francis books (he is just so great) and I’ve read the new C.J Box book, Endangered. His descriptions of Wyoming make me long to live there. But then he talks about the weather and ….maybe a trip in the summer would suffice. My plan is to re-read some of PD James old books. I have read a new book – Olive Again by Elizabeth Stout. Really good -beautiful writing. I’m definitely going to try The Forgotten Sisters, I’ll look for Clare Chase (I love English cozies) and The Spotted Dog. Any book with a dog is worth reading. Thanks for the suggestions. Joan

    Reply
  107. I’ve been going through my bookcase and doing a lot of re-reading. I’ve gone through most of C.S. Harris’ backlist of Sebastian St. Cyr books and am now reading her new one. I’ve been reading my old Dick Francis books (he is just so great) and I’ve read the new C.J Box book, Endangered. His descriptions of Wyoming make me long to live there. But then he talks about the weather and ….maybe a trip in the summer would suffice. My plan is to re-read some of PD James old books. I have read a new book – Olive Again by Elizabeth Stout. Really good -beautiful writing. I’m definitely going to try The Forgotten Sisters, I’ll look for Clare Chase (I love English cozies) and The Spotted Dog. Any book with a dog is worth reading. Thanks for the suggestions. Joan

    Reply
  108. I’ve been going through my bookcase and doing a lot of re-reading. I’ve gone through most of C.S. Harris’ backlist of Sebastian St. Cyr books and am now reading her new one. I’ve been reading my old Dick Francis books (he is just so great) and I’ve read the new C.J Box book, Endangered. His descriptions of Wyoming make me long to live there. But then he talks about the weather and ….maybe a trip in the summer would suffice. My plan is to re-read some of PD James old books. I have read a new book – Olive Again by Elizabeth Stout. Really good -beautiful writing. I’m definitely going to try The Forgotten Sisters, I’ll look for Clare Chase (I love English cozies) and The Spotted Dog. Any book with a dog is worth reading. Thanks for the suggestions. Joan

    Reply
  109. I’ve been going through my bookcase and doing a lot of re-reading. I’ve gone through most of C.S. Harris’ backlist of Sebastian St. Cyr books and am now reading her new one. I’ve been reading my old Dick Francis books (he is just so great) and I’ve read the new C.J Box book, Endangered. His descriptions of Wyoming make me long to live there. But then he talks about the weather and ….maybe a trip in the summer would suffice. My plan is to re-read some of PD James old books. I have read a new book – Olive Again by Elizabeth Stout. Really good -beautiful writing. I’m definitely going to try The Forgotten Sisters, I’ll look for Clare Chase (I love English cozies) and The Spotted Dog. Any book with a dog is worth reading. Thanks for the suggestions. Joan

    Reply
  110. I’ve been going through my bookcase and doing a lot of re-reading. I’ve gone through most of C.S. Harris’ backlist of Sebastian St. Cyr books and am now reading her new one. I’ve been reading my old Dick Francis books (he is just so great) and I’ve read the new C.J Box book, Endangered. His descriptions of Wyoming make me long to live there. But then he talks about the weather and ….maybe a trip in the summer would suffice. My plan is to re-read some of PD James old books. I have read a new book – Olive Again by Elizabeth Stout. Really good -beautiful writing. I’m definitely going to try The Forgotten Sisters, I’ll look for Clare Chase (I love English cozies) and The Spotted Dog. Any book with a dog is worth reading. Thanks for the suggestions. Joan

    Reply
  111. I love when the What We’re Reading blog comes out. So many great new ideas! I just finished Nicola’s House of Shadows. What a great read & highly recommended.

    Reply
  112. I love when the What We’re Reading blog comes out. So many great new ideas! I just finished Nicola’s House of Shadows. What a great read & highly recommended.

    Reply
  113. I love when the What We’re Reading blog comes out. So many great new ideas! I just finished Nicola’s House of Shadows. What a great read & highly recommended.

    Reply
  114. I love when the What We’re Reading blog comes out. So many great new ideas! I just finished Nicola’s House of Shadows. What a great read & highly recommended.

    Reply
  115. I love when the What We’re Reading blog comes out. So many great new ideas! I just finished Nicola’s House of Shadows. What a great read & highly recommended.

    Reply
  116. Thank you, Joan, lots of great recommendations there! And I’m with you – any book with a dog in it gets my vote!

    Reply
  117. Thank you, Joan, lots of great recommendations there! And I’m with you – any book with a dog in it gets my vote!

    Reply
  118. Thank you, Joan, lots of great recommendations there! And I’m with you – any book with a dog in it gets my vote!

    Reply
  119. Thank you, Joan, lots of great recommendations there! And I’m with you – any book with a dog in it gets my vote!

    Reply
  120. Thank you, Joan, lots of great recommendations there! And I’m with you – any book with a dog in it gets my vote!

    Reply
  121. Isn’t it wonderful, Jeanne? If you liked that you’re going to love The Forgotten Sister – it’s brilliant!

    Reply
  122. Isn’t it wonderful, Jeanne? If you liked that you’re going to love The Forgotten Sister – it’s brilliant!

    Reply
  123. Isn’t it wonderful, Jeanne? If you liked that you’re going to love The Forgotten Sister – it’s brilliant!

    Reply
  124. Isn’t it wonderful, Jeanne? If you liked that you’re going to love The Forgotten Sister – it’s brilliant!

    Reply
  125. Isn’t it wonderful, Jeanne? If you liked that you’re going to love The Forgotten Sister – it’s brilliant!

    Reply
  126. I to have been doing a lot of rereading, much of it by audiobook at night, since I’ve had enough of the news. I have listened to several Georgette Heyer tiles that I haven’t heard in years, and finding that I like the narrations (these are currently on Brilliance Audio) better than I initially did back in the cassette tape days. Among them were two favorites, The Quiet Gentleman and The Reluctant Widow. Now listening to The Talisman Ring.
    On paper I’ve read a Phyllis Taylor Pianka (a blast from the past) and a couple of Dorothy Macks (pleased to see she’s now on kindle – I like that these older authors’ books are finding a new audience). Now reading The Old Manor House by Charlotte Smith, which I haven’t seen nor thought of in decades, and finding it surprisingly readable. While Elinor Rochdale did not think much of Monimia for fainting too much, I think Elinor doesn’t allow for the cumulative effect on a little girl of being raised in absolute terror of saying or doing or being the wrong thing; if I had to deal with her aunt I’d probably learn to faint too – it might be the only escape available.
    I am also reading an odd little 1976 paperback called UFO Trek by Warren Smith, in which he reports various matters he had investigated, which he did at a time when these events were not so far away in time and it was possible to interview original witnesses. One chapter is devoted to Bo and Peep – Bo whom we knew 20 years later as Marshall Applewhite, the leader of the suicidal Heaven’s Gate cult. Aside from the subject matter being interesting to me, Smith had a very readable style. Good reporting.

    Reply
  127. I to have been doing a lot of rereading, much of it by audiobook at night, since I’ve had enough of the news. I have listened to several Georgette Heyer tiles that I haven’t heard in years, and finding that I like the narrations (these are currently on Brilliance Audio) better than I initially did back in the cassette tape days. Among them were two favorites, The Quiet Gentleman and The Reluctant Widow. Now listening to The Talisman Ring.
    On paper I’ve read a Phyllis Taylor Pianka (a blast from the past) and a couple of Dorothy Macks (pleased to see she’s now on kindle – I like that these older authors’ books are finding a new audience). Now reading The Old Manor House by Charlotte Smith, which I haven’t seen nor thought of in decades, and finding it surprisingly readable. While Elinor Rochdale did not think much of Monimia for fainting too much, I think Elinor doesn’t allow for the cumulative effect on a little girl of being raised in absolute terror of saying or doing or being the wrong thing; if I had to deal with her aunt I’d probably learn to faint too – it might be the only escape available.
    I am also reading an odd little 1976 paperback called UFO Trek by Warren Smith, in which he reports various matters he had investigated, which he did at a time when these events were not so far away in time and it was possible to interview original witnesses. One chapter is devoted to Bo and Peep – Bo whom we knew 20 years later as Marshall Applewhite, the leader of the suicidal Heaven’s Gate cult. Aside from the subject matter being interesting to me, Smith had a very readable style. Good reporting.

    Reply
  128. I to have been doing a lot of rereading, much of it by audiobook at night, since I’ve had enough of the news. I have listened to several Georgette Heyer tiles that I haven’t heard in years, and finding that I like the narrations (these are currently on Brilliance Audio) better than I initially did back in the cassette tape days. Among them were two favorites, The Quiet Gentleman and The Reluctant Widow. Now listening to The Talisman Ring.
    On paper I’ve read a Phyllis Taylor Pianka (a blast from the past) and a couple of Dorothy Macks (pleased to see she’s now on kindle – I like that these older authors’ books are finding a new audience). Now reading The Old Manor House by Charlotte Smith, which I haven’t seen nor thought of in decades, and finding it surprisingly readable. While Elinor Rochdale did not think much of Monimia for fainting too much, I think Elinor doesn’t allow for the cumulative effect on a little girl of being raised in absolute terror of saying or doing or being the wrong thing; if I had to deal with her aunt I’d probably learn to faint too – it might be the only escape available.
    I am also reading an odd little 1976 paperback called UFO Trek by Warren Smith, in which he reports various matters he had investigated, which he did at a time when these events were not so far away in time and it was possible to interview original witnesses. One chapter is devoted to Bo and Peep – Bo whom we knew 20 years later as Marshall Applewhite, the leader of the suicidal Heaven’s Gate cult. Aside from the subject matter being interesting to me, Smith had a very readable style. Good reporting.

    Reply
  129. I to have been doing a lot of rereading, much of it by audiobook at night, since I’ve had enough of the news. I have listened to several Georgette Heyer tiles that I haven’t heard in years, and finding that I like the narrations (these are currently on Brilliance Audio) better than I initially did back in the cassette tape days. Among them were two favorites, The Quiet Gentleman and The Reluctant Widow. Now listening to The Talisman Ring.
    On paper I’ve read a Phyllis Taylor Pianka (a blast from the past) and a couple of Dorothy Macks (pleased to see she’s now on kindle – I like that these older authors’ books are finding a new audience). Now reading The Old Manor House by Charlotte Smith, which I haven’t seen nor thought of in decades, and finding it surprisingly readable. While Elinor Rochdale did not think much of Monimia for fainting too much, I think Elinor doesn’t allow for the cumulative effect on a little girl of being raised in absolute terror of saying or doing or being the wrong thing; if I had to deal with her aunt I’d probably learn to faint too – it might be the only escape available.
    I am also reading an odd little 1976 paperback called UFO Trek by Warren Smith, in which he reports various matters he had investigated, which he did at a time when these events were not so far away in time and it was possible to interview original witnesses. One chapter is devoted to Bo and Peep – Bo whom we knew 20 years later as Marshall Applewhite, the leader of the suicidal Heaven’s Gate cult. Aside from the subject matter being interesting to me, Smith had a very readable style. Good reporting.

    Reply
  130. I to have been doing a lot of rereading, much of it by audiobook at night, since I’ve had enough of the news. I have listened to several Georgette Heyer tiles that I haven’t heard in years, and finding that I like the narrations (these are currently on Brilliance Audio) better than I initially did back in the cassette tape days. Among them were two favorites, The Quiet Gentleman and The Reluctant Widow. Now listening to The Talisman Ring.
    On paper I’ve read a Phyllis Taylor Pianka (a blast from the past) and a couple of Dorothy Macks (pleased to see she’s now on kindle – I like that these older authors’ books are finding a new audience). Now reading The Old Manor House by Charlotte Smith, which I haven’t seen nor thought of in decades, and finding it surprisingly readable. While Elinor Rochdale did not think much of Monimia for fainting too much, I think Elinor doesn’t allow for the cumulative effect on a little girl of being raised in absolute terror of saying or doing or being the wrong thing; if I had to deal with her aunt I’d probably learn to faint too – it might be the only escape available.
    I am also reading an odd little 1976 paperback called UFO Trek by Warren Smith, in which he reports various matters he had investigated, which he did at a time when these events were not so far away in time and it was possible to interview original witnesses. One chapter is devoted to Bo and Peep – Bo whom we knew 20 years later as Marshall Applewhite, the leader of the suicidal Heaven’s Gate cult. Aside from the subject matter being interesting to me, Smith had a very readable style. Good reporting.

    Reply
  131. I always enjoy this column as I invariably find a book or three to add to my list!
    May I request that a tag be added to this post? I like to find these columns back again.

    Reply
  132. I always enjoy this column as I invariably find a book or three to add to my list!
    May I request that a tag be added to this post? I like to find these columns back again.

    Reply
  133. I always enjoy this column as I invariably find a book or three to add to my list!
    May I request that a tag be added to this post? I like to find these columns back again.

    Reply
  134. I always enjoy this column as I invariably find a book or three to add to my list!
    May I request that a tag be added to this post? I like to find these columns back again.

    Reply
  135. I always enjoy this column as I invariably find a book or three to add to my list!
    May I request that a tag be added to this post? I like to find these columns back again.

    Reply
  136. I haven’t read as much as usual since my husband had major surgery early in the month and then was back in the hospital two weeks later; he’s now home recovering.
    Since last time ~
    — The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune which I quite enjoyed; this contemporary fantasy would be fine for teen readers as well as adults.
    — Regency Royal Navy Christmas by Carla Kelly which was a highly enjoyable collection of four novellas. I had previously read the final novella, but the other three were new for this collection.
    — the graphic novel Estranged by Ethan M. Aldridge; it was an enjoyable read, but I don’t believe I’ll be rereading it. My library has it classified as a children’s book.
    — a science fiction novel which I quite enjoyed ~ Guest by E. Stoops. This would also be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — a reread of SK Dunstall’s Linesman which I enjoyed once again.
    — The Parable of the Mustard Seed by Lisa Henry, a male/male romance. I enjoyed it, but I prefer other books by the author. This one had abuse content that some might find disconcerting.
    — Lab Girl by Hope Jahren for my book group. It’s a mix of memoir and science; I enjoyed it.
    — Taji From Beyond the Rings by R. Cooper, a science fiction romance which I enjoyed.
    — Reread the four Murderbot novellas: All Systems Red, Artificial Condition, Rogue Protocol, and Exit Strategy. I enjoyed them all.
    — an enjoyable romance novella, Dei Ex Machina by Kim Fielding. This was a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — The Pride of Chanur by C.J. Cherryh. I’d heard good things about this book, found it a pleasant read, and may read further in the series at some time.
    — enjoyed Portrait of Death: Unforgotten by Isabel Wroth; curiously, I’ve previously read other books with a similar storyline.
    — a short story Stormfront by M.C.A. Hogarth which happens to be currently free for Kindle readers. It had a twist.

    Reply
  137. I haven’t read as much as usual since my husband had major surgery early in the month and then was back in the hospital two weeks later; he’s now home recovering.
    Since last time ~
    — The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune which I quite enjoyed; this contemporary fantasy would be fine for teen readers as well as adults.
    — Regency Royal Navy Christmas by Carla Kelly which was a highly enjoyable collection of four novellas. I had previously read the final novella, but the other three were new for this collection.
    — the graphic novel Estranged by Ethan M. Aldridge; it was an enjoyable read, but I don’t believe I’ll be rereading it. My library has it classified as a children’s book.
    — a science fiction novel which I quite enjoyed ~ Guest by E. Stoops. This would also be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — a reread of SK Dunstall’s Linesman which I enjoyed once again.
    — The Parable of the Mustard Seed by Lisa Henry, a male/male romance. I enjoyed it, but I prefer other books by the author. This one had abuse content that some might find disconcerting.
    — Lab Girl by Hope Jahren for my book group. It’s a mix of memoir and science; I enjoyed it.
    — Taji From Beyond the Rings by R. Cooper, a science fiction romance which I enjoyed.
    — Reread the four Murderbot novellas: All Systems Red, Artificial Condition, Rogue Protocol, and Exit Strategy. I enjoyed them all.
    — an enjoyable romance novella, Dei Ex Machina by Kim Fielding. This was a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — The Pride of Chanur by C.J. Cherryh. I’d heard good things about this book, found it a pleasant read, and may read further in the series at some time.
    — enjoyed Portrait of Death: Unforgotten by Isabel Wroth; curiously, I’ve previously read other books with a similar storyline.
    — a short story Stormfront by M.C.A. Hogarth which happens to be currently free for Kindle readers. It had a twist.

    Reply
  138. I haven’t read as much as usual since my husband had major surgery early in the month and then was back in the hospital two weeks later; he’s now home recovering.
    Since last time ~
    — The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune which I quite enjoyed; this contemporary fantasy would be fine for teen readers as well as adults.
    — Regency Royal Navy Christmas by Carla Kelly which was a highly enjoyable collection of four novellas. I had previously read the final novella, but the other three were new for this collection.
    — the graphic novel Estranged by Ethan M. Aldridge; it was an enjoyable read, but I don’t believe I’ll be rereading it. My library has it classified as a children’s book.
    — a science fiction novel which I quite enjoyed ~ Guest by E. Stoops. This would also be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — a reread of SK Dunstall’s Linesman which I enjoyed once again.
    — The Parable of the Mustard Seed by Lisa Henry, a male/male romance. I enjoyed it, but I prefer other books by the author. This one had abuse content that some might find disconcerting.
    — Lab Girl by Hope Jahren for my book group. It’s a mix of memoir and science; I enjoyed it.
    — Taji From Beyond the Rings by R. Cooper, a science fiction romance which I enjoyed.
    — Reread the four Murderbot novellas: All Systems Red, Artificial Condition, Rogue Protocol, and Exit Strategy. I enjoyed them all.
    — an enjoyable romance novella, Dei Ex Machina by Kim Fielding. This was a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — The Pride of Chanur by C.J. Cherryh. I’d heard good things about this book, found it a pleasant read, and may read further in the series at some time.
    — enjoyed Portrait of Death: Unforgotten by Isabel Wroth; curiously, I’ve previously read other books with a similar storyline.
    — a short story Stormfront by M.C.A. Hogarth which happens to be currently free for Kindle readers. It had a twist.

    Reply
  139. I haven’t read as much as usual since my husband had major surgery early in the month and then was back in the hospital two weeks later; he’s now home recovering.
    Since last time ~
    — The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune which I quite enjoyed; this contemporary fantasy would be fine for teen readers as well as adults.
    — Regency Royal Navy Christmas by Carla Kelly which was a highly enjoyable collection of four novellas. I had previously read the final novella, but the other three were new for this collection.
    — the graphic novel Estranged by Ethan M. Aldridge; it was an enjoyable read, but I don’t believe I’ll be rereading it. My library has it classified as a children’s book.
    — a science fiction novel which I quite enjoyed ~ Guest by E. Stoops. This would also be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — a reread of SK Dunstall’s Linesman which I enjoyed once again.
    — The Parable of the Mustard Seed by Lisa Henry, a male/male romance. I enjoyed it, but I prefer other books by the author. This one had abuse content that some might find disconcerting.
    — Lab Girl by Hope Jahren for my book group. It’s a mix of memoir and science; I enjoyed it.
    — Taji From Beyond the Rings by R. Cooper, a science fiction romance which I enjoyed.
    — Reread the four Murderbot novellas: All Systems Red, Artificial Condition, Rogue Protocol, and Exit Strategy. I enjoyed them all.
    — an enjoyable romance novella, Dei Ex Machina by Kim Fielding. This was a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — The Pride of Chanur by C.J. Cherryh. I’d heard good things about this book, found it a pleasant read, and may read further in the series at some time.
    — enjoyed Portrait of Death: Unforgotten by Isabel Wroth; curiously, I’ve previously read other books with a similar storyline.
    — a short story Stormfront by M.C.A. Hogarth which happens to be currently free for Kindle readers. It had a twist.

    Reply
  140. I haven’t read as much as usual since my husband had major surgery early in the month and then was back in the hospital two weeks later; he’s now home recovering.
    Since last time ~
    — The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune which I quite enjoyed; this contemporary fantasy would be fine for teen readers as well as adults.
    — Regency Royal Navy Christmas by Carla Kelly which was a highly enjoyable collection of four novellas. I had previously read the final novella, but the other three were new for this collection.
    — the graphic novel Estranged by Ethan M. Aldridge; it was an enjoyable read, but I don’t believe I’ll be rereading it. My library has it classified as a children’s book.
    — a science fiction novel which I quite enjoyed ~ Guest by E. Stoops. This would also be a fine read for teens as well as adults.
    — a reread of SK Dunstall’s Linesman which I enjoyed once again.
    — The Parable of the Mustard Seed by Lisa Henry, a male/male romance. I enjoyed it, but I prefer other books by the author. This one had abuse content that some might find disconcerting.
    — Lab Girl by Hope Jahren for my book group. It’s a mix of memoir and science; I enjoyed it.
    — Taji From Beyond the Rings by R. Cooper, a science fiction romance which I enjoyed.
    — Reread the four Murderbot novellas: All Systems Red, Artificial Condition, Rogue Protocol, and Exit Strategy. I enjoyed them all.
    — an enjoyable romance novella, Dei Ex Machina by Kim Fielding. This was a male/male romance with a paranormal element.
    — The Pride of Chanur by C.J. Cherryh. I’d heard good things about this book, found it a pleasant read, and may read further in the series at some time.
    — enjoyed Portrait of Death: Unforgotten by Isabel Wroth; curiously, I’ve previously read other books with a similar storyline.
    — a short story Stormfront by M.C.A. Hogarth which happens to be currently free for Kindle readers. It had a twist.

    Reply
  141. I just finished Madeline Hunter’s new book, “Heiress for Hire” and I can definitely recommend it. There is a strong mystery plot as well as romance, very cleverly done. I loved the characters, and although there is an HEA, part of the mystery will continue in future books.
    I read “First Comes Scandal” by Julia Quinn. It’s a prequel to her well-known Bridgerton series. It’s a marriage of convenience plot, lightweight and good comfort reading during these difficult times.
    I’m currently reading the 5th Lady Darby mystery, “As Death Draws Near”. It’s the first one with the H&h as a married couple, so it’s fun to see them adjusting to married life.

    Reply
  142. I just finished Madeline Hunter’s new book, “Heiress for Hire” and I can definitely recommend it. There is a strong mystery plot as well as romance, very cleverly done. I loved the characters, and although there is an HEA, part of the mystery will continue in future books.
    I read “First Comes Scandal” by Julia Quinn. It’s a prequel to her well-known Bridgerton series. It’s a marriage of convenience plot, lightweight and good comfort reading during these difficult times.
    I’m currently reading the 5th Lady Darby mystery, “As Death Draws Near”. It’s the first one with the H&h as a married couple, so it’s fun to see them adjusting to married life.

    Reply
  143. I just finished Madeline Hunter’s new book, “Heiress for Hire” and I can definitely recommend it. There is a strong mystery plot as well as romance, very cleverly done. I loved the characters, and although there is an HEA, part of the mystery will continue in future books.
    I read “First Comes Scandal” by Julia Quinn. It’s a prequel to her well-known Bridgerton series. It’s a marriage of convenience plot, lightweight and good comfort reading during these difficult times.
    I’m currently reading the 5th Lady Darby mystery, “As Death Draws Near”. It’s the first one with the H&h as a married couple, so it’s fun to see them adjusting to married life.

    Reply
  144. I just finished Madeline Hunter’s new book, “Heiress for Hire” and I can definitely recommend it. There is a strong mystery plot as well as romance, very cleverly done. I loved the characters, and although there is an HEA, part of the mystery will continue in future books.
    I read “First Comes Scandal” by Julia Quinn. It’s a prequel to her well-known Bridgerton series. It’s a marriage of convenience plot, lightweight and good comfort reading during these difficult times.
    I’m currently reading the 5th Lady Darby mystery, “As Death Draws Near”. It’s the first one with the H&h as a married couple, so it’s fun to see them adjusting to married life.

    Reply
  145. I just finished Madeline Hunter’s new book, “Heiress for Hire” and I can definitely recommend it. There is a strong mystery plot as well as romance, very cleverly done. I loved the characters, and although there is an HEA, part of the mystery will continue in future books.
    I read “First Comes Scandal” by Julia Quinn. It’s a prequel to her well-known Bridgerton series. It’s a marriage of convenience plot, lightweight and good comfort reading during these difficult times.
    I’m currently reading the 5th Lady Darby mystery, “As Death Draws Near”. It’s the first one with the H&h as a married couple, so it’s fun to see them adjusting to married life.

    Reply
  146. Many thanks for all the recommendations, Janice! The Reluctant Widow is one of my all time favourite Heyers!

    Reply
  147. Many thanks for all the recommendations, Janice! The Reluctant Widow is one of my all time favourite Heyers!

    Reply
  148. Many thanks for all the recommendations, Janice! The Reluctant Widow is one of my all time favourite Heyers!

    Reply
  149. Many thanks for all the recommendations, Janice! The Reluctant Widow is one of my all time favourite Heyers!

    Reply
  150. Many thanks for all the recommendations, Janice! The Reluctant Widow is one of my all time favourite Heyers!

    Reply
  151. So glad you enjoy them Kareni! As regards the tag I will find out from the other wenches how to do that as I’m new to this 😊

    Reply
  152. So glad you enjoy them Kareni! As regards the tag I will find out from the other wenches how to do that as I’m new to this 😊

    Reply
  153. So glad you enjoy them Kareni! As regards the tag I will find out from the other wenches how to do that as I’m new to this 😊

    Reply
  154. So glad you enjoy them Kareni! As regards the tag I will find out from the other wenches how to do that as I’m new to this 😊

    Reply
  155. So glad you enjoy them Kareni! As regards the tag I will find out from the other wenches how to do that as I’m new to this 😊

    Reply
  156. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk is my introduction to this Scottish crime thriller series … and I wasn’t disappointed .. a Scottish Island stuck in a time warp created by Compton MacKenzie, I should think , where murder most foul is committed and investigated with a good deal of slapstick humour balanced by genuine empathy with the human condition .. and a solution that I really didn’t see coming… the only jarring note is the occasional fleeting appearances by DCI Logan’s boss, the Superintendent .. try as I might – and I did try very hard, I simply cannot see, even in the blackest of comedies, how such an obscenity-riddled ignoramus could have even a modicum of credibility ..

    Reply
  157. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk is my introduction to this Scottish crime thriller series … and I wasn’t disappointed .. a Scottish Island stuck in a time warp created by Compton MacKenzie, I should think , where murder most foul is committed and investigated with a good deal of slapstick humour balanced by genuine empathy with the human condition .. and a solution that I really didn’t see coming… the only jarring note is the occasional fleeting appearances by DCI Logan’s boss, the Superintendent .. try as I might – and I did try very hard, I simply cannot see, even in the blackest of comedies, how such an obscenity-riddled ignoramus could have even a modicum of credibility ..

    Reply
  158. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk is my introduction to this Scottish crime thriller series … and I wasn’t disappointed .. a Scottish Island stuck in a time warp created by Compton MacKenzie, I should think , where murder most foul is committed and investigated with a good deal of slapstick humour balanced by genuine empathy with the human condition .. and a solution that I really didn’t see coming… the only jarring note is the occasional fleeting appearances by DCI Logan’s boss, the Superintendent .. try as I might – and I did try very hard, I simply cannot see, even in the blackest of comedies, how such an obscenity-riddled ignoramus could have even a modicum of credibility ..

    Reply
  159. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk is my introduction to this Scottish crime thriller series … and I wasn’t disappointed .. a Scottish Island stuck in a time warp created by Compton MacKenzie, I should think , where murder most foul is committed and investigated with a good deal of slapstick humour balanced by genuine empathy with the human condition .. and a solution that I really didn’t see coming… the only jarring note is the occasional fleeting appearances by DCI Logan’s boss, the Superintendent .. try as I might – and I did try very hard, I simply cannot see, even in the blackest of comedies, how such an obscenity-riddled ignoramus could have even a modicum of credibility ..

    Reply
  160. The Last Bloody Straw by JD Kirk is my introduction to this Scottish crime thriller series … and I wasn’t disappointed .. a Scottish Island stuck in a time warp created by Compton MacKenzie, I should think , where murder most foul is committed and investigated with a good deal of slapstick humour balanced by genuine empathy with the human condition .. and a solution that I really didn’t see coming… the only jarring note is the occasional fleeting appearances by DCI Logan’s boss, the Superintendent .. try as I might – and I did try very hard, I simply cannot see, even in the blackest of comedies, how such an obscenity-riddled ignoramus could have even a modicum of credibility ..

    Reply

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