What kind of reader were you as a kid?

Joanna here, asking the Wenches "What kind of reader were you as a kid?"
Maybe I'm asking, where do adult readers come from?

 

Wench milne Wench faraway tree

Anne begins:
 
What kind of reader was I?
In a word? Insatiable — and I still am now. By day I was happy to be out and about, playing and exploring with my dog, but come night-time it was essential to my happiness that I always have something to read. (We didn't have TV — my father didn't approve of it.) I don't remember not being able to read, but probably that's because my parents and siblings read to me a lot. AA Milne — the poetry as well as the Winnie the Pooh stories, Pookie the flying rabbit, whatever they had, and once I could read I read everything I could lay my hands on. Not so much cereal boxes though — for me it was stories every time. Enid Blyton was a very prolific English children's writer, and I read everything I could find of hers, starting with Noddy, then The Magic Faraway Tree, and moving on to the Famous Five and many other series.

We always went away at Christmas (which are our long summer holidays) and my presents always included a book or two, so in the caravan or tent I read  my new books and then went on to read my brother's and sisters' books, even though they're a decade older than me. 7 isn't much of a playmate for 17, so whether it was tennis, or card games or scrabble in the evening, I couldn't join in. So it was usually a book for me.
 
Luckily we moved a lot, and in any new town the first place I sought out was the local library, and then when I started school it was the school library. In one school, another bookworm friend and I became a bit competitive — we were reading a decent sized book a night. The school librarian didn't believe we could read that fast and he'd grill us about each book before he'd let us borrow another one. 
 
Now I live in a house filled with books, my childhood friends and my adult companions. Some evoke special times or events, and with some I recall exactly where I was when I first read them. I wonder sometimes what kind of person I'd be if I'd been raised in a home with no books. Would I be a writer, or not? I really don't know.
 
Wench pokeyPat comes in with:

As I suspect most of the wenches and the majority of writers will say—I was an eclectic and voracious reader. One of my earliest memories is of lying on the floor with a book my librarian great-aunt had sent me for Christmas. I knew my alphabet but couldn’t read, and I had no one to read me the story promised by all the exotic pictures of foreign countries. So I lay there day after day, puzzling out the words on my own.

I begged for the Little Golden Books in the grocery store and to this day can probably quote from Poky Little Puppy and The Little Engine That Could. We had no library or bookstore, so I would read the stories over and over, making up my own to go with the pictures. 

Once I was able to access the school library, I knew no bounds. I’d pretty much read everything in the elementary school library by the time I was in sixth grade, including all the sports books meant for boys. I was reading Austen and Bronte because I could buy them through the Scholastic book club. I read Wheaties boxes at breakfast.

Those days are long gone, and I’m much too particular now. I can’t decide if that’s regrettable or not. I mean, Wheaties boxes? Let’s have a little discrimination!

 
 
 
 
Wench Fell Farm
Nicola
:
 
Like so many other bookish children I was a reader who read anything and everything. It was an amazing voyage of discovery finding out about people and places I had never imagined, past, present and fantastical. I look back on those days with nostalgia and some envy because I don’t think it’s possible to capture quite the same rush of excitement and drive for reading that I had then. I read about children who went to boarding school, who had ballet lessons, who kept horses, who lived in the middle ages or in different countries. I particularly loved stories about big families with siblings because I didn’t have any.
 
My favourites were The Brydons (especially the Brydons on the Broads because there was a ghostly Viking ship involved) and the Fell Farm Campers because I lived in a city and the countryside seemed a strange and exotic place. I loved science fiction, I scared myself with ghost stories, and I cried over The Secret Garden and A Little Princess. Happy Days!

 

Wench fabulous flight

 

Wench moon spinnersAndrea:

I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t in love with books. As a child I devoured (ummm, probably some of them literally) all those wonderful Golden Books picture books, then moved on to The Cat in the Hat, Winnie the Pooh, Charlotte’s Web, The Wind in the Willows . . .oh, the list of childhood classics goes on and on. The magic of storytelling already had me in its thrall. I remember a particular favorite was the Fabulous Flight by a local author, Robert Lawson. I still vividly remember being absolutely enchanted by the adventures of Peter Pepperell and his friend Gus the seagull as they set out to save the world from an evil scientist.

I quickly exhausted children’s books (my mother often came to do a bed check and make sure I hadn’t taken a flashlight with me to read under the covers once I had reached the ‘lights out” hour.) At age eleven I had to battle with the town librarians to be allowed in the adult section. I remember being told I couldn’t check out a book on Jacques Cousteau and his marine biology expeditions because it wasn’t “appropriate” reading material for my age. My mother thankfully marched down there the next day . . .I don’t know what she said, but after that I had free rein of the books. (I am forever grateful for that) Then I discovered Mary Stewart and Jane Austen and Georgette Heyer . . . Wenches what if

Reading is an integral part of who I am. It’s a source of joy, of discovery, of learning, of inspiration, of laughter. Whenever I’m feeling down, I know that curling up with a book will help lift my spirits. I’m never not reading a book, and often I have a few different genres going. I truly can’t imagine a life without books.

 

Joanna here: I'll just mention that there was wide Wench agreement about a childhood of flashlights and blankets.

 

Wench Tom Corbett  Space CadetAnd MaryJo rounds it out:

What kind of reader was I?  It will surprise no one to hear that I was voracious–I would read anything, including cereal boxes and ads in the back of magazines.  The worst vacation in my life was camping in a state park on the St. Lawrence River and I didn't have enough to read.  It was lethally boring!  We had a Reader's Digest, and I read every article in it. Twice.  (This may be related to the fact that I hate camping, too.)

I read horse books, stories with girl protagonists and boy protagonists, and mysteries and adventure and all else.  (I always liked if there was a romantic element, of course.)  I loved Robert Heinlein's science fiction and the Tom Corbett, Space Cadet books, and fairy tales and Greek and Roman mythology.  (No wonder I love fantasy!)

I loved the school library, though sadly I was only allowed to take out two books a day.  I read all the youth biographies of famous Americans and they helped lay the foundation for my love of history. 

A favorite that I read and reread was Swiss Family Robinson, a story of a family surviving when their ship founders and they have to figure out food and shelter and many other things.  (I recall a couple of the sons riding ostriches. <G>)  The book is a classic and the link above is to a free edition on Amazon.

Mary Jo, still reading lots, though pickier these days!

 

And me … Joanna

I read everything I could get my hands on. Fiction. Nonfiction. New. Old. Cereal boxes. Washing Wench kimmachine directions. Sometimes it seemed the world I lived in was a small place and the world of books was huge everywhere around me.

Particular books that have stuck with me? Kim. That was a huge world I wandered into that I never really strolled out of. If you glance above, you'll see Tom Corbett, one of Mary Jo's favorites. I loved those books.

What else? Robert Heinlein. He wrote so many lovely YAs,for instance, Have Spacesuit – Will Travel is one of the best. I loved the English girls' schools books, (me and Anne,) like Second Form at St. Clare's.  The Narnia books by CS Lewis.

So many cool books. I have been so lucky.

 

What about you? What kind of Reader were you as a child? Did it make you reader you are today?

 

210 thoughts on “What kind of reader were you as a kid?”

  1. Yes to the cereal boxes: sometimes there just isn’t anything else around.
    Things I would have done as a child: I’d a pile of books beside my bed, I’d always have been reading five or six at once – I can’t do that now. (I think six was the most you could take out from the library.) One book was always a dictionary – I looked up every word I didn’t know. I knew that as long as you’d read, and understood, each word, you’d read the book.
    On that basis, I ‘read’ Vanity Fair – had no sense whatsoever of the story, but I was so proud of myself.
    And I reread a lot, because books were limited, and probably read things a child wouldn’t now, because that’s what was available. I floored my daughter a couple of weeks ago by talking about how I read and reread our Children’s Encyclopedias from A to Z – just for something to read. (Which retold a lot of myths, which I found boring, and is the reason I avoid books based on myths now.)
    I did love Swiss Family Robinson, but I reread it a couple of years ago, and I sort of wish I hadn’t – it was better in my memory.
    And as for space books – did anyone else read the Hugh Walters books? They’re too expensive to buy secondhand, but I’d love to reread them just to see if they are anything like I remember.

    Reply
  2. Yes to the cereal boxes: sometimes there just isn’t anything else around.
    Things I would have done as a child: I’d a pile of books beside my bed, I’d always have been reading five or six at once – I can’t do that now. (I think six was the most you could take out from the library.) One book was always a dictionary – I looked up every word I didn’t know. I knew that as long as you’d read, and understood, each word, you’d read the book.
    On that basis, I ‘read’ Vanity Fair – had no sense whatsoever of the story, but I was so proud of myself.
    And I reread a lot, because books were limited, and probably read things a child wouldn’t now, because that’s what was available. I floored my daughter a couple of weeks ago by talking about how I read and reread our Children’s Encyclopedias from A to Z – just for something to read. (Which retold a lot of myths, which I found boring, and is the reason I avoid books based on myths now.)
    I did love Swiss Family Robinson, but I reread it a couple of years ago, and I sort of wish I hadn’t – it was better in my memory.
    And as for space books – did anyone else read the Hugh Walters books? They’re too expensive to buy secondhand, but I’d love to reread them just to see if they are anything like I remember.

    Reply
  3. Yes to the cereal boxes: sometimes there just isn’t anything else around.
    Things I would have done as a child: I’d a pile of books beside my bed, I’d always have been reading five or six at once – I can’t do that now. (I think six was the most you could take out from the library.) One book was always a dictionary – I looked up every word I didn’t know. I knew that as long as you’d read, and understood, each word, you’d read the book.
    On that basis, I ‘read’ Vanity Fair – had no sense whatsoever of the story, but I was so proud of myself.
    And I reread a lot, because books were limited, and probably read things a child wouldn’t now, because that’s what was available. I floored my daughter a couple of weeks ago by talking about how I read and reread our Children’s Encyclopedias from A to Z – just for something to read. (Which retold a lot of myths, which I found boring, and is the reason I avoid books based on myths now.)
    I did love Swiss Family Robinson, but I reread it a couple of years ago, and I sort of wish I hadn’t – it was better in my memory.
    And as for space books – did anyone else read the Hugh Walters books? They’re too expensive to buy secondhand, but I’d love to reread them just to see if they are anything like I remember.

    Reply
  4. Yes to the cereal boxes: sometimes there just isn’t anything else around.
    Things I would have done as a child: I’d a pile of books beside my bed, I’d always have been reading five or six at once – I can’t do that now. (I think six was the most you could take out from the library.) One book was always a dictionary – I looked up every word I didn’t know. I knew that as long as you’d read, and understood, each word, you’d read the book.
    On that basis, I ‘read’ Vanity Fair – had no sense whatsoever of the story, but I was so proud of myself.
    And I reread a lot, because books were limited, and probably read things a child wouldn’t now, because that’s what was available. I floored my daughter a couple of weeks ago by talking about how I read and reread our Children’s Encyclopedias from A to Z – just for something to read. (Which retold a lot of myths, which I found boring, and is the reason I avoid books based on myths now.)
    I did love Swiss Family Robinson, but I reread it a couple of years ago, and I sort of wish I hadn’t – it was better in my memory.
    And as for space books – did anyone else read the Hugh Walters books? They’re too expensive to buy secondhand, but I’d love to reread them just to see if they are anything like I remember.

    Reply
  5. Yes to the cereal boxes: sometimes there just isn’t anything else around.
    Things I would have done as a child: I’d a pile of books beside my bed, I’d always have been reading five or six at once – I can’t do that now. (I think six was the most you could take out from the library.) One book was always a dictionary – I looked up every word I didn’t know. I knew that as long as you’d read, and understood, each word, you’d read the book.
    On that basis, I ‘read’ Vanity Fair – had no sense whatsoever of the story, but I was so proud of myself.
    And I reread a lot, because books were limited, and probably read things a child wouldn’t now, because that’s what was available. I floored my daughter a couple of weeks ago by talking about how I read and reread our Children’s Encyclopedias from A to Z – just for something to read. (Which retold a lot of myths, which I found boring, and is the reason I avoid books based on myths now.)
    I did love Swiss Family Robinson, but I reread it a couple of years ago, and I sort of wish I hadn’t – it was better in my memory.
    And as for space books – did anyone else read the Hugh Walters books? They’re too expensive to buy secondhand, but I’d love to reread them just to see if they are anything like I remember.

    Reply
  6. Add me to the flashlight club. Note: do not try reading by a bare lightbulb under the covers. It will scorch the pillowcase. I was especially fond of Half Magic as a kid, then moved on to girls’ adventure/mystery series, with Beverly Gray as my favorite and Judy Bolton a close second, ahead of Nancy Drew and the rest. Then I took a giant leap to my father’s historical novels—those by Thomas Costain and Frank Yerby in particular.

    Reply
  7. Add me to the flashlight club. Note: do not try reading by a bare lightbulb under the covers. It will scorch the pillowcase. I was especially fond of Half Magic as a kid, then moved on to girls’ adventure/mystery series, with Beverly Gray as my favorite and Judy Bolton a close second, ahead of Nancy Drew and the rest. Then I took a giant leap to my father’s historical novels—those by Thomas Costain and Frank Yerby in particular.

    Reply
  8. Add me to the flashlight club. Note: do not try reading by a bare lightbulb under the covers. It will scorch the pillowcase. I was especially fond of Half Magic as a kid, then moved on to girls’ adventure/mystery series, with Beverly Gray as my favorite and Judy Bolton a close second, ahead of Nancy Drew and the rest. Then I took a giant leap to my father’s historical novels—those by Thomas Costain and Frank Yerby in particular.

    Reply
  9. Add me to the flashlight club. Note: do not try reading by a bare lightbulb under the covers. It will scorch the pillowcase. I was especially fond of Half Magic as a kid, then moved on to girls’ adventure/mystery series, with Beverly Gray as my favorite and Judy Bolton a close second, ahead of Nancy Drew and the rest. Then I took a giant leap to my father’s historical novels—those by Thomas Costain and Frank Yerby in particular.

    Reply
  10. Add me to the flashlight club. Note: do not try reading by a bare lightbulb under the covers. It will scorch the pillowcase. I was especially fond of Half Magic as a kid, then moved on to girls’ adventure/mystery series, with Beverly Gray as my favorite and Judy Bolton a close second, ahead of Nancy Drew and the rest. Then I took a giant leap to my father’s historical novels—those by Thomas Costain and Frank Yerby in particular.

    Reply
  11. I don’t think I would say that I was a voracious reader as a child, but I cannot remember a time when books were not in my life. Some of my earliest memories were of my mother reading to us at bedtime. I too, remember the little Golden Books. I think they were my earliest reading material.
    When I started school, I discovered the library. During the school year I haunted the school library, but come summer it was the public library. Some of my happiest memories were of my friends and I walking to the library. Walking home with an arm full of books and stopping at the deli for an ice cold Coke.
    My choice of reading material has changed over the years. Nowadays I read mostly for pure enjoyment (historical romance, biographies, and mysteries).
    Given my age and physical condition, I’m no longer able to haunt the library like I used to. Cannot walk up and down the aisles, choosing books at random, and leafing through them. But I know that I am lucky that I can do that on-line – at my public library and Amazon. But it is just not the same (sigh).

    Reply
  12. I don’t think I would say that I was a voracious reader as a child, but I cannot remember a time when books were not in my life. Some of my earliest memories were of my mother reading to us at bedtime. I too, remember the little Golden Books. I think they were my earliest reading material.
    When I started school, I discovered the library. During the school year I haunted the school library, but come summer it was the public library. Some of my happiest memories were of my friends and I walking to the library. Walking home with an arm full of books and stopping at the deli for an ice cold Coke.
    My choice of reading material has changed over the years. Nowadays I read mostly for pure enjoyment (historical romance, biographies, and mysteries).
    Given my age and physical condition, I’m no longer able to haunt the library like I used to. Cannot walk up and down the aisles, choosing books at random, and leafing through them. But I know that I am lucky that I can do that on-line – at my public library and Amazon. But it is just not the same (sigh).

    Reply
  13. I don’t think I would say that I was a voracious reader as a child, but I cannot remember a time when books were not in my life. Some of my earliest memories were of my mother reading to us at bedtime. I too, remember the little Golden Books. I think they were my earliest reading material.
    When I started school, I discovered the library. During the school year I haunted the school library, but come summer it was the public library. Some of my happiest memories were of my friends and I walking to the library. Walking home with an arm full of books and stopping at the deli for an ice cold Coke.
    My choice of reading material has changed over the years. Nowadays I read mostly for pure enjoyment (historical romance, biographies, and mysteries).
    Given my age and physical condition, I’m no longer able to haunt the library like I used to. Cannot walk up and down the aisles, choosing books at random, and leafing through them. But I know that I am lucky that I can do that on-line – at my public library and Amazon. But it is just not the same (sigh).

    Reply
  14. I don’t think I would say that I was a voracious reader as a child, but I cannot remember a time when books were not in my life. Some of my earliest memories were of my mother reading to us at bedtime. I too, remember the little Golden Books. I think they were my earliest reading material.
    When I started school, I discovered the library. During the school year I haunted the school library, but come summer it was the public library. Some of my happiest memories were of my friends and I walking to the library. Walking home with an arm full of books and stopping at the deli for an ice cold Coke.
    My choice of reading material has changed over the years. Nowadays I read mostly for pure enjoyment (historical romance, biographies, and mysteries).
    Given my age and physical condition, I’m no longer able to haunt the library like I used to. Cannot walk up and down the aisles, choosing books at random, and leafing through them. But I know that I am lucky that I can do that on-line – at my public library and Amazon. But it is just not the same (sigh).

    Reply
  15. I don’t think I would say that I was a voracious reader as a child, but I cannot remember a time when books were not in my life. Some of my earliest memories were of my mother reading to us at bedtime. I too, remember the little Golden Books. I think they were my earliest reading material.
    When I started school, I discovered the library. During the school year I haunted the school library, but come summer it was the public library. Some of my happiest memories were of my friends and I walking to the library. Walking home with an arm full of books and stopping at the deli for an ice cold Coke.
    My choice of reading material has changed over the years. Nowadays I read mostly for pure enjoyment (historical romance, biographies, and mysteries).
    Given my age and physical condition, I’m no longer able to haunt the library like I used to. Cannot walk up and down the aisles, choosing books at random, and leafing through them. But I know that I am lucky that I can do that on-line – at my public library and Amazon. But it is just not the same (sigh).

    Reply
  16. I was one of those who would read anything and everything. I can remember my mother saying, “Will you put down that book and go outside and play!” I’d go outside, but I’d generally take the book with me.
    I was lucky enough to have a public library right across the street from my elementary school, so my friends and I would generally stop on our way home and explore the treasures there—horse books, dog books, adventure stories, the different colored fairy tale books, Betsy-Tacy books, Little House books. And at night, my sister needed a night light, so after we had been tucked in I would hop out of bed and curl up with my book by the night light to continue reading—or rereading. I had my own copy of Robin Hood—the Pyle version—and read it so often I could practically recite it.
    When I got to high school, our school library had the complete novels of Sir Walter Scott. I adored those books. It wasn’t just the contents, it was the books themselves. They were small, about the dimensions of a mass market paperback, with very thin paper and bound in soft dark red leather. The books themselves were as much a treasure as the contents.

    Reply
  17. I was one of those who would read anything and everything. I can remember my mother saying, “Will you put down that book and go outside and play!” I’d go outside, but I’d generally take the book with me.
    I was lucky enough to have a public library right across the street from my elementary school, so my friends and I would generally stop on our way home and explore the treasures there—horse books, dog books, adventure stories, the different colored fairy tale books, Betsy-Tacy books, Little House books. And at night, my sister needed a night light, so after we had been tucked in I would hop out of bed and curl up with my book by the night light to continue reading—or rereading. I had my own copy of Robin Hood—the Pyle version—and read it so often I could practically recite it.
    When I got to high school, our school library had the complete novels of Sir Walter Scott. I adored those books. It wasn’t just the contents, it was the books themselves. They were small, about the dimensions of a mass market paperback, with very thin paper and bound in soft dark red leather. The books themselves were as much a treasure as the contents.

    Reply
  18. I was one of those who would read anything and everything. I can remember my mother saying, “Will you put down that book and go outside and play!” I’d go outside, but I’d generally take the book with me.
    I was lucky enough to have a public library right across the street from my elementary school, so my friends and I would generally stop on our way home and explore the treasures there—horse books, dog books, adventure stories, the different colored fairy tale books, Betsy-Tacy books, Little House books. And at night, my sister needed a night light, so after we had been tucked in I would hop out of bed and curl up with my book by the night light to continue reading—or rereading. I had my own copy of Robin Hood—the Pyle version—and read it so often I could practically recite it.
    When I got to high school, our school library had the complete novels of Sir Walter Scott. I adored those books. It wasn’t just the contents, it was the books themselves. They were small, about the dimensions of a mass market paperback, with very thin paper and bound in soft dark red leather. The books themselves were as much a treasure as the contents.

    Reply
  19. I was one of those who would read anything and everything. I can remember my mother saying, “Will you put down that book and go outside and play!” I’d go outside, but I’d generally take the book with me.
    I was lucky enough to have a public library right across the street from my elementary school, so my friends and I would generally stop on our way home and explore the treasures there—horse books, dog books, adventure stories, the different colored fairy tale books, Betsy-Tacy books, Little House books. And at night, my sister needed a night light, so after we had been tucked in I would hop out of bed and curl up with my book by the night light to continue reading—or rereading. I had my own copy of Robin Hood—the Pyle version—and read it so often I could practically recite it.
    When I got to high school, our school library had the complete novels of Sir Walter Scott. I adored those books. It wasn’t just the contents, it was the books themselves. They were small, about the dimensions of a mass market paperback, with very thin paper and bound in soft dark red leather. The books themselves were as much a treasure as the contents.

    Reply
  20. I was one of those who would read anything and everything. I can remember my mother saying, “Will you put down that book and go outside and play!” I’d go outside, but I’d generally take the book with me.
    I was lucky enough to have a public library right across the street from my elementary school, so my friends and I would generally stop on our way home and explore the treasures there—horse books, dog books, adventure stories, the different colored fairy tale books, Betsy-Tacy books, Little House books. And at night, my sister needed a night light, so after we had been tucked in I would hop out of bed and curl up with my book by the night light to continue reading—or rereading. I had my own copy of Robin Hood—the Pyle version—and read it so often I could practically recite it.
    When I got to high school, our school library had the complete novels of Sir Walter Scott. I adored those books. It wasn’t just the contents, it was the books themselves. They were small, about the dimensions of a mass market paperback, with very thin paper and bound in soft dark red leather. The books themselves were as much a treasure as the contents.

    Reply
  21. I always loved reading all the time. I remember reading something called, “The Silly Book.” Amelia Bedelia was a book I borrowed from a cousin about a hapless maid and the chaos that ensued from her shenanigans. As a young adult, I discovered the great classics in literature, either in school reading assignments, or I would see a film version of a book and want to explore the original to see how well or what liberties Hollywood took in portraying it. The British film industry was more accurate in movies and television.

    Reply
  22. I always loved reading all the time. I remember reading something called, “The Silly Book.” Amelia Bedelia was a book I borrowed from a cousin about a hapless maid and the chaos that ensued from her shenanigans. As a young adult, I discovered the great classics in literature, either in school reading assignments, or I would see a film version of a book and want to explore the original to see how well or what liberties Hollywood took in portraying it. The British film industry was more accurate in movies and television.

    Reply
  23. I always loved reading all the time. I remember reading something called, “The Silly Book.” Amelia Bedelia was a book I borrowed from a cousin about a hapless maid and the chaos that ensued from her shenanigans. As a young adult, I discovered the great classics in literature, either in school reading assignments, or I would see a film version of a book and want to explore the original to see how well or what liberties Hollywood took in portraying it. The British film industry was more accurate in movies and television.

    Reply
  24. I always loved reading all the time. I remember reading something called, “The Silly Book.” Amelia Bedelia was a book I borrowed from a cousin about a hapless maid and the chaos that ensued from her shenanigans. As a young adult, I discovered the great classics in literature, either in school reading assignments, or I would see a film version of a book and want to explore the original to see how well or what liberties Hollywood took in portraying it. The British film industry was more accurate in movies and television.

    Reply
  25. I always loved reading all the time. I remember reading something called, “The Silly Book.” Amelia Bedelia was a book I borrowed from a cousin about a hapless maid and the chaos that ensued from her shenanigans. As a young adult, I discovered the great classics in literature, either in school reading assignments, or I would see a film version of a book and want to explore the original to see how well or what liberties Hollywood took in portraying it. The British film industry was more accurate in movies and television.

    Reply
  26. As to flashlights — I did scorch the mattress while reading under the covers.
    As to cereal boxes — in the 1930s, Log Cabin syrup came in a cabin-shaped can with cartoons all over the cabin painted on the can (the chimney was the pouring spout). The cartoons continued to include the bottom of the can! The entire family had plates full of syrup EVERY pancake day!
    And this brings up something other responders have suggested, but not specified. I was a compulsive, all-categorie reader in a family of like-minded people.
    As to specifics, they’ve all been named. My sister and I devoured the Little House books as they were published. I was thrilled to realized that Laura was the age of my paternal grandmother.
    And as to restrictions — none at home (although mother was thrilled when I told her I was bored by Forever Amber), none worth mentioning at the library. BUT the druggist’s sons wouldn’t let me read Science Fiction at the drug store (I’d read while waiting for the medicine to be ready).

    Reply
  27. As to flashlights — I did scorch the mattress while reading under the covers.
    As to cereal boxes — in the 1930s, Log Cabin syrup came in a cabin-shaped can with cartoons all over the cabin painted on the can (the chimney was the pouring spout). The cartoons continued to include the bottom of the can! The entire family had plates full of syrup EVERY pancake day!
    And this brings up something other responders have suggested, but not specified. I was a compulsive, all-categorie reader in a family of like-minded people.
    As to specifics, they’ve all been named. My sister and I devoured the Little House books as they were published. I was thrilled to realized that Laura was the age of my paternal grandmother.
    And as to restrictions — none at home (although mother was thrilled when I told her I was bored by Forever Amber), none worth mentioning at the library. BUT the druggist’s sons wouldn’t let me read Science Fiction at the drug store (I’d read while waiting for the medicine to be ready).

    Reply
  28. As to flashlights — I did scorch the mattress while reading under the covers.
    As to cereal boxes — in the 1930s, Log Cabin syrup came in a cabin-shaped can with cartoons all over the cabin painted on the can (the chimney was the pouring spout). The cartoons continued to include the bottom of the can! The entire family had plates full of syrup EVERY pancake day!
    And this brings up something other responders have suggested, but not specified. I was a compulsive, all-categorie reader in a family of like-minded people.
    As to specifics, they’ve all been named. My sister and I devoured the Little House books as they were published. I was thrilled to realized that Laura was the age of my paternal grandmother.
    And as to restrictions — none at home (although mother was thrilled when I told her I was bored by Forever Amber), none worth mentioning at the library. BUT the druggist’s sons wouldn’t let me read Science Fiction at the drug store (I’d read while waiting for the medicine to be ready).

    Reply
  29. As to flashlights — I did scorch the mattress while reading under the covers.
    As to cereal boxes — in the 1930s, Log Cabin syrup came in a cabin-shaped can with cartoons all over the cabin painted on the can (the chimney was the pouring spout). The cartoons continued to include the bottom of the can! The entire family had plates full of syrup EVERY pancake day!
    And this brings up something other responders have suggested, but not specified. I was a compulsive, all-categorie reader in a family of like-minded people.
    As to specifics, they’ve all been named. My sister and I devoured the Little House books as they were published. I was thrilled to realized that Laura was the age of my paternal grandmother.
    And as to restrictions — none at home (although mother was thrilled when I told her I was bored by Forever Amber), none worth mentioning at the library. BUT the druggist’s sons wouldn’t let me read Science Fiction at the drug store (I’d read while waiting for the medicine to be ready).

    Reply
  30. As to flashlights — I did scorch the mattress while reading under the covers.
    As to cereal boxes — in the 1930s, Log Cabin syrup came in a cabin-shaped can with cartoons all over the cabin painted on the can (the chimney was the pouring spout). The cartoons continued to include the bottom of the can! The entire family had plates full of syrup EVERY pancake day!
    And this brings up something other responders have suggested, but not specified. I was a compulsive, all-categorie reader in a family of like-minded people.
    As to specifics, they’ve all been named. My sister and I devoured the Little House books as they were published. I was thrilled to realized that Laura was the age of my paternal grandmother.
    And as to restrictions — none at home (although mother was thrilled when I told her I was bored by Forever Amber), none worth mentioning at the library. BUT the druggist’s sons wouldn’t let me read Science Fiction at the drug store (I’d read while waiting for the medicine to be ready).

    Reply
  31. Oh the reading started out really early. My mom used to take me to the library and you could check out 20 books (as a little person) and I would have them all read and be ready to go back the next day which annoyed her prodigiously. She started a new rule that I had to read them twice. Once to myself, and once to my baby sister (4 years younger). I would be done in two days then. LOL She once told me to read the dictionary or something so I did. I found I liked learning new words so I did that once a year. So much for sarcasm. 😉 The first books I actually remember are the Little House Books, and Nancy Drew, Anne of Green Gables, Emily of New Moon, The Hardy Boys, Trixie Belden…Once I got old enough to go to the library by myself (much to my mom’s relief) I would go twice a week and get 10 books. I got to read my mom’s Grace Livingston Hill and Emilie Loring novels after I turned the magical age of 14. I loved all the classics. Austen and Heyer are still my favorites. I never could get into the things that my contemporaries were reading for some reason. Judy Blume, Beverly Cleary and the Sweet Valley High later on just never appealed. Give me a Jane Austen or LM Montgomery, Narnia or Tom Clancy. 🙂 I still pack more books then clothes when I travel, though thankfully I can carry my kindle these days. It’s much lighter.

    Reply
  32. Oh the reading started out really early. My mom used to take me to the library and you could check out 20 books (as a little person) and I would have them all read and be ready to go back the next day which annoyed her prodigiously. She started a new rule that I had to read them twice. Once to myself, and once to my baby sister (4 years younger). I would be done in two days then. LOL She once told me to read the dictionary or something so I did. I found I liked learning new words so I did that once a year. So much for sarcasm. 😉 The first books I actually remember are the Little House Books, and Nancy Drew, Anne of Green Gables, Emily of New Moon, The Hardy Boys, Trixie Belden…Once I got old enough to go to the library by myself (much to my mom’s relief) I would go twice a week and get 10 books. I got to read my mom’s Grace Livingston Hill and Emilie Loring novels after I turned the magical age of 14. I loved all the classics. Austen and Heyer are still my favorites. I never could get into the things that my contemporaries were reading for some reason. Judy Blume, Beverly Cleary and the Sweet Valley High later on just never appealed. Give me a Jane Austen or LM Montgomery, Narnia or Tom Clancy. 🙂 I still pack more books then clothes when I travel, though thankfully I can carry my kindle these days. It’s much lighter.

    Reply
  33. Oh the reading started out really early. My mom used to take me to the library and you could check out 20 books (as a little person) and I would have them all read and be ready to go back the next day which annoyed her prodigiously. She started a new rule that I had to read them twice. Once to myself, and once to my baby sister (4 years younger). I would be done in two days then. LOL She once told me to read the dictionary or something so I did. I found I liked learning new words so I did that once a year. So much for sarcasm. 😉 The first books I actually remember are the Little House Books, and Nancy Drew, Anne of Green Gables, Emily of New Moon, The Hardy Boys, Trixie Belden…Once I got old enough to go to the library by myself (much to my mom’s relief) I would go twice a week and get 10 books. I got to read my mom’s Grace Livingston Hill and Emilie Loring novels after I turned the magical age of 14. I loved all the classics. Austen and Heyer are still my favorites. I never could get into the things that my contemporaries were reading for some reason. Judy Blume, Beverly Cleary and the Sweet Valley High later on just never appealed. Give me a Jane Austen or LM Montgomery, Narnia or Tom Clancy. 🙂 I still pack more books then clothes when I travel, though thankfully I can carry my kindle these days. It’s much lighter.

    Reply
  34. Oh the reading started out really early. My mom used to take me to the library and you could check out 20 books (as a little person) and I would have them all read and be ready to go back the next day which annoyed her prodigiously. She started a new rule that I had to read them twice. Once to myself, and once to my baby sister (4 years younger). I would be done in two days then. LOL She once told me to read the dictionary or something so I did. I found I liked learning new words so I did that once a year. So much for sarcasm. 😉 The first books I actually remember are the Little House Books, and Nancy Drew, Anne of Green Gables, Emily of New Moon, The Hardy Boys, Trixie Belden…Once I got old enough to go to the library by myself (much to my mom’s relief) I would go twice a week and get 10 books. I got to read my mom’s Grace Livingston Hill and Emilie Loring novels after I turned the magical age of 14. I loved all the classics. Austen and Heyer are still my favorites. I never could get into the things that my contemporaries were reading for some reason. Judy Blume, Beverly Cleary and the Sweet Valley High later on just never appealed. Give me a Jane Austen or LM Montgomery, Narnia or Tom Clancy. 🙂 I still pack more books then clothes when I travel, though thankfully I can carry my kindle these days. It’s much lighter.

    Reply
  35. Oh the reading started out really early. My mom used to take me to the library and you could check out 20 books (as a little person) and I would have them all read and be ready to go back the next day which annoyed her prodigiously. She started a new rule that I had to read them twice. Once to myself, and once to my baby sister (4 years younger). I would be done in two days then. LOL She once told me to read the dictionary or something so I did. I found I liked learning new words so I did that once a year. So much for sarcasm. 😉 The first books I actually remember are the Little House Books, and Nancy Drew, Anne of Green Gables, Emily of New Moon, The Hardy Boys, Trixie Belden…Once I got old enough to go to the library by myself (much to my mom’s relief) I would go twice a week and get 10 books. I got to read my mom’s Grace Livingston Hill and Emilie Loring novels after I turned the magical age of 14. I loved all the classics. Austen and Heyer are still my favorites. I never could get into the things that my contemporaries were reading for some reason. Judy Blume, Beverly Cleary and the Sweet Valley High later on just never appealed. Give me a Jane Austen or LM Montgomery, Narnia or Tom Clancy. 🙂 I still pack more books then clothes when I travel, though thankfully I can carry my kindle these days. It’s much lighter.

    Reply
  36. You can add me to the voracious child reader’s club as I too read anything and everything I could put a hand on. I don’t recall my parents reading to me but my grandmother did. I remember her reading I Am David by Anne Holm. Independently I read Enid Blyton, Russian Fairytales, and The Little Prince. At some point, I moved on to Cherry Ames and the Hardy Boys and then to Valley of the Dolls, The Godfather, the Playboy magazines I found while babysitting, and you get the picture! Somewhere along the way I discovered Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland and a love of romance was born.

    Reply
  37. You can add me to the voracious child reader’s club as I too read anything and everything I could put a hand on. I don’t recall my parents reading to me but my grandmother did. I remember her reading I Am David by Anne Holm. Independently I read Enid Blyton, Russian Fairytales, and The Little Prince. At some point, I moved on to Cherry Ames and the Hardy Boys and then to Valley of the Dolls, The Godfather, the Playboy magazines I found while babysitting, and you get the picture! Somewhere along the way I discovered Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland and a love of romance was born.

    Reply
  38. You can add me to the voracious child reader’s club as I too read anything and everything I could put a hand on. I don’t recall my parents reading to me but my grandmother did. I remember her reading I Am David by Anne Holm. Independently I read Enid Blyton, Russian Fairytales, and The Little Prince. At some point, I moved on to Cherry Ames and the Hardy Boys and then to Valley of the Dolls, The Godfather, the Playboy magazines I found while babysitting, and you get the picture! Somewhere along the way I discovered Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland and a love of romance was born.

    Reply
  39. You can add me to the voracious child reader’s club as I too read anything and everything I could put a hand on. I don’t recall my parents reading to me but my grandmother did. I remember her reading I Am David by Anne Holm. Independently I read Enid Blyton, Russian Fairytales, and The Little Prince. At some point, I moved on to Cherry Ames and the Hardy Boys and then to Valley of the Dolls, The Godfather, the Playboy magazines I found while babysitting, and you get the picture! Somewhere along the way I discovered Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland and a love of romance was born.

    Reply
  40. You can add me to the voracious child reader’s club as I too read anything and everything I could put a hand on. I don’t recall my parents reading to me but my grandmother did. I remember her reading I Am David by Anne Holm. Independently I read Enid Blyton, Russian Fairytales, and The Little Prince. At some point, I moved on to Cherry Ames and the Hardy Boys and then to Valley of the Dolls, The Godfather, the Playboy magazines I found while babysitting, and you get the picture! Somewhere along the way I discovered Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland and a love of romance was born.

    Reply
  41. I did a lot of SF reading, right down to nine and ten years old. I missed the Hugh Walters books though.
    I was very very lucky. I had three older sisters, all great readers, and my mother not only read lots of books, but seems to have kept them all. I had a huge library to choose from.
    My father was not a great fiction reader but he read lots of history. I mostly got into that when I was much older. Gengis Khan, Tamerlane, Roman Egypt, the Kingdoms of Africa, Decline and Fall … it was all there waiting for me when I got into my teens.
    And he read to us when he got home from work. Little kid books. But often enough, books for my older sisters, so I got to hear it all.

    Reply
  42. I did a lot of SF reading, right down to nine and ten years old. I missed the Hugh Walters books though.
    I was very very lucky. I had three older sisters, all great readers, and my mother not only read lots of books, but seems to have kept them all. I had a huge library to choose from.
    My father was not a great fiction reader but he read lots of history. I mostly got into that when I was much older. Gengis Khan, Tamerlane, Roman Egypt, the Kingdoms of Africa, Decline and Fall … it was all there waiting for me when I got into my teens.
    And he read to us when he got home from work. Little kid books. But often enough, books for my older sisters, so I got to hear it all.

    Reply
  43. I did a lot of SF reading, right down to nine and ten years old. I missed the Hugh Walters books though.
    I was very very lucky. I had three older sisters, all great readers, and my mother not only read lots of books, but seems to have kept them all. I had a huge library to choose from.
    My father was not a great fiction reader but he read lots of history. I mostly got into that when I was much older. Gengis Khan, Tamerlane, Roman Egypt, the Kingdoms of Africa, Decline and Fall … it was all there waiting for me when I got into my teens.
    And he read to us when he got home from work. Little kid books. But often enough, books for my older sisters, so I got to hear it all.

    Reply
  44. I did a lot of SF reading, right down to nine and ten years old. I missed the Hugh Walters books though.
    I was very very lucky. I had three older sisters, all great readers, and my mother not only read lots of books, but seems to have kept them all. I had a huge library to choose from.
    My father was not a great fiction reader but he read lots of history. I mostly got into that when I was much older. Gengis Khan, Tamerlane, Roman Egypt, the Kingdoms of Africa, Decline and Fall … it was all there waiting for me when I got into my teens.
    And he read to us when he got home from work. Little kid books. But often enough, books for my older sisters, so I got to hear it all.

    Reply
  45. I did a lot of SF reading, right down to nine and ten years old. I missed the Hugh Walters books though.
    I was very very lucky. I had three older sisters, all great readers, and my mother not only read lots of books, but seems to have kept them all. I had a huge library to choose from.
    My father was not a great fiction reader but he read lots of history. I mostly got into that when I was much older. Gengis Khan, Tamerlane, Roman Egypt, the Kingdoms of Africa, Decline and Fall … it was all there waiting for me when I got into my teens.
    And he read to us when he got home from work. Little kid books. But often enough, books for my older sisters, so I got to hear it all.

    Reply
  46. My mother read aloud to her children when we were still in the womb, so it is hardly surprising that we all started reading early. I read voraciously from the the age of four. I remember stacks of Little Golden books, but apart from Bible stories, nursery rhymes, and fairy tales, the first characters and stories I remember are Betsy, Tacy, and Tib from Maud Hart Lovelace’s beloved series. I soon added books by Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery, and Laura Ingalls Wilder to those I read and reread. I also loved Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess and The Secret Garden, and I read other books my mother had loved as a child such as Margaret Sidney’s Five Little Peppers series, Gene Stratton-Porter’s Freckles and Girl of the Limberlost, Jean Webster’s Daddy Long Legs and Dear Enemy, and Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty. The summer I turned ten I read Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Emily Dickinson’s poems for the first time. That same summer I began reading my mother’s romances; I started with Emilie Loring and went on to read dozens of books by Grace Livingston Hill, Agnes Sligh Turnbull, Faith Baldwin, D. E. Stevenson, Elizabeth Cadell, and others. A bit later, I started reading Agatha Christie’s mysteries, Mazo de la Roche’s Jalna books, and Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series along with her Tryst, Remember Today, and The Lost General. At the same time, I was reading the popular YA authors of the day—Janet Lambert, Amelia Elizabeth Walden, Lenora Mattingly Weber—and my mother’s beloved Victorian poets. All these before I hit my teens.

    Reply
  47. My mother read aloud to her children when we were still in the womb, so it is hardly surprising that we all started reading early. I read voraciously from the the age of four. I remember stacks of Little Golden books, but apart from Bible stories, nursery rhymes, and fairy tales, the first characters and stories I remember are Betsy, Tacy, and Tib from Maud Hart Lovelace’s beloved series. I soon added books by Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery, and Laura Ingalls Wilder to those I read and reread. I also loved Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess and The Secret Garden, and I read other books my mother had loved as a child such as Margaret Sidney’s Five Little Peppers series, Gene Stratton-Porter’s Freckles and Girl of the Limberlost, Jean Webster’s Daddy Long Legs and Dear Enemy, and Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty. The summer I turned ten I read Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Emily Dickinson’s poems for the first time. That same summer I began reading my mother’s romances; I started with Emilie Loring and went on to read dozens of books by Grace Livingston Hill, Agnes Sligh Turnbull, Faith Baldwin, D. E. Stevenson, Elizabeth Cadell, and others. A bit later, I started reading Agatha Christie’s mysteries, Mazo de la Roche’s Jalna books, and Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series along with her Tryst, Remember Today, and The Lost General. At the same time, I was reading the popular YA authors of the day—Janet Lambert, Amelia Elizabeth Walden, Lenora Mattingly Weber—and my mother’s beloved Victorian poets. All these before I hit my teens.

    Reply
  48. My mother read aloud to her children when we were still in the womb, so it is hardly surprising that we all started reading early. I read voraciously from the the age of four. I remember stacks of Little Golden books, but apart from Bible stories, nursery rhymes, and fairy tales, the first characters and stories I remember are Betsy, Tacy, and Tib from Maud Hart Lovelace’s beloved series. I soon added books by Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery, and Laura Ingalls Wilder to those I read and reread. I also loved Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess and The Secret Garden, and I read other books my mother had loved as a child such as Margaret Sidney’s Five Little Peppers series, Gene Stratton-Porter’s Freckles and Girl of the Limberlost, Jean Webster’s Daddy Long Legs and Dear Enemy, and Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty. The summer I turned ten I read Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Emily Dickinson’s poems for the first time. That same summer I began reading my mother’s romances; I started with Emilie Loring and went on to read dozens of books by Grace Livingston Hill, Agnes Sligh Turnbull, Faith Baldwin, D. E. Stevenson, Elizabeth Cadell, and others. A bit later, I started reading Agatha Christie’s mysteries, Mazo de la Roche’s Jalna books, and Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series along with her Tryst, Remember Today, and The Lost General. At the same time, I was reading the popular YA authors of the day—Janet Lambert, Amelia Elizabeth Walden, Lenora Mattingly Weber—and my mother’s beloved Victorian poets. All these before I hit my teens.

    Reply
  49. My mother read aloud to her children when we were still in the womb, so it is hardly surprising that we all started reading early. I read voraciously from the the age of four. I remember stacks of Little Golden books, but apart from Bible stories, nursery rhymes, and fairy tales, the first characters and stories I remember are Betsy, Tacy, and Tib from Maud Hart Lovelace’s beloved series. I soon added books by Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery, and Laura Ingalls Wilder to those I read and reread. I also loved Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess and The Secret Garden, and I read other books my mother had loved as a child such as Margaret Sidney’s Five Little Peppers series, Gene Stratton-Porter’s Freckles and Girl of the Limberlost, Jean Webster’s Daddy Long Legs and Dear Enemy, and Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty. The summer I turned ten I read Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Emily Dickinson’s poems for the first time. That same summer I began reading my mother’s romances; I started with Emilie Loring and went on to read dozens of books by Grace Livingston Hill, Agnes Sligh Turnbull, Faith Baldwin, D. E. Stevenson, Elizabeth Cadell, and others. A bit later, I started reading Agatha Christie’s mysteries, Mazo de la Roche’s Jalna books, and Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series along with her Tryst, Remember Today, and The Lost General. At the same time, I was reading the popular YA authors of the day—Janet Lambert, Amelia Elizabeth Walden, Lenora Mattingly Weber—and my mother’s beloved Victorian poets. All these before I hit my teens.

    Reply
  50. My mother read aloud to her children when we were still in the womb, so it is hardly surprising that we all started reading early. I read voraciously from the the age of four. I remember stacks of Little Golden books, but apart from Bible stories, nursery rhymes, and fairy tales, the first characters and stories I remember are Betsy, Tacy, and Tib from Maud Hart Lovelace’s beloved series. I soon added books by Louisa May Alcott, Lucy Maud Montgomery, and Laura Ingalls Wilder to those I read and reread. I also loved Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess and The Secret Garden, and I read other books my mother had loved as a child such as Margaret Sidney’s Five Little Peppers series, Gene Stratton-Porter’s Freckles and Girl of the Limberlost, Jean Webster’s Daddy Long Legs and Dear Enemy, and Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty. The summer I turned ten I read Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Emily Dickinson’s poems for the first time. That same summer I began reading my mother’s romances; I started with Emilie Loring and went on to read dozens of books by Grace Livingston Hill, Agnes Sligh Turnbull, Faith Baldwin, D. E. Stevenson, Elizabeth Cadell, and others. A bit later, I started reading Agatha Christie’s mysteries, Mazo de la Roche’s Jalna books, and Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series along with her Tryst, Remember Today, and The Lost General. At the same time, I was reading the popular YA authors of the day—Janet Lambert, Amelia Elizabeth Walden, Lenora Mattingly Weber—and my mother’s beloved Victorian poets. All these before I hit my teens.

    Reply
  51. I think we’re the last generation where the average person held beautifully bound books in hand. For me, that was poetry books. My mother loved poetry and had a vast collection of 1920s and 30s volumes.
    While I read the classic children’s animal books like Black Beauty and Bambi and Call of the Wild, I wasn’t a big horsebook person. I knida missed that …

    Reply
  52. I think we’re the last generation where the average person held beautifully bound books in hand. For me, that was poetry books. My mother loved poetry and had a vast collection of 1920s and 30s volumes.
    While I read the classic children’s animal books like Black Beauty and Bambi and Call of the Wild, I wasn’t a big horsebook person. I knida missed that …

    Reply
  53. I think we’re the last generation where the average person held beautifully bound books in hand. For me, that was poetry books. My mother loved poetry and had a vast collection of 1920s and 30s volumes.
    While I read the classic children’s animal books like Black Beauty and Bambi and Call of the Wild, I wasn’t a big horsebook person. I knida missed that …

    Reply
  54. I think we’re the last generation where the average person held beautifully bound books in hand. For me, that was poetry books. My mother loved poetry and had a vast collection of 1920s and 30s volumes.
    While I read the classic children’s animal books like Black Beauty and Bambi and Call of the Wild, I wasn’t a big horsebook person. I knida missed that …

    Reply
  55. I think we’re the last generation where the average person held beautifully bound books in hand. For me, that was poetry books. My mother loved poetry and had a vast collection of 1920s and 30s volumes.
    While I read the classic children’s animal books like Black Beauty and Bambi and Call of the Wild, I wasn’t a big horsebook person. I knida missed that …

    Reply
  56. I didn’t read Amelia Bedelia myself as a kid, but I read it to MY kids. One loved it. One was politely puzzled.
    Winnie the Pooh as another I didn’t read quite young enough to enjoy it as it was meant tob e enjoyed.

    Reply
  57. I didn’t read Amelia Bedelia myself as a kid, but I read it to MY kids. One loved it. One was politely puzzled.
    Winnie the Pooh as another I didn’t read quite young enough to enjoy it as it was meant tob e enjoyed.

    Reply
  58. I didn’t read Amelia Bedelia myself as a kid, but I read it to MY kids. One loved it. One was politely puzzled.
    Winnie the Pooh as another I didn’t read quite young enough to enjoy it as it was meant tob e enjoyed.

    Reply
  59. I didn’t read Amelia Bedelia myself as a kid, but I read it to MY kids. One loved it. One was politely puzzled.
    Winnie the Pooh as another I didn’t read quite young enough to enjoy it as it was meant tob e enjoyed.

    Reply
  60. I didn’t read Amelia Bedelia myself as a kid, but I read it to MY kids. One loved it. One was politely puzzled.
    Winnie the Pooh as another I didn’t read quite young enough to enjoy it as it was meant tob e enjoyed.

    Reply
  61. I read the little house books … but I don’t think it was anywhere near when they first came out.Or, at least, I didn’t think of them as newly issued books.
    Nobody at the library every discouraged me from reading in any section. I think my formidable mother would have put a quick stop to that.
    And there was all sort of questionable books on the shelves at home, but my mother said, (I remember her saying this,) “If she knows what it’s about it’s too late to keep her ignorant. If she doesn’t, she’ll just be bored.”
    I do remember that my mother and father talked seriously about whether they should put the gory and graphically illustrated medical books away someplace the kids wouldn’t see them. I think they decided kids were gruesome folks anyway and wouldn’t come to much harm from anatomical textbooks.

    Reply
  62. I read the little house books … but I don’t think it was anywhere near when they first came out.Or, at least, I didn’t think of them as newly issued books.
    Nobody at the library every discouraged me from reading in any section. I think my formidable mother would have put a quick stop to that.
    And there was all sort of questionable books on the shelves at home, but my mother said, (I remember her saying this,) “If she knows what it’s about it’s too late to keep her ignorant. If she doesn’t, she’ll just be bored.”
    I do remember that my mother and father talked seriously about whether they should put the gory and graphically illustrated medical books away someplace the kids wouldn’t see them. I think they decided kids were gruesome folks anyway and wouldn’t come to much harm from anatomical textbooks.

    Reply
  63. I read the little house books … but I don’t think it was anywhere near when they first came out.Or, at least, I didn’t think of them as newly issued books.
    Nobody at the library every discouraged me from reading in any section. I think my formidable mother would have put a quick stop to that.
    And there was all sort of questionable books on the shelves at home, but my mother said, (I remember her saying this,) “If she knows what it’s about it’s too late to keep her ignorant. If she doesn’t, she’ll just be bored.”
    I do remember that my mother and father talked seriously about whether they should put the gory and graphically illustrated medical books away someplace the kids wouldn’t see them. I think they decided kids were gruesome folks anyway and wouldn’t come to much harm from anatomical textbooks.

    Reply
  64. I read the little house books … but I don’t think it was anywhere near when they first came out.Or, at least, I didn’t think of them as newly issued books.
    Nobody at the library every discouraged me from reading in any section. I think my formidable mother would have put a quick stop to that.
    And there was all sort of questionable books on the shelves at home, but my mother said, (I remember her saying this,) “If she knows what it’s about it’s too late to keep her ignorant. If she doesn’t, she’ll just be bored.”
    I do remember that my mother and father talked seriously about whether they should put the gory and graphically illustrated medical books away someplace the kids wouldn’t see them. I think they decided kids were gruesome folks anyway and wouldn’t come to much harm from anatomical textbooks.

    Reply
  65. I read the little house books … but I don’t think it was anywhere near when they first came out.Or, at least, I didn’t think of them as newly issued books.
    Nobody at the library every discouraged me from reading in any section. I think my formidable mother would have put a quick stop to that.
    And there was all sort of questionable books on the shelves at home, but my mother said, (I remember her saying this,) “If she knows what it’s about it’s too late to keep her ignorant. If she doesn’t, she’ll just be bored.”
    I do remember that my mother and father talked seriously about whether they should put the gory and graphically illustrated medical books away someplace the kids wouldn’t see them. I think they decided kids were gruesome folks anyway and wouldn’t come to much harm from anatomical textbooks.

    Reply
  66. I read SOOOO many books of fairy tales and myths. Greek myths, Moldavian myths, The Red, Green, Blue and who knows how many other fairy books.
    Alice in Wonderland — now that I read at a bunch of different ages and it was a different book every time I read it.

    Reply
  67. I read SOOOO many books of fairy tales and myths. Greek myths, Moldavian myths, The Red, Green, Blue and who knows how many other fairy books.
    Alice in Wonderland — now that I read at a bunch of different ages and it was a different book every time I read it.

    Reply
  68. I read SOOOO many books of fairy tales and myths. Greek myths, Moldavian myths, The Red, Green, Blue and who knows how many other fairy books.
    Alice in Wonderland — now that I read at a bunch of different ages and it was a different book every time I read it.

    Reply
  69. I read SOOOO many books of fairy tales and myths. Greek myths, Moldavian myths, The Red, Green, Blue and who knows how many other fairy books.
    Alice in Wonderland — now that I read at a bunch of different ages and it was a different book every time I read it.

    Reply
  70. I read SOOOO many books of fairy tales and myths. Greek myths, Moldavian myths, The Red, Green, Blue and who knows how many other fairy books.
    Alice in Wonderland — now that I read at a bunch of different ages and it was a different book every time I read it.

    Reply
  71. Interestingly enough, when I read Girl of the Limberlost as a full grown adult i did not, of course, come to it as a young girl would have, but as a writer.
    The main character is just an absolutely pure quill account of someone completely honest, full of integrity, straightforward. A case study of it, if you will. That’s how you write it.

    Reply
  72. Interestingly enough, when I read Girl of the Limberlost as a full grown adult i did not, of course, come to it as a young girl would have, but as a writer.
    The main character is just an absolutely pure quill account of someone completely honest, full of integrity, straightforward. A case study of it, if you will. That’s how you write it.

    Reply
  73. Interestingly enough, when I read Girl of the Limberlost as a full grown adult i did not, of course, come to it as a young girl would have, but as a writer.
    The main character is just an absolutely pure quill account of someone completely honest, full of integrity, straightforward. A case study of it, if you will. That’s how you write it.

    Reply
  74. Interestingly enough, when I read Girl of the Limberlost as a full grown adult i did not, of course, come to it as a young girl would have, but as a writer.
    The main character is just an absolutely pure quill account of someone completely honest, full of integrity, straightforward. A case study of it, if you will. That’s how you write it.

    Reply
  75. Interestingly enough, when I read Girl of the Limberlost as a full grown adult i did not, of course, come to it as a young girl would have, but as a writer.
    The main character is just an absolutely pure quill account of someone completely honest, full of integrity, straightforward. A case study of it, if you will. That’s how you write it.

    Reply
  76. I’ve always been a voracious reader. My Mom would take me to the library every week and I would check out and read whatever was the limit they would allow. The children’s librarian started wringing her hands because I had read all the books that were “age appropriate” and she didn’t know what to recommend. Yes to the flashlight under the covers. I started with animal books and histories of nurses, then general history and fiction. I found Sci-Fi in middle school; I loved Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov and other pioneers. By high school I was reading War and Peace, Gone with the Wind, and heavy into fantasy like Lord of the Rings. I didn’t find romance until I was a mother myself, so I had a lot of remedial work to accomplish (grin) My main issue now is that work interferes with my reading. But I still find time to squeeze something every day. The Wenches are among my favorites!

    Reply
  77. I’ve always been a voracious reader. My Mom would take me to the library every week and I would check out and read whatever was the limit they would allow. The children’s librarian started wringing her hands because I had read all the books that were “age appropriate” and she didn’t know what to recommend. Yes to the flashlight under the covers. I started with animal books and histories of nurses, then general history and fiction. I found Sci-Fi in middle school; I loved Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov and other pioneers. By high school I was reading War and Peace, Gone with the Wind, and heavy into fantasy like Lord of the Rings. I didn’t find romance until I was a mother myself, so I had a lot of remedial work to accomplish (grin) My main issue now is that work interferes with my reading. But I still find time to squeeze something every day. The Wenches are among my favorites!

    Reply
  78. I’ve always been a voracious reader. My Mom would take me to the library every week and I would check out and read whatever was the limit they would allow. The children’s librarian started wringing her hands because I had read all the books that were “age appropriate” and she didn’t know what to recommend. Yes to the flashlight under the covers. I started with animal books and histories of nurses, then general history and fiction. I found Sci-Fi in middle school; I loved Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov and other pioneers. By high school I was reading War and Peace, Gone with the Wind, and heavy into fantasy like Lord of the Rings. I didn’t find romance until I was a mother myself, so I had a lot of remedial work to accomplish (grin) My main issue now is that work interferes with my reading. But I still find time to squeeze something every day. The Wenches are among my favorites!

    Reply
  79. I’ve always been a voracious reader. My Mom would take me to the library every week and I would check out and read whatever was the limit they would allow. The children’s librarian started wringing her hands because I had read all the books that were “age appropriate” and she didn’t know what to recommend. Yes to the flashlight under the covers. I started with animal books and histories of nurses, then general history and fiction. I found Sci-Fi in middle school; I loved Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov and other pioneers. By high school I was reading War and Peace, Gone with the Wind, and heavy into fantasy like Lord of the Rings. I didn’t find romance until I was a mother myself, so I had a lot of remedial work to accomplish (grin) My main issue now is that work interferes with my reading. But I still find time to squeeze something every day. The Wenches are among my favorites!

    Reply
  80. I’ve always been a voracious reader. My Mom would take me to the library every week and I would check out and read whatever was the limit they would allow. The children’s librarian started wringing her hands because I had read all the books that were “age appropriate” and she didn’t know what to recommend. Yes to the flashlight under the covers. I started with animal books and histories of nurses, then general history and fiction. I found Sci-Fi in middle school; I loved Robert Heinlein, Isaac Asimov and other pioneers. By high school I was reading War and Peace, Gone with the Wind, and heavy into fantasy like Lord of the Rings. I didn’t find romance until I was a mother myself, so I had a lot of remedial work to accomplish (grin) My main issue now is that work interferes with my reading. But I still find time to squeeze something every day. The Wenches are among my favorites!

    Reply
  81. We didn’t get on the power grid until I was 10, so the first 10 years of my life were spent reading books, having books read to me and listening to the wireless (radio) serials. I am the youngest of five, so according to my brothers and sisters, I was spoilt! This meant that I was able to read pretty much anything that came into the house. All of my siblings read to me and I had one who did all the voices, although he denies it now.My sister used to read and collect Mills & Boon, and she would always buy me a book at the same time as the M&B.
    Some of my favourite books when I was young were, the Billabong books by Mary Grant Bruce (Australian), Heidi by Johanna Spyri, The Bobbsey Twins by Laura Lee Hope, any by Enid Blyton and the cheap westerns my brothers used to read. L.M. Montgomery was another favourite and also the Susannah books by Muriel Denison. Our whole family has a love of Australian poetry featuring A.B (Banjo) Patterson and can all recite snippets on cue.
    The reading under the covers with a torch (flashlight) was a common occurrence and my brothers used to use the fact that they had torches for their bikes as a bargaining chip!
    I and all of my brothers and sisters still read voraciously, as Mum and Dad did until they passed, so hopefully it carries on into the next generations.

    Reply
  82. We didn’t get on the power grid until I was 10, so the first 10 years of my life were spent reading books, having books read to me and listening to the wireless (radio) serials. I am the youngest of five, so according to my brothers and sisters, I was spoilt! This meant that I was able to read pretty much anything that came into the house. All of my siblings read to me and I had one who did all the voices, although he denies it now.My sister used to read and collect Mills & Boon, and she would always buy me a book at the same time as the M&B.
    Some of my favourite books when I was young were, the Billabong books by Mary Grant Bruce (Australian), Heidi by Johanna Spyri, The Bobbsey Twins by Laura Lee Hope, any by Enid Blyton and the cheap westerns my brothers used to read. L.M. Montgomery was another favourite and also the Susannah books by Muriel Denison. Our whole family has a love of Australian poetry featuring A.B (Banjo) Patterson and can all recite snippets on cue.
    The reading under the covers with a torch (flashlight) was a common occurrence and my brothers used to use the fact that they had torches for their bikes as a bargaining chip!
    I and all of my brothers and sisters still read voraciously, as Mum and Dad did until they passed, so hopefully it carries on into the next generations.

    Reply
  83. We didn’t get on the power grid until I was 10, so the first 10 years of my life were spent reading books, having books read to me and listening to the wireless (radio) serials. I am the youngest of five, so according to my brothers and sisters, I was spoilt! This meant that I was able to read pretty much anything that came into the house. All of my siblings read to me and I had one who did all the voices, although he denies it now.My sister used to read and collect Mills & Boon, and she would always buy me a book at the same time as the M&B.
    Some of my favourite books when I was young were, the Billabong books by Mary Grant Bruce (Australian), Heidi by Johanna Spyri, The Bobbsey Twins by Laura Lee Hope, any by Enid Blyton and the cheap westerns my brothers used to read. L.M. Montgomery was another favourite and also the Susannah books by Muriel Denison. Our whole family has a love of Australian poetry featuring A.B (Banjo) Patterson and can all recite snippets on cue.
    The reading under the covers with a torch (flashlight) was a common occurrence and my brothers used to use the fact that they had torches for their bikes as a bargaining chip!
    I and all of my brothers and sisters still read voraciously, as Mum and Dad did until they passed, so hopefully it carries on into the next generations.

    Reply
  84. We didn’t get on the power grid until I was 10, so the first 10 years of my life were spent reading books, having books read to me and listening to the wireless (radio) serials. I am the youngest of five, so according to my brothers and sisters, I was spoilt! This meant that I was able to read pretty much anything that came into the house. All of my siblings read to me and I had one who did all the voices, although he denies it now.My sister used to read and collect Mills & Boon, and she would always buy me a book at the same time as the M&B.
    Some of my favourite books when I was young were, the Billabong books by Mary Grant Bruce (Australian), Heidi by Johanna Spyri, The Bobbsey Twins by Laura Lee Hope, any by Enid Blyton and the cheap westerns my brothers used to read. L.M. Montgomery was another favourite and also the Susannah books by Muriel Denison. Our whole family has a love of Australian poetry featuring A.B (Banjo) Patterson and can all recite snippets on cue.
    The reading under the covers with a torch (flashlight) was a common occurrence and my brothers used to use the fact that they had torches for their bikes as a bargaining chip!
    I and all of my brothers and sisters still read voraciously, as Mum and Dad did until they passed, so hopefully it carries on into the next generations.

    Reply
  85. We didn’t get on the power grid until I was 10, so the first 10 years of my life were spent reading books, having books read to me and listening to the wireless (radio) serials. I am the youngest of five, so according to my brothers and sisters, I was spoilt! This meant that I was able to read pretty much anything that came into the house. All of my siblings read to me and I had one who did all the voices, although he denies it now.My sister used to read and collect Mills & Boon, and she would always buy me a book at the same time as the M&B.
    Some of my favourite books when I was young were, the Billabong books by Mary Grant Bruce (Australian), Heidi by Johanna Spyri, The Bobbsey Twins by Laura Lee Hope, any by Enid Blyton and the cheap westerns my brothers used to read. L.M. Montgomery was another favourite and also the Susannah books by Muriel Denison. Our whole family has a love of Australian poetry featuring A.B (Banjo) Patterson and can all recite snippets on cue.
    The reading under the covers with a torch (flashlight) was a common occurrence and my brothers used to use the fact that they had torches for their bikes as a bargaining chip!
    I and all of my brothers and sisters still read voraciously, as Mum and Dad did until they passed, so hopefully it carries on into the next generations.

    Reply
  86. Christine, I remember the Billabong books — in fact I still have some on my shelf. They’re old library copies — my oldest sister was a librarian and she used to bring home all the cancelled books they were throwing out. I also read my older brother’s books.
    My mum and dad could quote poetry at each other by the hour — they were of the generation that learned reams of poetry by heart, so we kids picked up a fair bit as well. And one of Banjo Patterson’s poems will always choke me up because Dad used to recite it to mum, and it’s so romantic — “As long as your eyes are blue”
    http://www.wallisandmatilda.com.au/as-long-as-your-eyes-are-blue.shtml

    Reply
  87. Christine, I remember the Billabong books — in fact I still have some on my shelf. They’re old library copies — my oldest sister was a librarian and she used to bring home all the cancelled books they were throwing out. I also read my older brother’s books.
    My mum and dad could quote poetry at each other by the hour — they were of the generation that learned reams of poetry by heart, so we kids picked up a fair bit as well. And one of Banjo Patterson’s poems will always choke me up because Dad used to recite it to mum, and it’s so romantic — “As long as your eyes are blue”
    http://www.wallisandmatilda.com.au/as-long-as-your-eyes-are-blue.shtml

    Reply
  88. Christine, I remember the Billabong books — in fact I still have some on my shelf. They’re old library copies — my oldest sister was a librarian and she used to bring home all the cancelled books they were throwing out. I also read my older brother’s books.
    My mum and dad could quote poetry at each other by the hour — they were of the generation that learned reams of poetry by heart, so we kids picked up a fair bit as well. And one of Banjo Patterson’s poems will always choke me up because Dad used to recite it to mum, and it’s so romantic — “As long as your eyes are blue”
    http://www.wallisandmatilda.com.au/as-long-as-your-eyes-are-blue.shtml

    Reply
  89. Christine, I remember the Billabong books — in fact I still have some on my shelf. They’re old library copies — my oldest sister was a librarian and she used to bring home all the cancelled books they were throwing out. I also read my older brother’s books.
    My mum and dad could quote poetry at each other by the hour — they were of the generation that learned reams of poetry by heart, so we kids picked up a fair bit as well. And one of Banjo Patterson’s poems will always choke me up because Dad used to recite it to mum, and it’s so romantic — “As long as your eyes are blue”
    http://www.wallisandmatilda.com.au/as-long-as-your-eyes-are-blue.shtml

    Reply
  90. Christine, I remember the Billabong books — in fact I still have some on my shelf. They’re old library copies — my oldest sister was a librarian and she used to bring home all the cancelled books they were throwing out. I also read my older brother’s books.
    My mum and dad could quote poetry at each other by the hour — they were of the generation that learned reams of poetry by heart, so we kids picked up a fair bit as well. And one of Banjo Patterson’s poems will always choke me up because Dad used to recite it to mum, and it’s so romantic — “As long as your eyes are blue”
    http://www.wallisandmatilda.com.au/as-long-as-your-eyes-are-blue.shtml

    Reply
  91. Kathy, I also came late to romance fiction — there wasn’t a lot of it around in the bookshops here. but libraries were magical places and when I’d gone through all the authors I knew were good, I’d start on the ones that had a lot of books, and that’s how I came to Asimov and Heinlein and others.

    Reply
  92. Kathy, I also came late to romance fiction — there wasn’t a lot of it around in the bookshops here. but libraries were magical places and when I’d gone through all the authors I knew were good, I’d start on the ones that had a lot of books, and that’s how I came to Asimov and Heinlein and others.

    Reply
  93. Kathy, I also came late to romance fiction — there wasn’t a lot of it around in the bookshops here. but libraries were magical places and when I’d gone through all the authors I knew were good, I’d start on the ones that had a lot of books, and that’s how I came to Asimov and Heinlein and others.

    Reply
  94. Kathy, I also came late to romance fiction — there wasn’t a lot of it around in the bookshops here. but libraries were magical places and when I’d gone through all the authors I knew were good, I’d start on the ones that had a lot of books, and that’s how I came to Asimov and Heinlein and others.

    Reply
  95. Kathy, I also came late to romance fiction — there wasn’t a lot of it around in the bookshops here. but libraries were magical places and when I’d gone through all the authors I knew were good, I’d start on the ones that had a lot of books, and that’s how I came to Asimov and Heinlein and others.

    Reply
  96. Wow, I still have the full set of those Magic Faraway Tree books – I mean that particular series of covers.
    I think adults can forget how important – and memorable – a good cover can be for children!
    What I loved growing up in the 80s were the book club brochures. You’d take a catalogue home from school and pick cheap books to buy every month or two. When they arrived it was more exciting than the new blockbuster at the cinema!

    Reply
  97. Wow, I still have the full set of those Magic Faraway Tree books – I mean that particular series of covers.
    I think adults can forget how important – and memorable – a good cover can be for children!
    What I loved growing up in the 80s were the book club brochures. You’d take a catalogue home from school and pick cheap books to buy every month or two. When they arrived it was more exciting than the new blockbuster at the cinema!

    Reply
  98. Wow, I still have the full set of those Magic Faraway Tree books – I mean that particular series of covers.
    I think adults can forget how important – and memorable – a good cover can be for children!
    What I loved growing up in the 80s were the book club brochures. You’d take a catalogue home from school and pick cheap books to buy every month or two. When they arrived it was more exciting than the new blockbuster at the cinema!

    Reply
  99. Wow, I still have the full set of those Magic Faraway Tree books – I mean that particular series of covers.
    I think adults can forget how important – and memorable – a good cover can be for children!
    What I loved growing up in the 80s were the book club brochures. You’d take a catalogue home from school and pick cheap books to buy every month or two. When they arrived it was more exciting than the new blockbuster at the cinema!

    Reply
  100. Wow, I still have the full set of those Magic Faraway Tree books – I mean that particular series of covers.
    I think adults can forget how important – and memorable – a good cover can be for children!
    What I loved growing up in the 80s were the book club brochures. You’d take a catalogue home from school and pick cheap books to buy every month or two. When they arrived it was more exciting than the new blockbuster at the cinema!

    Reply
  101. I never thought about the covers that way, but you’re right. The Pokey Little Puppy would not be The Pokey Little Puppy without that cover. The Velveteen Rabbit, likewise.
    And while it’s not one of MY childhood books, but one of my kids’, Good Night Moon wouldn’t be the same.
    I really hate the GNM cover, but it is so much part of the experience.

    Reply
  102. I never thought about the covers that way, but you’re right. The Pokey Little Puppy would not be The Pokey Little Puppy without that cover. The Velveteen Rabbit, likewise.
    And while it’s not one of MY childhood books, but one of my kids’, Good Night Moon wouldn’t be the same.
    I really hate the GNM cover, but it is so much part of the experience.

    Reply
  103. I never thought about the covers that way, but you’re right. The Pokey Little Puppy would not be The Pokey Little Puppy without that cover. The Velveteen Rabbit, likewise.
    And while it’s not one of MY childhood books, but one of my kids’, Good Night Moon wouldn’t be the same.
    I really hate the GNM cover, but it is so much part of the experience.

    Reply
  104. I never thought about the covers that way, but you’re right. The Pokey Little Puppy would not be The Pokey Little Puppy without that cover. The Velveteen Rabbit, likewise.
    And while it’s not one of MY childhood books, but one of my kids’, Good Night Moon wouldn’t be the same.
    I really hate the GNM cover, but it is so much part of the experience.

    Reply
  105. I never thought about the covers that way, but you’re right. The Pokey Little Puppy would not be The Pokey Little Puppy without that cover. The Velveteen Rabbit, likewise.
    And while it’s not one of MY childhood books, but one of my kids’, Good Night Moon wouldn’t be the same.
    I really hate the GNM cover, but it is so much part of the experience.

    Reply
  106. I did not have very many children’s books. I started reading when I was very young. So, I read big books. My father was a member of the book of the month club and he had a lot of books about WWII. I read those.
    When I got to a school with a library and the book mobile started coming out to the area where we lived, I started reading books for young people.
    My first introduction to Golden Books was when my parents were buying them for my brothers and sister. I read cereal boxes and everything else I could read. For some time I lived with my grandparents, and they had books.
    I never went without reading, because it was like breathing. Reading was a life saver for me.

    Reply
  107. I did not have very many children’s books. I started reading when I was very young. So, I read big books. My father was a member of the book of the month club and he had a lot of books about WWII. I read those.
    When I got to a school with a library and the book mobile started coming out to the area where we lived, I started reading books for young people.
    My first introduction to Golden Books was when my parents were buying them for my brothers and sister. I read cereal boxes and everything else I could read. For some time I lived with my grandparents, and they had books.
    I never went without reading, because it was like breathing. Reading was a life saver for me.

    Reply
  108. I did not have very many children’s books. I started reading when I was very young. So, I read big books. My father was a member of the book of the month club and he had a lot of books about WWII. I read those.
    When I got to a school with a library and the book mobile started coming out to the area where we lived, I started reading books for young people.
    My first introduction to Golden Books was when my parents were buying them for my brothers and sister. I read cereal boxes and everything else I could read. For some time I lived with my grandparents, and they had books.
    I never went without reading, because it was like breathing. Reading was a life saver for me.

    Reply
  109. I did not have very many children’s books. I started reading when I was very young. So, I read big books. My father was a member of the book of the month club and he had a lot of books about WWII. I read those.
    When I got to a school with a library and the book mobile started coming out to the area where we lived, I started reading books for young people.
    My first introduction to Golden Books was when my parents were buying them for my brothers and sister. I read cereal boxes and everything else I could read. For some time I lived with my grandparents, and they had books.
    I never went without reading, because it was like breathing. Reading was a life saver for me.

    Reply
  110. I did not have very many children’s books. I started reading when I was very young. So, I read big books. My father was a member of the book of the month club and he had a lot of books about WWII. I read those.
    When I got to a school with a library and the book mobile started coming out to the area where we lived, I started reading books for young people.
    My first introduction to Golden Books was when my parents were buying them for my brothers and sister. I read cereal boxes and everything else I could read. For some time I lived with my grandparents, and they had books.
    I never went without reading, because it was like breathing. Reading was a life saver for me.

    Reply
  111. Anne, I’ve still got some of the Billabong books as well.
    And you’re right, it is a romantic poem. Another one we loved was The Pioneers ~ Frank Hudson.
    I also read about teachers reading to students..that was something that also happened, but in my case, it was my older sister who was the teacher and I was one of her students. She’s in her 70’s now and can still hold us spellbound with her reading.

    Reply
  112. Anne, I’ve still got some of the Billabong books as well.
    And you’re right, it is a romantic poem. Another one we loved was The Pioneers ~ Frank Hudson.
    I also read about teachers reading to students..that was something that also happened, but in my case, it was my older sister who was the teacher and I was one of her students. She’s in her 70’s now and can still hold us spellbound with her reading.

    Reply
  113. Anne, I’ve still got some of the Billabong books as well.
    And you’re right, it is a romantic poem. Another one we loved was The Pioneers ~ Frank Hudson.
    I also read about teachers reading to students..that was something that also happened, but in my case, it was my older sister who was the teacher and I was one of her students. She’s in her 70’s now and can still hold us spellbound with her reading.

    Reply
  114. Anne, I’ve still got some of the Billabong books as well.
    And you’re right, it is a romantic poem. Another one we loved was The Pioneers ~ Frank Hudson.
    I also read about teachers reading to students..that was something that also happened, but in my case, it was my older sister who was the teacher and I was one of her students. She’s in her 70’s now and can still hold us spellbound with her reading.

    Reply
  115. Anne, I’ve still got some of the Billabong books as well.
    And you’re right, it is a romantic poem. Another one we loved was The Pioneers ~ Frank Hudson.
    I also read about teachers reading to students..that was something that also happened, but in my case, it was my older sister who was the teacher and I was one of her students. She’s in her 70’s now and can still hold us spellbound with her reading.

    Reply
  116. I had forgotten about the bookmobile.
    I do remember it coming to the end of the street and me going to it on my own when I was seven or eight. Maybe younger. I had to climb WAY up to get on that step.
    They let us take just stacks of books out. Really, so many. Admirable of them. I am a huge fan of libraries.
    And cereal boxes are a greatly underappreciated form of literature.

    Reply
  117. I had forgotten about the bookmobile.
    I do remember it coming to the end of the street and me going to it on my own when I was seven or eight. Maybe younger. I had to climb WAY up to get on that step.
    They let us take just stacks of books out. Really, so many. Admirable of them. I am a huge fan of libraries.
    And cereal boxes are a greatly underappreciated form of literature.

    Reply
  118. I had forgotten about the bookmobile.
    I do remember it coming to the end of the street and me going to it on my own when I was seven or eight. Maybe younger. I had to climb WAY up to get on that step.
    They let us take just stacks of books out. Really, so many. Admirable of them. I am a huge fan of libraries.
    And cereal boxes are a greatly underappreciated form of literature.

    Reply
  119. I had forgotten about the bookmobile.
    I do remember it coming to the end of the street and me going to it on my own when I was seven or eight. Maybe younger. I had to climb WAY up to get on that step.
    They let us take just stacks of books out. Really, so many. Admirable of them. I am a huge fan of libraries.
    And cereal boxes are a greatly underappreciated form of literature.

    Reply
  120. I had forgotten about the bookmobile.
    I do remember it coming to the end of the street and me going to it on my own when I was seven or eight. Maybe younger. I had to climb WAY up to get on that step.
    They let us take just stacks of books out. Really, so many. Admirable of them. I am a huge fan of libraries.
    And cereal boxes are a greatly underappreciated form of literature.

    Reply
  121. I was and still am a voracious reader. I grew up with Enid Blyton. I read a hell of a lot of her books. When I saw the beginning of this post and The Folk of the Faraway Tree my heart beat a little faster. I LOVED that book and I actually read it again before Christmas. It’s timeless.
    There are a couple here that I’d never heard of so will look them up and might get around to a read.
    Great post.

    Reply
  122. I was and still am a voracious reader. I grew up with Enid Blyton. I read a hell of a lot of her books. When I saw the beginning of this post and The Folk of the Faraway Tree my heart beat a little faster. I LOVED that book and I actually read it again before Christmas. It’s timeless.
    There are a couple here that I’d never heard of so will look them up and might get around to a read.
    Great post.

    Reply
  123. I was and still am a voracious reader. I grew up with Enid Blyton. I read a hell of a lot of her books. When I saw the beginning of this post and The Folk of the Faraway Tree my heart beat a little faster. I LOVED that book and I actually read it again before Christmas. It’s timeless.
    There are a couple here that I’d never heard of so will look them up and might get around to a read.
    Great post.

    Reply
  124. I was and still am a voracious reader. I grew up with Enid Blyton. I read a hell of a lot of her books. When I saw the beginning of this post and The Folk of the Faraway Tree my heart beat a little faster. I LOVED that book and I actually read it again before Christmas. It’s timeless.
    There are a couple here that I’d never heard of so will look them up and might get around to a read.
    Great post.

    Reply
  125. I was and still am a voracious reader. I grew up with Enid Blyton. I read a hell of a lot of her books. When I saw the beginning of this post and The Folk of the Faraway Tree my heart beat a little faster. I LOVED that book and I actually read it again before Christmas. It’s timeless.
    There are a couple here that I’d never heard of so will look them up and might get around to a read.
    Great post.

    Reply
  126. I remember those school bookclubs, Sonya — they certainly got a lot of kids reading more.
    As for covers, I think they’re just as important for adults. The book of mine, with the worst, bland “nothing” cover is also the worst selling — and it’s not the contents. It won several prestigious awards, but sadly the cover let it down.

    Reply
  127. I remember those school bookclubs, Sonya — they certainly got a lot of kids reading more.
    As for covers, I think they’re just as important for adults. The book of mine, with the worst, bland “nothing” cover is also the worst selling — and it’s not the contents. It won several prestigious awards, but sadly the cover let it down.

    Reply
  128. I remember those school bookclubs, Sonya — they certainly got a lot of kids reading more.
    As for covers, I think they’re just as important for adults. The book of mine, with the worst, bland “nothing” cover is also the worst selling — and it’s not the contents. It won several prestigious awards, but sadly the cover let it down.

    Reply
  129. I remember those school bookclubs, Sonya — they certainly got a lot of kids reading more.
    As for covers, I think they’re just as important for adults. The book of mine, with the worst, bland “nothing” cover is also the worst selling — and it’s not the contents. It won several prestigious awards, but sadly the cover let it down.

    Reply
  130. I remember those school bookclubs, Sonya — they certainly got a lot of kids reading more.
    As for covers, I think they’re just as important for adults. The book of mine, with the worst, bland “nothing” cover is also the worst selling — and it’s not the contents. It won several prestigious awards, but sadly the cover let it down.

    Reply
  131. So many favourites in your lists! Anything by Enid Blyton of course (although Famous Five/Secret Seven rather than the fantasy stories), Alan Garner, Laura Ingalls Wilder… the list is endless. But my absolute favourites were the books by the wonderful Rosemary Sutcliff. I think she influenced me as a writer more than any other.

    Reply
  132. So many favourites in your lists! Anything by Enid Blyton of course (although Famous Five/Secret Seven rather than the fantasy stories), Alan Garner, Laura Ingalls Wilder… the list is endless. But my absolute favourites were the books by the wonderful Rosemary Sutcliff. I think she influenced me as a writer more than any other.

    Reply
  133. So many favourites in your lists! Anything by Enid Blyton of course (although Famous Five/Secret Seven rather than the fantasy stories), Alan Garner, Laura Ingalls Wilder… the list is endless. But my absolute favourites were the books by the wonderful Rosemary Sutcliff. I think she influenced me as a writer more than any other.

    Reply
  134. So many favourites in your lists! Anything by Enid Blyton of course (although Famous Five/Secret Seven rather than the fantasy stories), Alan Garner, Laura Ingalls Wilder… the list is endless. But my absolute favourites were the books by the wonderful Rosemary Sutcliff. I think she influenced me as a writer more than any other.

    Reply
  135. So many favourites in your lists! Anything by Enid Blyton of course (although Famous Five/Secret Seven rather than the fantasy stories), Alan Garner, Laura Ingalls Wilder… the list is endless. But my absolute favourites were the books by the wonderful Rosemary Sutcliff. I think she influenced me as a writer more than any other.

    Reply
  136. Like everyone else here it seems, I was a compulsive and constant reader. But do any of you have the papers to prove it? I’ve still got my 2nd grade report card, which notes “Karin often does not pay attention in class. She is too busy reading.”
    My parents encouraged my reading habit, and my mother would drop me off at the library while she did her weekly grocery shopping, which I loved. We had a set of Childcraft encyclopedias, which I read and reread. They contain a lot of stories and poems, and I remember memorizing some long poems while I was home sick with chicken pox or measles. I used to know all of “The Walrus and the Carpenter” and “The Highwayman”by heart although why they thought that one was appropriate for children, I’ll never understand!)
    I remember reading Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, and the Lad, A Dog books(collie stories). I also ordered books from the Scholastic Book Club at school, and I would seek out all the books with the gold seals on the cover-Newbury Award winners.

    Reply
  137. Like everyone else here it seems, I was a compulsive and constant reader. But do any of you have the papers to prove it? I’ve still got my 2nd grade report card, which notes “Karin often does not pay attention in class. She is too busy reading.”
    My parents encouraged my reading habit, and my mother would drop me off at the library while she did her weekly grocery shopping, which I loved. We had a set of Childcraft encyclopedias, which I read and reread. They contain a lot of stories and poems, and I remember memorizing some long poems while I was home sick with chicken pox or measles. I used to know all of “The Walrus and the Carpenter” and “The Highwayman”by heart although why they thought that one was appropriate for children, I’ll never understand!)
    I remember reading Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, and the Lad, A Dog books(collie stories). I also ordered books from the Scholastic Book Club at school, and I would seek out all the books with the gold seals on the cover-Newbury Award winners.

    Reply
  138. Like everyone else here it seems, I was a compulsive and constant reader. But do any of you have the papers to prove it? I’ve still got my 2nd grade report card, which notes “Karin often does not pay attention in class. She is too busy reading.”
    My parents encouraged my reading habit, and my mother would drop me off at the library while she did her weekly grocery shopping, which I loved. We had a set of Childcraft encyclopedias, which I read and reread. They contain a lot of stories and poems, and I remember memorizing some long poems while I was home sick with chicken pox or measles. I used to know all of “The Walrus and the Carpenter” and “The Highwayman”by heart although why they thought that one was appropriate for children, I’ll never understand!)
    I remember reading Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, and the Lad, A Dog books(collie stories). I also ordered books from the Scholastic Book Club at school, and I would seek out all the books with the gold seals on the cover-Newbury Award winners.

    Reply
  139. Like everyone else here it seems, I was a compulsive and constant reader. But do any of you have the papers to prove it? I’ve still got my 2nd grade report card, which notes “Karin often does not pay attention in class. She is too busy reading.”
    My parents encouraged my reading habit, and my mother would drop me off at the library while she did her weekly grocery shopping, which I loved. We had a set of Childcraft encyclopedias, which I read and reread. They contain a lot of stories and poems, and I remember memorizing some long poems while I was home sick with chicken pox or measles. I used to know all of “The Walrus and the Carpenter” and “The Highwayman”by heart although why they thought that one was appropriate for children, I’ll never understand!)
    I remember reading Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, and the Lad, A Dog books(collie stories). I also ordered books from the Scholastic Book Club at school, and I would seek out all the books with the gold seals on the cover-Newbury Award winners.

    Reply
  140. Like everyone else here it seems, I was a compulsive and constant reader. But do any of you have the papers to prove it? I’ve still got my 2nd grade report card, which notes “Karin often does not pay attention in class. She is too busy reading.”
    My parents encouraged my reading habit, and my mother would drop me off at the library while she did her weekly grocery shopping, which I loved. We had a set of Childcraft encyclopedias, which I read and reread. They contain a lot of stories and poems, and I remember memorizing some long poems while I was home sick with chicken pox or measles. I used to know all of “The Walrus and the Carpenter” and “The Highwayman”by heart although why they thought that one was appropriate for children, I’ll never understand!)
    I remember reading Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins, and the Lad, A Dog books(collie stories). I also ordered books from the Scholastic Book Club at school, and I would seek out all the books with the gold seals on the cover-Newbury Award winners.

    Reply
  141. I loved Sutcliff. She was the beginning of a lifelong love of the Classics. Decline and Fall, Renault, I Claudius (on TV too!) and all the translations of Homer and the Greek dramas.
    She made my life so much richer.

    Reply
  142. I loved Sutcliff. She was the beginning of a lifelong love of the Classics. Decline and Fall, Renault, I Claudius (on TV too!) and all the translations of Homer and the Greek dramas.
    She made my life so much richer.

    Reply
  143. I loved Sutcliff. She was the beginning of a lifelong love of the Classics. Decline and Fall, Renault, I Claudius (on TV too!) and all the translations of Homer and the Greek dramas.
    She made my life so much richer.

    Reply
  144. I loved Sutcliff. She was the beginning of a lifelong love of the Classics. Decline and Fall, Renault, I Claudius (on TV too!) and all the translations of Homer and the Greek dramas.
    She made my life so much richer.

    Reply
  145. I loved Sutcliff. She was the beginning of a lifelong love of the Classics. Decline and Fall, Renault, I Claudius (on TV too!) and all the translations of Homer and the Greek dramas.
    She made my life so much richer.

    Reply
  146. Whenever I wonder if covers sell books, I think about those Newbury and Caldecott Medals on the cover that made me pick them out at once.
    I wish they did that with YA and adult books. There are awards of all kinds and they never seem to be shown off. Pity, I think.

    Reply
  147. Whenever I wonder if covers sell books, I think about those Newbury and Caldecott Medals on the cover that made me pick them out at once.
    I wish they did that with YA and adult books. There are awards of all kinds and they never seem to be shown off. Pity, I think.

    Reply
  148. Whenever I wonder if covers sell books, I think about those Newbury and Caldecott Medals on the cover that made me pick them out at once.
    I wish they did that with YA and adult books. There are awards of all kinds and they never seem to be shown off. Pity, I think.

    Reply
  149. Whenever I wonder if covers sell books, I think about those Newbury and Caldecott Medals on the cover that made me pick them out at once.
    I wish they did that with YA and adult books. There are awards of all kinds and they never seem to be shown off. Pity, I think.

    Reply
  150. Whenever I wonder if covers sell books, I think about those Newbury and Caldecott Medals on the cover that made me pick them out at once.
    I wish they did that with YA and adult books. There are awards of all kinds and they never seem to be shown off. Pity, I think.

    Reply
  151. Alison, I still have some of my old Sutcliffs — Eagle of the Ninth was a fave, but so many others, too. I wonder if people who read historical novels as children grew up to be historical readers — and vice versa. I’ve never understood people who say, “Oh I can’t read historicals.” As a child, history is just another world for your imagination to play in, but if you never read historical novels as a kid, maybe it’s harder to go there as an adult.

    Reply
  152. Alison, I still have some of my old Sutcliffs — Eagle of the Ninth was a fave, but so many others, too. I wonder if people who read historical novels as children grew up to be historical readers — and vice versa. I’ve never understood people who say, “Oh I can’t read historicals.” As a child, history is just another world for your imagination to play in, but if you never read historical novels as a kid, maybe it’s harder to go there as an adult.

    Reply
  153. Alison, I still have some of my old Sutcliffs — Eagle of the Ninth was a fave, but so many others, too. I wonder if people who read historical novels as children grew up to be historical readers — and vice versa. I’ve never understood people who say, “Oh I can’t read historicals.” As a child, history is just another world for your imagination to play in, but if you never read historical novels as a kid, maybe it’s harder to go there as an adult.

    Reply
  154. Alison, I still have some of my old Sutcliffs — Eagle of the Ninth was a fave, but so many others, too. I wonder if people who read historical novels as children grew up to be historical readers — and vice versa. I’ve never understood people who say, “Oh I can’t read historicals.” As a child, history is just another world for your imagination to play in, but if you never read historical novels as a kid, maybe it’s harder to go there as an adult.

    Reply
  155. Alison, I still have some of my old Sutcliffs — Eagle of the Ninth was a fave, but so many others, too. I wonder if people who read historical novels as children grew up to be historical readers — and vice versa. I’ve never understood people who say, “Oh I can’t read historicals.” As a child, history is just another world for your imagination to play in, but if you never read historical novels as a kid, maybe it’s harder to go there as an adult.

    Reply
  156. LOL Karin — you win, with that documented reading habit!
    I more or less know The Highwayman by heart, too. As for why they thought it suitable for children, a cautionary tale, perhaps? And also an action-filled poem and lots to teach about onomatopoeia and metaphor and simile etc.

    Reply
  157. LOL Karin — you win, with that documented reading habit!
    I more or less know The Highwayman by heart, too. As for why they thought it suitable for children, a cautionary tale, perhaps? And also an action-filled poem and lots to teach about onomatopoeia and metaphor and simile etc.

    Reply
  158. LOL Karin — you win, with that documented reading habit!
    I more or less know The Highwayman by heart, too. As for why they thought it suitable for children, a cautionary tale, perhaps? And also an action-filled poem and lots to teach about onomatopoeia and metaphor and simile etc.

    Reply
  159. LOL Karin — you win, with that documented reading habit!
    I more or less know The Highwayman by heart, too. As for why they thought it suitable for children, a cautionary tale, perhaps? And also an action-filled poem and lots to teach about onomatopoeia and metaphor and simile etc.

    Reply
  160. LOL Karin — you win, with that documented reading habit!
    I more or less know The Highwayman by heart, too. As for why they thought it suitable for children, a cautionary tale, perhaps? And also an action-filled poem and lots to teach about onomatopoeia and metaphor and simile etc.

    Reply

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