What Are You Reading?

Sun Susan Sarah here — it’s lazy, hot, humid summertime, vacation and beach time for many, and Romance Writers of America conference time for some (including a few of the Wenches). I am packing a suitcase, too, with a bag of books sitting beside it as I prepare to go away for a few days.

Which got me to wondering what you all are reading. If you have a minute, please pick up the nearest book or two that you’re currently reading, and share a little of the last page you read. I’ll go first…

Images I’m trying something a bit different this week, a Pulitzer Prize-nominated medieval historical novel called Godric by Frederick Buechner. Written in 1980, it’s the story of Godric of Finchale (pronounced "Finkle,") a 12th century English monk and hermit, famous in his day for healing and miracles, and more or less unknown to us today … (unless you happen to be mucking about in early medieval British history as I’ve been doing lately). Here’s Buechner, and Godric describing his younger brother, William:

Page 13 …

Words came spilling out of him before he knew their meaning, and if there was none to listen, he’d talk to his own ten toes. He didn’t care a fig for what he talked about. One matter would serve him as well as another. He’d prattle of Normans or crops or weather till the spittle gathered at the corners of his mouth, and if you made a move to flee, there’d come to his eyes a haunted look, and he’d prattle all the faster so you’d find no chink to flee him through. Words were the line that moored himto the world, I think, and he thought if ever the line should break, he’d be forever cast adrift.

Images2 I’m also reading Silent in the Grave by Deanna Raybourn (there’s always more than one book in play — fiction, nonfiction, whatever I’m writing, the back of a cereal box, the nearest catalog, bring it on!). This one’s been in my TBR pile for a while, and I finally got to it, and I’m very glad I did. Lady Julia Grey takes it upon herself to investigate the murder of her husband … I’m really enjoying the clean, excellent writing, characters both appealing and intriguing, and a story that’s clever and complex….

Page 62 …

In fact, the more I studied Mr. Brisbane, the more he resembled a chess king. Polished and hard, with a certain implacable dignity. He was darker than any man I knew, with storm-black eyes and a head of thick, waving hair to match that would have made Byron prickle with jealousy.

But my scrutiny did not amuse him. He arched a brow at me, imperious as an emperor. I was mightily impressed. He did it much better than Aunt Hermia….

Christine_de_pisan And then there all are the research books I’m reading — Ritchie’s Normans in Scotland, Anderson’s Sources of Scottish History, Barrow’s Kingship and Unity — while I’m working on another hardcover novel for Crown about the 11th century queen, Margaret of Scotland, Malcolm Canmore’s Anglo-Saxon bride. She followed Lady Macbeth on the throne of Scotland; I’ve brought the former queen into her story, and I’m having a great time playing around with that!

Meanwhile, I still have some luxury time to read other writers … later I’ll read only my own work, and after a while, even the concise and shining prose on the back of the cereal box will seem like better stuff than I’ve got. For now, the deadline seems too far in the distance to worry my purty little head about…

Millaismarianawithburne I’m a bit time-dyslexic, with an overly optimistic comprehension of the Work Load vs. Time Available factors. In a few weeks that will bite me on the arse, and I’ll realize I’ve played around long enough. Queen Margaret will want her story finished (my editor will too), and I’ll get down to the sober biz of Serious Writing and Deadline Crunching. Then I’ll stop reading other people’s stuff for a while… but for now, I’m enjoying my summertime reading.

How about you all? What are you reading today? I’d love some new recommendations before I have to retreat into my author cave once again….

~Susan Sarah

125 thoughts on “What Are You Reading?”

  1. Patricia Briggs, Cry Wolf
    “Walter found the dead man, dressed in hunter orange, propped up against a tree. From the looks of him, he’d fallen from the rocks above where a game trail snaked along the edge of a short cliff. One leg had been broken, but he’d managed to drag himself a few yards. Probably he’d died of the cold a few days ago.
    He must be the reason all the searchers had been hiking through the woods.”
    Mark Searle and Kenneth W. Stevenson, Documents of the Marriage Liturgy
    Ritual of Coutances, 18th century France
    “N., I give you the settlement which has been agreed between your parents and mine, of which these coins are the sign and symbol.”
    [A far cry from the hyperbole of the English, “With all my worldly good I thee endow.”]
    Steven Brust and Emma Bull, Freedom & Necessity
    “Engels leaned over the desk. I hadn’t properly recognized the differences in height between them; Engels is over six feet tall, so he had to bend, trying to meat James’ eyes. He spoke quietly, but very distinctly. ‘Because the leaders of the Chartist movement were brave, dedicated, self-sacrificing men and women who thought that all it took was to be brave, dedicated, and self-sacrificing.’ He straightened up.’They lacked political vision.'”

    Reply
  2. Patricia Briggs, Cry Wolf
    “Walter found the dead man, dressed in hunter orange, propped up against a tree. From the looks of him, he’d fallen from the rocks above where a game trail snaked along the edge of a short cliff. One leg had been broken, but he’d managed to drag himself a few yards. Probably he’d died of the cold a few days ago.
    He must be the reason all the searchers had been hiking through the woods.”
    Mark Searle and Kenneth W. Stevenson, Documents of the Marriage Liturgy
    Ritual of Coutances, 18th century France
    “N., I give you the settlement which has been agreed between your parents and mine, of which these coins are the sign and symbol.”
    [A far cry from the hyperbole of the English, “With all my worldly good I thee endow.”]
    Steven Brust and Emma Bull, Freedom & Necessity
    “Engels leaned over the desk. I hadn’t properly recognized the differences in height between them; Engels is over six feet tall, so he had to bend, trying to meat James’ eyes. He spoke quietly, but very distinctly. ‘Because the leaders of the Chartist movement were brave, dedicated, self-sacrificing men and women who thought that all it took was to be brave, dedicated, and self-sacrificing.’ He straightened up.’They lacked political vision.'”

    Reply
  3. Patricia Briggs, Cry Wolf
    “Walter found the dead man, dressed in hunter orange, propped up against a tree. From the looks of him, he’d fallen from the rocks above where a game trail snaked along the edge of a short cliff. One leg had been broken, but he’d managed to drag himself a few yards. Probably he’d died of the cold a few days ago.
    He must be the reason all the searchers had been hiking through the woods.”
    Mark Searle and Kenneth W. Stevenson, Documents of the Marriage Liturgy
    Ritual of Coutances, 18th century France
    “N., I give you the settlement which has been agreed between your parents and mine, of which these coins are the sign and symbol.”
    [A far cry from the hyperbole of the English, “With all my worldly good I thee endow.”]
    Steven Brust and Emma Bull, Freedom & Necessity
    “Engels leaned over the desk. I hadn’t properly recognized the differences in height between them; Engels is over six feet tall, so he had to bend, trying to meat James’ eyes. He spoke quietly, but very distinctly. ‘Because the leaders of the Chartist movement were brave, dedicated, self-sacrificing men and women who thought that all it took was to be brave, dedicated, and self-sacrificing.’ He straightened up.’They lacked political vision.'”

    Reply
  4. Patricia Briggs, Cry Wolf
    “Walter found the dead man, dressed in hunter orange, propped up against a tree. From the looks of him, he’d fallen from the rocks above where a game trail snaked along the edge of a short cliff. One leg had been broken, but he’d managed to drag himself a few yards. Probably he’d died of the cold a few days ago.
    He must be the reason all the searchers had been hiking through the woods.”
    Mark Searle and Kenneth W. Stevenson, Documents of the Marriage Liturgy
    Ritual of Coutances, 18th century France
    “N., I give you the settlement which has been agreed between your parents and mine, of which these coins are the sign and symbol.”
    [A far cry from the hyperbole of the English, “With all my worldly good I thee endow.”]
    Steven Brust and Emma Bull, Freedom & Necessity
    “Engels leaned over the desk. I hadn’t properly recognized the differences in height between them; Engels is over six feet tall, so he had to bend, trying to meat James’ eyes. He spoke quietly, but very distinctly. ‘Because the leaders of the Chartist movement were brave, dedicated, self-sacrificing men and women who thought that all it took was to be brave, dedicated, and self-sacrificing.’ He straightened up.’They lacked political vision.'”

    Reply
  5. Patricia Briggs, Cry Wolf
    “Walter found the dead man, dressed in hunter orange, propped up against a tree. From the looks of him, he’d fallen from the rocks above where a game trail snaked along the edge of a short cliff. One leg had been broken, but he’d managed to drag himself a few yards. Probably he’d died of the cold a few days ago.
    He must be the reason all the searchers had been hiking through the woods.”
    Mark Searle and Kenneth W. Stevenson, Documents of the Marriage Liturgy
    Ritual of Coutances, 18th century France
    “N., I give you the settlement which has been agreed between your parents and mine, of which these coins are the sign and symbol.”
    [A far cry from the hyperbole of the English, “With all my worldly good I thee endow.”]
    Steven Brust and Emma Bull, Freedom & Necessity
    “Engels leaned over the desk. I hadn’t properly recognized the differences in height between them; Engels is over six feet tall, so he had to bend, trying to meat James’ eyes. He spoke quietly, but very distinctly. ‘Because the leaders of the Chartist movement were brave, dedicated, self-sacrificing men and women who thought that all it took was to be brave, dedicated, and self-sacrificing.’ He straightened up.’They lacked political vision.'”

    Reply
  6. Oooh, one of my favorite games. I’m reading Terry Pratchett’s MASKERADE. From p. 193:
    “The shop bell tinkled in a refined tone, as if it were embarrassed to do something as vulgar as ring. It would have much preferred to give a polite cough.
    “This was Ankh-Morpork’s most prestigious dress shop, and one way of telling was the apparent absence of anything so crass as merchandise. The occasional carefully placed piece of expensive material merely hinted at the possibilities available.”
    Also, and less enchanting, but necessary to WIP, Princess Marie Liechtenstein’s HOLLAND HOUSE (1874), with the standard cheerful prose of not-so-great Victorian writers:
    “This DINING ROOM, therefore, by a happy contradiction, is cheerful; and yet, by a strange contradiction, in it was enacted a melancholy scene. The majesty of Death once occupied this room. Here Addison breathed his last. It is the well-known story. Time’s hand afterwards seem to sweep away the remembrance with the fact. A younger generation sat there and laughed a joyous laugh, destined also to be silenced by the grave…”

    Reply
  7. Oooh, one of my favorite games. I’m reading Terry Pratchett’s MASKERADE. From p. 193:
    “The shop bell tinkled in a refined tone, as if it were embarrassed to do something as vulgar as ring. It would have much preferred to give a polite cough.
    “This was Ankh-Morpork’s most prestigious dress shop, and one way of telling was the apparent absence of anything so crass as merchandise. The occasional carefully placed piece of expensive material merely hinted at the possibilities available.”
    Also, and less enchanting, but necessary to WIP, Princess Marie Liechtenstein’s HOLLAND HOUSE (1874), with the standard cheerful prose of not-so-great Victorian writers:
    “This DINING ROOM, therefore, by a happy contradiction, is cheerful; and yet, by a strange contradiction, in it was enacted a melancholy scene. The majesty of Death once occupied this room. Here Addison breathed his last. It is the well-known story. Time’s hand afterwards seem to sweep away the remembrance with the fact. A younger generation sat there and laughed a joyous laugh, destined also to be silenced by the grave…”

    Reply
  8. Oooh, one of my favorite games. I’m reading Terry Pratchett’s MASKERADE. From p. 193:
    “The shop bell tinkled in a refined tone, as if it were embarrassed to do something as vulgar as ring. It would have much preferred to give a polite cough.
    “This was Ankh-Morpork’s most prestigious dress shop, and one way of telling was the apparent absence of anything so crass as merchandise. The occasional carefully placed piece of expensive material merely hinted at the possibilities available.”
    Also, and less enchanting, but necessary to WIP, Princess Marie Liechtenstein’s HOLLAND HOUSE (1874), with the standard cheerful prose of not-so-great Victorian writers:
    “This DINING ROOM, therefore, by a happy contradiction, is cheerful; and yet, by a strange contradiction, in it was enacted a melancholy scene. The majesty of Death once occupied this room. Here Addison breathed his last. It is the well-known story. Time’s hand afterwards seem to sweep away the remembrance with the fact. A younger generation sat there and laughed a joyous laugh, destined also to be silenced by the grave…”

    Reply
  9. Oooh, one of my favorite games. I’m reading Terry Pratchett’s MASKERADE. From p. 193:
    “The shop bell tinkled in a refined tone, as if it were embarrassed to do something as vulgar as ring. It would have much preferred to give a polite cough.
    “This was Ankh-Morpork’s most prestigious dress shop, and one way of telling was the apparent absence of anything so crass as merchandise. The occasional carefully placed piece of expensive material merely hinted at the possibilities available.”
    Also, and less enchanting, but necessary to WIP, Princess Marie Liechtenstein’s HOLLAND HOUSE (1874), with the standard cheerful prose of not-so-great Victorian writers:
    “This DINING ROOM, therefore, by a happy contradiction, is cheerful; and yet, by a strange contradiction, in it was enacted a melancholy scene. The majesty of Death once occupied this room. Here Addison breathed his last. It is the well-known story. Time’s hand afterwards seem to sweep away the remembrance with the fact. A younger generation sat there and laughed a joyous laugh, destined also to be silenced by the grave…”

    Reply
  10. Oooh, one of my favorite games. I’m reading Terry Pratchett’s MASKERADE. From p. 193:
    “The shop bell tinkled in a refined tone, as if it were embarrassed to do something as vulgar as ring. It would have much preferred to give a polite cough.
    “This was Ankh-Morpork’s most prestigious dress shop, and one way of telling was the apparent absence of anything so crass as merchandise. The occasional carefully placed piece of expensive material merely hinted at the possibilities available.”
    Also, and less enchanting, but necessary to WIP, Princess Marie Liechtenstein’s HOLLAND HOUSE (1874), with the standard cheerful prose of not-so-great Victorian writers:
    “This DINING ROOM, therefore, by a happy contradiction, is cheerful; and yet, by a strange contradiction, in it was enacted a melancholy scene. The majesty of Death once occupied this room. Here Addison breathed his last. It is the well-known story. Time’s hand afterwards seem to sweep away the remembrance with the fact. A younger generation sat there and laughed a joyous laugh, destined also to be silenced by the grave…”

    Reply
  11. I’m currently reading two books, one for research, one just to read.
    The “just to read” book is Bernard Cornwell’s THE WINTER KING. From p. 163:
    “In the spring my son was born. He died three days later. For days afterwards I would see that small wrinkled red face and tears would come to my eyes at the memory. He had seemed healthy, but one morning, hung in his swaddling clothes on the wall of the kitchen so he would be out of the way of the dogs and piglets, he simply died.”
    My research book is WELLINGTON AS MILITARY COMMANDER, by Michael Glover. From p. 83:
    “Nine days later the army forming the northern arm of the Spanish pincers was wrecked at Alba de Tormes. For the time being there was no large body of Spanish regular troops to whom the French need pay attention. ‘I declare,’ wrote Wellington, ‘that if they had preserved their two armies, or even one of them, the cause was safe….But no! Nothing will answer excepting to fight great battles in plains, in which their defeat is as certain as is the commencement of the battle.'”

    Reply
  12. I’m currently reading two books, one for research, one just to read.
    The “just to read” book is Bernard Cornwell’s THE WINTER KING. From p. 163:
    “In the spring my son was born. He died three days later. For days afterwards I would see that small wrinkled red face and tears would come to my eyes at the memory. He had seemed healthy, but one morning, hung in his swaddling clothes on the wall of the kitchen so he would be out of the way of the dogs and piglets, he simply died.”
    My research book is WELLINGTON AS MILITARY COMMANDER, by Michael Glover. From p. 83:
    “Nine days later the army forming the northern arm of the Spanish pincers was wrecked at Alba de Tormes. For the time being there was no large body of Spanish regular troops to whom the French need pay attention. ‘I declare,’ wrote Wellington, ‘that if they had preserved their two armies, or even one of them, the cause was safe….But no! Nothing will answer excepting to fight great battles in plains, in which their defeat is as certain as is the commencement of the battle.'”

    Reply
  13. I’m currently reading two books, one for research, one just to read.
    The “just to read” book is Bernard Cornwell’s THE WINTER KING. From p. 163:
    “In the spring my son was born. He died three days later. For days afterwards I would see that small wrinkled red face and tears would come to my eyes at the memory. He had seemed healthy, but one morning, hung in his swaddling clothes on the wall of the kitchen so he would be out of the way of the dogs and piglets, he simply died.”
    My research book is WELLINGTON AS MILITARY COMMANDER, by Michael Glover. From p. 83:
    “Nine days later the army forming the northern arm of the Spanish pincers was wrecked at Alba de Tormes. For the time being there was no large body of Spanish regular troops to whom the French need pay attention. ‘I declare,’ wrote Wellington, ‘that if they had preserved their two armies, or even one of them, the cause was safe….But no! Nothing will answer excepting to fight great battles in plains, in which their defeat is as certain as is the commencement of the battle.'”

    Reply
  14. I’m currently reading two books, one for research, one just to read.
    The “just to read” book is Bernard Cornwell’s THE WINTER KING. From p. 163:
    “In the spring my son was born. He died three days later. For days afterwards I would see that small wrinkled red face and tears would come to my eyes at the memory. He had seemed healthy, but one morning, hung in his swaddling clothes on the wall of the kitchen so he would be out of the way of the dogs and piglets, he simply died.”
    My research book is WELLINGTON AS MILITARY COMMANDER, by Michael Glover. From p. 83:
    “Nine days later the army forming the northern arm of the Spanish pincers was wrecked at Alba de Tormes. For the time being there was no large body of Spanish regular troops to whom the French need pay attention. ‘I declare,’ wrote Wellington, ‘that if they had preserved their two armies, or even one of them, the cause was safe….But no! Nothing will answer excepting to fight great battles in plains, in which their defeat is as certain as is the commencement of the battle.'”

    Reply
  15. I’m currently reading two books, one for research, one just to read.
    The “just to read” book is Bernard Cornwell’s THE WINTER KING. From p. 163:
    “In the spring my son was born. He died three days later. For days afterwards I would see that small wrinkled red face and tears would come to my eyes at the memory. He had seemed healthy, but one morning, hung in his swaddling clothes on the wall of the kitchen so he would be out of the way of the dogs and piglets, he simply died.”
    My research book is WELLINGTON AS MILITARY COMMANDER, by Michael Glover. From p. 83:
    “Nine days later the army forming the northern arm of the Spanish pincers was wrecked at Alba de Tormes. For the time being there was no large body of Spanish regular troops to whom the French need pay attention. ‘I declare,’ wrote Wellington, ‘that if they had preserved their two armies, or even one of them, the cause was safe….But no! Nothing will answer excepting to fight great battles in plains, in which their defeat is as certain as is the commencement of the battle.'”

    Reply
  16. I, too, am reading Cry Wolf, but I won’t quote another bit from it as there’s already a snippit here. I just finished Liza Lutz’s two wonderful books, The Spellman Files and Curse of the Spellmans and can hardly wait for the next one to come out.
    I got a big kick out of Godric’s description of William; I’ve known a couple of guys EXACTLY LIKE THAT! I also had cousin who was just like Mrs. Bates in Austen’s “Emma.” Perhaps whoever the estimable Jane modeled Mrs. Bates on was an ancestor?
    I’m definitely mining today’s blog and comments for more good stuff to read; love it when you guys do this!

    Reply
  17. I, too, am reading Cry Wolf, but I won’t quote another bit from it as there’s already a snippit here. I just finished Liza Lutz’s two wonderful books, The Spellman Files and Curse of the Spellmans and can hardly wait for the next one to come out.
    I got a big kick out of Godric’s description of William; I’ve known a couple of guys EXACTLY LIKE THAT! I also had cousin who was just like Mrs. Bates in Austen’s “Emma.” Perhaps whoever the estimable Jane modeled Mrs. Bates on was an ancestor?
    I’m definitely mining today’s blog and comments for more good stuff to read; love it when you guys do this!

    Reply
  18. I, too, am reading Cry Wolf, but I won’t quote another bit from it as there’s already a snippit here. I just finished Liza Lutz’s two wonderful books, The Spellman Files and Curse of the Spellmans and can hardly wait for the next one to come out.
    I got a big kick out of Godric’s description of William; I’ve known a couple of guys EXACTLY LIKE THAT! I also had cousin who was just like Mrs. Bates in Austen’s “Emma.” Perhaps whoever the estimable Jane modeled Mrs. Bates on was an ancestor?
    I’m definitely mining today’s blog and comments for more good stuff to read; love it when you guys do this!

    Reply
  19. I, too, am reading Cry Wolf, but I won’t quote another bit from it as there’s already a snippit here. I just finished Liza Lutz’s two wonderful books, The Spellman Files and Curse of the Spellmans and can hardly wait for the next one to come out.
    I got a big kick out of Godric’s description of William; I’ve known a couple of guys EXACTLY LIKE THAT! I also had cousin who was just like Mrs. Bates in Austen’s “Emma.” Perhaps whoever the estimable Jane modeled Mrs. Bates on was an ancestor?
    I’m definitely mining today’s blog and comments for more good stuff to read; love it when you guys do this!

    Reply
  20. I, too, am reading Cry Wolf, but I won’t quote another bit from it as there’s already a snippit here. I just finished Liza Lutz’s two wonderful books, The Spellman Files and Curse of the Spellmans and can hardly wait for the next one to come out.
    I got a big kick out of Godric’s description of William; I’ve known a couple of guys EXACTLY LIKE THAT! I also had cousin who was just like Mrs. Bates in Austen’s “Emma.” Perhaps whoever the estimable Jane modeled Mrs. Bates on was an ancestor?
    I’m definitely mining today’s blog and comments for more good stuff to read; love it when you guys do this!

    Reply
  21. I like to read one fiction and one non-fiction at the same time…one to enjoy and one to learn something.
    Right now for sheer reading pleasure I’m reading Loretta’s Your Scandalous Ways and loving it.
    I’m also learning a lot from Judith Schneid Lewis, In the Family Way: Childbearing in the British Aristocracy, 1760-1860. It’s a fascinating book.
    Waiting in the wings after that is The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England by Amanda Vickery.
    Working in a library sure has its advantages for I have access to most any book that sounds interesting from online talk.
    Also on my summer reading list was Lady Macbeth. What a great retelling of the tale from a source much maligned and seldom heard from. I look forward to reading about Malcolm Canmore’s wife. Thank you for opening up this world to us.

    Reply
  22. I like to read one fiction and one non-fiction at the same time…one to enjoy and one to learn something.
    Right now for sheer reading pleasure I’m reading Loretta’s Your Scandalous Ways and loving it.
    I’m also learning a lot from Judith Schneid Lewis, In the Family Way: Childbearing in the British Aristocracy, 1760-1860. It’s a fascinating book.
    Waiting in the wings after that is The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England by Amanda Vickery.
    Working in a library sure has its advantages for I have access to most any book that sounds interesting from online talk.
    Also on my summer reading list was Lady Macbeth. What a great retelling of the tale from a source much maligned and seldom heard from. I look forward to reading about Malcolm Canmore’s wife. Thank you for opening up this world to us.

    Reply
  23. I like to read one fiction and one non-fiction at the same time…one to enjoy and one to learn something.
    Right now for sheer reading pleasure I’m reading Loretta’s Your Scandalous Ways and loving it.
    I’m also learning a lot from Judith Schneid Lewis, In the Family Way: Childbearing in the British Aristocracy, 1760-1860. It’s a fascinating book.
    Waiting in the wings after that is The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England by Amanda Vickery.
    Working in a library sure has its advantages for I have access to most any book that sounds interesting from online talk.
    Also on my summer reading list was Lady Macbeth. What a great retelling of the tale from a source much maligned and seldom heard from. I look forward to reading about Malcolm Canmore’s wife. Thank you for opening up this world to us.

    Reply
  24. I like to read one fiction and one non-fiction at the same time…one to enjoy and one to learn something.
    Right now for sheer reading pleasure I’m reading Loretta’s Your Scandalous Ways and loving it.
    I’m also learning a lot from Judith Schneid Lewis, In the Family Way: Childbearing in the British Aristocracy, 1760-1860. It’s a fascinating book.
    Waiting in the wings after that is The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England by Amanda Vickery.
    Working in a library sure has its advantages for I have access to most any book that sounds interesting from online talk.
    Also on my summer reading list was Lady Macbeth. What a great retelling of the tale from a source much maligned and seldom heard from. I look forward to reading about Malcolm Canmore’s wife. Thank you for opening up this world to us.

    Reply
  25. I like to read one fiction and one non-fiction at the same time…one to enjoy and one to learn something.
    Right now for sheer reading pleasure I’m reading Loretta’s Your Scandalous Ways and loving it.
    I’m also learning a lot from Judith Schneid Lewis, In the Family Way: Childbearing in the British Aristocracy, 1760-1860. It’s a fascinating book.
    Waiting in the wings after that is The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England by Amanda Vickery.
    Working in a library sure has its advantages for I have access to most any book that sounds interesting from online talk.
    Also on my summer reading list was Lady Macbeth. What a great retelling of the tale from a source much maligned and seldom heard from. I look forward to reading about Malcolm Canmore’s wife. Thank you for opening up this world to us.

    Reply
  26. Am reading a book that I think is only available in the UK right now, Julie Cohen’s Honey Trap. I had the pleasure of meeting her last week at a reading/booksigning with Kathy Love and Anna Louise Luica.
    p.82
    She’d had a lucky escape.
    He walked by her without a word, and despite herself she watched his long, loose-limbed stride, the proud way he held his head up. The walk of a star. The same way he’d walked in the music videos she’d seen every now and then, late night on television, when she was tired and not quick enough to change the channel. Not quick enough, or not strong enough.
    Sophie wrapped her arms around herself and climbed into the bus.
    She was kidding herself. She hadn’t escaped at all, not from the moment she’d met him.
    ***Love Deanna Raybourn!

    Reply
  27. Am reading a book that I think is only available in the UK right now, Julie Cohen’s Honey Trap. I had the pleasure of meeting her last week at a reading/booksigning with Kathy Love and Anna Louise Luica.
    p.82
    She’d had a lucky escape.
    He walked by her without a word, and despite herself she watched his long, loose-limbed stride, the proud way he held his head up. The walk of a star. The same way he’d walked in the music videos she’d seen every now and then, late night on television, when she was tired and not quick enough to change the channel. Not quick enough, or not strong enough.
    Sophie wrapped her arms around herself and climbed into the bus.
    She was kidding herself. She hadn’t escaped at all, not from the moment she’d met him.
    ***Love Deanna Raybourn!

    Reply
  28. Am reading a book that I think is only available in the UK right now, Julie Cohen’s Honey Trap. I had the pleasure of meeting her last week at a reading/booksigning with Kathy Love and Anna Louise Luica.
    p.82
    She’d had a lucky escape.
    He walked by her without a word, and despite herself she watched his long, loose-limbed stride, the proud way he held his head up. The walk of a star. The same way he’d walked in the music videos she’d seen every now and then, late night on television, when she was tired and not quick enough to change the channel. Not quick enough, or not strong enough.
    Sophie wrapped her arms around herself and climbed into the bus.
    She was kidding herself. She hadn’t escaped at all, not from the moment she’d met him.
    ***Love Deanna Raybourn!

    Reply
  29. Am reading a book that I think is only available in the UK right now, Julie Cohen’s Honey Trap. I had the pleasure of meeting her last week at a reading/booksigning with Kathy Love and Anna Louise Luica.
    p.82
    She’d had a lucky escape.
    He walked by her without a word, and despite herself she watched his long, loose-limbed stride, the proud way he held his head up. The walk of a star. The same way he’d walked in the music videos she’d seen every now and then, late night on television, when she was tired and not quick enough to change the channel. Not quick enough, or not strong enough.
    Sophie wrapped her arms around herself and climbed into the bus.
    She was kidding herself. She hadn’t escaped at all, not from the moment she’d met him.
    ***Love Deanna Raybourn!

    Reply
  30. Am reading a book that I think is only available in the UK right now, Julie Cohen’s Honey Trap. I had the pleasure of meeting her last week at a reading/booksigning with Kathy Love and Anna Louise Luica.
    p.82
    She’d had a lucky escape.
    He walked by her without a word, and despite herself she watched his long, loose-limbed stride, the proud way he held his head up. The walk of a star. The same way he’d walked in the music videos she’d seen every now and then, late night on television, when she was tired and not quick enough to change the channel. Not quick enough, or not strong enough.
    Sophie wrapped her arms around herself and climbed into the bus.
    She was kidding herself. She hadn’t escaped at all, not from the moment she’d met him.
    ***Love Deanna Raybourn!

    Reply
  31. Hi. I just wanted to let you know that I just finished reading To Wed a Highland Bride, and I loved it! When do you think you will publish the next one in the series? I am anxious to continue the story! 🙂

    Reply
  32. Hi. I just wanted to let you know that I just finished reading To Wed a Highland Bride, and I loved it! When do you think you will publish the next one in the series? I am anxious to continue the story! 🙂

    Reply
  33. Hi. I just wanted to let you know that I just finished reading To Wed a Highland Bride, and I loved it! When do you think you will publish the next one in the series? I am anxious to continue the story! 🙂

    Reply
  34. Hi. I just wanted to let you know that I just finished reading To Wed a Highland Bride, and I loved it! When do you think you will publish the next one in the series? I am anxious to continue the story! 🙂

    Reply
  35. Hi. I just wanted to let you know that I just finished reading To Wed a Highland Bride, and I loved it! When do you think you will publish the next one in the series? I am anxious to continue the story! 🙂

    Reply
  36. “Egyptian scribes,” Helena read out to me, delightedly devouring some encyclopaedia she had borrowed from her father’s private library, “write with the sheets in a roll stuck down right over left, because their script goes that way and as they write their reed needs to pass downhill across the joins; Greek scribes turn the roll upside down, so the joins lap the other way. Marcus, have you noticed that the grain on the innter surface of a scroll is always horizontal? That’s because there is then less risk of the scroll pulling apart than if the vertical sides were used-”
    Fron Ode to a Banker by Lindsey Davis

    Reply
  37. “Egyptian scribes,” Helena read out to me, delightedly devouring some encyclopaedia she had borrowed from her father’s private library, “write with the sheets in a roll stuck down right over left, because their script goes that way and as they write their reed needs to pass downhill across the joins; Greek scribes turn the roll upside down, so the joins lap the other way. Marcus, have you noticed that the grain on the innter surface of a scroll is always horizontal? That’s because there is then less risk of the scroll pulling apart than if the vertical sides were used-”
    Fron Ode to a Banker by Lindsey Davis

    Reply
  38. “Egyptian scribes,” Helena read out to me, delightedly devouring some encyclopaedia she had borrowed from her father’s private library, “write with the sheets in a roll stuck down right over left, because their script goes that way and as they write their reed needs to pass downhill across the joins; Greek scribes turn the roll upside down, so the joins lap the other way. Marcus, have you noticed that the grain on the innter surface of a scroll is always horizontal? That’s because there is then less risk of the scroll pulling apart than if the vertical sides were used-”
    Fron Ode to a Banker by Lindsey Davis

    Reply
  39. “Egyptian scribes,” Helena read out to me, delightedly devouring some encyclopaedia she had borrowed from her father’s private library, “write with the sheets in a roll stuck down right over left, because their script goes that way and as they write their reed needs to pass downhill across the joins; Greek scribes turn the roll upside down, so the joins lap the other way. Marcus, have you noticed that the grain on the innter surface of a scroll is always horizontal? That’s because there is then less risk of the scroll pulling apart than if the vertical sides were used-”
    Fron Ode to a Banker by Lindsey Davis

    Reply
  40. “Egyptian scribes,” Helena read out to me, delightedly devouring some encyclopaedia she had borrowed from her father’s private library, “write with the sheets in a roll stuck down right over left, because their script goes that way and as they write their reed needs to pass downhill across the joins; Greek scribes turn the roll upside down, so the joins lap the other way. Marcus, have you noticed that the grain on the innter surface of a scroll is always horizontal? That’s because there is then less risk of the scroll pulling apart than if the vertical sides were used-”
    Fron Ode to a Banker by Lindsey Davis

    Reply
  41. I am re-reading Immortal Highlander by Karen Marie Moning. Adam, I’m sure only in my opinion but regardless, to me, the very best Alpha Hero with the best redemption story ever! But they have to be read in order for the full impact, in all honesty…
    “But the MacKeltars treated him as if he were one of them. Ribbed and jested with him as they did among themselves. Thrust their wee bairns into his arms and made him hold them. He’d not had a baby in his hands for over a thousand years, had never had one spit up on him. Regurgitated formula was hell on silk and leather, but then he’d caught the look in Gabrielle’s eyes and decided tiny Maddy MacKeltar could spit up on him all she wanted.
    They even got testy with him when they felt he wasn’t being forthcoming enough about himself. In the past few days he’d talked of things, shared experiences he’d shared with none before. His own kind would have scoffed, and mortals had never truly seen him as one of them, never freed him so completely simply to be, without censure or preconception. Not even Morganna. He’d always been one fo the Fae to her, and his son had never welcomed him at Castle Brodie, refusing to acknowledge him as his father.
    But here, in this enchanted time, he was Adam. A man. Nothing more. Nothing less. And it was a completely fascinating thing to be.

    Reply
  42. I am re-reading Immortal Highlander by Karen Marie Moning. Adam, I’m sure only in my opinion but regardless, to me, the very best Alpha Hero with the best redemption story ever! But they have to be read in order for the full impact, in all honesty…
    “But the MacKeltars treated him as if he were one of them. Ribbed and jested with him as they did among themselves. Thrust their wee bairns into his arms and made him hold them. He’d not had a baby in his hands for over a thousand years, had never had one spit up on him. Regurgitated formula was hell on silk and leather, but then he’d caught the look in Gabrielle’s eyes and decided tiny Maddy MacKeltar could spit up on him all she wanted.
    They even got testy with him when they felt he wasn’t being forthcoming enough about himself. In the past few days he’d talked of things, shared experiences he’d shared with none before. His own kind would have scoffed, and mortals had never truly seen him as one of them, never freed him so completely simply to be, without censure or preconception. Not even Morganna. He’d always been one fo the Fae to her, and his son had never welcomed him at Castle Brodie, refusing to acknowledge him as his father.
    But here, in this enchanted time, he was Adam. A man. Nothing more. Nothing less. And it was a completely fascinating thing to be.

    Reply
  43. I am re-reading Immortal Highlander by Karen Marie Moning. Adam, I’m sure only in my opinion but regardless, to me, the very best Alpha Hero with the best redemption story ever! But they have to be read in order for the full impact, in all honesty…
    “But the MacKeltars treated him as if he were one of them. Ribbed and jested with him as they did among themselves. Thrust their wee bairns into his arms and made him hold them. He’d not had a baby in his hands for over a thousand years, had never had one spit up on him. Regurgitated formula was hell on silk and leather, but then he’d caught the look in Gabrielle’s eyes and decided tiny Maddy MacKeltar could spit up on him all she wanted.
    They even got testy with him when they felt he wasn’t being forthcoming enough about himself. In the past few days he’d talked of things, shared experiences he’d shared with none before. His own kind would have scoffed, and mortals had never truly seen him as one of them, never freed him so completely simply to be, without censure or preconception. Not even Morganna. He’d always been one fo the Fae to her, and his son had never welcomed him at Castle Brodie, refusing to acknowledge him as his father.
    But here, in this enchanted time, he was Adam. A man. Nothing more. Nothing less. And it was a completely fascinating thing to be.

    Reply
  44. I am re-reading Immortal Highlander by Karen Marie Moning. Adam, I’m sure only in my opinion but regardless, to me, the very best Alpha Hero with the best redemption story ever! But they have to be read in order for the full impact, in all honesty…
    “But the MacKeltars treated him as if he were one of them. Ribbed and jested with him as they did among themselves. Thrust their wee bairns into his arms and made him hold them. He’d not had a baby in his hands for over a thousand years, had never had one spit up on him. Regurgitated formula was hell on silk and leather, but then he’d caught the look in Gabrielle’s eyes and decided tiny Maddy MacKeltar could spit up on him all she wanted.
    They even got testy with him when they felt he wasn’t being forthcoming enough about himself. In the past few days he’d talked of things, shared experiences he’d shared with none before. His own kind would have scoffed, and mortals had never truly seen him as one of them, never freed him so completely simply to be, without censure or preconception. Not even Morganna. He’d always been one fo the Fae to her, and his son had never welcomed him at Castle Brodie, refusing to acknowledge him as his father.
    But here, in this enchanted time, he was Adam. A man. Nothing more. Nothing less. And it was a completely fascinating thing to be.

    Reply
  45. I am re-reading Immortal Highlander by Karen Marie Moning. Adam, I’m sure only in my opinion but regardless, to me, the very best Alpha Hero with the best redemption story ever! But they have to be read in order for the full impact, in all honesty…
    “But the MacKeltars treated him as if he were one of them. Ribbed and jested with him as they did among themselves. Thrust their wee bairns into his arms and made him hold them. He’d not had a baby in his hands for over a thousand years, had never had one spit up on him. Regurgitated formula was hell on silk and leather, but then he’d caught the look in Gabrielle’s eyes and decided tiny Maddy MacKeltar could spit up on him all she wanted.
    They even got testy with him when they felt he wasn’t being forthcoming enough about himself. In the past few days he’d talked of things, shared experiences he’d shared with none before. His own kind would have scoffed, and mortals had never truly seen him as one of them, never freed him so completely simply to be, without censure or preconception. Not even Morganna. He’d always been one fo the Fae to her, and his son had never welcomed him at Castle Brodie, refusing to acknowledge him as his father.
    But here, in this enchanted time, he was Adam. A man. Nothing more. Nothing less. And it was a completely fascinating thing to be.

    Reply
  46. It must be catching! I just finished CRY WOLF last night! Loved it.
    I’ve been mainly rereading lately, mostly stuff that I turned out not to like as well as when I last read it. One book in progress–possibly for the rest of the decade–is Hannah Arendt’s EICHMANN IN JERUSALEM, with its meditation on “the banality of evil.”
    Not sure what I’ll be getting into next. Hopefully, reshelving all the books on the floor…
    I do have on deck CUPBOARD LOVE: A DICTIONARY OF CULINARY CURIOSITIES by by Mark Morton. I love books about words, like James Lipton’s AN EXALTATION OF LARKS and Eric Partridge’s ORIGINS (an etymological dictionary one can wander around in for hours).

    Reply
  47. It must be catching! I just finished CRY WOLF last night! Loved it.
    I’ve been mainly rereading lately, mostly stuff that I turned out not to like as well as when I last read it. One book in progress–possibly for the rest of the decade–is Hannah Arendt’s EICHMANN IN JERUSALEM, with its meditation on “the banality of evil.”
    Not sure what I’ll be getting into next. Hopefully, reshelving all the books on the floor…
    I do have on deck CUPBOARD LOVE: A DICTIONARY OF CULINARY CURIOSITIES by by Mark Morton. I love books about words, like James Lipton’s AN EXALTATION OF LARKS and Eric Partridge’s ORIGINS (an etymological dictionary one can wander around in for hours).

    Reply
  48. It must be catching! I just finished CRY WOLF last night! Loved it.
    I’ve been mainly rereading lately, mostly stuff that I turned out not to like as well as when I last read it. One book in progress–possibly for the rest of the decade–is Hannah Arendt’s EICHMANN IN JERUSALEM, with its meditation on “the banality of evil.”
    Not sure what I’ll be getting into next. Hopefully, reshelving all the books on the floor…
    I do have on deck CUPBOARD LOVE: A DICTIONARY OF CULINARY CURIOSITIES by by Mark Morton. I love books about words, like James Lipton’s AN EXALTATION OF LARKS and Eric Partridge’s ORIGINS (an etymological dictionary one can wander around in for hours).

    Reply
  49. It must be catching! I just finished CRY WOLF last night! Loved it.
    I’ve been mainly rereading lately, mostly stuff that I turned out not to like as well as when I last read it. One book in progress–possibly for the rest of the decade–is Hannah Arendt’s EICHMANN IN JERUSALEM, with its meditation on “the banality of evil.”
    Not sure what I’ll be getting into next. Hopefully, reshelving all the books on the floor…
    I do have on deck CUPBOARD LOVE: A DICTIONARY OF CULINARY CURIOSITIES by by Mark Morton. I love books about words, like James Lipton’s AN EXALTATION OF LARKS and Eric Partridge’s ORIGINS (an etymological dictionary one can wander around in for hours).

    Reply
  50. It must be catching! I just finished CRY WOLF last night! Loved it.
    I’ve been mainly rereading lately, mostly stuff that I turned out not to like as well as when I last read it. One book in progress–possibly for the rest of the decade–is Hannah Arendt’s EICHMANN IN JERUSALEM, with its meditation on “the banality of evil.”
    Not sure what I’ll be getting into next. Hopefully, reshelving all the books on the floor…
    I do have on deck CUPBOARD LOVE: A DICTIONARY OF CULINARY CURIOSITIES by by Mark Morton. I love books about words, like James Lipton’s AN EXALTATION OF LARKS and Eric Partridge’s ORIGINS (an etymological dictionary one can wander around in for hours).

    Reply
  51. I just finished “Your Scandolous Ways” yesterday. It was fabulous. I am reading now Georgette Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub” for the very first time. I had never even heard of her, but the book came highly reccomended. I am also starting Janet Evanovich’s “Fearless Fourteen” I am looking forward to a few laughs there.

    Reply
  52. I just finished “Your Scandolous Ways” yesterday. It was fabulous. I am reading now Georgette Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub” for the very first time. I had never even heard of her, but the book came highly reccomended. I am also starting Janet Evanovich’s “Fearless Fourteen” I am looking forward to a few laughs there.

    Reply
  53. I just finished “Your Scandolous Ways” yesterday. It was fabulous. I am reading now Georgette Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub” for the very first time. I had never even heard of her, but the book came highly reccomended. I am also starting Janet Evanovich’s “Fearless Fourteen” I am looking forward to a few laughs there.

    Reply
  54. I just finished “Your Scandolous Ways” yesterday. It was fabulous. I am reading now Georgette Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub” for the very first time. I had never even heard of her, but the book came highly reccomended. I am also starting Janet Evanovich’s “Fearless Fourteen” I am looking forward to a few laughs there.

    Reply
  55. I just finished “Your Scandolous Ways” yesterday. It was fabulous. I am reading now Georgette Heyer’s “Devil’s Cub” for the very first time. I had never even heard of her, but the book came highly reccomended. I am also starting Janet Evanovich’s “Fearless Fourteen” I am looking forward to a few laughs there.

    Reply
  56. Currently reading two nonfiction – “Food not Lawns” by H. C. Flores. It discusses how to build food gardens around your house instead of all that grass that you have to mow…her gardens are set up to be more self-sufficient. She does an awesome job of giving you all kinds of hints on how to do this on a very tight budget.
    The other book is “Truly Cultured” by Nancy Lee Bentley. It is a very interesting book about how to make fermented foods. She goes into a little bit of the background of fermented foods – her own history and world history. She is a very entertaining writer.
    Not too much light reading this summer….although I did manage to squeeze in “Your Scandalous Ways”.

    Reply
  57. Currently reading two nonfiction – “Food not Lawns” by H. C. Flores. It discusses how to build food gardens around your house instead of all that grass that you have to mow…her gardens are set up to be more self-sufficient. She does an awesome job of giving you all kinds of hints on how to do this on a very tight budget.
    The other book is “Truly Cultured” by Nancy Lee Bentley. It is a very interesting book about how to make fermented foods. She goes into a little bit of the background of fermented foods – her own history and world history. She is a very entertaining writer.
    Not too much light reading this summer….although I did manage to squeeze in “Your Scandalous Ways”.

    Reply
  58. Currently reading two nonfiction – “Food not Lawns” by H. C. Flores. It discusses how to build food gardens around your house instead of all that grass that you have to mow…her gardens are set up to be more self-sufficient. She does an awesome job of giving you all kinds of hints on how to do this on a very tight budget.
    The other book is “Truly Cultured” by Nancy Lee Bentley. It is a very interesting book about how to make fermented foods. She goes into a little bit of the background of fermented foods – her own history and world history. She is a very entertaining writer.
    Not too much light reading this summer….although I did manage to squeeze in “Your Scandalous Ways”.

    Reply
  59. Currently reading two nonfiction – “Food not Lawns” by H. C. Flores. It discusses how to build food gardens around your house instead of all that grass that you have to mow…her gardens are set up to be more self-sufficient. She does an awesome job of giving you all kinds of hints on how to do this on a very tight budget.
    The other book is “Truly Cultured” by Nancy Lee Bentley. It is a very interesting book about how to make fermented foods. She goes into a little bit of the background of fermented foods – her own history and world history. She is a very entertaining writer.
    Not too much light reading this summer….although I did manage to squeeze in “Your Scandalous Ways”.

    Reply
  60. Currently reading two nonfiction – “Food not Lawns” by H. C. Flores. It discusses how to build food gardens around your house instead of all that grass that you have to mow…her gardens are set up to be more self-sufficient. She does an awesome job of giving you all kinds of hints on how to do this on a very tight budget.
    The other book is “Truly Cultured” by Nancy Lee Bentley. It is a very interesting book about how to make fermented foods. She goes into a little bit of the background of fermented foods – her own history and world history. She is a very entertaining writer.
    Not too much light reading this summer….although I did manage to squeeze in “Your Scandalous Ways”.

    Reply
  61. I am currently reading I KNOW YOU GOT SOUL by Jeremy Clarkson, one of the hosts of Top Gear, and a very funny writer. It’s about manmade objects he has loved – the Concorde, the Millenium Falcon, Hoover Dam, a satellite dish named Arthur, the B52, the Zeppelin. I’m hardly a car nut, but he makes me laugh out loud.
    I am also reading A POISONED SEASON by Tasha Alexander, the second of her books about Lady Emily Ashton, and carrying LORD HAWKRIDGE’S SECRET by Anne Ashley.
    I too enjoyed SILENT IN THE GRAVE and SILENT IN THE SANCTUARY, as well as YOUR SCANDALOUS WAYS.

    Reply
  62. I am currently reading I KNOW YOU GOT SOUL by Jeremy Clarkson, one of the hosts of Top Gear, and a very funny writer. It’s about manmade objects he has loved – the Concorde, the Millenium Falcon, Hoover Dam, a satellite dish named Arthur, the B52, the Zeppelin. I’m hardly a car nut, but he makes me laugh out loud.
    I am also reading A POISONED SEASON by Tasha Alexander, the second of her books about Lady Emily Ashton, and carrying LORD HAWKRIDGE’S SECRET by Anne Ashley.
    I too enjoyed SILENT IN THE GRAVE and SILENT IN THE SANCTUARY, as well as YOUR SCANDALOUS WAYS.

    Reply
  63. I am currently reading I KNOW YOU GOT SOUL by Jeremy Clarkson, one of the hosts of Top Gear, and a very funny writer. It’s about manmade objects he has loved – the Concorde, the Millenium Falcon, Hoover Dam, a satellite dish named Arthur, the B52, the Zeppelin. I’m hardly a car nut, but he makes me laugh out loud.
    I am also reading A POISONED SEASON by Tasha Alexander, the second of her books about Lady Emily Ashton, and carrying LORD HAWKRIDGE’S SECRET by Anne Ashley.
    I too enjoyed SILENT IN THE GRAVE and SILENT IN THE SANCTUARY, as well as YOUR SCANDALOUS WAYS.

    Reply
  64. I am currently reading I KNOW YOU GOT SOUL by Jeremy Clarkson, one of the hosts of Top Gear, and a very funny writer. It’s about manmade objects he has loved – the Concorde, the Millenium Falcon, Hoover Dam, a satellite dish named Arthur, the B52, the Zeppelin. I’m hardly a car nut, but he makes me laugh out loud.
    I am also reading A POISONED SEASON by Tasha Alexander, the second of her books about Lady Emily Ashton, and carrying LORD HAWKRIDGE’S SECRET by Anne Ashley.
    I too enjoyed SILENT IN THE GRAVE and SILENT IN THE SANCTUARY, as well as YOUR SCANDALOUS WAYS.

    Reply
  65. I am currently reading I KNOW YOU GOT SOUL by Jeremy Clarkson, one of the hosts of Top Gear, and a very funny writer. It’s about manmade objects he has loved – the Concorde, the Millenium Falcon, Hoover Dam, a satellite dish named Arthur, the B52, the Zeppelin. I’m hardly a car nut, but he makes me laugh out loud.
    I am also reading A POISONED SEASON by Tasha Alexander, the second of her books about Lady Emily Ashton, and carrying LORD HAWKRIDGE’S SECRET by Anne Ashley.
    I too enjoyed SILENT IN THE GRAVE and SILENT IN THE SANCTUARY, as well as YOUR SCANDALOUS WAYS.

    Reply
  66. Theo, I have it in my toolbar!
    My current reread is Jonathan Kellerman’s COMPULSION. There’s a rather overly made up theatrical wannabe female described as having “tarantulous” eyelashes. Almost as good as his “pollocked” sidewalk in OBSESSION.
    The weird thing about Kellerman is that he always describes everybody’s shoes.
    I think my next reread is going to be Roger Zelazny’s last book (with Jane Lindskold), LORD DEMON, about a nice guy demon.
    (Incidentally, Lindskold also has a great series about a girl raised by intelligent, psychic wolves.)

    Reply
  67. Theo, I have it in my toolbar!
    My current reread is Jonathan Kellerman’s COMPULSION. There’s a rather overly made up theatrical wannabe female described as having “tarantulous” eyelashes. Almost as good as his “pollocked” sidewalk in OBSESSION.
    The weird thing about Kellerman is that he always describes everybody’s shoes.
    I think my next reread is going to be Roger Zelazny’s last book (with Jane Lindskold), LORD DEMON, about a nice guy demon.
    (Incidentally, Lindskold also has a great series about a girl raised by intelligent, psychic wolves.)

    Reply
  68. Theo, I have it in my toolbar!
    My current reread is Jonathan Kellerman’s COMPULSION. There’s a rather overly made up theatrical wannabe female described as having “tarantulous” eyelashes. Almost as good as his “pollocked” sidewalk in OBSESSION.
    The weird thing about Kellerman is that he always describes everybody’s shoes.
    I think my next reread is going to be Roger Zelazny’s last book (with Jane Lindskold), LORD DEMON, about a nice guy demon.
    (Incidentally, Lindskold also has a great series about a girl raised by intelligent, psychic wolves.)

    Reply
  69. Theo, I have it in my toolbar!
    My current reread is Jonathan Kellerman’s COMPULSION. There’s a rather overly made up theatrical wannabe female described as having “tarantulous” eyelashes. Almost as good as his “pollocked” sidewalk in OBSESSION.
    The weird thing about Kellerman is that he always describes everybody’s shoes.
    I think my next reread is going to be Roger Zelazny’s last book (with Jane Lindskold), LORD DEMON, about a nice guy demon.
    (Incidentally, Lindskold also has a great series about a girl raised by intelligent, psychic wolves.)

    Reply
  70. Theo, I have it in my toolbar!
    My current reread is Jonathan Kellerman’s COMPULSION. There’s a rather overly made up theatrical wannabe female described as having “tarantulous” eyelashes. Almost as good as his “pollocked” sidewalk in OBSESSION.
    The weird thing about Kellerman is that he always describes everybody’s shoes.
    I think my next reread is going to be Roger Zelazny’s last book (with Jane Lindskold), LORD DEMON, about a nice guy demon.
    (Incidentally, Lindskold also has a great series about a girl raised by intelligent, psychic wolves.)

    Reply
  71. tal, I noticed that too, about Kellerman…wouldn’t you love to see his wife’s shoe closet? Wonder if there’s a little ‘thing’ going on there… *snort*
    Okay, mind out of the gutter…for now 😀

    Reply
  72. tal, I noticed that too, about Kellerman…wouldn’t you love to see his wife’s shoe closet? Wonder if there’s a little ‘thing’ going on there… *snort*
    Okay, mind out of the gutter…for now 😀

    Reply
  73. tal, I noticed that too, about Kellerman…wouldn’t you love to see his wife’s shoe closet? Wonder if there’s a little ‘thing’ going on there… *snort*
    Okay, mind out of the gutter…for now 😀

    Reply
  74. tal, I noticed that too, about Kellerman…wouldn’t you love to see his wife’s shoe closet? Wonder if there’s a little ‘thing’ going on there… *snort*
    Okay, mind out of the gutter…for now 😀

    Reply
  75. tal, I noticed that too, about Kellerman…wouldn’t you love to see his wife’s shoe closet? Wonder if there’s a little ‘thing’ going on there… *snort*
    Okay, mind out of the gutter…for now 😀

    Reply
  76. At the moment I’m reading Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsider”, my first book by her and I’m quite impressed. Don’t have it with me to quote from, however.
    I’m also rereading Eva Ibbotson’s “Magic Flutes”. She’s such a wonderful, warm writer, with a keen eye for human frailty and an understanding heart. One of the characters, an older widower, is describing his late wife: “[b]ut she was so intelligent she could think herself into beauty. Intelligence. . .they don’t talk about it much, the poets, but when a woman is intelligent and passionate and good . . .” I think that describes Francesca from “Your Scandalous Ways” and many other Wench heroines, which is why I like them so much.
    Another quote from the same book: “‘I am ruined’ said Harriet, waking in the great white-netted bed. The word seemed to her so beautiful that she spoke it again to herself, very softly: ‘Ruined. I am a fallen woman.’ She turned her head on the pillow. Rom’s dark head was half-buried in the sheet, with one arm thrown out in sleep. The problem now was what to do with so much happiness; how to contain it and not let it spill out and disturb him. . . .A new world lay
    before her — a world whose existence she had not even guessed. The mystics knew it, and perhaps God Himself (and possibly Johann Sebastian Bach in places.
    But none of them had been ruined by Rom, so they could not know it as she knew it. . . .” I adore this quote.

    Reply
  77. At the moment I’m reading Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsider”, my first book by her and I’m quite impressed. Don’t have it with me to quote from, however.
    I’m also rereading Eva Ibbotson’s “Magic Flutes”. She’s such a wonderful, warm writer, with a keen eye for human frailty and an understanding heart. One of the characters, an older widower, is describing his late wife: “[b]ut she was so intelligent she could think herself into beauty. Intelligence. . .they don’t talk about it much, the poets, but when a woman is intelligent and passionate and good . . .” I think that describes Francesca from “Your Scandalous Ways” and many other Wench heroines, which is why I like them so much.
    Another quote from the same book: “‘I am ruined’ said Harriet, waking in the great white-netted bed. The word seemed to her so beautiful that she spoke it again to herself, very softly: ‘Ruined. I am a fallen woman.’ She turned her head on the pillow. Rom’s dark head was half-buried in the sheet, with one arm thrown out in sleep. The problem now was what to do with so much happiness; how to contain it and not let it spill out and disturb him. . . .A new world lay
    before her — a world whose existence she had not even guessed. The mystics knew it, and perhaps God Himself (and possibly Johann Sebastian Bach in places.
    But none of them had been ruined by Rom, so they could not know it as she knew it. . . .” I adore this quote.

    Reply
  78. At the moment I’m reading Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsider”, my first book by her and I’m quite impressed. Don’t have it with me to quote from, however.
    I’m also rereading Eva Ibbotson’s “Magic Flutes”. She’s such a wonderful, warm writer, with a keen eye for human frailty and an understanding heart. One of the characters, an older widower, is describing his late wife: “[b]ut she was so intelligent she could think herself into beauty. Intelligence. . .they don’t talk about it much, the poets, but when a woman is intelligent and passionate and good . . .” I think that describes Francesca from “Your Scandalous Ways” and many other Wench heroines, which is why I like them so much.
    Another quote from the same book: “‘I am ruined’ said Harriet, waking in the great white-netted bed. The word seemed to her so beautiful that she spoke it again to herself, very softly: ‘Ruined. I am a fallen woman.’ She turned her head on the pillow. Rom’s dark head was half-buried in the sheet, with one arm thrown out in sleep. The problem now was what to do with so much happiness; how to contain it and not let it spill out and disturb him. . . .A new world lay
    before her — a world whose existence she had not even guessed. The mystics knew it, and perhaps God Himself (and possibly Johann Sebastian Bach in places.
    But none of them had been ruined by Rom, so they could not know it as she knew it. . . .” I adore this quote.

    Reply
  79. At the moment I’m reading Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsider”, my first book by her and I’m quite impressed. Don’t have it with me to quote from, however.
    I’m also rereading Eva Ibbotson’s “Magic Flutes”. She’s such a wonderful, warm writer, with a keen eye for human frailty and an understanding heart. One of the characters, an older widower, is describing his late wife: “[b]ut she was so intelligent she could think herself into beauty. Intelligence. . .they don’t talk about it much, the poets, but when a woman is intelligent and passionate and good . . .” I think that describes Francesca from “Your Scandalous Ways” and many other Wench heroines, which is why I like them so much.
    Another quote from the same book: “‘I am ruined’ said Harriet, waking in the great white-netted bed. The word seemed to her so beautiful that she spoke it again to herself, very softly: ‘Ruined. I am a fallen woman.’ She turned her head on the pillow. Rom’s dark head was half-buried in the sheet, with one arm thrown out in sleep. The problem now was what to do with so much happiness; how to contain it and not let it spill out and disturb him. . . .A new world lay
    before her — a world whose existence she had not even guessed. The mystics knew it, and perhaps God Himself (and possibly Johann Sebastian Bach in places.
    But none of them had been ruined by Rom, so they could not know it as she knew it. . . .” I adore this quote.

    Reply
  80. At the moment I’m reading Penelope Williamson’s “The Outsider”, my first book by her and I’m quite impressed. Don’t have it with me to quote from, however.
    I’m also rereading Eva Ibbotson’s “Magic Flutes”. She’s such a wonderful, warm writer, with a keen eye for human frailty and an understanding heart. One of the characters, an older widower, is describing his late wife: “[b]ut she was so intelligent she could think herself into beauty. Intelligence. . .they don’t talk about it much, the poets, but when a woman is intelligent and passionate and good . . .” I think that describes Francesca from “Your Scandalous Ways” and many other Wench heroines, which is why I like them so much.
    Another quote from the same book: “‘I am ruined’ said Harriet, waking in the great white-netted bed. The word seemed to her so beautiful that she spoke it again to herself, very softly: ‘Ruined. I am a fallen woman.’ She turned her head on the pillow. Rom’s dark head was half-buried in the sheet, with one arm thrown out in sleep. The problem now was what to do with so much happiness; how to contain it and not let it spill out and disturb him. . . .A new world lay
    before her — a world whose existence she had not even guessed. The mystics knew it, and perhaps God Himself (and possibly Johann Sebastian Bach in places.
    But none of them had been ruined by Rom, so they could not know it as she knew it. . . .” I adore this quote.

    Reply
  81. Oh – I loved “Silent in the Grave” and the followup “Silent in the Sanctuary even more. The opening lines of “Silent in the Grave” hooked me so hard :
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate. Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”
    Wowza!
    Right now I’m reading “Wild Irish” by Robin Maxwell. It’s a story about Queen Elizabeth I and the Irish pirate Grace O’Malley.
    Page 125-126
    “I heard a laugh then, for the damn turbaned Turk was standing in the doorway lookin’ down at the pathetic sight that was me – a crazed woman, naked under a bloodied shift, just cryin’ out to be raped. He dropped his longsword and, keeping the short one in hand, undid his breeches, at the same time movin’ across the threshold and into my cabin.
    Well, that was when it happened. That small green demon from Hell exploded off her perch, all beak and claw and flapping wing. She went straight for the face, Molly did. He never knew what hit him, but his shrieks were wonderful to hear, and by the time he’d regained sense enough to wrench the parrot off his face, she’d taken out his eye. She was busy biting the hands that held her, and I knew the pirate’s shock was wearin’ off, so I quick wrenched open the cabinet and grabbed the blunderbuss. I heard Molly screech once before I turned and fired pointblank, blowing a great gaping hole in the Turk’s chest. Well, the recoil from that hammered my poor belly somethin’ fierce, and then the dead Turk fell hard and heavy on top of me. I blacked out from the pain and, dead to the world, never came to till the next day.”

    Reply
  82. Oh – I loved “Silent in the Grave” and the followup “Silent in the Sanctuary even more. The opening lines of “Silent in the Grave” hooked me so hard :
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate. Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”
    Wowza!
    Right now I’m reading “Wild Irish” by Robin Maxwell. It’s a story about Queen Elizabeth I and the Irish pirate Grace O’Malley.
    Page 125-126
    “I heard a laugh then, for the damn turbaned Turk was standing in the doorway lookin’ down at the pathetic sight that was me – a crazed woman, naked under a bloodied shift, just cryin’ out to be raped. He dropped his longsword and, keeping the short one in hand, undid his breeches, at the same time movin’ across the threshold and into my cabin.
    Well, that was when it happened. That small green demon from Hell exploded off her perch, all beak and claw and flapping wing. She went straight for the face, Molly did. He never knew what hit him, but his shrieks were wonderful to hear, and by the time he’d regained sense enough to wrench the parrot off his face, she’d taken out his eye. She was busy biting the hands that held her, and I knew the pirate’s shock was wearin’ off, so I quick wrenched open the cabinet and grabbed the blunderbuss. I heard Molly screech once before I turned and fired pointblank, blowing a great gaping hole in the Turk’s chest. Well, the recoil from that hammered my poor belly somethin’ fierce, and then the dead Turk fell hard and heavy on top of me. I blacked out from the pain and, dead to the world, never came to till the next day.”

    Reply
  83. Oh – I loved “Silent in the Grave” and the followup “Silent in the Sanctuary even more. The opening lines of “Silent in the Grave” hooked me so hard :
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate. Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”
    Wowza!
    Right now I’m reading “Wild Irish” by Robin Maxwell. It’s a story about Queen Elizabeth I and the Irish pirate Grace O’Malley.
    Page 125-126
    “I heard a laugh then, for the damn turbaned Turk was standing in the doorway lookin’ down at the pathetic sight that was me – a crazed woman, naked under a bloodied shift, just cryin’ out to be raped. He dropped his longsword and, keeping the short one in hand, undid his breeches, at the same time movin’ across the threshold and into my cabin.
    Well, that was when it happened. That small green demon from Hell exploded off her perch, all beak and claw and flapping wing. She went straight for the face, Molly did. He never knew what hit him, but his shrieks were wonderful to hear, and by the time he’d regained sense enough to wrench the parrot off his face, she’d taken out his eye. She was busy biting the hands that held her, and I knew the pirate’s shock was wearin’ off, so I quick wrenched open the cabinet and grabbed the blunderbuss. I heard Molly screech once before I turned and fired pointblank, blowing a great gaping hole in the Turk’s chest. Well, the recoil from that hammered my poor belly somethin’ fierce, and then the dead Turk fell hard and heavy on top of me. I blacked out from the pain and, dead to the world, never came to till the next day.”

    Reply
  84. Oh – I loved “Silent in the Grave” and the followup “Silent in the Sanctuary even more. The opening lines of “Silent in the Grave” hooked me so hard :
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate. Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”
    Wowza!
    Right now I’m reading “Wild Irish” by Robin Maxwell. It’s a story about Queen Elizabeth I and the Irish pirate Grace O’Malley.
    Page 125-126
    “I heard a laugh then, for the damn turbaned Turk was standing in the doorway lookin’ down at the pathetic sight that was me – a crazed woman, naked under a bloodied shift, just cryin’ out to be raped. He dropped his longsword and, keeping the short one in hand, undid his breeches, at the same time movin’ across the threshold and into my cabin.
    Well, that was when it happened. That small green demon from Hell exploded off her perch, all beak and claw and flapping wing. She went straight for the face, Molly did. He never knew what hit him, but his shrieks were wonderful to hear, and by the time he’d regained sense enough to wrench the parrot off his face, she’d taken out his eye. She was busy biting the hands that held her, and I knew the pirate’s shock was wearin’ off, so I quick wrenched open the cabinet and grabbed the blunderbuss. I heard Molly screech once before I turned and fired pointblank, blowing a great gaping hole in the Turk’s chest. Well, the recoil from that hammered my poor belly somethin’ fierce, and then the dead Turk fell hard and heavy on top of me. I blacked out from the pain and, dead to the world, never came to till the next day.”

    Reply
  85. Oh – I loved “Silent in the Grave” and the followup “Silent in the Sanctuary even more. The opening lines of “Silent in the Grave” hooked me so hard :
    “To say that I met Nicholas Brisbane over my husband’s dead body is not entirely accurate. Edward, it should be noted, was still twitching upon the floor.”
    Wowza!
    Right now I’m reading “Wild Irish” by Robin Maxwell. It’s a story about Queen Elizabeth I and the Irish pirate Grace O’Malley.
    Page 125-126
    “I heard a laugh then, for the damn turbaned Turk was standing in the doorway lookin’ down at the pathetic sight that was me – a crazed woman, naked under a bloodied shift, just cryin’ out to be raped. He dropped his longsword and, keeping the short one in hand, undid his breeches, at the same time movin’ across the threshold and into my cabin.
    Well, that was when it happened. That small green demon from Hell exploded off her perch, all beak and claw and flapping wing. She went straight for the face, Molly did. He never knew what hit him, but his shrieks were wonderful to hear, and by the time he’d regained sense enough to wrench the parrot off his face, she’d taken out his eye. She was busy biting the hands that held her, and I knew the pirate’s shock was wearin’ off, so I quick wrenched open the cabinet and grabbed the blunderbuss. I heard Molly screech once before I turned and fired pointblank, blowing a great gaping hole in the Turk’s chest. Well, the recoil from that hammered my poor belly somethin’ fierce, and then the dead Turk fell hard and heavy on top of me. I blacked out from the pain and, dead to the world, never came to till the next day.”

    Reply
  86. Made a mistake above: the quotes are from Ibbotson’s “A Company of Swans”. Both books are VG (as are all of her books). A quote I like that actually does come from “Magic Flutes” describes the hero’s fiance:
    “Nerine’s greed and self-absorption were akin to those of an artist or composer who will sacrifice everything and everyone in the service of his own gift, only Nerine’s gift was her own beauty. She also realized that since there was nothing evil or vicious in this girl which would sicken Guy and thus release him, he was doomed.” Nerine may be a monster of selfishness, but she is shown to be a human monster whose motivations are understandable — which is very typical of Ibbotson. No cardboard, mustache-twirling villains for her, which makes them all the more believable.

    Reply
  87. Made a mistake above: the quotes are from Ibbotson’s “A Company of Swans”. Both books are VG (as are all of her books). A quote I like that actually does come from “Magic Flutes” describes the hero’s fiance:
    “Nerine’s greed and self-absorption were akin to those of an artist or composer who will sacrifice everything and everyone in the service of his own gift, only Nerine’s gift was her own beauty. She also realized that since there was nothing evil or vicious in this girl which would sicken Guy and thus release him, he was doomed.” Nerine may be a monster of selfishness, but she is shown to be a human monster whose motivations are understandable — which is very typical of Ibbotson. No cardboard, mustache-twirling villains for her, which makes them all the more believable.

    Reply
  88. Made a mistake above: the quotes are from Ibbotson’s “A Company of Swans”. Both books are VG (as are all of her books). A quote I like that actually does come from “Magic Flutes” describes the hero’s fiance:
    “Nerine’s greed and self-absorption were akin to those of an artist or composer who will sacrifice everything and everyone in the service of his own gift, only Nerine’s gift was her own beauty. She also realized that since there was nothing evil or vicious in this girl which would sicken Guy and thus release him, he was doomed.” Nerine may be a monster of selfishness, but she is shown to be a human monster whose motivations are understandable — which is very typical of Ibbotson. No cardboard, mustache-twirling villains for her, which makes them all the more believable.

    Reply
  89. Made a mistake above: the quotes are from Ibbotson’s “A Company of Swans”. Both books are VG (as are all of her books). A quote I like that actually does come from “Magic Flutes” describes the hero’s fiance:
    “Nerine’s greed and self-absorption were akin to those of an artist or composer who will sacrifice everything and everyone in the service of his own gift, only Nerine’s gift was her own beauty. She also realized that since there was nothing evil or vicious in this girl which would sicken Guy and thus release him, he was doomed.” Nerine may be a monster of selfishness, but she is shown to be a human monster whose motivations are understandable — which is very typical of Ibbotson. No cardboard, mustache-twirling villains for her, which makes them all the more believable.

    Reply
  90. Made a mistake above: the quotes are from Ibbotson’s “A Company of Swans”. Both books are VG (as are all of her books). A quote I like that actually does come from “Magic Flutes” describes the hero’s fiance:
    “Nerine’s greed and self-absorption were akin to those of an artist or composer who will sacrifice everything and everyone in the service of his own gift, only Nerine’s gift was her own beauty. She also realized that since there was nothing evil or vicious in this girl which would sicken Guy and thus release him, he was doomed.” Nerine may be a monster of selfishness, but she is shown to be a human monster whose motivations are understandable — which is very typical of Ibbotson. No cardboard, mustache-twirling villains for her, which makes them all the more believable.

    Reply
  91. These are great recommendations!! Interesting to see what we’re all reading — such a wide variety, and yet we’re reading some stories in common, too.
    Cheryl, thanks for the thumbs-up for To Wed A Highland Bride! The next book is coming soon: The Highland Groom, which tells Fiona’s story in the series, will be out in January 2009. Cover coming soon!
    Thanks, Valerie, for the great comment on Lady Macbeth. The trade edition will be out next spring — with a whole new look, which I’ll debut here as soon as I get the final proof.
    Keep those summer reading lists coming, we love to see them. Just as I start to make some progress on the TBR pile … I’ve got more books to add to it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  92. These are great recommendations!! Interesting to see what we’re all reading — such a wide variety, and yet we’re reading some stories in common, too.
    Cheryl, thanks for the thumbs-up for To Wed A Highland Bride! The next book is coming soon: The Highland Groom, which tells Fiona’s story in the series, will be out in January 2009. Cover coming soon!
    Thanks, Valerie, for the great comment on Lady Macbeth. The trade edition will be out next spring — with a whole new look, which I’ll debut here as soon as I get the final proof.
    Keep those summer reading lists coming, we love to see them. Just as I start to make some progress on the TBR pile … I’ve got more books to add to it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  93. These are great recommendations!! Interesting to see what we’re all reading — such a wide variety, and yet we’re reading some stories in common, too.
    Cheryl, thanks for the thumbs-up for To Wed A Highland Bride! The next book is coming soon: The Highland Groom, which tells Fiona’s story in the series, will be out in January 2009. Cover coming soon!
    Thanks, Valerie, for the great comment on Lady Macbeth. The trade edition will be out next spring — with a whole new look, which I’ll debut here as soon as I get the final proof.
    Keep those summer reading lists coming, we love to see them. Just as I start to make some progress on the TBR pile … I’ve got more books to add to it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  94. These are great recommendations!! Interesting to see what we’re all reading — such a wide variety, and yet we’re reading some stories in common, too.
    Cheryl, thanks for the thumbs-up for To Wed A Highland Bride! The next book is coming soon: The Highland Groom, which tells Fiona’s story in the series, will be out in January 2009. Cover coming soon!
    Thanks, Valerie, for the great comment on Lady Macbeth. The trade edition will be out next spring — with a whole new look, which I’ll debut here as soon as I get the final proof.
    Keep those summer reading lists coming, we love to see them. Just as I start to make some progress on the TBR pile … I’ve got more books to add to it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  95. These are great recommendations!! Interesting to see what we’re all reading — such a wide variety, and yet we’re reading some stories in common, too.
    Cheryl, thanks for the thumbs-up for To Wed A Highland Bride! The next book is coming soon: The Highland Groom, which tells Fiona’s story in the series, will be out in January 2009. Cover coming soon!
    Thanks, Valerie, for the great comment on Lady Macbeth. The trade edition will be out next spring — with a whole new look, which I’ll debut here as soon as I get the final proof.
    Keep those summer reading lists coming, we love to see them. Just as I start to make some progress on the TBR pile … I’ve got more books to add to it!
    Susan Sarah

    Reply
  96. I’m not reading this because it’s coming out this month, however, it looks interesting. I believe it’s classed in the historical fiction genre. It’s about Martha Carrier, one of the first women to be accused, tried and hanged as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts. And, if I’m reading the reviews correctly it’s told through her daughter’s eyes. Sounds interesting and I believe it’s a debut author. Oh, its called The Heretics Daughter by Kathleen Kent.

    Reply
  97. I’m not reading this because it’s coming out this month, however, it looks interesting. I believe it’s classed in the historical fiction genre. It’s about Martha Carrier, one of the first women to be accused, tried and hanged as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts. And, if I’m reading the reviews correctly it’s told through her daughter’s eyes. Sounds interesting and I believe it’s a debut author. Oh, its called The Heretics Daughter by Kathleen Kent.

    Reply
  98. I’m not reading this because it’s coming out this month, however, it looks interesting. I believe it’s classed in the historical fiction genre. It’s about Martha Carrier, one of the first women to be accused, tried and hanged as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts. And, if I’m reading the reviews correctly it’s told through her daughter’s eyes. Sounds interesting and I believe it’s a debut author. Oh, its called The Heretics Daughter by Kathleen Kent.

    Reply
  99. I’m not reading this because it’s coming out this month, however, it looks interesting. I believe it’s classed in the historical fiction genre. It’s about Martha Carrier, one of the first women to be accused, tried and hanged as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts. And, if I’m reading the reviews correctly it’s told through her daughter’s eyes. Sounds interesting and I believe it’s a debut author. Oh, its called The Heretics Daughter by Kathleen Kent.

    Reply
  100. I’m not reading this because it’s coming out this month, however, it looks interesting. I believe it’s classed in the historical fiction genre. It’s about Martha Carrier, one of the first women to be accused, tried and hanged as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts. And, if I’m reading the reviews correctly it’s told through her daughter’s eyes. Sounds interesting and I believe it’s a debut author. Oh, its called The Heretics Daughter by Kathleen Kent.

    Reply
  101. Two other excellent mystery writers:
    Sarah Rayne (pseudonym for a well-known horror writer)–dark suspense, touch of horror but not supernatural.
    Phillip DePoy writes a series about Fever Devilin, born and raised amongst the hill country folk of the Georgia Appalachians, who left home a long time ago and pursued an education, then a career, in the wider outside world. A folklorist by inclination and profession, he left the strange world of academia behind to return to his family-home in the if-anything-stranger mountain town he grew up in. But oddness follows Fever wherever he goes and Blue Mountain, Georgia is no different.
    Also, if you haven’t discovered her yet, Minette Walters writes wonderful mysteries. I especially recommend THE DARK ROOM and THE SCOLD’S BRIDLE.

    Reply
  102. Two other excellent mystery writers:
    Sarah Rayne (pseudonym for a well-known horror writer)–dark suspense, touch of horror but not supernatural.
    Phillip DePoy writes a series about Fever Devilin, born and raised amongst the hill country folk of the Georgia Appalachians, who left home a long time ago and pursued an education, then a career, in the wider outside world. A folklorist by inclination and profession, he left the strange world of academia behind to return to his family-home in the if-anything-stranger mountain town he grew up in. But oddness follows Fever wherever he goes and Blue Mountain, Georgia is no different.
    Also, if you haven’t discovered her yet, Minette Walters writes wonderful mysteries. I especially recommend THE DARK ROOM and THE SCOLD’S BRIDLE.

    Reply
  103. Two other excellent mystery writers:
    Sarah Rayne (pseudonym for a well-known horror writer)–dark suspense, touch of horror but not supernatural.
    Phillip DePoy writes a series about Fever Devilin, born and raised amongst the hill country folk of the Georgia Appalachians, who left home a long time ago and pursued an education, then a career, in the wider outside world. A folklorist by inclination and profession, he left the strange world of academia behind to return to his family-home in the if-anything-stranger mountain town he grew up in. But oddness follows Fever wherever he goes and Blue Mountain, Georgia is no different.
    Also, if you haven’t discovered her yet, Minette Walters writes wonderful mysteries. I especially recommend THE DARK ROOM and THE SCOLD’S BRIDLE.

    Reply
  104. Two other excellent mystery writers:
    Sarah Rayne (pseudonym for a well-known horror writer)–dark suspense, touch of horror but not supernatural.
    Phillip DePoy writes a series about Fever Devilin, born and raised amongst the hill country folk of the Georgia Appalachians, who left home a long time ago and pursued an education, then a career, in the wider outside world. A folklorist by inclination and profession, he left the strange world of academia behind to return to his family-home in the if-anything-stranger mountain town he grew up in. But oddness follows Fever wherever he goes and Blue Mountain, Georgia is no different.
    Also, if you haven’t discovered her yet, Minette Walters writes wonderful mysteries. I especially recommend THE DARK ROOM and THE SCOLD’S BRIDLE.

    Reply
  105. Two other excellent mystery writers:
    Sarah Rayne (pseudonym for a well-known horror writer)–dark suspense, touch of horror but not supernatural.
    Phillip DePoy writes a series about Fever Devilin, born and raised amongst the hill country folk of the Georgia Appalachians, who left home a long time ago and pursued an education, then a career, in the wider outside world. A folklorist by inclination and profession, he left the strange world of academia behind to return to his family-home in the if-anything-stranger mountain town he grew up in. But oddness follows Fever wherever he goes and Blue Mountain, Georgia is no different.
    Also, if you haven’t discovered her yet, Minette Walters writes wonderful mysteries. I especially recommend THE DARK ROOM and THE SCOLD’S BRIDLE.

    Reply
  106. Awww….Molly… You’ll just have to read the book, Theo.
    No – I kid. Here is the next paragraph:
    I awoke to find Tibbot gnawin’ at my nipple, and when I opened my eyes, I found myself cleaned up and snug in my bunk. The first thing I saw was Molly’s empty perch. It all came back to me and the sight wrenched a sob from my throat. I’d like to tell you why that parrot saved my life, for I thought she hated me. And in truth I’d not been altogether fond of her. But she was a hero nonetheless and was buried at sea with honors like the rest of our mates.
    Sniff….poor Molly…

    Reply
  107. Awww….Molly… You’ll just have to read the book, Theo.
    No – I kid. Here is the next paragraph:
    I awoke to find Tibbot gnawin’ at my nipple, and when I opened my eyes, I found myself cleaned up and snug in my bunk. The first thing I saw was Molly’s empty perch. It all came back to me and the sight wrenched a sob from my throat. I’d like to tell you why that parrot saved my life, for I thought she hated me. And in truth I’d not been altogether fond of her. But she was a hero nonetheless and was buried at sea with honors like the rest of our mates.
    Sniff….poor Molly…

    Reply
  108. Awww….Molly… You’ll just have to read the book, Theo.
    No – I kid. Here is the next paragraph:
    I awoke to find Tibbot gnawin’ at my nipple, and when I opened my eyes, I found myself cleaned up and snug in my bunk. The first thing I saw was Molly’s empty perch. It all came back to me and the sight wrenched a sob from my throat. I’d like to tell you why that parrot saved my life, for I thought she hated me. And in truth I’d not been altogether fond of her. But she was a hero nonetheless and was buried at sea with honors like the rest of our mates.
    Sniff….poor Molly…

    Reply
  109. Awww….Molly… You’ll just have to read the book, Theo.
    No – I kid. Here is the next paragraph:
    I awoke to find Tibbot gnawin’ at my nipple, and when I opened my eyes, I found myself cleaned up and snug in my bunk. The first thing I saw was Molly’s empty perch. It all came back to me and the sight wrenched a sob from my throat. I’d like to tell you why that parrot saved my life, for I thought she hated me. And in truth I’d not been altogether fond of her. But she was a hero nonetheless and was buried at sea with honors like the rest of our mates.
    Sniff….poor Molly…

    Reply
  110. Awww….Molly… You’ll just have to read the book, Theo.
    No – I kid. Here is the next paragraph:
    I awoke to find Tibbot gnawin’ at my nipple, and when I opened my eyes, I found myself cleaned up and snug in my bunk. The first thing I saw was Molly’s empty perch. It all came back to me and the sight wrenched a sob from my throat. I’d like to tell you why that parrot saved my life, for I thought she hated me. And in truth I’d not been altogether fond of her. But she was a hero nonetheless and was buried at sea with honors like the rest of our mates.
    Sniff….poor Molly…

    Reply
  111. I’m late to the discussion, but I have to recommend my current “beach read.” It is called “The Bronte Project” by Jennifer Vandever. It is about a grad student who is pursuing letters which may still be “out there” by Charlotte Bronte. The writing is funny and intelligent and weaves in quotes from Bronte’s letters in wonderful ways. It is “a novel about reconciling the mythology of romance with the reality of modern love.” Good stuff.
    I’m also reading “A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare: 1599” by James Shapiro. It’s more interesting than it sounds. 🙂
    I recently read “Redeeming Love” by Francine Rivers. It is a very unusual love story and I highly recommend it, too.
    It’s been fun to read what everyone else is reading this summer!

    Reply
  112. I’m late to the discussion, but I have to recommend my current “beach read.” It is called “The Bronte Project” by Jennifer Vandever. It is about a grad student who is pursuing letters which may still be “out there” by Charlotte Bronte. The writing is funny and intelligent and weaves in quotes from Bronte’s letters in wonderful ways. It is “a novel about reconciling the mythology of romance with the reality of modern love.” Good stuff.
    I’m also reading “A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare: 1599” by James Shapiro. It’s more interesting than it sounds. 🙂
    I recently read “Redeeming Love” by Francine Rivers. It is a very unusual love story and I highly recommend it, too.
    It’s been fun to read what everyone else is reading this summer!

    Reply
  113. I’m late to the discussion, but I have to recommend my current “beach read.” It is called “The Bronte Project” by Jennifer Vandever. It is about a grad student who is pursuing letters which may still be “out there” by Charlotte Bronte. The writing is funny and intelligent and weaves in quotes from Bronte’s letters in wonderful ways. It is “a novel about reconciling the mythology of romance with the reality of modern love.” Good stuff.
    I’m also reading “A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare: 1599” by James Shapiro. It’s more interesting than it sounds. 🙂
    I recently read “Redeeming Love” by Francine Rivers. It is a very unusual love story and I highly recommend it, too.
    It’s been fun to read what everyone else is reading this summer!

    Reply
  114. I’m late to the discussion, but I have to recommend my current “beach read.” It is called “The Bronte Project” by Jennifer Vandever. It is about a grad student who is pursuing letters which may still be “out there” by Charlotte Bronte. The writing is funny and intelligent and weaves in quotes from Bronte’s letters in wonderful ways. It is “a novel about reconciling the mythology of romance with the reality of modern love.” Good stuff.
    I’m also reading “A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare: 1599” by James Shapiro. It’s more interesting than it sounds. 🙂
    I recently read “Redeeming Love” by Francine Rivers. It is a very unusual love story and I highly recommend it, too.
    It’s been fun to read what everyone else is reading this summer!

    Reply
  115. I’m late to the discussion, but I have to recommend my current “beach read.” It is called “The Bronte Project” by Jennifer Vandever. It is about a grad student who is pursuing letters which may still be “out there” by Charlotte Bronte. The writing is funny and intelligent and weaves in quotes from Bronte’s letters in wonderful ways. It is “a novel about reconciling the mythology of romance with the reality of modern love.” Good stuff.
    I’m also reading “A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare: 1599” by James Shapiro. It’s more interesting than it sounds. 🙂
    I recently read “Redeeming Love” by Francine Rivers. It is a very unusual love story and I highly recommend it, too.
    It’s been fun to read what everyone else is reading this summer!

    Reply

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