Wenchly Guest — Kathrynn Dennis

Davyhead
Jo here (with Davy). It’s a pleasure to have Kathrynn Dennis as a guest at Word Wenches. As well as being the author of two intriguing medieval romances she has a demanding career as a vet.

She’s going to share some of her road to publication and also her research on pets and their people, in reality and fiction.

Shadowr

Jo: Welcome, Kathrynn. When did you decide to try to write a
romance novel?

 

Kathrynn20201292020web_2
Kathrynn: I
bought Rita Clay Estrada’s and Rita Gallagher’s “You can Write a Romance” in
the 1990s (back when the book cover was hot pink) and read it cover to cover at
least twenty times over the next fourteen years. I finally got serious and joined Romance Writers of America in 2001. After I’d been to so many conferences, workshops, and read more
craft books than I can count, I finally decided enough already! Just do it! I
finished my first book in 2004 and my second in 2005. My only regret—I wished
I’d started writing a long time ago. But I’m the living example of how it’s
never too late.

 

Jo: What were the biggest hurdles you had to
overcome?

 

Kathrynn: The demand
on my time from so many other sources—my full time day job, my family, my need
for a work-life balance, all compete for my writing time. I think most writers,
pubbed and unpubbed, have that experience. I like to think (dream?) authors
like the Word Wench authors are so wildly successful they at last have personal
trainers, chefs, and live-in maids. You guys all do right? Please say yes . .
.

Jo: LOL! Or, sorry…. Of course, darlink. 🙂

 

Kathrynn: Seriously,
I know every author has hurdles. Mine are mundane, but sometimes they can block
the muse completely for days on end.

 

Darkridercover_large
Jo: Can you tell us about the path to
publication for your first book, Dark Rider? How did you break in?

 

Kathrynn: I entered
a writing contest and won the historical category with the book that is now
called Shadow Rider. When the
editor-judge called and asked for the full manuscript, I told her I’d just
finished the first draft but I asked if could I send her another polished-and-ready-to-go-book,
Dark Rider. She said something like
“yeah, why not?” Forty-eight hours later, she called and wanted to buy both
books. I was amazed.

 

Funny
thing is I’d pitched Dark Rider, my
first book, to that same editor five years ago–before I’d written a single word.
I pitched to her at my very first RWA conference
and I was such a newbie, I didn’t know you it wasn’t great form to pitch just
an idea, especially if you haven’t
written a word–ever.  Thankfully, she took pity on a rookie and said
“when you finish it, send it to me.” Five years later, I ended up doing just
that.

 

Jo: Clearly an editor who knows a good idea when she hears one. Shadow Rider has received a glowing review from Romantic Times. "The color, vibrancy, and excitement of the Middle Ages allows Dennis to spin a memorable tale of two people whose destiny is tied to a mystical colt. Dennis tells her story with passion, drama, and a love of animals that will enthrall readers." 4 Stars. Congratulations!


Everyone, you can read an excerpt here.

 

Kathrynn, what’s the most
interesting thing you’ve learned about the business as a new author?

 

Kathrynn: If you are a romance-reader-aspiring-to-be-an-author, pay
attention to what the seasoned veterans say. When list-hitting, award-winning
authors like Jo Beverly, Loretta Chase, Miranda Jerret, Susan King, Edith
Layton, or Mary Jo Putney are presenting a craft or business session at a conference,
go and listen. Buy their books and study.

I’ve heard “there will be things you
cannot control that affect your sales (like cover art, title, and back cover
blurb, or a snowstorm the week your books are supposed to be delivered to
Wal-Mart) a million times. I heard what they said, but until I sold a book, it
didn’t sink in. Knowing these fabulous authors have been there, done that, and
still write great books that sell takes the sting out of it when the tough part
of the writing business happens to you.

I’ve also heard “write the best book
you can and then write another, and then another. . . Keep writing and write a lot.” Only now is that advice starting
to sink in. I’m a little slow, but I’m catching up.

Jo: Yes, "long haul" and "writing career" go together, which is something we don’t realize for a while. Your second release,
SHADOW RIDER, is out this month. There’s a barking horse, a heroine/horse
midwife and a brooding knight who’s lost his lust for life. Where did you get
the idea for this unusual 14th century romance?

BTW, Kathrynn definitely knows her horses. The handsome fellow is her horse, Jawknee Reb. 

 Jawknee_reb_two
Kathrynn: I’m a veterinarian in my day job and drew on experience when
I wrote the first chapter of Shadow Rider–about
a medieval female theriogenologist (a livestock
obstetrician), (Jo: a new word. Yum!) who delivers a foal affected with a real-life condition that
makes him bark, sit like a dog, and stare at the stars.  This would have caused a stir in medieval times
and lots of accusations — he’s possessed, she’s a witch  — they both end up in trouble.
They need a hero.

Enter Sir Guy, a knight who believes the little horse is the
mystical beast who can lead him to redemption and revenge. He rescues the
heroine and her colt, but he has an agenda…and you can bet the heroine is not
going to like it. From there, the story turned into a book.

 

Jo: You mentioned studying pets in novels as an extension of a
character’s personality.  Care to share
what you’ve learned?

 

Kathrynn: As a veterinarian and an author, I
started wondering: what does the kind of pet you own tell you about your
character (or about the characters in a novel)? I did some research, trolling
through the psychology literature.
Pet-owner profiling is still a
burgeoning science, but making progress. There are several good studies which
suggest pets are an extension of their owners—in looks and in behavior. Parishiltondog91908
People tend
to chose pets that look like them, much like they choose a human life-partner.
Take a look at Paris Hilton, Jessica Simpson, and Jake Gyllenhaal with their
dogs. It’s hard to miss the physical similarities.

Jessicas

Pet owners also tend to choose pets with personality traits
like their own. Turns out you can learn a lot about a person just by knowing
what kind of pet they own. Jakeg

Here’s what the seminal research by Kidd and Kidd
(1980) tells us about pet-owner personality traits:

Cat lovers are high in autonomy and low in dominance and nurturing.

Dog-loving men are high in dominance and aggression. Dog-loving women are high in dominance, too, but low in aggression.   


Horse lovers in general are assertive, introspective, and self-concerned, but
     limited in cooperativeness, nurturing, and warm human relationships. Male
     horse-lovers are aggressive, dominant, and less expressive in general. Female horse-lovers avoided aggression and are easy going.


Turtle lovers are hard-working, reliable, goal-oriented, and see the world as
     lawful.

Snake lovers are unconventional, informal, novelty seeking, and unpredictable.

Bird lovers are contented, courteous, expressive, social, and altruistic.

 

Pet owners in general are considered to be more nurturing
and low in autonomy, no matter what kind of pet they own. I’ve noticed dog and
cat-loving characters enrich a fair number of romance novels (for an early
example, think of Georgette Heyer’s Ulysses in Arabella) and the personality of
a male horse-owner certainly has the makings of a historical romance hero—think
cowboys, knights, and men who were rich enough to fox hunt. Dominant men.
Aggressive, alpha males who had trouble expressing themselves (until they met
the heroine, of course).

 

I keep thinking about Rex, the hamster in Janet Evanovich’s
Stephanie Plum series. Rex embodies the character of a bounty-hunting woman who
keeps a hamster for a pet. She’s high in autonomy and not especially nurturing.
Neither is Rex. Both make me laugh.

I’ve not seen many romances where a character owns a nontraditional
pet (fish, lizards, or pocket pets like Rex), but I’m sure they are out there.

 

There are also some interesting reads on the pathological
condition known as pet hoarding. Profiles of hoarders suggest the condition is
a type of obsessive-compulsive disorder and affected people usually come from
chaotic, unstable homes. Just google pet
hoarding and you’ll turn up a fair number of psych reviews on the topic.

 

Whydogs
If you’d like to dig deeper into pet-owner profiling, check
out Why We Love the Dogs We Do: How to
Find the Dog That Matches Your Personality
by Stanley Coren (Simon and
Schuster; ISBN 978-0684855028).
There are some interesting chapters in there about dogs (breeds) for introverts
and extroverts, dominant people, not-so-dominant people, trusting, or
controlling people, and an in-depth examination of the dogs owned by various
leaders and famous personalities–what their dog-ownership reveals about their
non-public personality.

 

I love an author who can weave a pet into a story and enrich
my understanding of the owner’s character. Do you have a memorable pet you
think is/was an extension of yourself? As a reader, can you recall outstanding
pets in a novel and could you relate better to the owner’s character because of
that?

Thank you, Word Wenches, for inviting me to blog!

Jo: Wonderful insights and information, Kathrynn. I have to confess to not being a pet person. I would have loved a pet when young — preferably a pony, of course — but only got a white budgie called Snowy. Later the best I can offer is guppies.

 

So, over to you, all. What are your answers to Kathrynn’s questions? Do you see other angles on the topic of pets and their people? Is there anyone out there who shies away from books that have pets in them?

Kathrynn has kindly offered a signed copy of Shadow Rider as a prize. It will go to the author of a randomly picked comment posted before midnight pacific time on Saturday.

A little promo note from me, here. Christmas Angel was reissued on October 1st, in case Canewcov
you’re missing that from your Rogues collection.

AbbcAnd Harlequin has reissues the novella The Wise Virgin in a new collection called A Bride By Christmas, in company with Heather Graham and Candace Camp.

Jo 🙂

305 thoughts on “Wenchly Guest — Kathrynn Dennis”

  1. Very interesting info about pet owner characteristics! Our cat of 18 yrs just died and we’re contemplating getting a Papillion (or two) instead of another Abby. Wonder what that says about us??
    Look forward to reading your book.
    Welcome back Jo – hope your second stopover in Honolulu went better than the first, and that you found some good seafood and local produce.
    Donna

    Reply
  2. Very interesting info about pet owner characteristics! Our cat of 18 yrs just died and we’re contemplating getting a Papillion (or two) instead of another Abby. Wonder what that says about us??
    Look forward to reading your book.
    Welcome back Jo – hope your second stopover in Honolulu went better than the first, and that you found some good seafood and local produce.
    Donna

    Reply
  3. Very interesting info about pet owner characteristics! Our cat of 18 yrs just died and we’re contemplating getting a Papillion (or two) instead of another Abby. Wonder what that says about us??
    Look forward to reading your book.
    Welcome back Jo – hope your second stopover in Honolulu went better than the first, and that you found some good seafood and local produce.
    Donna

    Reply
  4. Very interesting info about pet owner characteristics! Our cat of 18 yrs just died and we’re contemplating getting a Papillion (or two) instead of another Abby. Wonder what that says about us??
    Look forward to reading your book.
    Welcome back Jo – hope your second stopover in Honolulu went better than the first, and that you found some good seafood and local produce.
    Donna

    Reply
  5. Very interesting info about pet owner characteristics! Our cat of 18 yrs just died and we’re contemplating getting a Papillion (or two) instead of another Abby. Wonder what that says about us??
    Look forward to reading your book.
    Welcome back Jo – hope your second stopover in Honolulu went better than the first, and that you found some good seafood and local produce.
    Donna

    Reply
  6. Loved, loved, LOVED this interview! It combined all my favorite things: animals/psychology, a good romance, and pretty horse pictures! Jawknee Reb is gorgeous.
    “I’ve not seen many romances where a character owns a nontraditional pet”
    There’s a book by Laura Kinsale where the hero has a pair of ferrets who help him in his hobby as a highwayman. They’re called Stand and Deliver, and they provide comic relief. Oh, and I just remembered another Kinsale book where the heroine owns a hedgehog, which also provides some comic moments. For the life of me I can’t remember the titles of the books.
    But I want to read YOUR book! A barking horse! (my horse drinks wine from a wineglass & eats dog biscuits). I’m really interested in this “real life” condition in horses. Would love to know more about it, and look forward to seeing how you wove it into your story. Fascinating!
    And thank you for the new word! I can’t wait to whip out “theriogenologist” during my next social outing!

    Reply
  7. Loved, loved, LOVED this interview! It combined all my favorite things: animals/psychology, a good romance, and pretty horse pictures! Jawknee Reb is gorgeous.
    “I’ve not seen many romances where a character owns a nontraditional pet”
    There’s a book by Laura Kinsale where the hero has a pair of ferrets who help him in his hobby as a highwayman. They’re called Stand and Deliver, and they provide comic relief. Oh, and I just remembered another Kinsale book where the heroine owns a hedgehog, which also provides some comic moments. For the life of me I can’t remember the titles of the books.
    But I want to read YOUR book! A barking horse! (my horse drinks wine from a wineglass & eats dog biscuits). I’m really interested in this “real life” condition in horses. Would love to know more about it, and look forward to seeing how you wove it into your story. Fascinating!
    And thank you for the new word! I can’t wait to whip out “theriogenologist” during my next social outing!

    Reply
  8. Loved, loved, LOVED this interview! It combined all my favorite things: animals/psychology, a good romance, and pretty horse pictures! Jawknee Reb is gorgeous.
    “I’ve not seen many romances where a character owns a nontraditional pet”
    There’s a book by Laura Kinsale where the hero has a pair of ferrets who help him in his hobby as a highwayman. They’re called Stand and Deliver, and they provide comic relief. Oh, and I just remembered another Kinsale book where the heroine owns a hedgehog, which also provides some comic moments. For the life of me I can’t remember the titles of the books.
    But I want to read YOUR book! A barking horse! (my horse drinks wine from a wineglass & eats dog biscuits). I’m really interested in this “real life” condition in horses. Would love to know more about it, and look forward to seeing how you wove it into your story. Fascinating!
    And thank you for the new word! I can’t wait to whip out “theriogenologist” during my next social outing!

    Reply
  9. Loved, loved, LOVED this interview! It combined all my favorite things: animals/psychology, a good romance, and pretty horse pictures! Jawknee Reb is gorgeous.
    “I’ve not seen many romances where a character owns a nontraditional pet”
    There’s a book by Laura Kinsale where the hero has a pair of ferrets who help him in his hobby as a highwayman. They’re called Stand and Deliver, and they provide comic relief. Oh, and I just remembered another Kinsale book where the heroine owns a hedgehog, which also provides some comic moments. For the life of me I can’t remember the titles of the books.
    But I want to read YOUR book! A barking horse! (my horse drinks wine from a wineglass & eats dog biscuits). I’m really interested in this “real life” condition in horses. Would love to know more about it, and look forward to seeing how you wove it into your story. Fascinating!
    And thank you for the new word! I can’t wait to whip out “theriogenologist” during my next social outing!

    Reply
  10. Loved, loved, LOVED this interview! It combined all my favorite things: animals/psychology, a good romance, and pretty horse pictures! Jawknee Reb is gorgeous.
    “I’ve not seen many romances where a character owns a nontraditional pet”
    There’s a book by Laura Kinsale where the hero has a pair of ferrets who help him in his hobby as a highwayman. They’re called Stand and Deliver, and they provide comic relief. Oh, and I just remembered another Kinsale book where the heroine owns a hedgehog, which also provides some comic moments. For the life of me I can’t remember the titles of the books.
    But I want to read YOUR book! A barking horse! (my horse drinks wine from a wineglass & eats dog biscuits). I’m really interested in this “real life” condition in horses. Would love to know more about it, and look forward to seeing how you wove it into your story. Fascinating!
    And thank you for the new word! I can’t wait to whip out “theriogenologist” during my next social outing!

    Reply
  11. Hi Kathrynn! You’re all over the web today. 🙂 Fabulous interview!
    I love animals in books. In fact, I’ve bought romances at the store simply because there was a dog on the cover. Yes, I’m a dog person. My current buddies are a 12 y/o chocolate lab and a 2 y/o lab/shepherd mix who are happily snoozing next to my chair.
    You’ve combined three of my favorite elements in a book – a medieval setting, animals and the mystical. I’m looking forward to reading DARK RIDER and SHADOW RIDER!
    ~PJ

    Reply
  12. Hi Kathrynn! You’re all over the web today. 🙂 Fabulous interview!
    I love animals in books. In fact, I’ve bought romances at the store simply because there was a dog on the cover. Yes, I’m a dog person. My current buddies are a 12 y/o chocolate lab and a 2 y/o lab/shepherd mix who are happily snoozing next to my chair.
    You’ve combined three of my favorite elements in a book – a medieval setting, animals and the mystical. I’m looking forward to reading DARK RIDER and SHADOW RIDER!
    ~PJ

    Reply
  13. Hi Kathrynn! You’re all over the web today. 🙂 Fabulous interview!
    I love animals in books. In fact, I’ve bought romances at the store simply because there was a dog on the cover. Yes, I’m a dog person. My current buddies are a 12 y/o chocolate lab and a 2 y/o lab/shepherd mix who are happily snoozing next to my chair.
    You’ve combined three of my favorite elements in a book – a medieval setting, animals and the mystical. I’m looking forward to reading DARK RIDER and SHADOW RIDER!
    ~PJ

    Reply
  14. Hi Kathrynn! You’re all over the web today. 🙂 Fabulous interview!
    I love animals in books. In fact, I’ve bought romances at the store simply because there was a dog on the cover. Yes, I’m a dog person. My current buddies are a 12 y/o chocolate lab and a 2 y/o lab/shepherd mix who are happily snoozing next to my chair.
    You’ve combined three of my favorite elements in a book – a medieval setting, animals and the mystical. I’m looking forward to reading DARK RIDER and SHADOW RIDER!
    ~PJ

    Reply
  15. Hi Kathrynn! You’re all over the web today. 🙂 Fabulous interview!
    I love animals in books. In fact, I’ve bought romances at the store simply because there was a dog on the cover. Yes, I’m a dog person. My current buddies are a 12 y/o chocolate lab and a 2 y/o lab/shepherd mix who are happily snoozing next to my chair.
    You’ve combined three of my favorite elements in a book – a medieval setting, animals and the mystical. I’m looking forward to reading DARK RIDER and SHADOW RIDER!
    ~PJ

    Reply
  16. It doesn’t really matter to me whether there are animals or not in books, as long as the animals don’t overshadow the people.
    Also, the animals I like best, birds, are in short supply in novels. Now, I do not own a bird, so don’t put me into the bird owner category, because I don’t fit.
    I think there should be more birds in books.

    Reply
  17. It doesn’t really matter to me whether there are animals or not in books, as long as the animals don’t overshadow the people.
    Also, the animals I like best, birds, are in short supply in novels. Now, I do not own a bird, so don’t put me into the bird owner category, because I don’t fit.
    I think there should be more birds in books.

    Reply
  18. It doesn’t really matter to me whether there are animals or not in books, as long as the animals don’t overshadow the people.
    Also, the animals I like best, birds, are in short supply in novels. Now, I do not own a bird, so don’t put me into the bird owner category, because I don’t fit.
    I think there should be more birds in books.

    Reply
  19. It doesn’t really matter to me whether there are animals or not in books, as long as the animals don’t overshadow the people.
    Also, the animals I like best, birds, are in short supply in novels. Now, I do not own a bird, so don’t put me into the bird owner category, because I don’t fit.
    I think there should be more birds in books.

    Reply
  20. It doesn’t really matter to me whether there are animals or not in books, as long as the animals don’t overshadow the people.
    Also, the animals I like best, birds, are in short supply in novels. Now, I do not own a bird, so don’t put me into the bird owner category, because I don’t fit.
    I think there should be more birds in books.

    Reply
  21. What an interesting blog! I read few Medievals, but the mystical colt has persuaded me to try Shadow Rider.
    I rather like animal characters in romances, and I expect animals in some writers’ books. Jenny Crusie almost always has an animal in hers. Barbara Metzger has lots of dogs in her books. Laura Kinsale probably wins the prize for the most unusual. In addition to the ferrets Sherrie mentioned, Kinsale has had a shark, a wolf, a hedgehog, and a pig. Some of the Wenches have used unusual animals too. Jo’s Knox the parrot and Loretta’s Marigold the mongoose come to mind. I’d classify Jo’s Banshee as unusual too, even though there are lots of horses in romances. 🙂

    Reply
  22. What an interesting blog! I read few Medievals, but the mystical colt has persuaded me to try Shadow Rider.
    I rather like animal characters in romances, and I expect animals in some writers’ books. Jenny Crusie almost always has an animal in hers. Barbara Metzger has lots of dogs in her books. Laura Kinsale probably wins the prize for the most unusual. In addition to the ferrets Sherrie mentioned, Kinsale has had a shark, a wolf, a hedgehog, and a pig. Some of the Wenches have used unusual animals too. Jo’s Knox the parrot and Loretta’s Marigold the mongoose come to mind. I’d classify Jo’s Banshee as unusual too, even though there are lots of horses in romances. 🙂

    Reply
  23. What an interesting blog! I read few Medievals, but the mystical colt has persuaded me to try Shadow Rider.
    I rather like animal characters in romances, and I expect animals in some writers’ books. Jenny Crusie almost always has an animal in hers. Barbara Metzger has lots of dogs in her books. Laura Kinsale probably wins the prize for the most unusual. In addition to the ferrets Sherrie mentioned, Kinsale has had a shark, a wolf, a hedgehog, and a pig. Some of the Wenches have used unusual animals too. Jo’s Knox the parrot and Loretta’s Marigold the mongoose come to mind. I’d classify Jo’s Banshee as unusual too, even though there are lots of horses in romances. 🙂

    Reply
  24. What an interesting blog! I read few Medievals, but the mystical colt has persuaded me to try Shadow Rider.
    I rather like animal characters in romances, and I expect animals in some writers’ books. Jenny Crusie almost always has an animal in hers. Barbara Metzger has lots of dogs in her books. Laura Kinsale probably wins the prize for the most unusual. In addition to the ferrets Sherrie mentioned, Kinsale has had a shark, a wolf, a hedgehog, and a pig. Some of the Wenches have used unusual animals too. Jo’s Knox the parrot and Loretta’s Marigold the mongoose come to mind. I’d classify Jo’s Banshee as unusual too, even though there are lots of horses in romances. 🙂

    Reply
  25. What an interesting blog! I read few Medievals, but the mystical colt has persuaded me to try Shadow Rider.
    I rather like animal characters in romances, and I expect animals in some writers’ books. Jenny Crusie almost always has an animal in hers. Barbara Metzger has lots of dogs in her books. Laura Kinsale probably wins the prize for the most unusual. In addition to the ferrets Sherrie mentioned, Kinsale has had a shark, a wolf, a hedgehog, and a pig. Some of the Wenches have used unusual animals too. Jo’s Knox the parrot and Loretta’s Marigold the mongoose come to mind. I’d classify Jo’s Banshee as unusual too, even though there are lots of horses in romances. 🙂

    Reply
  26. From Kathrynn: Oh Wow, Janga! I’m keeping a list of animals in romances…you’ve listed some great ones I didn’t have. Thank you.
    As for writers with pets, the book I mentioned (Why We Love the Animals We Do) has a few chapters on famous artists and their pets–and why artists need them. I consider romance writers artists.
    I got the sense creative people need to nurture and be nurtured, and when it came to celebrity artists (Picasso) they seem to feel their animals were the only ones who didn’t want something from them (other than food of course).

    Reply
  27. From Kathrynn: Oh Wow, Janga! I’m keeping a list of animals in romances…you’ve listed some great ones I didn’t have. Thank you.
    As for writers with pets, the book I mentioned (Why We Love the Animals We Do) has a few chapters on famous artists and their pets–and why artists need them. I consider romance writers artists.
    I got the sense creative people need to nurture and be nurtured, and when it came to celebrity artists (Picasso) they seem to feel their animals were the only ones who didn’t want something from them (other than food of course).

    Reply
  28. From Kathrynn: Oh Wow, Janga! I’m keeping a list of animals in romances…you’ve listed some great ones I didn’t have. Thank you.
    As for writers with pets, the book I mentioned (Why We Love the Animals We Do) has a few chapters on famous artists and their pets–and why artists need them. I consider romance writers artists.
    I got the sense creative people need to nurture and be nurtured, and when it came to celebrity artists (Picasso) they seem to feel their animals were the only ones who didn’t want something from them (other than food of course).

    Reply
  29. From Kathrynn: Oh Wow, Janga! I’m keeping a list of animals in romances…you’ve listed some great ones I didn’t have. Thank you.
    As for writers with pets, the book I mentioned (Why We Love the Animals We Do) has a few chapters on famous artists and their pets–and why artists need them. I consider romance writers artists.
    I got the sense creative people need to nurture and be nurtured, and when it came to celebrity artists (Picasso) they seem to feel their animals were the only ones who didn’t want something from them (other than food of course).

    Reply
  30. From Kathrynn: Oh Wow, Janga! I’m keeping a list of animals in romances…you’ve listed some great ones I didn’t have. Thank you.
    As for writers with pets, the book I mentioned (Why We Love the Animals We Do) has a few chapters on famous artists and their pets–and why artists need them. I consider romance writers artists.
    I got the sense creative people need to nurture and be nurtured, and when it came to celebrity artists (Picasso) they seem to feel their animals were the only ones who didn’t want something from them (other than food of course).

    Reply
  31. From Kathryn. Thanks PJ and Linda. And Linda, I used to own a parrot named “Whoopie” who talked a blue streak. I’ve been trying to think of some ways to work him in a story. He constantly asked, “Whatya doing?” Drove me nuts but I loved him. 😉

    Reply
  32. From Kathryn. Thanks PJ and Linda. And Linda, I used to own a parrot named “Whoopie” who talked a blue streak. I’ve been trying to think of some ways to work him in a story. He constantly asked, “Whatya doing?” Drove me nuts but I loved him. 😉

    Reply
  33. From Kathryn. Thanks PJ and Linda. And Linda, I used to own a parrot named “Whoopie” who talked a blue streak. I’ve been trying to think of some ways to work him in a story. He constantly asked, “Whatya doing?” Drove me nuts but I loved him. 😉

    Reply
  34. From Kathryn. Thanks PJ and Linda. And Linda, I used to own a parrot named “Whoopie” who talked a blue streak. I’ve been trying to think of some ways to work him in a story. He constantly asked, “Whatya doing?” Drove me nuts but I loved him. 😉

    Reply
  35. From Kathryn. Thanks PJ and Linda. And Linda, I used to own a parrot named “Whoopie” who talked a blue streak. I’ve been trying to think of some ways to work him in a story. He constantly asked, “Whatya doing?” Drove me nuts but I loved him. 😉

    Reply
  36. From Kathrynn: Talpiana, you got me. I’m guess that’s the back end of something…not sure what, unless its photoshopped! It’s certianly not the poor creatures head!
    I’d say you are a true cat lover–with many facets to your
    personality! 😉

    Reply
  37. From Kathrynn: Talpiana, you got me. I’m guess that’s the back end of something…not sure what, unless its photoshopped! It’s certianly not the poor creatures head!
    I’d say you are a true cat lover–with many facets to your
    personality! 😉

    Reply
  38. From Kathrynn: Talpiana, you got me. I’m guess that’s the back end of something…not sure what, unless its photoshopped! It’s certianly not the poor creatures head!
    I’d say you are a true cat lover–with many facets to your
    personality! 😉

    Reply
  39. From Kathrynn: Talpiana, you got me. I’m guess that’s the back end of something…not sure what, unless its photoshopped! It’s certianly not the poor creatures head!
    I’d say you are a true cat lover–with many facets to your
    personality! 😉

    Reply
  40. From Kathrynn: Talpiana, you got me. I’m guess that’s the back end of something…not sure what, unless its photoshopped! It’s certianly not the poor creatures head!
    I’d say you are a true cat lover–with many facets to your
    personality! 😉

    Reply
  41. I’m so sorry, Donna to hear about your cat.
    As for Papillons, as breed they are considered “observant, trainable, and VERY clever.”
    Hmmm, I expect you are, too (trainable, that is, as it applies to learning)!

    Reply
  42. I’m so sorry, Donna to hear about your cat.
    As for Papillons, as breed they are considered “observant, trainable, and VERY clever.”
    Hmmm, I expect you are, too (trainable, that is, as it applies to learning)!

    Reply
  43. I’m so sorry, Donna to hear about your cat.
    As for Papillons, as breed they are considered “observant, trainable, and VERY clever.”
    Hmmm, I expect you are, too (trainable, that is, as it applies to learning)!

    Reply
  44. I’m so sorry, Donna to hear about your cat.
    As for Papillons, as breed they are considered “observant, trainable, and VERY clever.”
    Hmmm, I expect you are, too (trainable, that is, as it applies to learning)!

    Reply
  45. I’m so sorry, Donna to hear about your cat.
    As for Papillons, as breed they are considered “observant, trainable, and VERY clever.”
    Hmmm, I expect you are, too (trainable, that is, as it applies to learning)!

    Reply
  46. Fascinating, Kathrynn! I’m looking at the fluffy cat that is walking between me and the monitor and wondering what she says about me. She was a salvage cat, not precisely a chosen cat, but I’m thinking that there is a lot to your pet profiling. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who usually has a cat lurking in the corners of a book, looking superior, as cats are wont to do.

    Reply
  47. Fascinating, Kathrynn! I’m looking at the fluffy cat that is walking between me and the monitor and wondering what she says about me. She was a salvage cat, not precisely a chosen cat, but I’m thinking that there is a lot to your pet profiling. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who usually has a cat lurking in the corners of a book, looking superior, as cats are wont to do.

    Reply
  48. Fascinating, Kathrynn! I’m looking at the fluffy cat that is walking between me and the monitor and wondering what she says about me. She was a salvage cat, not precisely a chosen cat, but I’m thinking that there is a lot to your pet profiling. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who usually has a cat lurking in the corners of a book, looking superior, as cats are wont to do.

    Reply
  49. Fascinating, Kathrynn! I’m looking at the fluffy cat that is walking between me and the monitor and wondering what she says about me. She was a salvage cat, not precisely a chosen cat, but I’m thinking that there is a lot to your pet profiling. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who usually has a cat lurking in the corners of a book, looking superior, as cats are wont to do.

    Reply
  50. Fascinating, Kathrynn! I’m looking at the fluffy cat that is walking between me and the monitor and wondering what she says about me. She was a salvage cat, not precisely a chosen cat, but I’m thinking that there is a lot to your pet profiling. 🙂
    Mary Jo, who usually has a cat lurking in the corners of a book, looking superior, as cats are wont to do.

    Reply
  51. Jo here.
    I was visiting family in Ottawa and they have two cats. Both are indoor cats, but one would really like to be an outdoor one — it was a rescue — so they take it out on a harness.
    We sometimes talk about cats being cool etc, but as soon as that harness appears the cat’s like a kid on Christmas morning.
    I “walked” it one day. Cats being cats it was more like walking a curious toddler. Better not be in a hurry!
    Jo

    Reply
  52. Jo here.
    I was visiting family in Ottawa and they have two cats. Both are indoor cats, but one would really like to be an outdoor one — it was a rescue — so they take it out on a harness.
    We sometimes talk about cats being cool etc, but as soon as that harness appears the cat’s like a kid on Christmas morning.
    I “walked” it one day. Cats being cats it was more like walking a curious toddler. Better not be in a hurry!
    Jo

    Reply
  53. Jo here.
    I was visiting family in Ottawa and they have two cats. Both are indoor cats, but one would really like to be an outdoor one — it was a rescue — so they take it out on a harness.
    We sometimes talk about cats being cool etc, but as soon as that harness appears the cat’s like a kid on Christmas morning.
    I “walked” it one day. Cats being cats it was more like walking a curious toddler. Better not be in a hurry!
    Jo

    Reply
  54. Jo here.
    I was visiting family in Ottawa and they have two cats. Both are indoor cats, but one would really like to be an outdoor one — it was a rescue — so they take it out on a harness.
    We sometimes talk about cats being cool etc, but as soon as that harness appears the cat’s like a kid on Christmas morning.
    I “walked” it one day. Cats being cats it was more like walking a curious toddler. Better not be in a hurry!
    Jo

    Reply
  55. Jo here.
    I was visiting family in Ottawa and they have two cats. Both are indoor cats, but one would really like to be an outdoor one — it was a rescue — so they take it out on a harness.
    We sometimes talk about cats being cool etc, but as soon as that harness appears the cat’s like a kid on Christmas morning.
    I “walked” it one day. Cats being cats it was more like walking a curious toddler. Better not be in a hurry!
    Jo

    Reply
  56. Hey Kathrynn! Had to come over and support my fellow Hoyden (and fellow horse nut). Your horse is sure pretty boy (?). Love that blaze.
    What does it say about me that I just got two (!) mastiff puppies? I’m guessing it must be something about having lost my mind, LOL!

    Reply
  57. Hey Kathrynn! Had to come over and support my fellow Hoyden (and fellow horse nut). Your horse is sure pretty boy (?). Love that blaze.
    What does it say about me that I just got two (!) mastiff puppies? I’m guessing it must be something about having lost my mind, LOL!

    Reply
  58. Hey Kathrynn! Had to come over and support my fellow Hoyden (and fellow horse nut). Your horse is sure pretty boy (?). Love that blaze.
    What does it say about me that I just got two (!) mastiff puppies? I’m guessing it must be something about having lost my mind, LOL!

    Reply
  59. Hey Kathrynn! Had to come over and support my fellow Hoyden (and fellow horse nut). Your horse is sure pretty boy (?). Love that blaze.
    What does it say about me that I just got two (!) mastiff puppies? I’m guessing it must be something about having lost my mind, LOL!

    Reply
  60. Hey Kathrynn! Had to come over and support my fellow Hoyden (and fellow horse nut). Your horse is sure pretty boy (?). Love that blaze.
    What does it say about me that I just got two (!) mastiff puppies? I’m guessing it must be something about having lost my mind, LOL!

    Reply
  61. Welcome to the Wenches, Kathrynn!
    As a vet who writes, were you influenced by James Herriot growing up?
    I love dogs and cats, but horses will always be “it” for me. I’m hoping to become a horse owner again in this life. My dh, however, is strictly a cat man. Think DeNiro in Meet The Parents. We currently have four, and he thinks it’s grossly unfair that people who have four dogs are not called, “crazy dog people.” lol
    Best of success with your Rider books!

    Reply
  62. Welcome to the Wenches, Kathrynn!
    As a vet who writes, were you influenced by James Herriot growing up?
    I love dogs and cats, but horses will always be “it” for me. I’m hoping to become a horse owner again in this life. My dh, however, is strictly a cat man. Think DeNiro in Meet The Parents. We currently have four, and he thinks it’s grossly unfair that people who have four dogs are not called, “crazy dog people.” lol
    Best of success with your Rider books!

    Reply
  63. Welcome to the Wenches, Kathrynn!
    As a vet who writes, were you influenced by James Herriot growing up?
    I love dogs and cats, but horses will always be “it” for me. I’m hoping to become a horse owner again in this life. My dh, however, is strictly a cat man. Think DeNiro in Meet The Parents. We currently have four, and he thinks it’s grossly unfair that people who have four dogs are not called, “crazy dog people.” lol
    Best of success with your Rider books!

    Reply
  64. Welcome to the Wenches, Kathrynn!
    As a vet who writes, were you influenced by James Herriot growing up?
    I love dogs and cats, but horses will always be “it” for me. I’m hoping to become a horse owner again in this life. My dh, however, is strictly a cat man. Think DeNiro in Meet The Parents. We currently have four, and he thinks it’s grossly unfair that people who have four dogs are not called, “crazy dog people.” lol
    Best of success with your Rider books!

    Reply
  65. Welcome to the Wenches, Kathrynn!
    As a vet who writes, were you influenced by James Herriot growing up?
    I love dogs and cats, but horses will always be “it” for me. I’m hoping to become a horse owner again in this life. My dh, however, is strictly a cat man. Think DeNiro in Meet The Parents. We currently have four, and he thinks it’s grossly unfair that people who have four dogs are not called, “crazy dog people.” lol
    Best of success with your Rider books!

    Reply
  66. Thanks, Kalen, for stopping by! TWO Mastiffs! Yikes, you are a true dog lover.
    Mastiffs are: territorial and dominant, highly protective. solid and good natured. They are in the “steady” dog group, according to their personality tests (yes, they do have such tests for dogs–shelters use them when matching with potential owners).
    My book say these dogs settle in easily and are very friendly with people. Seems like a good fit!

    Reply
  67. Thanks, Kalen, for stopping by! TWO Mastiffs! Yikes, you are a true dog lover.
    Mastiffs are: territorial and dominant, highly protective. solid and good natured. They are in the “steady” dog group, according to their personality tests (yes, they do have such tests for dogs–shelters use them when matching with potential owners).
    My book say these dogs settle in easily and are very friendly with people. Seems like a good fit!

    Reply
  68. Thanks, Kalen, for stopping by! TWO Mastiffs! Yikes, you are a true dog lover.
    Mastiffs are: territorial and dominant, highly protective. solid and good natured. They are in the “steady” dog group, according to their personality tests (yes, they do have such tests for dogs–shelters use them when matching with potential owners).
    My book say these dogs settle in easily and are very friendly with people. Seems like a good fit!

    Reply
  69. Thanks, Kalen, for stopping by! TWO Mastiffs! Yikes, you are a true dog lover.
    Mastiffs are: territorial and dominant, highly protective. solid and good natured. They are in the “steady” dog group, according to their personality tests (yes, they do have such tests for dogs–shelters use them when matching with potential owners).
    My book say these dogs settle in easily and are very friendly with people. Seems like a good fit!

    Reply
  70. Thanks, Kalen, for stopping by! TWO Mastiffs! Yikes, you are a true dog lover.
    Mastiffs are: territorial and dominant, highly protective. solid and good natured. They are in the “steady” dog group, according to their personality tests (yes, they do have such tests for dogs–shelters use them when matching with potential owners).
    My book say these dogs settle in easily and are very friendly with people. Seems like a good fit!

    Reply
  71. Thank you, Jane. And yes, I grew up with James Herriot, went to England for a summer to practice in a rural mixed-practice (in Tunbridge Wells), thinking it would be just like Herriot described. It almost was…
    “Tristan” came to speak at my vet school graduation. The real guy was as funny as the character–I’d guuess he was 70 years old at the time!

    Reply
  72. Thank you, Jane. And yes, I grew up with James Herriot, went to England for a summer to practice in a rural mixed-practice (in Tunbridge Wells), thinking it would be just like Herriot described. It almost was…
    “Tristan” came to speak at my vet school graduation. The real guy was as funny as the character–I’d guuess he was 70 years old at the time!

    Reply
  73. Thank you, Jane. And yes, I grew up with James Herriot, went to England for a summer to practice in a rural mixed-practice (in Tunbridge Wells), thinking it would be just like Herriot described. It almost was…
    “Tristan” came to speak at my vet school graduation. The real guy was as funny as the character–I’d guuess he was 70 years old at the time!

    Reply
  74. Thank you, Jane. And yes, I grew up with James Herriot, went to England for a summer to practice in a rural mixed-practice (in Tunbridge Wells), thinking it would be just like Herriot described. It almost was…
    “Tristan” came to speak at my vet school graduation. The real guy was as funny as the character–I’d guuess he was 70 years old at the time!

    Reply
  75. Thank you, Jane. And yes, I grew up with James Herriot, went to England for a summer to practice in a rural mixed-practice (in Tunbridge Wells), thinking it would be just like Herriot described. It almost was…
    “Tristan” came to speak at my vet school graduation. The real guy was as funny as the character–I’d guuess he was 70 years old at the time!

    Reply
  76. Hi Kathrynn,
    I got Dark Rider for a friend who LOVES horses. She read it, gave it back to me, and said, “You’ve GOT to read this.” I am in the middle of it now and am enthralled. Now we both will be getting Shadow Rider—Hopefully your autographed copy! Thank you for a beautiful story.
    As far as pets go, I had a male cat (Mr. Data) whom my family jokingly referred to as my familiar. That was 10 years ago, and since then I’ve bonded with my dog, Winter, a half-German Sheppard/half Catahoula. She is VERY protective of me.
    I love stories with animals in them as I seem to attract them, or rather they seem to talk to me.
    Just yesterday, I had come across an article about Pets and your personality. This is the link for anyone interested:
    http://www.californiapsychics.com/articles/Features/1070/What_Your_Pet_Says_About_You.aspx
    This link has related artciles like “Pet Telepathy.”
    I enjoyed your interview and discussion of Pets, Pet Owners and their likeness. I will be passing this interview on to others. Thank you.
    Julie

    Reply
  77. Hi Kathrynn,
    I got Dark Rider for a friend who LOVES horses. She read it, gave it back to me, and said, “You’ve GOT to read this.” I am in the middle of it now and am enthralled. Now we both will be getting Shadow Rider—Hopefully your autographed copy! Thank you for a beautiful story.
    As far as pets go, I had a male cat (Mr. Data) whom my family jokingly referred to as my familiar. That was 10 years ago, and since then I’ve bonded with my dog, Winter, a half-German Sheppard/half Catahoula. She is VERY protective of me.
    I love stories with animals in them as I seem to attract them, or rather they seem to talk to me.
    Just yesterday, I had come across an article about Pets and your personality. This is the link for anyone interested:
    http://www.californiapsychics.com/articles/Features/1070/What_Your_Pet_Says_About_You.aspx
    This link has related artciles like “Pet Telepathy.”
    I enjoyed your interview and discussion of Pets, Pet Owners and their likeness. I will be passing this interview on to others. Thank you.
    Julie

    Reply
  78. Hi Kathrynn,
    I got Dark Rider for a friend who LOVES horses. She read it, gave it back to me, and said, “You’ve GOT to read this.” I am in the middle of it now and am enthralled. Now we both will be getting Shadow Rider—Hopefully your autographed copy! Thank you for a beautiful story.
    As far as pets go, I had a male cat (Mr. Data) whom my family jokingly referred to as my familiar. That was 10 years ago, and since then I’ve bonded with my dog, Winter, a half-German Sheppard/half Catahoula. She is VERY protective of me.
    I love stories with animals in them as I seem to attract them, or rather they seem to talk to me.
    Just yesterday, I had come across an article about Pets and your personality. This is the link for anyone interested:
    http://www.californiapsychics.com/articles/Features/1070/What_Your_Pet_Says_About_You.aspx
    This link has related artciles like “Pet Telepathy.”
    I enjoyed your interview and discussion of Pets, Pet Owners and their likeness. I will be passing this interview on to others. Thank you.
    Julie

    Reply
  79. Hi Kathrynn,
    I got Dark Rider for a friend who LOVES horses. She read it, gave it back to me, and said, “You’ve GOT to read this.” I am in the middle of it now and am enthralled. Now we both will be getting Shadow Rider—Hopefully your autographed copy! Thank you for a beautiful story.
    As far as pets go, I had a male cat (Mr. Data) whom my family jokingly referred to as my familiar. That was 10 years ago, and since then I’ve bonded with my dog, Winter, a half-German Sheppard/half Catahoula. She is VERY protective of me.
    I love stories with animals in them as I seem to attract them, or rather they seem to talk to me.
    Just yesterday, I had come across an article about Pets and your personality. This is the link for anyone interested:
    http://www.californiapsychics.com/articles/Features/1070/What_Your_Pet_Says_About_You.aspx
    This link has related artciles like “Pet Telepathy.”
    I enjoyed your interview and discussion of Pets, Pet Owners and their likeness. I will be passing this interview on to others. Thank you.
    Julie

    Reply
  80. Hi Kathrynn,
    I got Dark Rider for a friend who LOVES horses. She read it, gave it back to me, and said, “You’ve GOT to read this.” I am in the middle of it now and am enthralled. Now we both will be getting Shadow Rider—Hopefully your autographed copy! Thank you for a beautiful story.
    As far as pets go, I had a male cat (Mr. Data) whom my family jokingly referred to as my familiar. That was 10 years ago, and since then I’ve bonded with my dog, Winter, a half-German Sheppard/half Catahoula. She is VERY protective of me.
    I love stories with animals in them as I seem to attract them, or rather they seem to talk to me.
    Just yesterday, I had come across an article about Pets and your personality. This is the link for anyone interested:
    http://www.californiapsychics.com/articles/Features/1070/What_Your_Pet_Says_About_You.aspx
    This link has related artciles like “Pet Telepathy.”
    I enjoyed your interview and discussion of Pets, Pet Owners and their likeness. I will be passing this interview on to others. Thank you.
    Julie

    Reply
  81. Hi Jo,
    I must admit, I’ve never walked a cat…I’d love to see a “happy cat” or one get excited for something other than food. 😉
    Ottowa? Brrrr. I also practiced in Guelph, Ontario for a couple of years–and I thought that was cold!

    Reply
  82. Hi Jo,
    I must admit, I’ve never walked a cat…I’d love to see a “happy cat” or one get excited for something other than food. 😉
    Ottowa? Brrrr. I also practiced in Guelph, Ontario for a couple of years–and I thought that was cold!

    Reply
  83. Hi Jo,
    I must admit, I’ve never walked a cat…I’d love to see a “happy cat” or one get excited for something other than food. 😉
    Ottowa? Brrrr. I also practiced in Guelph, Ontario for a couple of years–and I thought that was cold!

    Reply
  84. Hi Jo,
    I must admit, I’ve never walked a cat…I’d love to see a “happy cat” or one get excited for something other than food. 😉
    Ottowa? Brrrr. I also practiced in Guelph, Ontario for a couple of years–and I thought that was cold!

    Reply
  85. Hi Jo,
    I must admit, I’ve never walked a cat…I’d love to see a “happy cat” or one get excited for something other than food. 😉
    Ottowa? Brrrr. I also practiced in Guelph, Ontario for a couple of years–and I thought that was cold!

    Reply
  86. Talpianna’s animal is real- it is a mole and that is how its nose really looks! I think they are called “star-nosed” but undoubtedly there is another name for them. I have mentioned before in these pages that I loved Patricia Veryan’s books because there was always an animal in them. How a character treats animals reveals much about his or her personality. I think animals belong in Regency era books- and I am not just talking about horses. I think a love of animals, particularly dogs, is a very British trait. I have three re-cycled cats, myself, but sadly I am not able to give a dog the attention it needs, although I hope to have one when I retire. Animals make the best friends!

    Reply
  87. Talpianna’s animal is real- it is a mole and that is how its nose really looks! I think they are called “star-nosed” but undoubtedly there is another name for them. I have mentioned before in these pages that I loved Patricia Veryan’s books because there was always an animal in them. How a character treats animals reveals much about his or her personality. I think animals belong in Regency era books- and I am not just talking about horses. I think a love of animals, particularly dogs, is a very British trait. I have three re-cycled cats, myself, but sadly I am not able to give a dog the attention it needs, although I hope to have one when I retire. Animals make the best friends!

    Reply
  88. Talpianna’s animal is real- it is a mole and that is how its nose really looks! I think they are called “star-nosed” but undoubtedly there is another name for them. I have mentioned before in these pages that I loved Patricia Veryan’s books because there was always an animal in them. How a character treats animals reveals much about his or her personality. I think animals belong in Regency era books- and I am not just talking about horses. I think a love of animals, particularly dogs, is a very British trait. I have three re-cycled cats, myself, but sadly I am not able to give a dog the attention it needs, although I hope to have one when I retire. Animals make the best friends!

    Reply
  89. Talpianna’s animal is real- it is a mole and that is how its nose really looks! I think they are called “star-nosed” but undoubtedly there is another name for them. I have mentioned before in these pages that I loved Patricia Veryan’s books because there was always an animal in them. How a character treats animals reveals much about his or her personality. I think animals belong in Regency era books- and I am not just talking about horses. I think a love of animals, particularly dogs, is a very British trait. I have three re-cycled cats, myself, but sadly I am not able to give a dog the attention it needs, although I hope to have one when I retire. Animals make the best friends!

    Reply
  90. Talpianna’s animal is real- it is a mole and that is how its nose really looks! I think they are called “star-nosed” but undoubtedly there is another name for them. I have mentioned before in these pages that I loved Patricia Veryan’s books because there was always an animal in them. How a character treats animals reveals much about his or her personality. I think animals belong in Regency era books- and I am not just talking about horses. I think a love of animals, particularly dogs, is a very British trait. I have three re-cycled cats, myself, but sadly I am not able to give a dog the attention it needs, although I hope to have one when I retire. Animals make the best friends!

    Reply
  91. I’m buried in pets. Admittedly, it’s because my girls rescue any animal that comes along. From Sophie the rabbit, four dogs, including an epileptic St Bernard, and four cats, including one too-good-for-anyone Maine Coon, there are days I want to run away. However, I can’t imagine life without pets–just fewer of them. LOL
    Looking forward to reading your book. I love stories where the animal is central. The way the characters respond to it tells you so much without additional narrative.

    Reply
  92. I’m buried in pets. Admittedly, it’s because my girls rescue any animal that comes along. From Sophie the rabbit, four dogs, including an epileptic St Bernard, and four cats, including one too-good-for-anyone Maine Coon, there are days I want to run away. However, I can’t imagine life without pets–just fewer of them. LOL
    Looking forward to reading your book. I love stories where the animal is central. The way the characters respond to it tells you so much without additional narrative.

    Reply
  93. I’m buried in pets. Admittedly, it’s because my girls rescue any animal that comes along. From Sophie the rabbit, four dogs, including an epileptic St Bernard, and four cats, including one too-good-for-anyone Maine Coon, there are days I want to run away. However, I can’t imagine life without pets–just fewer of them. LOL
    Looking forward to reading your book. I love stories where the animal is central. The way the characters respond to it tells you so much without additional narrative.

    Reply
  94. I’m buried in pets. Admittedly, it’s because my girls rescue any animal that comes along. From Sophie the rabbit, four dogs, including an epileptic St Bernard, and four cats, including one too-good-for-anyone Maine Coon, there are days I want to run away. However, I can’t imagine life without pets–just fewer of them. LOL
    Looking forward to reading your book. I love stories where the animal is central. The way the characters respond to it tells you so much without additional narrative.

    Reply
  95. I’m buried in pets. Admittedly, it’s because my girls rescue any animal that comes along. From Sophie the rabbit, four dogs, including an epileptic St Bernard, and four cats, including one too-good-for-anyone Maine Coon, there are days I want to run away. However, I can’t imagine life without pets–just fewer of them. LOL
    Looking forward to reading your book. I love stories where the animal is central. The way the characters respond to it tells you so much without additional narrative.

    Reply
  96. Hi Kathryn! Great interview! I never really thought about any of these questions before. It doesn’t bother me at all when characters have pets, it seems only natural and makes them more human.
    I do have to disagree that I have any physical similarities to my dog though… He’s a boxer, and if my jowels start hanging and slobbering like his I will just bury myself, lol.
    Cheers!

    Reply
  97. Hi Kathryn! Great interview! I never really thought about any of these questions before. It doesn’t bother me at all when characters have pets, it seems only natural and makes them more human.
    I do have to disagree that I have any physical similarities to my dog though… He’s a boxer, and if my jowels start hanging and slobbering like his I will just bury myself, lol.
    Cheers!

    Reply
  98. Hi Kathryn! Great interview! I never really thought about any of these questions before. It doesn’t bother me at all when characters have pets, it seems only natural and makes them more human.
    I do have to disagree that I have any physical similarities to my dog though… He’s a boxer, and if my jowels start hanging and slobbering like his I will just bury myself, lol.
    Cheers!

    Reply
  99. Hi Kathryn! Great interview! I never really thought about any of these questions before. It doesn’t bother me at all when characters have pets, it seems only natural and makes them more human.
    I do have to disagree that I have any physical similarities to my dog though… He’s a boxer, and if my jowels start hanging and slobbering like his I will just bury myself, lol.
    Cheers!

    Reply
  100. Hi Kathryn! Great interview! I never really thought about any of these questions before. It doesn’t bother me at all when characters have pets, it seems only natural and makes them more human.
    I do have to disagree that I have any physical similarities to my dog though… He’s a boxer, and if my jowels start hanging and slobbering like his I will just bury myself, lol.
    Cheers!

    Reply
  101. Hi Kathrynn,
    I’ve always thought that you can tell a lot about people by their animals personalities. A lot of friendly people seem to have friendly animals and, of course, unfriendly people often have unfriendly animals.

    Reply
  102. Hi Kathrynn,
    I’ve always thought that you can tell a lot about people by their animals personalities. A lot of friendly people seem to have friendly animals and, of course, unfriendly people often have unfriendly animals.

    Reply
  103. Hi Kathrynn,
    I’ve always thought that you can tell a lot about people by their animals personalities. A lot of friendly people seem to have friendly animals and, of course, unfriendly people often have unfriendly animals.

    Reply
  104. Hi Kathrynn,
    I’ve always thought that you can tell a lot about people by their animals personalities. A lot of friendly people seem to have friendly animals and, of course, unfriendly people often have unfriendly animals.

    Reply
  105. Hi Kathrynn,
    I’ve always thought that you can tell a lot about people by their animals personalities. A lot of friendly people seem to have friendly animals and, of course, unfriendly people often have unfriendly animals.

    Reply
  106. Wild wave to Kathrynn!
    You said:
    “Cat lovers are high in autonomy and low in dominance and nurturing. {Does this translate to we’re too lazy to train them and are happy to leave out kibble and a litter box?}
    Dog-loving men are high in dominance and aggression. {The ideal dog for DH would be one that responds to commands like a robot!}
    Dog-loving women are high in dominance, too, but low in aggression. {I love puppies!!!}”
    In the past, when dh and I were young and fancy-free (aka pre-kids) we had practice babies. 😉
    We adopted an orange tabby kitty and trained him to pee in the toilet because we were too lazy to clean out a litter box. LOL! We almost got him trained to flush, too! We got a harness to walk him, but in the end we felt stupid walking a cat — who in her right mind walks a cat? 😀
    After a few years, when we bought a house, we got a golden retriever. He was a beautiful dog and so sweet. My dh though would often say that the dog was a dumb blond (apologies to all the blondes on-line!).
    Now, earlier this year my boys adopted two full grown cats and they’re fun to have around the house. They much more vocal than my first cat and very demanding. As Kathrynn can attest, they don’t stop yelling at you when they think they need to be feed! LOL! I’ve managed to train them to sit before I feed them their scoop of kibble. What do you think, Kathrynn? Am I just a messed up dog owner trying to be lazy with cats? DH doesn’t want another dog even though our boys and I would love one. Truth of the matter is I’m not a morning person and the job of walking the dog would eventually fall on DH, especially those cold, pre-dawn mornings. Brrrr!
    I was privileged to read advanced copies of Dark Rider and Shadow Rider. To anyone out there who are on the fence about buying these books — they’re super reads! Don’t hesitate to buy them!

    Reply
  107. Wild wave to Kathrynn!
    You said:
    “Cat lovers are high in autonomy and low in dominance and nurturing. {Does this translate to we’re too lazy to train them and are happy to leave out kibble and a litter box?}
    Dog-loving men are high in dominance and aggression. {The ideal dog for DH would be one that responds to commands like a robot!}
    Dog-loving women are high in dominance, too, but low in aggression. {I love puppies!!!}”
    In the past, when dh and I were young and fancy-free (aka pre-kids) we had practice babies. 😉
    We adopted an orange tabby kitty and trained him to pee in the toilet because we were too lazy to clean out a litter box. LOL! We almost got him trained to flush, too! We got a harness to walk him, but in the end we felt stupid walking a cat — who in her right mind walks a cat? 😀
    After a few years, when we bought a house, we got a golden retriever. He was a beautiful dog and so sweet. My dh though would often say that the dog was a dumb blond (apologies to all the blondes on-line!).
    Now, earlier this year my boys adopted two full grown cats and they’re fun to have around the house. They much more vocal than my first cat and very demanding. As Kathrynn can attest, they don’t stop yelling at you when they think they need to be feed! LOL! I’ve managed to train them to sit before I feed them their scoop of kibble. What do you think, Kathrynn? Am I just a messed up dog owner trying to be lazy with cats? DH doesn’t want another dog even though our boys and I would love one. Truth of the matter is I’m not a morning person and the job of walking the dog would eventually fall on DH, especially those cold, pre-dawn mornings. Brrrr!
    I was privileged to read advanced copies of Dark Rider and Shadow Rider. To anyone out there who are on the fence about buying these books — they’re super reads! Don’t hesitate to buy them!

    Reply
  108. Wild wave to Kathrynn!
    You said:
    “Cat lovers are high in autonomy and low in dominance and nurturing. {Does this translate to we’re too lazy to train them and are happy to leave out kibble and a litter box?}
    Dog-loving men are high in dominance and aggression. {The ideal dog for DH would be one that responds to commands like a robot!}
    Dog-loving women are high in dominance, too, but low in aggression. {I love puppies!!!}”
    In the past, when dh and I were young and fancy-free (aka pre-kids) we had practice babies. 😉
    We adopted an orange tabby kitty and trained him to pee in the toilet because we were too lazy to clean out a litter box. LOL! We almost got him trained to flush, too! We got a harness to walk him, but in the end we felt stupid walking a cat — who in her right mind walks a cat? 😀
    After a few years, when we bought a house, we got a golden retriever. He was a beautiful dog and so sweet. My dh though would often say that the dog was a dumb blond (apologies to all the blondes on-line!).
    Now, earlier this year my boys adopted two full grown cats and they’re fun to have around the house. They much more vocal than my first cat and very demanding. As Kathrynn can attest, they don’t stop yelling at you when they think they need to be feed! LOL! I’ve managed to train them to sit before I feed them their scoop of kibble. What do you think, Kathrynn? Am I just a messed up dog owner trying to be lazy with cats? DH doesn’t want another dog even though our boys and I would love one. Truth of the matter is I’m not a morning person and the job of walking the dog would eventually fall on DH, especially those cold, pre-dawn mornings. Brrrr!
    I was privileged to read advanced copies of Dark Rider and Shadow Rider. To anyone out there who are on the fence about buying these books — they’re super reads! Don’t hesitate to buy them!

    Reply
  109. Wild wave to Kathrynn!
    You said:
    “Cat lovers are high in autonomy and low in dominance and nurturing. {Does this translate to we’re too lazy to train them and are happy to leave out kibble and a litter box?}
    Dog-loving men are high in dominance and aggression. {The ideal dog for DH would be one that responds to commands like a robot!}
    Dog-loving women are high in dominance, too, but low in aggression. {I love puppies!!!}”
    In the past, when dh and I were young and fancy-free (aka pre-kids) we had practice babies. 😉
    We adopted an orange tabby kitty and trained him to pee in the toilet because we were too lazy to clean out a litter box. LOL! We almost got him trained to flush, too! We got a harness to walk him, but in the end we felt stupid walking a cat — who in her right mind walks a cat? 😀
    After a few years, when we bought a house, we got a golden retriever. He was a beautiful dog and so sweet. My dh though would often say that the dog was a dumb blond (apologies to all the blondes on-line!).
    Now, earlier this year my boys adopted two full grown cats and they’re fun to have around the house. They much more vocal than my first cat and very demanding. As Kathrynn can attest, they don’t stop yelling at you when they think they need to be feed! LOL! I’ve managed to train them to sit before I feed them their scoop of kibble. What do you think, Kathrynn? Am I just a messed up dog owner trying to be lazy with cats? DH doesn’t want another dog even though our boys and I would love one. Truth of the matter is I’m not a morning person and the job of walking the dog would eventually fall on DH, especially those cold, pre-dawn mornings. Brrrr!
    I was privileged to read advanced copies of Dark Rider and Shadow Rider. To anyone out there who are on the fence about buying these books — they’re super reads! Don’t hesitate to buy them!

    Reply
  110. Wild wave to Kathrynn!
    You said:
    “Cat lovers are high in autonomy and low in dominance and nurturing. {Does this translate to we’re too lazy to train them and are happy to leave out kibble and a litter box?}
    Dog-loving men are high in dominance and aggression. {The ideal dog for DH would be one that responds to commands like a robot!}
    Dog-loving women are high in dominance, too, but low in aggression. {I love puppies!!!}”
    In the past, when dh and I were young and fancy-free (aka pre-kids) we had practice babies. 😉
    We adopted an orange tabby kitty and trained him to pee in the toilet because we were too lazy to clean out a litter box. LOL! We almost got him trained to flush, too! We got a harness to walk him, but in the end we felt stupid walking a cat — who in her right mind walks a cat? 😀
    After a few years, when we bought a house, we got a golden retriever. He was a beautiful dog and so sweet. My dh though would often say that the dog was a dumb blond (apologies to all the blondes on-line!).
    Now, earlier this year my boys adopted two full grown cats and they’re fun to have around the house. They much more vocal than my first cat and very demanding. As Kathrynn can attest, they don’t stop yelling at you when they think they need to be feed! LOL! I’ve managed to train them to sit before I feed them their scoop of kibble. What do you think, Kathrynn? Am I just a messed up dog owner trying to be lazy with cats? DH doesn’t want another dog even though our boys and I would love one. Truth of the matter is I’m not a morning person and the job of walking the dog would eventually fall on DH, especially those cold, pre-dawn mornings. Brrrr!
    I was privileged to read advanced copies of Dark Rider and Shadow Rider. To anyone out there who are on the fence about buying these books — they’re super reads! Don’t hesitate to buy them!

    Reply
  111. Loved this blog. I have an all-white, nearly 5-year old mini-lop rabbit. Buttercup has her own bedroom and lives in a cardboard “condo.” She’s very loving – when it’s time for breakfast (main diet is hay). I’m not sure what having a rabbit for a pet says about me, but I love it when she binkies (jumps for joy).

    Reply
  112. Loved this blog. I have an all-white, nearly 5-year old mini-lop rabbit. Buttercup has her own bedroom and lives in a cardboard “condo.” She’s very loving – when it’s time for breakfast (main diet is hay). I’m not sure what having a rabbit for a pet says about me, but I love it when she binkies (jumps for joy).

    Reply
  113. Loved this blog. I have an all-white, nearly 5-year old mini-lop rabbit. Buttercup has her own bedroom and lives in a cardboard “condo.” She’s very loving – when it’s time for breakfast (main diet is hay). I’m not sure what having a rabbit for a pet says about me, but I love it when she binkies (jumps for joy).

    Reply
  114. Loved this blog. I have an all-white, nearly 5-year old mini-lop rabbit. Buttercup has her own bedroom and lives in a cardboard “condo.” She’s very loving – when it’s time for breakfast (main diet is hay). I’m not sure what having a rabbit for a pet says about me, but I love it when she binkies (jumps for joy).

    Reply
  115. Loved this blog. I have an all-white, nearly 5-year old mini-lop rabbit. Buttercup has her own bedroom and lives in a cardboard “condo.” She’s very loving – when it’s time for breakfast (main diet is hay). I’m not sure what having a rabbit for a pet says about me, but I love it when she binkies (jumps for joy).

    Reply
  116. Kathrynn, I just wanted to say that I loved your call story–how funny how life works 🙂 Congratulations again on your books–they sound like fabulous reads!

    Reply
  117. Kathrynn, I just wanted to say that I loved your call story–how funny how life works 🙂 Congratulations again on your books–they sound like fabulous reads!

    Reply
  118. Kathrynn, I just wanted to say that I loved your call story–how funny how life works 🙂 Congratulations again on your books–they sound like fabulous reads!

    Reply
  119. Kathrynn, I just wanted to say that I loved your call story–how funny how life works 🙂 Congratulations again on your books–they sound like fabulous reads!

    Reply
  120. Kathrynn, I just wanted to say that I loved your call story–how funny how life works 🙂 Congratulations again on your books–they sound like fabulous reads!

    Reply
  121. Maureen, I agree completely…mean pets seem to go with mean people.
    Kalen, thanks for straightening me out on the Maine coon thing. See this is why I’m meant to be large animal vet. I pretty much know a horse, cow, pig, sheep and goat when I see one. 😉

    Reply
  122. Maureen, I agree completely…mean pets seem to go with mean people.
    Kalen, thanks for straightening me out on the Maine coon thing. See this is why I’m meant to be large animal vet. I pretty much know a horse, cow, pig, sheep and goat when I see one. 😉

    Reply
  123. Maureen, I agree completely…mean pets seem to go with mean people.
    Kalen, thanks for straightening me out on the Maine coon thing. See this is why I’m meant to be large animal vet. I pretty much know a horse, cow, pig, sheep and goat when I see one. 😉

    Reply
  124. Maureen, I agree completely…mean pets seem to go with mean people.
    Kalen, thanks for straightening me out on the Maine coon thing. See this is why I’m meant to be large animal vet. I pretty much know a horse, cow, pig, sheep and goat when I see one. 😉

    Reply
  125. Maureen, I agree completely…mean pets seem to go with mean people.
    Kalen, thanks for straightening me out on the Maine coon thing. See this is why I’m meant to be large animal vet. I pretty much know a horse, cow, pig, sheep and goat when I see one. 😉

    Reply
  126. You know, Vicky I looked to see if I could find anything on rabbit owners…I like rabbits, too. But there’s just not much out there yet–except you are a caregiver, for sure.
    Thank you, Fedora, for your kind words about my books.

    Reply
  127. You know, Vicky I looked to see if I could find anything on rabbit owners…I like rabbits, too. But there’s just not much out there yet–except you are a caregiver, for sure.
    Thank you, Fedora, for your kind words about my books.

    Reply
  128. You know, Vicky I looked to see if I could find anything on rabbit owners…I like rabbits, too. But there’s just not much out there yet–except you are a caregiver, for sure.
    Thank you, Fedora, for your kind words about my books.

    Reply
  129. You know, Vicky I looked to see if I could find anything on rabbit owners…I like rabbits, too. But there’s just not much out there yet–except you are a caregiver, for sure.
    Thank you, Fedora, for your kind words about my books.

    Reply
  130. You know, Vicky I looked to see if I could find anything on rabbit owners…I like rabbits, too. But there’s just not much out there yet–except you are a caregiver, for sure.
    Thank you, Fedora, for your kind words about my books.

    Reply
  131. Glad you had time in your hectic schedule to stop by the wenches, Kathrynn! I love the idea of a barking horse. My husband grew up on a horse farm but I doubt he’s ever met one of those. “G” And I don’t want to know what it says about my son that he has parrots and monkeys, except that he lives in an exotic location!

    Reply
  132. Glad you had time in your hectic schedule to stop by the wenches, Kathrynn! I love the idea of a barking horse. My husband grew up on a horse farm but I doubt he’s ever met one of those. “G” And I don’t want to know what it says about my son that he has parrots and monkeys, except that he lives in an exotic location!

    Reply
  133. Glad you had time in your hectic schedule to stop by the wenches, Kathrynn! I love the idea of a barking horse. My husband grew up on a horse farm but I doubt he’s ever met one of those. “G” And I don’t want to know what it says about my son that he has parrots and monkeys, except that he lives in an exotic location!

    Reply
  134. Glad you had time in your hectic schedule to stop by the wenches, Kathrynn! I love the idea of a barking horse. My husband grew up on a horse farm but I doubt he’s ever met one of those. “G” And I don’t want to know what it says about my son that he has parrots and monkeys, except that he lives in an exotic location!

    Reply
  135. Glad you had time in your hectic schedule to stop by the wenches, Kathrynn! I love the idea of a barking horse. My husband grew up on a horse farm but I doubt he’s ever met one of those. “G” And I don’t want to know what it says about my son that he has parrots and monkeys, except that he lives in an exotic location!

    Reply
  136. Correction–I should say that generally, mean animals who have not been subjected harsh treatment are generally very dominant, aggressive animals who were somehow mismatched with an owner at the opposite end of the personality profile.

    Reply
  137. Correction–I should say that generally, mean animals who have not been subjected harsh treatment are generally very dominant, aggressive animals who were somehow mismatched with an owner at the opposite end of the personality profile.

    Reply
  138. Correction–I should say that generally, mean animals who have not been subjected harsh treatment are generally very dominant, aggressive animals who were somehow mismatched with an owner at the opposite end of the personality profile.

    Reply
  139. Correction–I should say that generally, mean animals who have not been subjected harsh treatment are generally very dominant, aggressive animals who were somehow mismatched with an owner at the opposite end of the personality profile.

    Reply
  140. Correction–I should say that generally, mean animals who have not been subjected harsh treatment are generally very dominant, aggressive animals who were somehow mismatched with an owner at the opposite end of the personality profile.

    Reply
  141. Hi Anne,
    No you are not a lazy, would-be dog owner. 😉 You are a very good cat trainer–probably more of a cat owner personality than you realized.
    Your cats make me laugh. The more I ignore them, the more they demand my attention. I’m still picking cat hair out of my keyboard from the one that decided to sit on my hands while I was typing!
    Just kidding…got it all out a few days ago.

    Reply
  142. Hi Anne,
    No you are not a lazy, would-be dog owner. 😉 You are a very good cat trainer–probably more of a cat owner personality than you realized.
    Your cats make me laugh. The more I ignore them, the more they demand my attention. I’m still picking cat hair out of my keyboard from the one that decided to sit on my hands while I was typing!
    Just kidding…got it all out a few days ago.

    Reply
  143. Hi Anne,
    No you are not a lazy, would-be dog owner. 😉 You are a very good cat trainer–probably more of a cat owner personality than you realized.
    Your cats make me laugh. The more I ignore them, the more they demand my attention. I’m still picking cat hair out of my keyboard from the one that decided to sit on my hands while I was typing!
    Just kidding…got it all out a few days ago.

    Reply
  144. Hi Anne,
    No you are not a lazy, would-be dog owner. 😉 You are a very good cat trainer–probably more of a cat owner personality than you realized.
    Your cats make me laugh. The more I ignore them, the more they demand my attention. I’m still picking cat hair out of my keyboard from the one that decided to sit on my hands while I was typing!
    Just kidding…got it all out a few days ago.

    Reply
  145. Hi Anne,
    No you are not a lazy, would-be dog owner. 😉 You are a very good cat trainer–probably more of a cat owner personality than you realized.
    Your cats make me laugh. The more I ignore them, the more they demand my attention. I’m still picking cat hair out of my keyboard from the one that decided to sit on my hands while I was typing!
    Just kidding…got it all out a few days ago.

    Reply
  146. Hi Pat, you know the “barking” new born foal is not that uncommon! Your husband may have seen one. Ask him if he ever knew of a “dummy foal”…that’s what they were called (along with star gazer, barker etc)…

    Reply
  147. Hi Pat, you know the “barking” new born foal is not that uncommon! Your husband may have seen one. Ask him if he ever knew of a “dummy foal”…that’s what they were called (along with star gazer, barker etc)…

    Reply
  148. Hi Pat, you know the “barking” new born foal is not that uncommon! Your husband may have seen one. Ask him if he ever knew of a “dummy foal”…that’s what they were called (along with star gazer, barker etc)…

    Reply
  149. Hi Pat, you know the “barking” new born foal is not that uncommon! Your husband may have seen one. Ask him if he ever knew of a “dummy foal”…that’s what they were called (along with star gazer, barker etc)…

    Reply
  150. Hi Pat, you know the “barking” new born foal is not that uncommon! Your husband may have seen one. Ask him if he ever knew of a “dummy foal”…that’s what they were called (along with star gazer, barker etc)…

    Reply
  151. Hi, Kathryn…
    Just had the vet out earlier this week for our 28 year old gelding…suspected colic….doing nicely so far.
    Also have two dogs, four house cats (too many coyotes around). One is an escape artist…gets out every chance.
    I’ll have to find your books…sound very interesting.

    Reply
  152. Hi, Kathryn…
    Just had the vet out earlier this week for our 28 year old gelding…suspected colic….doing nicely so far.
    Also have two dogs, four house cats (too many coyotes around). One is an escape artist…gets out every chance.
    I’ll have to find your books…sound very interesting.

    Reply
  153. Hi, Kathryn…
    Just had the vet out earlier this week for our 28 year old gelding…suspected colic….doing nicely so far.
    Also have two dogs, four house cats (too many coyotes around). One is an escape artist…gets out every chance.
    I’ll have to find your books…sound very interesting.

    Reply
  154. Hi, Kathryn…
    Just had the vet out earlier this week for our 28 year old gelding…suspected colic….doing nicely so far.
    Also have two dogs, four house cats (too many coyotes around). One is an escape artist…gets out every chance.
    I’ll have to find your books…sound very interesting.

    Reply
  155. Hi, Kathryn…
    Just had the vet out earlier this week for our 28 year old gelding…suspected colic….doing nicely so far.
    Also have two dogs, four house cats (too many coyotes around). One is an escape artist…gets out every chance.
    I’ll have to find your books…sound very interesting.

    Reply
  156. Kathrynn, I agree–Boxers are the sweetest, HAPPIEST dogs, always upbeat! I keep hearing people say Boxers drool, but I’ve had Boxers for 30 years and never had a drooler.
    I used to show Dobermans, and have had Dobies for 40 years, and while I love dogs and horses, my very favorite pet is cats. Lord Byron is a lazy, good-for-nothing lie-about with an astounding vocabulary–he talks nonstop to anyone who’ll listen, and if there’s no one to listen, he talks to himself.
    Christopher the Assassin is a cross between a matinee idol (suave, impeccably groomed, a great lover)and Bwana, the Great White Hunter (super macho, a hunting and killing machine).
    My horse Tempest is just a plain goofball. I could write a book about his antics. As requested, I’ll send you pics of him drinking from a wineglass, but for a sneak peek, go here: http://tinyurl.com/32fe5f (2nd page).
    As humans, we’ve lost the connection to our sixth sense, lost our ability to understand animals on an intuitive, nonverbal level. Those who are in touch with these things have, I believe, a better chance of keying into animal behavior and better understanding their pets.
    I love animals in Romances if they are done well. I roll my eyes, however, when the author obviously knows nothing about horses! I can’t wait to read your book, because I know you’ll have the horse behavior down pat!

    Reply
  157. Kathrynn, I agree–Boxers are the sweetest, HAPPIEST dogs, always upbeat! I keep hearing people say Boxers drool, but I’ve had Boxers for 30 years and never had a drooler.
    I used to show Dobermans, and have had Dobies for 40 years, and while I love dogs and horses, my very favorite pet is cats. Lord Byron is a lazy, good-for-nothing lie-about with an astounding vocabulary–he talks nonstop to anyone who’ll listen, and if there’s no one to listen, he talks to himself.
    Christopher the Assassin is a cross between a matinee idol (suave, impeccably groomed, a great lover)and Bwana, the Great White Hunter (super macho, a hunting and killing machine).
    My horse Tempest is just a plain goofball. I could write a book about his antics. As requested, I’ll send you pics of him drinking from a wineglass, but for a sneak peek, go here: http://tinyurl.com/32fe5f (2nd page).
    As humans, we’ve lost the connection to our sixth sense, lost our ability to understand animals on an intuitive, nonverbal level. Those who are in touch with these things have, I believe, a better chance of keying into animal behavior and better understanding their pets.
    I love animals in Romances if they are done well. I roll my eyes, however, when the author obviously knows nothing about horses! I can’t wait to read your book, because I know you’ll have the horse behavior down pat!

    Reply
  158. Kathrynn, I agree–Boxers are the sweetest, HAPPIEST dogs, always upbeat! I keep hearing people say Boxers drool, but I’ve had Boxers for 30 years and never had a drooler.
    I used to show Dobermans, and have had Dobies for 40 years, and while I love dogs and horses, my very favorite pet is cats. Lord Byron is a lazy, good-for-nothing lie-about with an astounding vocabulary–he talks nonstop to anyone who’ll listen, and if there’s no one to listen, he talks to himself.
    Christopher the Assassin is a cross between a matinee idol (suave, impeccably groomed, a great lover)and Bwana, the Great White Hunter (super macho, a hunting and killing machine).
    My horse Tempest is just a plain goofball. I could write a book about his antics. As requested, I’ll send you pics of him drinking from a wineglass, but for a sneak peek, go here: http://tinyurl.com/32fe5f (2nd page).
    As humans, we’ve lost the connection to our sixth sense, lost our ability to understand animals on an intuitive, nonverbal level. Those who are in touch with these things have, I believe, a better chance of keying into animal behavior and better understanding their pets.
    I love animals in Romances if they are done well. I roll my eyes, however, when the author obviously knows nothing about horses! I can’t wait to read your book, because I know you’ll have the horse behavior down pat!

    Reply
  159. Kathrynn, I agree–Boxers are the sweetest, HAPPIEST dogs, always upbeat! I keep hearing people say Boxers drool, but I’ve had Boxers for 30 years and never had a drooler.
    I used to show Dobermans, and have had Dobies for 40 years, and while I love dogs and horses, my very favorite pet is cats. Lord Byron is a lazy, good-for-nothing lie-about with an astounding vocabulary–he talks nonstop to anyone who’ll listen, and if there’s no one to listen, he talks to himself.
    Christopher the Assassin is a cross between a matinee idol (suave, impeccably groomed, a great lover)and Bwana, the Great White Hunter (super macho, a hunting and killing machine).
    My horse Tempest is just a plain goofball. I could write a book about his antics. As requested, I’ll send you pics of him drinking from a wineglass, but for a sneak peek, go here: http://tinyurl.com/32fe5f (2nd page).
    As humans, we’ve lost the connection to our sixth sense, lost our ability to understand animals on an intuitive, nonverbal level. Those who are in touch with these things have, I believe, a better chance of keying into animal behavior and better understanding their pets.
    I love animals in Romances if they are done well. I roll my eyes, however, when the author obviously knows nothing about horses! I can’t wait to read your book, because I know you’ll have the horse behavior down pat!

    Reply
  160. Kathrynn, I agree–Boxers are the sweetest, HAPPIEST dogs, always upbeat! I keep hearing people say Boxers drool, but I’ve had Boxers for 30 years and never had a drooler.
    I used to show Dobermans, and have had Dobies for 40 years, and while I love dogs and horses, my very favorite pet is cats. Lord Byron is a lazy, good-for-nothing lie-about with an astounding vocabulary–he talks nonstop to anyone who’ll listen, and if there’s no one to listen, he talks to himself.
    Christopher the Assassin is a cross between a matinee idol (suave, impeccably groomed, a great lover)and Bwana, the Great White Hunter (super macho, a hunting and killing machine).
    My horse Tempest is just a plain goofball. I could write a book about his antics. As requested, I’ll send you pics of him drinking from a wineglass, but for a sneak peek, go here: http://tinyurl.com/32fe5f (2nd page).
    As humans, we’ve lost the connection to our sixth sense, lost our ability to understand animals on an intuitive, nonverbal level. Those who are in touch with these things have, I believe, a better chance of keying into animal behavior and better understanding their pets.
    I love animals in Romances if they are done well. I roll my eyes, however, when the author obviously knows nothing about horses! I can’t wait to read your book, because I know you’ll have the horse behavior down pat!

    Reply
  161. Kathrynn, that is indeed a star-nosed mole. My mole addiction probably really began with Mole in WIND IN THE WILLOWS and was fostered by William Horwood’s DUNCTON WOOD (sort of a cross between LORD OF THE RINGS and WATERSHIP DOWN, but about moles) and its sequels, as well as the sequels he’s written to WitW.
    I collect moles–Molenniums and Wee Forest Folks figurines, illustrated editions of WitW, mole-bedecked aprons, and any mole tchotchkes I can find. I have a stuffed mole, but alas! no live ones.
    Maine Coon cats are magnificent!
    http://www.lostcoastmc.com/mattole1.jpg
    According to the legend, they resulted from matings of cats and raccoons; but the truth is more likely that the large fluffy striped tail made them resemble raccoons.
    My cats are half Siamese and half gentleman caller. Sethra the fluffy one talks all the time; Aliera doesn’t so much meow as beep.
    Sherrie, perhaps we should set up a blind date for Christopher the Assassin and Aliera of the Many, Many Sharp White Teeth. Not that anything will come of it, as she’s been fixed.
    I know of one medieval in which the hero had a pet marten. The heroine had a billygoat, which at one point apparently gave milk. There used to be a couple of series of Regency anthologies featuring stories about cats or kittens, but I haven’t come across any of them lately.
    Janga, please tell me about the pet shark!
    The hero of Mary Jo’s THUNDER AND ROSES kept penguins. In Wales!
    The heroine of one of Elsie Lee’s Regencies, a widow returned from India, had two Siamese cats. Her companion had a mynah bird and her manservant had a mongoose.
    People who want birds (in a fantasy, not a romance, if that’s OK) should read Mercedes Lackey’s THE WIZARD OF LONDON. The heroines are two schoolgirls with unusual powers, and they have bird companions with even more unusual ones. One has an African Grey parrot, which she brought with her from Africa (her parents are missionaries); the other acquires one of the Tower of London ravens.

    Reply
  162. Kathrynn, that is indeed a star-nosed mole. My mole addiction probably really began with Mole in WIND IN THE WILLOWS and was fostered by William Horwood’s DUNCTON WOOD (sort of a cross between LORD OF THE RINGS and WATERSHIP DOWN, but about moles) and its sequels, as well as the sequels he’s written to WitW.
    I collect moles–Molenniums and Wee Forest Folks figurines, illustrated editions of WitW, mole-bedecked aprons, and any mole tchotchkes I can find. I have a stuffed mole, but alas! no live ones.
    Maine Coon cats are magnificent!
    http://www.lostcoastmc.com/mattole1.jpg
    According to the legend, they resulted from matings of cats and raccoons; but the truth is more likely that the large fluffy striped tail made them resemble raccoons.
    My cats are half Siamese and half gentleman caller. Sethra the fluffy one talks all the time; Aliera doesn’t so much meow as beep.
    Sherrie, perhaps we should set up a blind date for Christopher the Assassin and Aliera of the Many, Many Sharp White Teeth. Not that anything will come of it, as she’s been fixed.
    I know of one medieval in which the hero had a pet marten. The heroine had a billygoat, which at one point apparently gave milk. There used to be a couple of series of Regency anthologies featuring stories about cats or kittens, but I haven’t come across any of them lately.
    Janga, please tell me about the pet shark!
    The hero of Mary Jo’s THUNDER AND ROSES kept penguins. In Wales!
    The heroine of one of Elsie Lee’s Regencies, a widow returned from India, had two Siamese cats. Her companion had a mynah bird and her manservant had a mongoose.
    People who want birds (in a fantasy, not a romance, if that’s OK) should read Mercedes Lackey’s THE WIZARD OF LONDON. The heroines are two schoolgirls with unusual powers, and they have bird companions with even more unusual ones. One has an African Grey parrot, which she brought with her from Africa (her parents are missionaries); the other acquires one of the Tower of London ravens.

    Reply
  163. Kathrynn, that is indeed a star-nosed mole. My mole addiction probably really began with Mole in WIND IN THE WILLOWS and was fostered by William Horwood’s DUNCTON WOOD (sort of a cross between LORD OF THE RINGS and WATERSHIP DOWN, but about moles) and its sequels, as well as the sequels he’s written to WitW.
    I collect moles–Molenniums and Wee Forest Folks figurines, illustrated editions of WitW, mole-bedecked aprons, and any mole tchotchkes I can find. I have a stuffed mole, but alas! no live ones.
    Maine Coon cats are magnificent!
    http://www.lostcoastmc.com/mattole1.jpg
    According to the legend, they resulted from matings of cats and raccoons; but the truth is more likely that the large fluffy striped tail made them resemble raccoons.
    My cats are half Siamese and half gentleman caller. Sethra the fluffy one talks all the time; Aliera doesn’t so much meow as beep.
    Sherrie, perhaps we should set up a blind date for Christopher the Assassin and Aliera of the Many, Many Sharp White Teeth. Not that anything will come of it, as she’s been fixed.
    I know of one medieval in which the hero had a pet marten. The heroine had a billygoat, which at one point apparently gave milk. There used to be a couple of series of Regency anthologies featuring stories about cats or kittens, but I haven’t come across any of them lately.
    Janga, please tell me about the pet shark!
    The hero of Mary Jo’s THUNDER AND ROSES kept penguins. In Wales!
    The heroine of one of Elsie Lee’s Regencies, a widow returned from India, had two Siamese cats. Her companion had a mynah bird and her manservant had a mongoose.
    People who want birds (in a fantasy, not a romance, if that’s OK) should read Mercedes Lackey’s THE WIZARD OF LONDON. The heroines are two schoolgirls with unusual powers, and they have bird companions with even more unusual ones. One has an African Grey parrot, which she brought with her from Africa (her parents are missionaries); the other acquires one of the Tower of London ravens.

    Reply
  164. Kathrynn, that is indeed a star-nosed mole. My mole addiction probably really began with Mole in WIND IN THE WILLOWS and was fostered by William Horwood’s DUNCTON WOOD (sort of a cross between LORD OF THE RINGS and WATERSHIP DOWN, but about moles) and its sequels, as well as the sequels he’s written to WitW.
    I collect moles–Molenniums and Wee Forest Folks figurines, illustrated editions of WitW, mole-bedecked aprons, and any mole tchotchkes I can find. I have a stuffed mole, but alas! no live ones.
    Maine Coon cats are magnificent!
    http://www.lostcoastmc.com/mattole1.jpg
    According to the legend, they resulted from matings of cats and raccoons; but the truth is more likely that the large fluffy striped tail made them resemble raccoons.
    My cats are half Siamese and half gentleman caller. Sethra the fluffy one talks all the time; Aliera doesn’t so much meow as beep.
    Sherrie, perhaps we should set up a blind date for Christopher the Assassin and Aliera of the Many, Many Sharp White Teeth. Not that anything will come of it, as she’s been fixed.
    I know of one medieval in which the hero had a pet marten. The heroine had a billygoat, which at one point apparently gave milk. There used to be a couple of series of Regency anthologies featuring stories about cats or kittens, but I haven’t come across any of them lately.
    Janga, please tell me about the pet shark!
    The hero of Mary Jo’s THUNDER AND ROSES kept penguins. In Wales!
    The heroine of one of Elsie Lee’s Regencies, a widow returned from India, had two Siamese cats. Her companion had a mynah bird and her manservant had a mongoose.
    People who want birds (in a fantasy, not a romance, if that’s OK) should read Mercedes Lackey’s THE WIZARD OF LONDON. The heroines are two schoolgirls with unusual powers, and they have bird companions with even more unusual ones. One has an African Grey parrot, which she brought with her from Africa (her parents are missionaries); the other acquires one of the Tower of London ravens.

    Reply
  165. Kathrynn, that is indeed a star-nosed mole. My mole addiction probably really began with Mole in WIND IN THE WILLOWS and was fostered by William Horwood’s DUNCTON WOOD (sort of a cross between LORD OF THE RINGS and WATERSHIP DOWN, but about moles) and its sequels, as well as the sequels he’s written to WitW.
    I collect moles–Molenniums and Wee Forest Folks figurines, illustrated editions of WitW, mole-bedecked aprons, and any mole tchotchkes I can find. I have a stuffed mole, but alas! no live ones.
    Maine Coon cats are magnificent!
    http://www.lostcoastmc.com/mattole1.jpg
    According to the legend, they resulted from matings of cats and raccoons; but the truth is more likely that the large fluffy striped tail made them resemble raccoons.
    My cats are half Siamese and half gentleman caller. Sethra the fluffy one talks all the time; Aliera doesn’t so much meow as beep.
    Sherrie, perhaps we should set up a blind date for Christopher the Assassin and Aliera of the Many, Many Sharp White Teeth. Not that anything will come of it, as she’s been fixed.
    I know of one medieval in which the hero had a pet marten. The heroine had a billygoat, which at one point apparently gave milk. There used to be a couple of series of Regency anthologies featuring stories about cats or kittens, but I haven’t come across any of them lately.
    Janga, please tell me about the pet shark!
    The hero of Mary Jo’s THUNDER AND ROSES kept penguins. In Wales!
    The heroine of one of Elsie Lee’s Regencies, a widow returned from India, had two Siamese cats. Her companion had a mynah bird and her manservant had a mongoose.
    People who want birds (in a fantasy, not a romance, if that’s OK) should read Mercedes Lackey’s THE WIZARD OF LONDON. The heroines are two schoolgirls with unusual powers, and they have bird companions with even more unusual ones. One has an African Grey parrot, which she brought with her from Africa (her parents are missionaries); the other acquires one of the Tower of London ravens.

    Reply
  166. Kathrynn, the reason you haven’t seen a mole (star-nosed or otherwise) in your practice is that when people find an injured mole, they don’t convey it tenderly to the nearest vet. They are more likely to finish the job by whacking the bejazus out of the little bastard with a shovel.
    And while we’re talking of pets in romance novels, let’s not forget the dust bunnies in Jayne Ann Krentz’s Jayne Castle futuristics.

    Reply
  167. Kathrynn, the reason you haven’t seen a mole (star-nosed or otherwise) in your practice is that when people find an injured mole, they don’t convey it tenderly to the nearest vet. They are more likely to finish the job by whacking the bejazus out of the little bastard with a shovel.
    And while we’re talking of pets in romance novels, let’s not forget the dust bunnies in Jayne Ann Krentz’s Jayne Castle futuristics.

    Reply
  168. Kathrynn, the reason you haven’t seen a mole (star-nosed or otherwise) in your practice is that when people find an injured mole, they don’t convey it tenderly to the nearest vet. They are more likely to finish the job by whacking the bejazus out of the little bastard with a shovel.
    And while we’re talking of pets in romance novels, let’s not forget the dust bunnies in Jayne Ann Krentz’s Jayne Castle futuristics.

    Reply
  169. Kathrynn, the reason you haven’t seen a mole (star-nosed or otherwise) in your practice is that when people find an injured mole, they don’t convey it tenderly to the nearest vet. They are more likely to finish the job by whacking the bejazus out of the little bastard with a shovel.
    And while we’re talking of pets in romance novels, let’s not forget the dust bunnies in Jayne Ann Krentz’s Jayne Castle futuristics.

    Reply
  170. Kathrynn, the reason you haven’t seen a mole (star-nosed or otherwise) in your practice is that when people find an injured mole, they don’t convey it tenderly to the nearest vet. They are more likely to finish the job by whacking the bejazus out of the little bastard with a shovel.
    And while we’re talking of pets in romance novels, let’s not forget the dust bunnies in Jayne Ann Krentz’s Jayne Castle futuristics.

    Reply
  171. Oh, this was both entertaining and informative. 😉 It’s just a fluke I opened that digest and saw the link! Thanks so much for describing me through my favorite animals. No, I’m not confessing. LOL ~Skhye

    Reply
  172. Oh, this was both entertaining and informative. 😉 It’s just a fluke I opened that digest and saw the link! Thanks so much for describing me through my favorite animals. No, I’m not confessing. LOL ~Skhye

    Reply
  173. Oh, this was both entertaining and informative. 😉 It’s just a fluke I opened that digest and saw the link! Thanks so much for describing me through my favorite animals. No, I’m not confessing. LOL ~Skhye

    Reply
  174. Oh, this was both entertaining and informative. 😉 It’s just a fluke I opened that digest and saw the link! Thanks so much for describing me through my favorite animals. No, I’m not confessing. LOL ~Skhye

    Reply
  175. Oh, this was both entertaining and informative. 😉 It’s just a fluke I opened that digest and saw the link! Thanks so much for describing me through my favorite animals. No, I’m not confessing. LOL ~Skhye

    Reply
  176. Talpianna, thanks for the photo linke. Maine coons are beautiful!
    And thanks for the tips on pets in romance—I’m keeping a running list.
    Come on, Skhye, do tell. What are your favorite animals!

    Reply
  177. Talpianna, thanks for the photo linke. Maine coons are beautiful!
    And thanks for the tips on pets in romance—I’m keeping a running list.
    Come on, Skhye, do tell. What are your favorite animals!

    Reply
  178. Talpianna, thanks for the photo linke. Maine coons are beautiful!
    And thanks for the tips on pets in romance—I’m keeping a running list.
    Come on, Skhye, do tell. What are your favorite animals!

    Reply
  179. Talpianna, thanks for the photo linke. Maine coons are beautiful!
    And thanks for the tips on pets in romance—I’m keeping a running list.
    Come on, Skhye, do tell. What are your favorite animals!

    Reply
  180. Talpianna, thanks for the photo linke. Maine coons are beautiful!
    And thanks for the tips on pets in romance—I’m keeping a running list.
    Come on, Skhye, do tell. What are your favorite animals!

    Reply
  181. Jo here. This is so much fun! I’m deep in deadline dementia, so I’m very grateful to Kathrynn for catching the slack.
    I have a cat in the MIP. It’s still a bit of a mystery to me, but then, perhaps that’s it’s purpose!
    For all the Canadians here — Happy Thanksgiving weekend.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  182. Jo here. This is so much fun! I’m deep in deadline dementia, so I’m very grateful to Kathrynn for catching the slack.
    I have a cat in the MIP. It’s still a bit of a mystery to me, but then, perhaps that’s it’s purpose!
    For all the Canadians here — Happy Thanksgiving weekend.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  183. Jo here. This is so much fun! I’m deep in deadline dementia, so I’m very grateful to Kathrynn for catching the slack.
    I have a cat in the MIP. It’s still a bit of a mystery to me, but then, perhaps that’s it’s purpose!
    For all the Canadians here — Happy Thanksgiving weekend.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  184. Jo here. This is so much fun! I’m deep in deadline dementia, so I’m very grateful to Kathrynn for catching the slack.
    I have a cat in the MIP. It’s still a bit of a mystery to me, but then, perhaps that’s it’s purpose!
    For all the Canadians here — Happy Thanksgiving weekend.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  185. Jo here. This is so much fun! I’m deep in deadline dementia, so I’m very grateful to Kathrynn for catching the slack.
    I have a cat in the MIP. It’s still a bit of a mystery to me, but then, perhaps that’s it’s purpose!
    For all the Canadians here — Happy Thanksgiving weekend.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  186. Great blog, Katherine. I enjoyed Dark Rider and look forward to Shadow Rider.
    Personally, I’m first and foremost a horse person. Horses have played an important part in my life. Started riding at three. I wonder what gender preferences tell about you? I have always preferred mares to geldings. Have three in their mid-20’s now. My daughter’s 32 year old had to be put down last summer. Can’t imagine life without horses.
    Until a few years ago, I would have said dogs were my second love and cats third. That was until we got our current “puppy cat.” She was supposed to be a barn cat and keep down the mice, but she declared herself a “people cat” and that was that. I’ve never had a cat like her before. She acts more like a dog than a cat, asking for attention – a genuine familiar. She comes when called, greets people at the door, has to have her lap time in the morning and before bed, and is quite a nag when we don’t keep to our schedule and go to bed when she thinks we should.
    As to pets in stories, it really bothers me when I see stuff written by someone who obviously doesn’t know anything about horses, particularly. My pet peeve is horses screaming!

    Reply
  187. Great blog, Katherine. I enjoyed Dark Rider and look forward to Shadow Rider.
    Personally, I’m first and foremost a horse person. Horses have played an important part in my life. Started riding at three. I wonder what gender preferences tell about you? I have always preferred mares to geldings. Have three in their mid-20’s now. My daughter’s 32 year old had to be put down last summer. Can’t imagine life without horses.
    Until a few years ago, I would have said dogs were my second love and cats third. That was until we got our current “puppy cat.” She was supposed to be a barn cat and keep down the mice, but she declared herself a “people cat” and that was that. I’ve never had a cat like her before. She acts more like a dog than a cat, asking for attention – a genuine familiar. She comes when called, greets people at the door, has to have her lap time in the morning and before bed, and is quite a nag when we don’t keep to our schedule and go to bed when she thinks we should.
    As to pets in stories, it really bothers me when I see stuff written by someone who obviously doesn’t know anything about horses, particularly. My pet peeve is horses screaming!

    Reply
  188. Great blog, Katherine. I enjoyed Dark Rider and look forward to Shadow Rider.
    Personally, I’m first and foremost a horse person. Horses have played an important part in my life. Started riding at three. I wonder what gender preferences tell about you? I have always preferred mares to geldings. Have three in their mid-20’s now. My daughter’s 32 year old had to be put down last summer. Can’t imagine life without horses.
    Until a few years ago, I would have said dogs were my second love and cats third. That was until we got our current “puppy cat.” She was supposed to be a barn cat and keep down the mice, but she declared herself a “people cat” and that was that. I’ve never had a cat like her before. She acts more like a dog than a cat, asking for attention – a genuine familiar. She comes when called, greets people at the door, has to have her lap time in the morning and before bed, and is quite a nag when we don’t keep to our schedule and go to bed when she thinks we should.
    As to pets in stories, it really bothers me when I see stuff written by someone who obviously doesn’t know anything about horses, particularly. My pet peeve is horses screaming!

    Reply
  189. Great blog, Katherine. I enjoyed Dark Rider and look forward to Shadow Rider.
    Personally, I’m first and foremost a horse person. Horses have played an important part in my life. Started riding at three. I wonder what gender preferences tell about you? I have always preferred mares to geldings. Have three in their mid-20’s now. My daughter’s 32 year old had to be put down last summer. Can’t imagine life without horses.
    Until a few years ago, I would have said dogs were my second love and cats third. That was until we got our current “puppy cat.” She was supposed to be a barn cat and keep down the mice, but she declared herself a “people cat” and that was that. I’ve never had a cat like her before. She acts more like a dog than a cat, asking for attention – a genuine familiar. She comes when called, greets people at the door, has to have her lap time in the morning and before bed, and is quite a nag when we don’t keep to our schedule and go to bed when she thinks we should.
    As to pets in stories, it really bothers me when I see stuff written by someone who obviously doesn’t know anything about horses, particularly. My pet peeve is horses screaming!

    Reply
  190. Great blog, Katherine. I enjoyed Dark Rider and look forward to Shadow Rider.
    Personally, I’m first and foremost a horse person. Horses have played an important part in my life. Started riding at three. I wonder what gender preferences tell about you? I have always preferred mares to geldings. Have three in their mid-20’s now. My daughter’s 32 year old had to be put down last summer. Can’t imagine life without horses.
    Until a few years ago, I would have said dogs were my second love and cats third. That was until we got our current “puppy cat.” She was supposed to be a barn cat and keep down the mice, but she declared herself a “people cat” and that was that. I’ve never had a cat like her before. She acts more like a dog than a cat, asking for attention – a genuine familiar. She comes when called, greets people at the door, has to have her lap time in the morning and before bed, and is quite a nag when we don’t keep to our schedule and go to bed when she thinks we should.
    As to pets in stories, it really bothers me when I see stuff written by someone who obviously doesn’t know anything about horses, particularly. My pet peeve is horses screaming!

    Reply
  191. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am sooooo excited!! You’ve made my day. I just finished Dark Rider today and fell in love with Robert, Eldwythe, and Barstow. Can’t wait for Shadow Rider.
    Julie

    Reply
  192. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am sooooo excited!! You’ve made my day. I just finished Dark Rider today and fell in love with Robert, Eldwythe, and Barstow. Can’t wait for Shadow Rider.
    Julie

    Reply
  193. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am sooooo excited!! You’ve made my day. I just finished Dark Rider today and fell in love with Robert, Eldwythe, and Barstow. Can’t wait for Shadow Rider.
    Julie

    Reply
  194. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am sooooo excited!! You’ve made my day. I just finished Dark Rider today and fell in love with Robert, Eldwythe, and Barstow. Can’t wait for Shadow Rider.
    Julie

    Reply
  195. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am sooooo excited!! You’ve made my day. I just finished Dark Rider today and fell in love with Robert, Eldwythe, and Barstow. Can’t wait for Shadow Rider.
    Julie

    Reply
  196. It’s interesting what people call their adopted cats. So far in this comment stream I’ve seen “salvage” and “recycled.” I think the standard term used by rescue people is “rehomed.”
    Our friend the Silver Tigress has a timeshare cat. It actually belongs to the family next door, but they have seven kids, and for some reason Alfie prefers the company of two quiet elderly people possessed of a cat door and an apparently unlimited supply of roast chicken.

    Reply
  197. It’s interesting what people call their adopted cats. So far in this comment stream I’ve seen “salvage” and “recycled.” I think the standard term used by rescue people is “rehomed.”
    Our friend the Silver Tigress has a timeshare cat. It actually belongs to the family next door, but they have seven kids, and for some reason Alfie prefers the company of two quiet elderly people possessed of a cat door and an apparently unlimited supply of roast chicken.

    Reply
  198. It’s interesting what people call their adopted cats. So far in this comment stream I’ve seen “salvage” and “recycled.” I think the standard term used by rescue people is “rehomed.”
    Our friend the Silver Tigress has a timeshare cat. It actually belongs to the family next door, but they have seven kids, and for some reason Alfie prefers the company of two quiet elderly people possessed of a cat door and an apparently unlimited supply of roast chicken.

    Reply
  199. It’s interesting what people call their adopted cats. So far in this comment stream I’ve seen “salvage” and “recycled.” I think the standard term used by rescue people is “rehomed.”
    Our friend the Silver Tigress has a timeshare cat. It actually belongs to the family next door, but they have seven kids, and for some reason Alfie prefers the company of two quiet elderly people possessed of a cat door and an apparently unlimited supply of roast chicken.

    Reply
  200. It’s interesting what people call their adopted cats. So far in this comment stream I’ve seen “salvage” and “recycled.” I think the standard term used by rescue people is “rehomed.”
    Our friend the Silver Tigress has a timeshare cat. It actually belongs to the family next door, but they have seven kids, and for some reason Alfie prefers the company of two quiet elderly people possessed of a cat door and an apparently unlimited supply of roast chicken.

    Reply
  201. Well, I’m usually a day late and a dollar short, but I wanted to make sure to thank Word Wenches for having Kathrynn Dennis for this interview and contest. Although I had emailed her my private thanks upon winning her book Shadow Rider, I was remiss in thanking Word Wenches. So thank you very much. It was the first book I’d ever won on the internet! Julie

    Reply
  202. Well, I’m usually a day late and a dollar short, but I wanted to make sure to thank Word Wenches for having Kathrynn Dennis for this interview and contest. Although I had emailed her my private thanks upon winning her book Shadow Rider, I was remiss in thanking Word Wenches. So thank you very much. It was the first book I’d ever won on the internet! Julie

    Reply
  203. Well, I’m usually a day late and a dollar short, but I wanted to make sure to thank Word Wenches for having Kathrynn Dennis for this interview and contest. Although I had emailed her my private thanks upon winning her book Shadow Rider, I was remiss in thanking Word Wenches. So thank you very much. It was the first book I’d ever won on the internet! Julie

    Reply
  204. Well, I’m usually a day late and a dollar short, but I wanted to make sure to thank Word Wenches for having Kathrynn Dennis for this interview and contest. Although I had emailed her my private thanks upon winning her book Shadow Rider, I was remiss in thanking Word Wenches. So thank you very much. It was the first book I’d ever won on the internet! Julie

    Reply
  205. Well, I’m usually a day late and a dollar short, but I wanted to make sure to thank Word Wenches for having Kathrynn Dennis for this interview and contest. Although I had emailed her my private thanks upon winning her book Shadow Rider, I was remiss in thanking Word Wenches. So thank you very much. It was the first book I’d ever won on the internet! Julie

    Reply

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